Introduction System Requirements Installation Backing Up Files Un

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					1            Introduction
2            System Requirements
3            Installation
4            Backing Up Files
5            Un-installation
6            Upgrading
7            ZIP File Installation

8            Getting Started
     8.1     Launching
     8.2     Connecting an ECU to the PC
     8.3     Configuration Files
     8.4     Easimap 5 Main Screen
     8.5     User Profiles
     8.6     Assessing Basic Features

9            The Real Time Display
     9.1     Demo Mode
     9.2     Screen Background
     9.3     Alarm & Alerts
     9.4     Panel Information

10           Using Chipfiles
     10.1    Chipfiles
     10.2    Opening & Closing Chipfiles
     10.3    Deleting Chipfiles

11           Viewing & Editing ECU Maps & Settings
     11.1    ECU Data
     11.2    Organisation of ECU Data – The Parameter Tree

12           Editing Map Data – Spreadsheet & Graph
     12.1    About Maps
     12.2    Spreadsheet Use during Mapping
     12.3    Graph Site Tagging & Colour Codes

13           Mapping (Calibration)
     13.1    Overview
     13.2    Using Live-Map
     13.3    Using Quick-Map
     13.4    Using Pro-Map
     13.5    Using Direct-Map

14           Logging
     14.1    Overview

15           Tools & System Specific Functions
     15.1    Overview
     15.2    Search for Devices
     15.3    Device Info (Chip comments)
     15.4    Set Default Data
     15.5    Device Hex Dump
     15.6    Compare Devices
     15.7    PIN Control
     15.8    Erase Device
     15.9    Download ECU Code
     15.10   Reboot ECU
     15.11   Adaptive Map Control
     15.12   Comm Port Test

16           Software Options
     16.1    Preferences
     16.2    Languages
     16.3    Background
     16.5    Select User Profile

17           Keyboard Reference

18           Trouble-Shooting
     18.1    Problems with Installing Easimap 5
     18.2    Problems with Uninstalling Easimap 5
     18.3    Problems with Starting Easimap 5
     18.4    Problems Communicating with the ECU
     18.5    Problems with Editing Data
     18.6    PIN Control Problems
     18.7    Tools Menu Problems
     18.8    Options Menu Problems

19           Glossary
This information booklet has been produced from the help files on the Easimap Software (December 2007).


1. Introduction

Overview

Easimap 5 is MBE Systems latest generation of mapping software. It provides a method of controlling and configuring
MBE ECUs from the PC. Easimap 5 performs the following main roles:

• Monitoring. The software allows you to see the current state of the Engine Management System as it is running an
  engine. You can see the status of all the inputs to the ECU (such as engine speed, etc.) and also the values that the
  ECU is using to control the actuators in the system (fuel injection values, ignition timing, etc.).

• Setup. The software is also used to setup the global aspects of ECU control, such as the trigger wheel type being
  used and what engine type is being run, etc.

• Mapping (Calibration). Mapping is the process of determining appropriate data to control the actuators in the
  management system (e.g. fuel injectors) in order to produce optimal engine performance within specified limits. The
  terms mapping and calibration are used interchangeably.

• Logging (Data Acquisition). Logging is the process of recording the status of the management system over a
  period of time. The data collected can then be graphed and analysed to measure performance and to locate
  problem areas.

The purpose of this help document is to introduce and explain the various features and functions of this PC software.
For assistance on the setup of ECU systems and wiring, please contact your ECU equipment supplier.


2. System Requirements

PC:
Desktop or Notebook

Operating System:
Microsoft Windows 98, Me, 2000, XP, Server 2003 or Vista. Please note Windows 95 / NT4 is not supported.

Processor:
Intel Pentium III / Celeron /AMD Duron - 800Mhz or faster / equivalent.

Memory:
64Mb minimum. 128Mb or more recommended.

Hard disk:
15Mb or more free space for application files.

Display:
1024x768 pixel resolution and 16-bit (High Color) color resolution (64000 or more colors).

Communications:
An available 9-way serial port for communication with serial ECU systems (a USB-serial adapter may be used, we
recommend the Belkin F5U109).
An available USB port (version 1 or 2) for communication with USB or CAN ECU systems (A USB-CAN interface from
your ECU equipment supplier will be required for CAN systems).

Other:
Mouse or equivalent pointing device required.
3. First-Time Installation from CD

Close all programs running on your computer.

Important: Many Windows 2000/XP systems that are on a Local Area Network (LAN) require that you log in as the
Administrator before software will install correctly. Please contact your Network Administrator if you do not have the
required permissions.

1. Insert CD into your computers CD / DVD drive.

2. If Auto Run is enabled on your PC, the setup program should start after a few moments. If this doesn't happen, Go
   to 'Start', 'Run'. Click on 'Browse'. Change the 'Look in' item to point to your CD/DVD drive. Select 'Setup' and click
   'Open'. Click on 'OK'.

3. Click 'Next' on the welcome screen.

4. Read the license agreement and click 'Next' to accept it. If you do not accept the agreement you must click 'Cancel'
   and exit the installation at this point.

5. The next screen allows you to select the folder on your hard drive to install the software into. It is recommended you
   use the folder provided and just click 'Next'. If you need to change the folder for some reason, please make a note
   of the folder that you have selected.

6. The next section allows you to select where in the Start/Programs menu the program icon will be placed. It is
   recommended that you leave this as the default folder. If you need to select a different folder, type the path in the
   box, or select an existing folder from the list. Click 'Next' when ready.

7. Finally, a message box appears asking whether you require a shortcut icon to the software to appear on the
   desktop. This is usually a good idea as it allows you to start the software quickly from the desktop screen. Answer
   'Yes' or 'No'.

8. The files should now install. If you experience problems, try running the software to see if there are any apparent
   errors. If the program hasn't installed properly, try reinstalling. If problems persist, contact your software distributor.


4. Backing-up Files

It is sensible to back-up important files that you have added or modified, especially if you are about to delete the
software. The table below shows where various files are stored in the software. Backing up can be done by using a
program such as Windows Explorer (usually in Start/Programs) to copy a folder or selection of files to a new location.
In the table below the term {base} refers to the base folder of the software. Unless you changed this in the installation,
this will be:

C: \ Program Files \ {program name} or C: \ Program Files \ {company name} \ {program name}

{model of ECU} refers to the first 3 digits of the ECU name, e.g., 941, 992, etc.

File Type                      File Extension                                 Location
Chipfiles                      {name}.ECC                                     {base} \ {model of ECU} e.g. Program
                                                                              Files \ Easimap5 \ 972
Real-time Views                {name}.PGE                                     {base} \ {model of ECU}
Mapping (Calibration) Data {name}.LOG                                         {base} \ Mapping Sessions
Logged Data                    {name}.LSN and {name}.LSN.DAT (both            {base} \ Logging Sessions
                               files required)
ECU Code                       {name}.H86 or {name}.S86                       {base} \ {model of ECU}



5. Uninstallation

There are two methods of removing the software from your PC.
Important: The uninstallation process should leave any files, such as data files, that you have added or changed,
unaffected by the uninstallation. However it is always a good idea to backup important data-files, especially when you
are about to delete software.

1. Close all programs running on your computer.

2. Insert the CD into your computers CD / DVD drive.

3. If Auto Run is enabled on your PC, the setup program should start after a few moments. If this doesn't happen, Go
   to 'Start', 'Run'. Click on 'Browse'. Change the 'Look in' item to point to your CD/DVD drive. Select 'Setup' and click
   'Open'. Click on 'OK'.

4. A screen should now appear asking you whether you want to Modify, Repair or Remove the software. Select
   'Remove' and click on 'Next'.

5. The software will now uninstall. If you get errors saying that there are locked files, just click 'Ignore'. Locked files are
   files that you have altered during the running of the software and these will remain on the drive after you have
   uninstalled the software.

Alternatively, you can:

1. Click on Start/Settings/Control Panel.

2. Select 'Add/Remove Programs'.

3. Select the software name and click 'Add/Remove'.

4. A screen should now appear asking you whether you want to Modify, Repair or Remove the software. Select
   'Remove' and click on 'Next'.

5. The software will now uninstall. If you get errors saying that there are locked files, just click 'Ignore'. Locked files are
   files that you have altered during the running of the software and these will remain on the drive after you have
   uninstalled the software.


6. Upgrading

Upgrading (or downgrading) of the software is basically just uninstallation followed by installation.

Important: If you modify the files supplied with the installation (e.g. supplied realtime views, chipfiles, etc.) and then
uninstall the software, these files will be left in place on your computer. When you reinstall, these files will be
overwritten with those on the CD (they will be returned to their original state). If you think that there are files, which you
have changed and you want to keep them in their modified form, back them up before reinstalling. This doesn't apply
to new chipfiles and realtime views that you have added: these will be left intact after uninstallation and reinstallation.

1. Follow one of the uninstallation procedures.

2. Follow the installation procedure.


7. ZIP File Installations

If you have been emailed the software, it will most likely come in the form of a single ZIP file attached to the email (a
compressed file with a .zip extension). Windows Me and later typically contain built in support for ZIP files (they can be
opened just like a normal folder). If your operating system does not support ZIP files directly you will need to download
the WinZip tool (http://www.winzip.com).

ZIP files can be used in one of three ways:

1. Open the ZIP file and run setup.exe. Follow on-screen instructions to either install or remove the software.

2. Extract the contents of a ZIP file to a temporary folder and run setup.exe.
3. Extract the contents of the ZIP file to a temporary folder, burn the files onto CD and then use the CD to install the
software.



8. Getting Started

8.1 Launching

You should have the software successfully installed on your PC. If not, follow the installation instructions or contact
your software distributor for help.
The software can be started by either double clicking on the desktop shortcut icon (if you chose to add this when
installing the software) or by going to the Start/Programs menu and selecting the software from the its folder on the
menu (or alternative group that you chose when installing the software).


8.2 Connecting an ECU to the PC

The software can be used as a chipfile editor when not connected to a device. If you want to calibrate, view, log or edit
data inside an ECU, you must first connect it to your PC.

Communication Status




The communications status box on the top-right corner of the screen shows the current device connection status. This
will show one of the following states:

"No Device", Black Background, NOT Flashing

This shows that there is no device connected to the PC and that the software is not searching for any. Go to the
Options/Preferences menu and set up the Communications options to search for a device.

"No Device"/"Searching", Flashing BLACK - RED Background

This shows that there is no device currently connected to the PC. If you are connecting to your ECU via a USB-CAN
interface box, this state also indicates that the USB-CAN interface has not been detected by Windows.

"Unknown Device"/"Searching", Flashing BLACK - RED Background

This shows that there is a device (usually serial) connected to the PC but it is returning invalid identification
information. Try resetting the ECU and check the serial connection.

"USB-CAN interface"/"Searching", Flashing BLACK - YELLOW Background

This shows that a valid USB-CAN interface is connected to a USB port. If you see this state, it means that the USB
connection is working and that the correct USB drivers have been successfully installed.

It also means that no CAN ECU has been detected by the USB-CAN interface.

ECU Identifier shown, GREY background

This shows that an ECU is successfully connected.

Connection Types

There is a wide variety of methods used to communicate between ECUs and the PC. The type of connection used will
depend upon the model and age of ECU, type of project/application, wiring systems, etc.

Generally there are three communications types:
• Serial (RS232). The oldest and simplest connection type. Communication is between a 9-pin D-type serial
  connector on the PC (or USB-serial adaptor) via a serial communications lead to either a 9-pin D-type socket on the
  ECU itself, a serial type mapping box or a connector on the vehicle wiring harness.

• CAN (Controller Area Network). The CAN bus is a common ECU communications system on vehicles. Use of a
  CAN ECU requires a USB-CAN interface box or mapping box (from your ECU supplier), which connects to the USB
  port on the PC. The CAN bus itself is a two-wire connection (CAN high and CAN low). The USB-CAN interface must
  be installed as a device on Windows with the appropriate driver (found on the CD or in the software folder) before it
  can be used. See Installing USB Devices for more info.

• USB direct (Universal Serial Bus). The USB bus is a common PC communications system. Some ECUs use a direct
  USB connection between the PC USB port and a USB connector on the ECU case or on the vehicle wiring harness.
  The USB device must be installed as a device on Windows with the appropriate driver (found on the CD or in the
  software folder) before it can be used. See Installing USB Devices for more info.

Connecting your ECU

To obtain the appropriate leads, interfaces, connectors and connection information for your ECU, please contact your
ECU supplier; you will provide you with an appropriate kit and support info.

USB cables and USB-serial adaptors (we recommend the Belkin F5U109) can be obtained from most computer stores
or vendors.

USB-CAN interfaces must be a type supplied by the ECU manufacturer, typically a 985 unit. A generic USB-CAN
system from another manufacturer will not work.

For serial ECUs, you may make your own serial cable based upon this diagram:




Installing USB Devices

USB-CAN interfaces, USB mapping boxes and ECUs with a direct USB connection need to be installed in Windows
before they can be used. Installation involves supplying Windows with an appropriate device driver. A device driver is
a piece of software, which tells Windows how to communicate with the device. The device driver needs to be installed
the first time that the device is connected to a PC.
When you first connect the USB device to the PC, the Windows Add New Hardware Wizard should appear a few
moments after connection. Please follow the instructions applicable to your operating system carefully in order to
successfully install your USB device.




Trouble-Shooting

If you select the wrong driver, or you cancel the Wizard before it completes, or something appears to go wrong during
the driver installation; it may be necessary to reinstall the USB device driver. To do this, go to Control Panel (Start
menu, Settings), select System. Find the Device Manager (may be under the Hardware tab). Browse through until
you find the item relating to the USB device (depending on the state of the installation, this may be shown as an
unknown USB device and may be under the USB devices group or the USB-CAN group). Right-click on the item and
select Remove. Accept the warning. The next time the device is plugged into the system, the Add New Hardware
Wizard should reappear and you can retry the installation instructions above.

Windows 98

1. Connect the USB cable from the USB device to the PC.

2. After a few moments, the 'Add New Hardware Wizard' should appear. Click Next >.

3. When asked "What do you want Windows to do?", select "Display a list of all the drivers in a specific location".
   Click Next >.

4. Select "Other devices" from the list of device types. Click Next >.

5. Click the Have Disk... button. A browse box will appear asking you to find the folder containing the device driver.
   Click Browse. If you have the software CD, you can browse to the CD, open the 'Windows 98' folder and select
   the '.inf' file shown in that folder. Or, if the software is already installed on this PC, you can browse to the software's
   Program Files folder (C:\Program Files\{program name}\Windows 98') and select the '.inf' file shown in that
   folder.

6. The name of the device should appear in the list. Click Next >.

7. The dialog box shown will now show which driver is being used for this device. Click Next >.

8. Allow the driver to install. Click Finish. The device is now ready to use.

Windows Me, 2000 and XP

1. Connect the USB cable from the USB device to the PC.

2. After a few moments, the 'Add New Hardware Wizard' should appear. Select Specify the location of the driver
   (Advanced). Click Next >.




3. On the next dialog box, select Search for the best driver for your device. Check the Specify a location box.
   Click the Browse button and either browse to the installation CD or the software folder. Browse to the Windows Me
  2000 XP (Route: My computer; Local Disk C; Program Files; Easimap 5; Windows ME 2000 XP) sub-folder and
  click Open. Optionally you may also check the Removable Media box if you have the installation CD.




4. Windows should now locate a driver for this device. Click Next >.




A Hardware Installation warning may appear next. Click
  Continue Anyway to proceed.




5. The device should now be ready to use. Click Finish.




6. It may be necessary to repeat this process a couple of times, if your computer does not recognise the device the
next time it is turned on.


8.3 Configuration Files

The operation of the software relies upon (whether the ECU is connected or not) the use of a file called a configuration
file. These files have a .ec2 extension (previous version files have a .ecf extension). A configuration file describes the
structure of the data inside the ECU to the mapping software. Note that configuration files do not describe the actual
data itself; files that do this are called chipfiles.
Upon start-up, if an ECU is connected, the software will attempt to automatically locate the best configuration file for
that particular ECU. If there is no ECU connected on start-up, or if an appropriate configuration file cannot be found,
the last used file, or the default installation file will be loaded.
Occasionally, you will need to select a file manually. This can be done by either:

a. Going to the 'File' menu and selecting load configuration.
b. Clicking on the box at the top of the screen, which shows the name of the current file.
c. If the software fails to find any relevant files at start-up, the program will not start, an error box will appear. This box
   allows you an option to select the file manually. The software cannot start without a valid configuration file.

Configuration filenames have the following structure:
{ 3 digit ECU number } { 2 letter hardware id } { 2 digit software id } { issue letter} . ec2
e.g.941ba50d.ec2
These file names map onto the identifiers stored inside the ECU.
It is important that the configuration file that you use closely matches the ECU identifier.


8.4 Main Screen

The main screen is divided into the following areas:




A. Real-time display. This is where ECU monitoring information is presented to the user.

B. Title bar. This shows the title of the current realtime page, whether it has been altered from its saved state and how
   many open pages there are.
C. Menu bar. Contains the menus and menu items for controlling the program.

D. Tool bar buttons. These are shortcut buttons to commonly used or important menu items.

E. Configuration pane. This shows the current configuration file being used. Clicking on this pane will allow you to
   select a new file manually.

F. ECU id pane. This shows the status of the PC connection with the ECU. Either:

    • It will be black and show 'No device'. This indicates that there is no connection with an ECU and the software is
      not searching for one.
    • It will be black and show 'No device', but occasionally flash red. This shows there is no connection with an ECU,
      but the software is searching selected ports and connections for ECUs (go to Options | Preferences if you need
      to change the settings).
    • It will be black and show 'Unknown device', but occasionally flash red. This shows that a device is connected to
      the PC but is unrecognisable as an ECU.
    • It will be grey and have an ECU id written in it. This shows that an ECU is connected and successfully
      communicating with the PC. The number shown is the id of the ECU and should be identical or very similar to
      the configuration file being used.
    • It will be as (d) but occasionally flash red. This is a sign that the software is having communication problems
      with the ECU. This often happens if a realtime page is being shown which is designed for an ECU that is
      completely incompatible with the current connected ECU.
    • Clicking on this pane will bring up a preferences box which allows you to set up the communication options with
      the ECU, in particular, which COM ports on the PC are being searched for ECUs, whether USB
      communications are enabled, etc.

G. Mapping pane. Shows the current mapping strategy, whether mapping mode is active or not and if so, how
   mapping hits there have been. When mapping mode is active this box will turn green. Clicking on this box is a
   shortcut way of switching mapping mode on and off.

H. Status bar. Shows general help information and the status of logging.

I. Profile pane. Shows the current working user profile. User profiles effect the features and menu items that are
   available to a particular user. Clicking on this box will allow you to select from the available user profiles.

8.5 User Profiles

User profiles are a method of simplifying the software, either to help people learn the features of the software or to
prevent the use of certain operations. It is possible that the version of the software that you receive will start-up in a
particular sub-level profile (the top unrestricted level profile is called 'Master'). If so there may be menu items and
features shown in this help file that you cannot find in your software. These features may be hidden by the current
user profile. The profile pane in the bottom right corner of the window should tell you what profile is currently active.
Go to the Options menu and click Select User Profile to change the profile. It is possible some of the profiles may
need a password to be used. Contact your software distributor for help on this, or to upgrade your copy of the
software.


8.6 Accessing Basic Features

Exit the program by going to the File menu and clicking Exit, or by clicking the close button at the top right of the
window. You will be warned if there is any unsaved data in use.
Find the version number of the mapping software by going to the Help menu and clicking About, or by clicking on the
copyright symbol on the tool bar.
Access the help system by going to the Help menu and clicking Contents.


9. Monitoring - The Real-time Display

9.1 Demo mode
If there is no device connected to the PC on start-up, and a page is open and displayed, it will be in demo mode. In
demo mode, the realtime display will contain 'blank' data and some of the graphics on the screen may scroll through a
pattern or sequence. This display is switched into realtime mode when a device is connected and will only revert back
to demo mode when the application is restarted again without a device connected.
Some demo versions of the software exist which simulates a connected ECU by running through some built in logged
data. These demo versions cannot be used with real ECUs. You have to obtain the full version for this capability.


Panels




A panel is a rectangular area on the realtime display that shows the status of some ECU input or calculation, i.e. a
realtime parameter. Parameters can be moved and resized to produce the best display. In addition, a panel can be
one of several view-types. Each of the view-types presents realtime information in a different way, e.g. as a number,
as a needle position on a full face dial, as a trace on a pen-plot graph, etc.
Panels can be in two states, anchored or non-anchored. An anchored panel has a minimum of buttons and cannot be
resized or moved until the anchor state is disabled. Anchored panels make for neater displays than non-anchored
panels and they are always placed at the back of the display.
A panels title bar is the area at the top of the panel which shows the parameters title.

To add a panel to the realtime display

First ensure you have a page open, see Pages for this.
Go to the 'Panel' menu and select 'Add'. Alternatively, right-clicking on an empty part of the realtime screen is a
shortcut for the 'Add' menu item.
The 'Select Parameter' dialog box will appear, see Using the 'Select Parameter' Dialog Box 11.2 for help on this.
Once you have selected a parameter, the new panel should appear in the middle of the screen.

To move a panel around the screen

This has to be done with the mouse.
Click and hold down the left mouse button on the title bar of the panel in question.
Move the mouse around the screen and the panel should reposition.
If the panel doesn't move it may be anchored (see To anchor/unanchor a panel) or you may be trying to move it off the
screen. Panels cannot be partially on screen.

To resize a panel

This has to be done with the mouse.
Position the mouse pointer over the border of the panel so that the pointer changes to a double arrow shape. Click
and hold down the left mouse button.
Move the mouse around the screen and the border that you clicked on should follow.
If the panel doesn't resize it may be anchored (see To anchor/unanchor a panel) or you may be trying to resize it off
the edge of the screen.

To anchor/unanchor a panel

Either click on the circular button on the top-right corner of the panel or select the panel by clicking on its title bar, go
to the 'Panel' menu and click 'Toggle Anchor'. Anchored panels have a black dot in the circular button and no other
buttons on them. They have a title bar but no borders and cannot be moved or resized. Anchored panels are always
underneath unanchored ones.

To remove a panel

If the panel is not anchored, there will be a close button on the top right of the panel’s title bar. Click this to remove the
panel or click on the panel’s title bar to select it and then go to the 'Panel' menu and click 'Remove'.


Pages




A page is a particular arrangement of panels on the realtime display. Pages can be designed to efficiently display
relevant information to the user and provide parameters to be logged by the logging system (see Overview 14.1 for
more on this).
Pages are saved as files on disk called Page files (.pge extension). Only one page is ever displayed at one time, but
many pages can be in an 'open' state which allows the user to switch easily between different realtime views.
The title bar of the software is important for finding out information about the pages being displayed and how many are
open. For example, if the following is displayed on the title-bar:

{Software name} – 941/966 view 1 [view001.pge] – Page 1/3 *

This indicates that the current page being displayed is called '941/966 view 1' and is saved as a file called
'view001.pge'. It also shows that this is one of three open pages that you can switch between. The asterisk shows that
the page has been modified in some way compared to the saved file on disk, i.e. the user has added, removed,
moved, resized or anchored/unanchored some or all of the panels on this page.
To switch between open pages (view another page)

You can cycle between open pages on the realtime display by pressing the TAB key to display the next page and shift
+ TAB to display the previous page in the list. The 'Next' and 'Previous' items in the 'Page' menu also do this as well
as the arrow buttons on the toolbar.

To make a new page

You can either create a new page from scratch or create a copy of an existing one (see below).
To create a new blank page, go to the 'Page' menu and click 'New'.
A box will appear asking you to supply a title, description and filename. The title will appear on the title bar when
viewing the page. The description appears in the information box when opening a page file. The filename is the name
used to store the page as a file on disk. Don't worry about the location or file extension of the filename.
After clicking on OK, the new blank page will appear on the screen. You can now add panels to the new page.

To open an existing page (add it to the list of open pages)

Go to 'Open' in the page menu. A file selection box will appear which will allow you to select from the saved pages in
the appropriate folder. Select one and click 'Open'. This should now be the displayed page.

To copy an exisiting page

Open the page, or cycle through the open pages until the one you want to copy is displayed. Go to the 'Save As...'
menu item in the page menu. Choose a filename for the copy of the page and click 'Save'. A page file should now
have been created which is identical to the displayed page. This can be opened as described above.

To save the state of a page

If you have altered the panels on a page an asterisk will appear on the title bar to indicate that the page has changed.
Save it by clicking on the 'Save' item in the 'Page' menu.

To close a page (remove it from the list of open pages)

View the page you wish to close and select 'Close' from the 'Page' menu. This has no affect on the file itself, it simply
means that it is no longer visible.

To delete a page

This will destroy the page and its associated file. View the page and select 'Delete' from the 'Page' menu. Read the
warning message and click delete to destroy the file or cancel to cancel the action.

To change the properties of a page

You can edit the title or description for a page by selecting 'Properties' from the 'Page' menu whilst viewing the page.


9.2 Screen Background

The background of the realtime display can be customized. You can either have a solid colour as a background, a
bitmap image positioned in the middle of the screen, a bitmap image stretched to fill the whole screen or a repeating
pattern of a bitmap image (tiled image). To set up the background, click on 'Background' in the 'Options' menu. You
can select the background colour, the bitmap to be displayed and the way that the bitmap is displayed. The bitmap
must be a Windows bitmap file (.bmp extension). To only display the background colour (no bitmap) select 'Don't
display bitmap' from the 'Bitmap Alignment' drop-down list.



Shortcuts

In the context of this software, a shortcut is an icon on the realtime display. When you click on it, it opens a particular
map or list of parameters to edit. Some pages may be supplied with the software with shortcut icons, others may not
have any.
To use a shortcut

Using the mouse, either click on the icon or the text below it. This will either cause a data window to appear, or will
allow you to select a device from which to get the data from. See ECU Data 11.1 for more details. Note that right
clicking on the shortcut icon and selecting 'Use' from the menu has the same effect.

To create a shortcut icon

Go to the 'Page' menu and click on 'New Shortcut...'. A box will appear asking you for the shortcut details. The title can
be any text. The position of the icon is set manually on the screen by the Grid X and Grid Y values. These values can
range from (0,0) – the top left corner of the screen to (99,99) – the bottom-right corner of the screen. A picture for the
icon can be selected from the 'Icon' box.
The target of the shortcut is the parameter that is edited when you click on the icon. Click on 'Select Target...' to
choose this. A 'Select Parameter' dialog box will appear. See Using the 'Select Parameter' Dialog Box 11.2 for help on
using this. When you have chosen a target, click 'Finish'.

To change the properties of a shortcut icon

Right click on the icon and select 'Properties'. This will display the same box as when you create a new icon (see To
create a shortcut icon). Choose the new properties and click on 'Finish'.

To remove a shortcut icon

Right click on the icon and select 'Remove'.


9.3 Alarms and Alerts

Some pages may be setup so that when a certain event occurs, the panels on the realtime display change colour or
flash a message etc, in order to attract attention to the situation. This is especially useful for safety critical events like
sudden changes in oil pressure or sudden rises in coolant temperature, etc. Some of these colour changes are 'hard-
coded' by the configuration file being used – these are referred to as 'Alarms' or sometimes as 'Proteaus variables'.
You cannot change the way that these operate.

Alerts are a user configurable version of Alarms. They can be used to highlight occasions when a realtime value
enters or leaves a particular range of values. You can set or cancel alert states for a particular panel by right clicking
on the panels display and selecting 'Alert Setup' from the menu. The box that appears lists the current alert settings
for that panel. Clicking on 'Add' or 'Edit' for an existing alert will allow you to setup the alert state. Alerts can have a
primary state, a secondary state which allows a message to be displayed, or can alternate between the two.

Hint: If you decide to setup alerts for panels on a page, use the feature as sparingly as possible, as it is easy to
produce confusing displays if there are too many colour changes and messages on screen at the same time.


9.4 Panel Information

Right clicking on a panels display and selecting 'Information' from the menu will display a box which contains a large
amount of information about both the parameter being displayed and the view-type being used. Most of this
information is required only for technical support purposes, although the parameter description may be of some use.

Special Panel Features

Some types of panel view have particular features:
Alphanumeric panels




This type of panel displays output as a simple number or text state. It is possible to switch the output mode of this type
of panel. To change the output mode, select the alphanumeric panel by clicking on its title bar and press one of the
following keys:

Pressing 'h' – switches to raw hexadecimal, i.e. the parameter value coming from the ECU as a hexadecimal number.
Pressing 'd' – switches to raw decimal, i.e. the parameter value coming from the ECU as a decimal number.
Pressing 'b' – switches to raw binary, i.e. the parameter value coming from the ECU as a binary number.
Pressing 'n' – returns the panel to normal or default output, i.e., the parameter value expressed as scaled engineering
units.

Pen plotter panels




This type of display allows you to see a graphical trace of the parameter value as it varies over time. Note that the
trace is only there for reference purposes; it is not part of the logging system. There are two buttons on this type of
panel:
Start/Stop button (red square/green triangle) -This button allows you to freeze the trace in its current state and to
restart it afterwards. Click once to stop the trace and again to restart it.

Colour button (pen plot symbol) -This button allows you to change the colour of the plot. Click repeatedly to cycle
through the available colours.

Switch panels

These are currently only available for particular specialized applications. Switch panels show the state of a parameter
on the right-hand side and on the left-side shows a column of buttons. Click on one of the buttons to command the
ECU to change to that state.

Other panels

As of time of writing, the other panel types available are the full dial and bar graph views. These do not have any
special features.
10. Using Chipfiles

10.1 Chipfiles

A chipfile is complete copy of all the data inside an ECU, stored as a binary file on disk. Chipfiles are useful for two
reasons:

1. They allow data inside the ECU to be backed-up for restoring at a later time. It is very important that you save
   the state of your ECU to a chipfile when you have spent time setting up and mapping the device. If the ECU
   fails, or you make an unintentional change to the ECU data, you will want to restore it to its original state. Also if you
   PIN code the ECU, and then forget the code, the only way to restore the original state is to erase the ECU (go to
   'Tools' menu, select 'Erase Device' see 15.10) and then reload the information from the chipfile.

2. Chipfiles allow you to make several changes to an ECU setup and then send them to the ECU in one transfer. This
   means that you can prepare several maps, check that they are correct and then send them all to the ECU at the
   same time.

Chipfiles can be treated like ECUs as they contain all maps and setup data present in the ECU from which the chipfile
was created. Of course, chipfiles cannot be used to provide realtime data as they represent a 'frozen snapshot' of the
ECU data.


Making and Transfering Chipfiles

The 'Transfer Chip Data' menu item in the 'Chipfile' menu is used to make new chipfiles, copy data from the ECU to an
existing chipfile, copy data from a chipfile to the ECU and copy data between chipfiles.

To create a new chipfile

You will need to copy data from an existing device, either an ECU or another chipfile:

1. Go to the 'Chipfile' menu. Select 'Transfer Chip Data'.
2. You now need to select the source for the new chipfile data. Either select the ECU option (if there is an ECU
   connected), one of the chipfiles that you have recently used (if there are any) or select 'Other chipfile' to look for a
   specific chipfile on disk.
3. You will now be asked for a target device. Select 'Other Chipfile' and then use the file dialog box to select a folder
   for the new chipfile and type in a new filename before clicking Save.

To copy data from the ECU to an existing chipfile

1. Go to the 'Chipfile' menu. Select 'Transfer Chip Data'.
2. Select the ECU as the source device.
3. You will now be asked for a target device. If the chipfile you want to copy to is in the list, select it or select 'Other
   Chipfile' and then use the file dialog box to select the required chipfile.

To copy data from an existing chipfile to the ECU

1. Go to the 'Chipfile' menu. Select 'Transfer Chip Data'.
2. If the chipfile that you want to copy from is in the list, select it or select 'Other Chipfile' and then use the file dialog
   box to select the required chipfile.
3. Select the ECU as the target device.

To copy data between chipfiles

1. Go to the 'Chipfile' menu. Select 'Transfer Chip Data'.
2. If the chipfile that you want to copy from is in the list, select it or select 'Other Chipfile' and then use the file dialog
   box to select the required chipfile.
3. You will now be asked for a target device. If the chipfile you want to copy to is in the list, select it or select 'Other
   Chipfile' and then use the file dialog box to select the chipfile.
10.2 Opening and Closing Chipfiles

When you create, copy or use a chipfile, it is added to the recently used list. This means that when you next have to
select a device for an operation or function, the chipfile is automatically shown in the list of options.
If you just want to add a chipfile to this list, Go to the 'Chipfile' menu and select 'Add to Open List'. Now select the
chipfile from disk by using the file dialog box.
If you want to remove the chipfile from the list, Go to the 'Chipfile' menu and select 'Remove from Open List'. After
choosing a chipfile from the list of opened chipfiles, the chipfile will be removed from the device selection box. The file
itself is not affected.


10.3 Deleting Chipfiles

You can use the 'Delete' menu item in the 'Chipfile' menu to delete a chipfile from disk.

Important: When you delete a chipfile in the software, it is not sent to the recycle bin and therefore is permanently
deleted.

Go to 'Delete' and then select either one of the open chipfiles, or another chipfile from disk. Read the warning and
then proceed to delete the chipfile.


Backing up and Restoring chipfiles

The backup chipfile feature allows you to take a quick copy of a chipfile so that you can restore it to its previous state
later on. When you backup a chipfile its contents overwrites a default file in the software folder.

To Backup a Chipfile

Select 'Backup Chipfile' from the 'Chipfile' menu. Select the chipfile that you want to backup and then confirm that you
want to overwrite the contents of the backup file.

To Restore a Chipfile

Select 'Restore Chipfile' from the 'Chipfile' menu and confirm that you want to replace the contents of the chipfile that
you backed up with the contents of the backup file.


11. Viewing and Editing ECU Maps and Settings

11.1 ECU Data

Various forms of data are stored inside ECUs and chipfiles. These include:

1. Real-time Variables. These are applicable only to ECUs, not chipfiles. Real-time variables are parameters inside
   the ECU with values that vary over time to correspond to ECU inputs and calculations. Real-time information is
   monitored using the realtime display (see Demo mode 9.1).
2. Maps. These are tables of values used to control the actuators in the management system or to calibrate input
   sensors. Map data is calibrated for a particular application by the mapping process (see Overview 13.1) and then
   usually fine-tuned by editing the data manually.
3. Setup Information. These are sometimes referred to as 1D maps or configuration maps. They are single values
   inside the ECU/chipfile, either number or text based, that setup general properties of the management system.
4. Histograms. These are maps, which are updated by the ECU to record the performance of some aspect of the
   management system, usually a safety critical variable such as oil pressure. You will rarely need to edit these maps
   but may need to view them.
5. Adaptive maps. These are similar to histograms in the sense that they are updated by the ECU during operation of
   the management system. Values placed by the ECU into an adaptive map are then usually combined with other
   maps. You will rarely need to edit these maps but may need to view them.
As mentioned above, realtime information in the ECU is monitored by connecting an ECU to the PC and using the
realtime display. The other information can be retrieved and edited by using the 'Get Data' menu item on the 'Data'
menu.

To view / edit ECU data

Go to the 'Data' menu and select 'Get Data'. The 'Select Parameter' dialog box will appear. Read the following three
sections for help on using this. Alternatives for using the 'Get Data' menu item are:

Pressing Ctrl + U on the keyboard.

Clicking the 'Get Data' button on the toolbar.

Clicking on a shortcut icon on the realtime page (if any shortcuts are present).

When you have selected a parameter to edit and a device to get the data from, a window will appear on the screen.
Typically, if you have selected a map, a spreadsheet and graph interface will appear, see About Maps 12.1 for help.

Selecting setup parameters will typically cause a window with a list of related setup parameters to appear, see the
sections below for help.

11.2 Organisation of ECU Data - The Parameter Tree




The configuration file arranges ECU parameters in a hierarchical or tree-like structure (a structure consisting of groups
and subgroups) called the parameter tree. The purpose of this is to group together related ECU information and to
allow you to browse through the data in the ECU in a structured way. For example, in most configurations there is a
group called 'Ignition'. In this group is a collection of most of the maps and setup data relating to ignition management.
The 'Ignition' group typically contains subgroups, which deal with more advanced ignition management data.
Depending on the user profile your software is using, some maps maybe hidden if they are not applicable to the user
of the software. When the software is in 'Master' mode, the entire set of maps is available for viewing.
Using the 'Select Parameter' Dialog Box




The Select Parameter dialog box is used to add panels to the realtime display and select parameters to view/edit in a
window. This type of interface is used frequently throughout the software; so learning to use it quickly will make using
the software easier (the keyboard is usually the fastest way to use this dialog box). As with all Windows dialog boxes
you can use the TAB and shift and TAB key presses to move the focus around the elements of the box and the Enter
and Escape keys are shortcuts for the OK and Cancel buttons respectively.
The left hand side of this dialog box is the parameter selection tree. Using this is similar to using the Windows
Explorer program to browse folders and files.
Parameters are arranged in groups and subgroups in a hierarchy or tree structure. The tree structure is designed to
group together relevant sets of parameters.
The yellow folder icons with plus and minus symbols next to them are the parameter groups. A group can be
expanded and collapsed in order to show/hide the parameters or subgroups they contain. The folder icon is shown
open or closed to reflect this.
The parameters themselves are shown with icons that reflect the type of parameter. A gauge icon represents a
realtime parameter, a spanner icon represents an engine setting or configuration map and a chart icon represents a
map.

To use the parameter tree with the mouse

Single clicking a folder icon or parameter icon simply highlights that item. To expand or collapse a group, single click
on the plus/minus symbol or double click the folder icon. Double clicking a parameter icon has the same effect as
pressing the OK button and selecting that parameter.

To use the parameter tree with the keyboard

Use the arrow keys to move through the tree. Pressing the right and left arrow keys when a group is selected expands
or collapses the group. The up and down arrow keys move to the next and previous items in the tree. Pressing Enter
has the same effect as pressing the OK button and selecting that parameter. If the tree control doesn't respond to your
key-presses, try single clicking anywhere in the tree to give it the keyboard focus.

The Information box

This text box shows a short passage of text associated with the currently selected item in the tree.

The Data Source list

If you are viewing/editing a parameter in a window you can choose a default place to get the data from using this list. If
the data source is set to 'Ask me…' each time you select a parameter a second box will appear from which you can
choose from the currently open devices (data sources) – see the section below. If it is set to 'Other chipfile…' each
time you select a parameter, a file dialog box will appear enabling you to select a chipfile from disk. Otherwise you can
choose from one of the listed devices and each time a parameter is selected it will be fetched from that device. Click
on the down arrow on the list box to see all the options in the list.

The View Type list

This list is used to select the way that you want to view the parameter. In some cases there will only be one option in
this list. The default or 'standard' view-type is always shown at the top of the list and the view-types available depend
on the currently selected item in the tree control. Click on the down arrow on the list box to see all the options in the
list.

The 'If possible, group together associated parameters' checkbox

With some parameters (especially engine settings/configuration maps) the default behaviour is to fetch a group of
associated parameters when one is selected. Remove the check in this box to override this behaviour and only fetch
one parameter. Clicking on the checkbox toggles whether it is checked or not.

The Search edit box and Find Next button

If you are unsure about where a parameter is in the tree you can enter a word or phrase in the search box and click on
the Find Next button. Each time you click on the Find Next button, any parameters, groups or parameters belonging to
groups, which have the phrase in its title, will be highlighted. Clicking inside the edit box gives it keyboard focus and
allows you to type in the phrase.


Using the 'Select Device' Dialog Box




This box will appear whenever the software needs you to select a device, either to get data from or to send data to.
Typical items that appear in this box include the following:

1. ECU Devices. These are shown next to a microchip icon. An ECU device represents an ECU connected to the PC.
   Shown in brackets is the number of the port on the PC to which the ECU is connected (COM1, COM2, etc..). When
   you click on an ECU device item, the identifier for the ECU is shown in the information box. It is possible to have
   multiple ECUs connected. The first ECU in the list is the primary ECU from which any realtime information is read.
2. Chip-File Devices. These are shown next to a folder icon. A chipfile device represents a file on disk in which ECU
   data is stored. Shown in brackets is the full path filename of the file. When you click on a chipfile device item, the
   contents of the chipfile comment field is displayed in the information box. You can control which chipfiles are
   displayed in the list by using the 'Add to open list' and 'Remove from open list' items in the 'Chipfile' menu. A chipfile
   is placed in this list when it is used at some point in the program.
3. Other Chipfile item. If you cannot find the chipfile that you require in the list you can click on this item. Doing this will
   bring up an 'open file' dialog box from which you can browse you computers disk drives in order to find the chipfile.
   Having done this, the chipfile is added to the open list.
4. Cancel item. This will cancel the get data or send data operation and close the box. You can also press the escape
   to do the same thing.
To select a device using the mouse

Double click on one of the items in the list.

To select a device using the keyboard

Use the up and down arrow keys to select an item and press Enter

To close the box (cancel the operation)

Either select the 'Cancel' item, press escape or click on the close box in the corner of the dialog box.

To select more than one item in the list

Certain operations allow you to select more than one device in the device list; others only allow you to select one.
Usually when you are allowed to select multiple devices, the text 'Select Device(s)' is shown at the top of the box.
Note that you can only select multiple items in the list when all the items you are selecting are open devices.
Attempting to select multiple items, which include the ‘Other chipfile...’ and 'Cancel' options will not work.

To select more than one item in the list using the mouse

Either surround the items with a box (click on an empty part of the list and drag the mouse pointer whilst holding the
mouse button down). This produces a box, which selects items contained within it.
You can also hold down the Ctrl key and click on items to select and deselect them.
Press Enter when finished.

To select more than one item in the list using the keyboard

Hold down the Ctrl key whilst using the up and down arrows to move between the items in the list. Use the space bar
whilst holding down the Ctrl key to select and deselect the items in the list


Data Windows

When you get data from an ECU or a chipfile a separate window appears. This is called a data window. The
appearance of the window differs depending on what data is being viewing/edited, but there are some common
features.
The title bar shows what data the window contains and which device the data comes from. During mapping, it also
shows the mapping status of the data. An asterisk shown on the title bar indicates that the data has been altered since
being loaded.
Data windows are setup as default to always stay on top of every other window, including the main screen. This allows
map data to be organized on the screen so it is always visible. This feature can be turned on or off (see below).
All data windows have a row of menu items under the title bar. Some of these may be greyed-out' (disabled) if they
are not applicable to the type of data being viewed. The menu items are:




1. Send. Clicking on this item (or pressing Alt + S when the data window is the active window) will open a 'Select
   Device' dialog box. This allows you to send the current data in the window to a particular device.
2. Send/Close (or Alt + C). This performs the same task as Send but also closes the data window afterwards.
3. Reload (or Alt + R). This will reload the data from the original device. You will be warned, if the data has changed,
   as the new data will be overwritten by the data currently saved in the device.
4. Import (or Alt + I). This is used to select a mapping session to import into a map. See the section on mapping for
   more information.
5. Options (or Alt + O). This will bring up a menu that allows you to configure the display of the data in the window.
   The contents of this menu will depend on the data being viewed. See the sections below for more information.
6. Window (or Alt + W). This menu allows you to control the display mode of the data window and switch to other
   windows.
7. Exit (or Alt + X). Closes the window allowing you to save the data first if it has changed.
8. Mapping Disabled/Enabled (Alt + M). Enables or disables mapping for this map. At least one window must be
   enabled to perform mapping.

To turn on / off the 'always on top' property for windows

This can be done on a per window basis by toggling the 'Always on Top' menu item in the 'Window' menu on the data
window in question. To set the default mode, go to the 'Options' menu on the main screen and select 'Preferences'.
Click on the 'Miscellaneous' tab and then on the 'Default mode is always on top' checkbox.

To move between the Easimap5 main window and data windows

Press Ctrl + Left and Ctrl + Right to cycle through the active windows.
You can also select 'Next' and 'Previous' on either the main screen 'Window' menu or the data window's 'Window'
menu.
You can also click on the title of the window that you want from the taskbar at the bottom of the screen.
Pressing Alt + TAB will also allow you to select windows.
Both the 'Window' menu on the main screen and on the data window's 'Window' menu provide a selectable list of all
the windows on screen.

To close or hide/show all data windows on screen

You can close all the open data windows on screen by going to the 'Window' main menu and selecting 'Close All'.
Each window will give you the opportunity to save any unsaved data before it closes.
Windows can be hidden (minimized) by using the 'Hide All' item in the 'Window' main menu. They can be shown again
(restored) by using 'Show All'.


Editing Setup Parameters (Using the Group Editor)




If you select a setup parameter from the 'Select Parameter' dialog box, a data window similar to the one shown above
should appear. This is called the group editor. Unless you de selected the checkbox 'If possible, group together all
related parameters', in addition to the parameter you selected, all other related setup parameters will be listed in the
editor.
There are two types of setup parameter: number-based and text-based. Number based parameters usually set a
threshold inside the ECU and text-based parameters usually represent a mode of operation. Number-based
parameters are edited by changing the value in an edit box. Text based parameters are edited by selecting a value
from a drop-down list. For number based parameters, a title bar appears in the editor with columns showing the value,
units, minimum value and maximum value.
The blue box on the left-hand side indicates which of the parameters in the group you are currently editing. A red box
appears on the right-hand side of the parameter when its value has been altered.

To move through the parameters in the list

Use the up and down arrow keys. You can also use the 'Next' and 'Previous' items in the window's 'Options' menu.
You can also use the scroll bar on the right-hand side if the list is longer than the height of the window.
Clicking on one of the parameter rows will also select that parameter as will clicking on one of the edit boxes/drop-
down lists.

To edit a number based parameter using the mouse

Click inside the edit box which shows the parameters value. Type a new value into the box and then press enter or
click elsewhere on the editor. The software may adjust the value you type to compensate for lack of ECU precision or
to set it within legal limits.

To edit a number based parameter using the keyboard

Use the arrow keys to position the blue box next to the parameter that you want to edit. Start typing a new value into
the box or press the right arrow key to highlight the value first and then type the new value. Press enter or click
elsewhere on the editor to finish editing. The software may adjust the value you type to compensate for lack of ECU
precision or to set it within legal limits.

To edit a text based parameter using the mouse

Click on the down arrow button on the parameters drop-down list. Select a new value from the list by clicking on it.

To edit a text based parameter using the keyboard

Use the arrow keys to position the blue box next to the parameter that you want to edit. Press the right arrow key to
start editing and then use the up and down arrow keys to select a new value. Press enter when finished.

To cancel editing a parameter

Press the escape key instead of the enter key. This will return the parameter to its previous value.

To increment / decrement a numeric value

Select a parameter using the keyboard or mouse. Use the page up and down keys to increment and decrement the
value. The following combination of keys (also shown in the data window's 'Options' menu) have the following effect:

Page Up/Down- Increment/Decrement by 1% approx. of range
Shift + Page Up/Down- Increment/Decrement by smallest amount possible.
Ctrl + Page Up/Down- Increment/Decrement by 10% approx. of range
Ctrl + Shift + Page Up/Down - Set value to maximum / minimum

To send the changes to a device

Click on the Send menu item (Alt+S) and select the device.
Alternatively click on the Send/Close menu item (Alt+C) and select the device.
Or click on Exit (Alt+X) and answer Yes to whether or not you want to save the data, then select the device.

To restore the original values for the parameters (overwriting your changes)

Click on the Reload menu item (Alt+R).

To close the window without saving the changes

Click on the Exit menu item (Alt+X) or the windows close box and answer No.
12. Spreadsheet and Graph - Editing Map Data

12.1 About Maps




See the section on ECU Data 11.1 to find out how to get map data from ECUs and chipfiles.
A map is a table or grid of values. Each number in the table is called a site or cell. ECUs use maps by cross-
referencing the current values of the axis parameters to locate a group of relevant sites in the map and then combine
the values in order to produce a single output value. This is the output of the map and represents the weighted
interpolation of adjacent sites in a map depending on the input values of the axis parameters. For example, the TPS
vs Speed Fuel map cross-references the current engine speed (horizontal axis) against the current throttle position
(vertical axis) to find a corresponding group of adjacent sites in the map. The values of these sites are then combined
to produce a single output value, which is used by the ECU as a basis for calculating the required fuel injector duty
cycle.
Some maps consist of a single row of data with a single horizontal axis. These maps are known as two-dimensional
maps. Other maps consist of many rows of data and have both a horizontal axis and a vertical axis. These are known
as three-dimensional maps.


Basic Spreadsheet Use

The spreadsheet provides the most direct and accurate way of viewing and editing a map. The map is shown as a grid
of cells, the top-left cell is the first site in the map; the bottom-right is the last site in the map. Many maps will have
spreadsheets that are bigger than the window in which they are displayed and so scroll bars are provided to scroll
through the whole map.
Running along each side of the map (or just the horizontal side if it's a two dimensional map) are the map axis. These
are shown as grey buttons. Each cell of the axis specifies the value of that row/column. The box in the upper-left
corner of the spreadsheet shows the units for the axis.
The cells on the map are coloured in order to show certain states.
The cell coloured BLACK shows the position of the cursor on the spreadsheet. The cursor row and column is also
indicated on the axis by 'pressed-in' buttons.
The cells coloured LIGHT GREY show which row/column of cells on the spreadsheet is currently being shown on the
graph (assuming the graph is in 2D mode-see below).
The cells coloured DARK GRAY show the current selected area of the spreadsheet.
It is possible to select an area of the spreadsheet to perform certain operations.
Most of the editing options are available both as key presses and as menu items in the map windows 'Options' menu.
You can also access relevant menus by right clicking on single sites, selected areas of sites and other areas of the
spreadsheet.

To move the cursor around the spreadsheet

Use the left, right, up and down arrow keys to move the cursor around the spreadsheet. Moving the cursor to a non-
visible cell will cause the spreadsheet view to scroll left/right/up/down until you reach the edge of the map.

To move the cursor to a specific cell

Either use the arrow keys to do this or click on the cell with the mouse pointer. Use the scrollbars to move to non-
visible areas of a map.

To select an area of the spreadsheet using the keyboard

Move the cursor to a corner of the area you want to select. Hold down the shift key and use the arrow keys to move
the opposite corner of the area you want to select. As you move the cursor, a rectangular area of the map will be
shown in dark grey to indicate that it is selected. If you move to a non-visible area of the map, the view will scroll to
show that part of the map.

To select an area of the spreadsheet using the mouse

Click on the corner of the area you want to select. Hold down the left mouse button and drag the mouse pointer to the
opposite corner of the area you want to select. As you drag the mouse, a rectangular area of the map will be shown in
dark grey to indicate that it is selected. If you move to a non-visible area of the map, the view should scroll to show
that part of the map.

To deselect a selected part of the map

Press the escape key or move the cursor outside the selected area using the keyboard or the mouse.

To toggle between displaying rows or columns on the graph

Note that this only applies to viewing 3D maps in 2D graph mode. Press F2 to toggle between rows and columns or go
to the map windows 'Options' menu and click on 'Toggle Row/Column View'.

To select the entire map

Press Ctrl + A or go to the map windows 'Options' menu, select 'Selection' and then 'Select All'.

To select the entire row/column

Press Ctrl + E or go to the map windows 'Options' menu, select 'Selection' and then 'Select All of Line'. Use F2 to
toggle between row and column mode.

To select from the cursor to the start of the row/column

Press Ctrl + Q or go to the map windows 'Options' menu, select 'Selection' and then 'Select to Start of Line'. Use F2 to
toggle between row and column mode.

To select from the cursor to the end of the row/column

Press Ctrl + W or go to the map windows 'Options' menu, select 'Selection' and then 'Select to End of Line'. Use F2 to
toggle between row and column mode.
To move the cursor to the first site in the map

Press Ctrl + Home or go to 'Options' – 'Location' – 'Go to First Cell'.

To move the cursor to the last site in the map

Press Ctrl + End or go to 'Options' – 'Location' – 'Go to Last Cell'

To move the cursor to the first site in the row/column

Press Home or go to 'Options' – 'Location' – 'Go to Start of Line'

To move the cursor to the last site in the row/column

Press End or go to 'Options' – 'Location' – 'Go to End of Line'

To undo a change to the spreadsheet

The software offers a single level of undo, which restores the previous state. Press Ctrl + Z or go to 'Options' – 'Edit' –
'Undo'.

To copy an area on the spreadsheet

You can copy a range of values on the spreadsheet by selecting the area that you want to copy and pressing Ctrl + C
or selecting 'Copy' from 'Edit' in the 'Options' menu. Once copied values can be pasted elsewhere into the
spreadsheet. The copied values are also compatible with text-editors and Excel.

To paste copied data into the spreadsheet

If you have copied an area of values you can paste them into the spreadsheet at the current cursor position. Press Ctrl
+ V or select 'Paste' from 'Edit' in the 'Options' menu. This should also work with data copied from Excel.


Basic Spreadsheet Editing

Once you have moved the cursor to the part of the map that you want to edit, or selected the area of the spreadsheet
you want to edit (see previous section) you can change the values in the map cells. In the descriptions below the
phrase 'selected cell(s)' refers to either the cell under the cursor or a selected area of the map.
Note. When you select an area of the map and make a change to one of the cells, the change is made to all of the
selected cells (this is the purpose of selecting areas of the map).
Note. When you enter a value into the spreadsheet the actual value placed in the map may be adjusted, either to
compensate for lack of ECU precision when storing the number or to place it within legal limits. The number entered
represents the closest actual value that can be stored in the ECU. If the number you enter is above or below the
upper/lower range limit a dialog box will instruct you of this.

To enter a value into the selected cell(s)

Type in the value and press enter or move the cursor to another cell. You can also double click on the cell to begin
editing the value. When editing the value you can press escape to cancel the change.

To enter a negative value into the selected cell(s)

Same as above but type = (equals sign) before the negative value.

To increment the value in the selected cell(s)

Use the Page Up key. Pressing different combinations of the control and shift keys adjust the values by differing
amounts:

Page Up only – increments the values by the smallest amount possible (1 bit)
Shift and Page Up – increments the values by 1% approx. of values range
Ctrl and Page Up – increments the values by 10% approx. of values range
Ctrl and Shift and Page Up – Sets the values to the maximum limit of the range

To decrement the value in the selected cell(s)

Use the Page Down key. Pressing different combinations of the control and shift keys adjust the values by differing
amounts:

Page Down only – decrements the values by the smallest amount possible (1 bit)
Shift and Page Down – decrements the values by 1% approx. of values range
Ctrl and Page Down – decrements the values by 10% approx. of values range
Ctrl and Shift and Page Down – Sets the values to the minimum limit of the range

To add a value to the selected cell(s)

Type + (plus sign) followed by the value to add and press enter or move to another cell.

To subtract a value from the selected cell(s)

Type – (minus sign) followed by the value to subtract and press enter or move to another cell.

To multiply the selected cell(s) by a value

Type * (asterisk) followed by the value to multiply and press enter or move to another cell.

To divide the selected cell(s) by a value

Type / (forward slash) followed by the value to divide by and press enter or move to another cell.

To set the selected cell(s) to a percentage of their original values

Type % (percent sign) followed by the required percentage and press enter or move to another cell.


Advanced Spreadsheet Editing

The following editing commands allow extra control over spreadsheet values.

To add a percentage of the selected cell(s) values to the selected cell(s)

Type +% (plus sign, percent sign) followed by the required percentage and press enter or move to another cell.

To subtract a percentage of the selected cell(s) values from the selected cell(s)

Type -% (minus sign, percent sign) followed by the required percentage and press enter or move to another cell.

To multiply a percentage of the selected cell(s) values with the selected cell(s)

Type *% (asterisk, percent sign) followed by the required percentage and press enter or move to another cell.

To divide the values in the selected cell(s) with a percentage of their values

Type /% (forward slash, percent sign) followed by the required percentage and press enter or move to another cell.

To store a raw (value stored in ECU) hexadecimal number in the selected cell(s)

Type #h{number}.

To store a raw (value stored in ECU) decimal number in the selected cell(s)

Type #d{number}.
To store a raw (value stored in ECU) binary number in the selected cell(s)

Type #b{number}.

To set a bit in the raw value stored in the selected cell(s)

Type ^s (circumflex symbol, letter s) followed by the bit number to set.

To clear a bit in the raw value stored in the selected cells(s)

Type ^r (circumflex symbol, letter r) followed by the bit number to set.


Spreadsheet Presentation Options

Various options are available for controlling how the spreadsheet is presented. You can control the position, size and
format of the spreadsheet display as detailed below:

To turn on/off the display of the spreadsheet

Repeatedly pressing F6 will cycle through the display options for the graph and spreadsheet. The options are:
spreadsheet on the bottom half of the window, spreadsheet on the top half of the window, graph only and spreadsheet
only.
You can also find this function in the map windows 'Options' menu as 'Cycle Sheet/Graph Position'.

To change the proportion of the window taken up by the spreadsheet

A splitter bar is located between the graph and the spreadsheet. Move the mouse pointer over the bar until the cursor
changes to a double arrow shape. Then press and hold the left mouse button whilst moving the mouse up or down.
This will change the position of the splitter bar.
You can also use the [(open square bracket) key and the] (close square bracket) keys to do the same thing.

To change the size of the spreadsheet numbers

Put the spreadsheet into 'Big Map' mode and back to normal again by pressing Shift+F6. This mode is useful for
viewing the spreadsheet from a distance. You can also find this function in the map windows 'Options' menu as 'Big
Map Mode'.

To change the format of the spreadsheet numbers

By default the spreadsheet will display the values in the map as scaled engineering units. You can also view the data
in raw form (exactly as it is stored inside the ECU) as hexadecimal, decimal or binary numbers. Press Shift+F7 to
cycle through the options. The order is decimal->hexadecimal->binary and then back to scaled units.
You can also find this function in the map windows 'Options' menu as 'Cycle Spreadsheet Format'.


Spreadsheet Interpolation

If you have two or more points in the spreadsheet, which contain valid data, you can interpolate the values in the sites
in-between these points in order to produce a straight gradient of values between the valid points.
You can interpolate in two ways:

To interpolate a rectangular area of the spreadsheet

Select the area of the spreadsheet that you want to interpolate and press F8 (or go to the 'Options' menu and select
'Interpolate'). The values in the selected area will now be interpolated between the four corners of the area.

To interpolate a non-rectangular area of the spreadsheet

You can interpolate between any sites on the spreadsheet by tagging the sites you want to interpolate between and
then using the interpolate function.
Tag a site by selecting it with the cursor and pressing F9 to tag/untag it. Once tagged a site will be shown as purple on
the spreadsheet. You can also use 'Tag Cell' menu item in the map windows 'Options' menu.
Once you have tagged the sites you want to interpolate between, press F8 to interpolate (or go to the 'Options' menu
and select 'Interpolate').
Note that any sites that have been tagged by the software will be included in the interpolation (see the next section).


Spreadsheet Site Tagging and Colour Codes

Sites on the spreadsheet may be tagged or colour coded in order to show that they have been processed in some
way. Below is a table of the site colours and their meaning:

Colour            Meaning


BLACK             This site is the current cursor position
LIGHT GREY        This site is currently being displayed on the 2D graph
DARK GREY         This site is part of the selected area on the spreadsheet
PURPLE            This site has been tagged by the user for interpolation
CYAN              This site has been changed by the interpolate function
YELLOW            This site has been imported from a session of mapping data
GREEN             This site has been mapped (a mapping hit)
DARK GREEN        This site has been mapped using Direct Map and is about to be sent to the ECU
BLUE              During mapping, this colour indicates the current ECU mapping site. The darker the blue, the
                  closer the ECU is to that site,
                  After map merging of adaptive maps, this colour is used to indicate that a site value has been
                  decremented by an adaptive map
RED               After map merging of adaptive maps, this colour is used to indicate that a site value has been
                  incremented by an adaptive map.


To tag/untag a site for interpolation

Tag a site by selecting it with the cursor and pressing F9. Once tagged a site will be shown as purple on the
spreadsheet. You can also use 'Tag Cell' menu item in the map windows 'Options' menu. Pressing F9 on a tagged site
will untag it.

To clear all tagging on the spreadsheet

Press F3 or select 'Clear Tagged Cells' from the map windows 'Options' menu.

To clear all tagging on a particular site

Right click with the mouse on the site in question and select 'Clear Site Tags'.

To view the mapping information associated with an imported site

See the section on mapping for more information on importing map data.
When you have imported a mapping session file into a map, the mapped sites are tagged as yellow to show they've
been imported. You can see the information associated with the site by right-clicking on the site and selecting
'Imported Data'. You can also go to the 'Options' menu and select 'View Imported Cell Data'.


Spreadsheet Index Map Editing

The axes of some maps are fixed, i.e. each row or column represents a specific value of some input parameter. Other
maps are indexed, i.e. the values running along the axis are taken from another two-dimensional map known as an
index map. A map that is referenced in this way is called an indexed map. If a map is indexed its index maps are
always loaded when the map itself is loaded from a device.




Important. The use of index maps will vary between ECUs and software releases for ECUs. Some ECUs will have no
index maps and therefore the value of rows and columns on its maps are fixed. Other ECUs will use a single index
map to index many maps. For example, a common situation is to have a single speed index map and a throttle index
map. These maps provide the axes for all maps referenced by speed and throttle. Changing the values of these index
maps affects how the ECU interprets ALL maps referenced by speed and throttle.
Index maps can be changed in three ways:
1. By loading the index map from the device and editing it directly. This is the simplest and most direct method.
   However, no assistance is provided by the software in terms of making sure that all maps that are indexed by the
   index map are modified to compensate for the new axis values.
2. By loading a map whose axes are defined by the index map, and using the spreadsheet to directly change the axis
   values. This method is equivalent to editing the index map directly. When sending the map to a device, the software
   provides a list of all maps that are affected by the change to the index map and allows you to load the maps from
   the device.
3. By inserting and deleting rows and columns in the map. All maps are fixed in size, but you can use the spreadsheet
   to remove unused rows/columns from the later parts of maps and use them to provide better definition at lower
   values. For example, when inserting a column on a map, another column of data is deleted (usually the last column)
   in order to provide an extra column of data at the point of insertion. The map data is 'shifted along' to account for
   this and the new column is filled with interpolated data from either side of the inserted column. Deletion of rows and
   columns works in reverse, by removing a row/column of data, shifting the data across to compensate and adding a
   new row/column of data elsewhere (usually the last row/column). When you insert and delete information on the
   map and then send it to a device, the software provides an option to automatically do the same to all maps
   referenced by the same index maps and this allows the changes you make on one map to be made on all other
   relevant maps in a chipfile, ensuring the validity of the map data. Note that when you insert and delete rows and
   columns, the software automatically restricts the devices that you can send the map data to, to chipfiles. This is
   because the amount of map transferring that has to be done by software is too large to perform reliably with an
   ECU and it is much faster to work with files on disk.
When you change the values of the map axes on a spreadsheet a red box will appear next to each changed value.

To toggle between viewing map axises as indexed/non-indexed

Go to the map windows 'Options' menu, select 'Axis Indexing'. The two items called 'Show Horizontal Axis as Indexed'
and 'Show Vertical Axis as Indexed' control whether the axes are shown in terms of the index map values or in terms
of a fixed site value. If an item is greyed out, this means that this axis is not indexed. A tick is shown next to the menu
item if the axis is being displayed as indexed.
You can also right-click on the rectangle that shows the units of the spreadsheet axis (in the top-left corner of the
spreadsheet) and select 'Toggle Horizontal Indexing' and 'Toggle Vertical Indexing'. These items will have no effect if
the axis is not indexed.

To change the axis value of a row or column

First use the F2 key (or Options/Toggle row column view) to select whether you want to edit a row or column value.
Now press Ctrl + I or go to the map windows 'Options' menu, select 'Axis Indexing' and 'Change Axis Value of Line'. If
the map is indexed an edit box will appear on the axis. Type in the new axis value and press enter to confirm or
escape to cancel. If the value is less than the previous value or greater than the next, the change will not be made as
all map indexes should be monotonic (they should have a either a positive or negative slope).
Double clicking on the axis value that you want to change is a shortcut for bringing up the edit box.

To insert a row or column

First use the F2 key (or Options/Toggle row column view) to select whether you want to insert a row or column. Now
move the cursor to the row or column that you want to insert the new line after. Press the INS (insert) key or go to the
map windows 'Options' menu, select 'Axis Indexing' and 'Insert Axis Line'. For a map axis that is not indexed, this
operation will have no affect.
It is possible that the gap between the axis values you are attempting to insert a line between is too small for an
additional value. If this is the case, the software will put up a message box.
A box should appear which shows what changes will be made to the map. The top edit box shows the new value of
the inserted line. By default this will be half way between the values on either side of the inserted line. You can alter
the value as required.
The drop-down list allows you to select a map line to delete in order to make room for the inserted line. By default, this
will be the last row/column on the map. Note that the data in this line will be deleted when the new line is introduced.
Press Cancel to cancel the change or Insert to insert the line. The map should now shift across and a line of data will
be added at the row/column that you have specified. The new data in this line will be as default, half way between the
values on either side of it (interpolated). If you specified a non-central value for the new line, the data will represent an
interpolation that is weighted toward one side of the line.

To delete a row or column

First use the F2 key (or Options/Toggle row column view) to select whether you want to delete a row or column. Now
move the cursor to the row or column that you want to delete. Press the DEL (delete) key or go to the map windows
'Options' menu, select 'Axis Indexing' and 'Delete Axis Line'. For a map axis that is not indexed, this operation will
have no affect.
A box should appear which shows what changes will be made to the map. The top box names the line that you are
about to delete. The list box allows you select a line to insert a new line of data after (as the map must remain the
same size, when you delete a line another must be created). This is set as the last line of the map by default. An edit
box allows you to specify the new axis value of the new line. This will be between the previous value and the
maximum limit by default.
Press Cancel to cancel the change or Delete to delete the line. The map should now shift across and a line of data will
be added at the row/column that you have specified. The new data in this line will be as default, half way between the
values on either side of it (interpolated). If you specified a non-central value for the new line, the data will represent an
interpolation that is weighted toward one side of the line.

To send map data to a device after changing the map axis values directly

Click on the map windows Send button or press Alt + S. A dialog box will appear that warns you that you have altered
the map axis values. A list of all the maps that are affected by this change will appear. You can either:
1. Send the map data and the new index map to a device. This is the default option.
2. Send the map data and the new index map to a device and then get the software to load all the affected maps from
   the device.
3. Only send the map data. Any changes to the index map will be ignored.
Press Cancel to return to editing the map or press OK to select a device to download to and send the data.

To send map data to a device after inserting or deleting rows/columns

Click on the map windows Send button or press Alt + S. A dialog box will appear that warns you that you have
reformatted the map and shows a list of all other maps that need reformatting the same way. You can either:

1. Get the software to reformat all the maps automatically. This is recommended. When this option is selected, the
   software will send the current map and index maps to a chipfile and will then work through the list of affected maps,
   load them from a chipfile, perform identical insertions and deletions in the order in which you performed them
   originally and then send the new data back to the chipfile and close the map. Obviously, as new lines of data will be
   inserted and deleted, some of the existing data in these maps will be lost. This should not be a problem if all of the
   maps are being used in the same way.
2. Get the software to load all the affected maps. When this option is selected, the software will send the current map
   and index maps to a device and then open all the affected maps, the map data can then be adjusted viewed and
   adjusted manually as required.
3. Send only this map and the altered index maps. No changes will be made to any other maps.
4. Send only the map data and not the index maps. Any changes to the index map will be ignored.
Pressing Cancel will return to editing the map without sending any data.
If you select the automatic reformatting option, you are restricted to selecting a chipfile only as the target device. This
is because of the amount of data transfers that need to take place. This means that in order to make the changes to
an ECU, you should download the ECU to a chipfile, reformat it and then send it back to the ECU.
Before automatic reformatting takes place, the software will ask you whether you want to backup the chipfile. This is
recommended because of the number of changes that are made to a large quantity of maps. Answering yes copies
the chipfile data over to the backup chipfile. This enables you to restore the previous state by going to the 'Chipfile'
menu and selecting 'Restore'.
During automatic reformatting, the software will suspend operation for a time, while it processes each map on the list.


12.2 Spreadsheet Use During Mapping

During mapping the spreadsheet switches into a different mode. In this mode the user does not have control over the
cursor, instead the current cursor position is determined by the sites on the map that are currently being used by the
ECU for the output of the map. As the axis parameters (such as engine speed, throttle position, etc.) change, the
cursor position moves across the spreadsheet.
The current mapping row and column is indicated by pressed-down buttons on the axes of the map. Cross-referencing
these indicates the absolute cursor position on the spreadsheet, i.e. any mapping hits or changes to the map will be
made at this site.
On the spreadsheet a shaded blue colour is used to indicate how close the ECU is to the current absolute cursor
position. If the site is shaded deep blue and all adjacent sites are white, this indicates that the ECU is running very
close to or exactly on that site. If the blue colour is distributed across several sites this shows that all of these sites are
contributing to the output of the map, because the ECU is running in-between absolute sites on the map. The paler the
blue, the less effect a site has on the output of the map.
In addition to the site colour shading, an extra information bar appears above the map spreadsheet during mapping.
This shows four values labelled X, Y, Z and +. X represents the current horizontal axis parameter value, Y represents
the current vertical axis parameter value, Z represents the output of the map and + represents the output of the map
plus the trim value set by the knobs on the mapping box.

Graph Presentation Options

In a 2D map the graph displays the data as a single line graph. In 3D maps, lots of options are available as to the
display of the spreadsheet data.

1. Row or column view. You can either choose spreadsheet rows as the horizontal axis of the graph or spreadsheet
   columns (default).
2. 2D or 3D mode. The graph can either display a 2D cross-section line graph, or view the data in 3D.
3. One, three, five, or all line mode. You can set the graph to display a single line of data (single line mode), a line of
   data together with the previous and next lines (three line mode), a line of data together with the previous two lines
   and next two lines (five line mode) or view all the lines on the map (all lines mode). When the graph is in 3D mode
   and in all-lines mode, a solid 3D graph is displayed.
4. Graphing limits. You can specify a sub-area of the graph to display.
In three line and five line graph modes, the lines are displayed in different colours to indicate which lines are being
displayed. These colours correspond to coloured tags on the spreadsheet axis and this shows which line on the graph
corresponds to which line on the spreadsheet. The current line is always the middle one.
On the graph, the vertical axis always represents the scale of the numbers on the spreadsheet, ie, the depth or output
axis of the map.
The current spreadsheet cursor position is shown on the graph as a large dot (usually either white or black) together
with an X.

To toggle between viewing rows and columns on the graph

Press F2 or go to the map windows 'Options' menu and select 'Toggle Row/Column View'. When the graph is in
column mode, the current row is highlighted on the spreadsheet and the horizontal axis of the graph becomes the
columns of the current row. When in row mode, the current column is highlighted on the spreadsheet and the
horizontal axis of the graph becomes the rows of the current column.

To toggle between 2D mode and 3D mode

Press Shift+F3 or go to the map windows 'Options' menu and select '3D mode'.
To cycle through the number of lines on the graph

Press Shift+F2 or go to the map windows 'Options' menu and select 'Cycle Display Lines'. The order is single-line,
three-line, five-line, all-lines and back to single-line.

To display a solid 3D graph

Press Shift+F3 to get the graph into 3D mode and then use Shift+F2 to cycle through the number of lines displayed
until all the lines are displayed.

To select a section of the graph to view

Press Shift+F5 or go to the map windows 'Options' menu and select 'Graph Display Limits'. A box will appear which
allows you to change the maximum and minimum axis limits of the section of the graph to display. The restore defaults
button sets the limits back to viewing 100% of the graph.

To turn on/off the display of the graph

Repeatedly pressing F6 will cycle through the display options for the graph and spreadsheet. The options are:
spreadsheet on the bottom half of the window, spreadsheet on the top half of the window, graph only and spreadsheet
only.
You can also find this function in the map windows 'Options' menu as 'Cycle Sheet/Graph Position'.

To change the proportion of the window taken up by the graph

A splitter bar is located between the graph and the spreadsheet. Move the mouse pointer over the bar until the cursor
changes to a double arrow shape. Then press and hold the left mouse button whilst moving the mouse up or down.
This will change the position of the splitter bar.
You can also use the [(open square bracket) key and the] (close square bracket) keys to do the same thing.

To change the graph colours used

You can edit the colour of the graph lines, grid lines, graph background, cursor colour and 3D plot colour. Go to the
'Options' menu and select 'Preferences'. Click on the 'Colours' tab. Alter the colours used for each item by clicking on
'Select' and choosing a colour. Click on OK to make the changes.
Note. Changes to graph colours will take effect when the next map window is loaded. Any map windows on screen
before you changed the colours will still be using their old colour scheme.


Basic Graph Editing

You can use the graph to edit the map in addition to the spreadsheet. The accuracy of the editing is proportional to the
amount of space that the map takes up on screen. If you cannot edit points to a fine enough resolution, try increasing
the size of the graph. The spreadsheet is the most accurate way of editing map data.
To assist in editing, when you position the mouse pointer over the graph area, the value of that point on the graph is
shown in the coordinate bar on top of the graph. The horizontal and vertical axis positions are shown, together with
the current line value on the right-hand side.
When in 3D mode, the coordinate bar shows the current position of the cursor on the spreadsheet. Note that you
cannot reposition points on the graph in 3D mode; you have to use the spreadsheet to edit the data or change the
graph back into 2D mode.

To select a point on the graph line in 2D mode

Position the mouse pointer near to the point that you want to select and click the right mouse button.

To move a point on the graph line in 2D mode

Position the mouse pointer near to the point that you want to edit and click and hold the left mouse button. Move the
mouse up and down to move the point.
To select a series of points on the graph line in 2D mode

Position the mouse pointer near to the first point in the series and click and hold the right mouse button. Drag the
mouse left or right to select the required points.

To move a series of points on the graph line in 2D mode

Position the mouse pointer near to the first point in the series and click and hold the right mouse button. Drag the
mouse left or right to select the required points. Release the right mouse button and click and hold the left mouse
button. Move the mouse up and down to move the selected points.


12.3 Graph Site Tagging and Colour Codes

Points on the graph may be tagged or colour coded in order to show that they have been processed in some way.
Below is a table of the point colours and their meaning:

Colour            Meaning


Usually WHITE This point is the current cursor position. This colour may be altered by the Preferences box in
or BLACK      the Options menu.
PURPLE            This point has been tagged by the user for interpolation
CYAN              This point has been changed by the interpolate function
YELLOW            This point has been imported from a session of mapping data
GREEN             This point has been mapped (a mapping hit)
DARK GREEN        This point has been mapped using Direct Map and is about to be sent to the ECU
BLUE              After map merging of adaptive maps, this colour is used to indicate that a point value has been
                  decremented by an adaptive map
RED               After map merging of adaptive maps, this colour is used to indicate that a point value has been
                  incremented by an adaptive map.


13. Mapping (Calibration)

13.1 Overview

Mapping is the process of determining appropriate data to place into maps in order to produce optimal engine
performance. To map you must have a correctly configured and powered ECU connected to an engine that can be
operated over a range of speeds and loads, e.g. on a dynometer or a rolling-road. Advanced mapping requires the
use of a mapping box (calibration controller), connected to the ECU using the appropriate lead. Contact your ECU
supplier if you require this equipment.
The software currently offers four different methods of mapping, these are called mapping strategies. In fact, all these
methods are very similar and the main differentiating factor is the point at which the new mapping data is sent to the
ECU.
Below is a summary of how to map using this software. All of the stages in this procedure are described in detail in the
rest of this chapter.
With Live Map, many of these stages can be bypassed. When you get a map from an ECU, pressing F4 will
automatically enable the map and put the map into Live Map mode. You can then Live Map and press F4 again (or
Stop Mapping) to finish. As no information is recorded in a mapping session file with Live Map, there is no need to
specify a mapping session name and no need to setup a mapping box.

1. Decide which mapping strategy to use.
2. Select the mapping strategy.
3. If using a mapping box, set up the mapping box.
4. Get the map(s) you want to map from the ECU.
5. Click on the 'Mapping DISABLED' item on each map window so it reads 'Mapping ENABLED'.
6. Go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Start Mapping'.
7. Unless using Live Map, choose a name for the mapping session.
8. Move the engine speed and load from site to site on the map. Adjust engine performance until optimal (either using
   the keyboard on Live Map or the mapping box with the other strategies). When engine performance is optimal,
   press the space bar to record a mapping hit (unless using Live Map).
9. When finished, go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Stop Mapping'.
10.The next step depends on the mapping strategy used. If using Live Map or Direct Map then mapping has been
   completed. If using Quick Map, the map data in the map window can now be fine-tuned/interpolated and then sent
   to the ECU. If using Pro Map, the mapping hits can now be imported by clicking on the map windows 'Import' menu
   item, selecting the mapping session and clicking OK. This inserts the mapping data into the map and it can now be
   fine-tuned/interpolated and then sent to the ECU. You can import mapping session data at a later date unless you
   have used Live Map in which case no data has been recorded.


Mapping Strategies

You can map in different ways depending on your specific needs and what style you prefer. The different methods of
mapping using the software are called mapping strategies. When you map, you have decide which strategy you are
going to use and select the strategy in the software. There are four strategies: Live-Map, Quick-Map, Pro-Map and
Direct-Map.

Live-Map

Live map is the simplest of the mapping strategies. It is the only mapping strategy where the mapping box is not
required. Live-Map allows you to make simple non-logged changes to engine maps in the ECU while the engine is
running.

To use Live-Map you get the maps that you want to map (one or more) from the ECU, enable them for mapping,
select Live-Map as the strategy and then select 'Start Mapping' from the 'Mapping' menu. You start the engine (if it is
not already running) and then adjust the engine status in order to move the ECU from site to site on the map. When
you press the Page-Up key (to increment) or Page-Down key (to decrement) the current site value on the PC, the
value of the site will increment/decrement on the screen and once you release the key, the new value will be
immediately sent to the ECU for use. There is a slight delay while the value is loaded into the ECU. Every site that you
edit turns green to show that you have visited it. Once you have visited all the sites that you want to edit, you can then
select 'Stop Mapping' from the mapping menu and then close the maps. The maps on the PC will always have the
same data as the maps in the ECU.

Pro-Map

A mapping box is required for this method. This method is the 'slowest' method of mapping but allows the greatest
degree of control for examining and editing new mapping data before it is sent to the ECU. Pro-Map is provided mostly
for backward compatibility, most people will find Quick-Map a better alternative.

To use Pro-Map you get the maps that you want to map (one or more) from the ECU, enable them for mapping and
select Pro-Map as the strategy. You then set up the mapping box to control the appropriate parameters. Once you
have setup the mapping box you select 'Start Mapping' from the 'Mapping' menu. You will be asked for a description
for this mapping session. This will be used to locate the mapping data later. You start the engine (if it is not already
running) and then adjust the engine status in order to move the ECU from site to site on the map. You adjust the
mapping box trim controls until optimal engine performance for that site is achieved. When you are satisfied with the
engine performance you press the space bar on the keyboard to log this state (this is called a mapping hit). The green
mapping indicator on the top-right part of the screen will flash and the hit count will increase. Also, the site turns green
to show that it has been visited but no other changes to the map take place.

Once you have visited all the required sites, you then stop mapping by selecting 'Stop Mapping' from the 'Mapping'
menu. No changes have been made to the maps on the PC or the ECU. To use the mapping data you have created,
you get the map from the ECU and click on the maps 'Import' menu item. A box appears with a list of mapping
sessions, listed by description. You find the description of the mapping session that you have created, select it and
click OK. The new mapping data will then be imported into the map, a yellow site indicates a site that has been
mapped. You can now edit the data and send it to the ECU when ready.

Quick-Map

Quick-map is provided as a faster alternative to Pro-Map. It is faster because it bypasses the need to import data after
you have finished mapping. Otherwise it is virtually identical to Pro-Map.
To use Quick-Map you get the maps that you want to map (one or more) from the ECU, enable them for mapping and
select Quick-Map as the strategy. You then set up the mapping box to control the appropriate parameters (this is
described later). Once you have setup the mapping box you select 'Start Mapping' from the 'Mapping' menu. You will
be asked for a description for this mapping session. This may be used to locate the mapping data later. You start the
engine (if it is not already running) and then adjust the engine status in order to move the ECU from site to site on the
map. You adjust the mapping box trim controls until optimal engine performance for that site is achieved. When you
are satisfied with the engine performance you press the space bar on the keyboard to log this state (this is called a
mapping hit). The green mapping indicator on the top-right part of the screen will flash and the hit count will increase.
The site turns green to show that it has been visited and also the new mapping value will be imported into the PC copy
of the map.

Once you have visited all the required sites, you then stop mapping by selecting 'Stop Mapping' from the 'Mapping'
menu. The PC map you now have on screen contains the new mapping data. From here you can edit the data if
necessary and then send it to the ECU. If you don't want to send the mapping data to the ECU you import the
mapping session into map at a later date, just like when using Pro-Map described above.

Direct-Map

Direct-map is a hybrid method of Live-mapping and Quick-mapping. It is 'live' in the sense that data is sent to the ECU
during the mapping process. Unlike Live-map it records mapping data to disk for future use. It offers a method of
mapping the ECU directly and is therefore the most direct of the mapping box methods.

To use Direct-Map you get the maps that you want to map (one or more) from the ECU, enable them for mapping and
select Direct-Map as the strategy. You then set up the mapping box to control the appropriate parameters (this is
described later). Once you have setup the mapping box you select 'Start Mapping' from the 'Mapping' menu. You will
be asked for a description for this mapping session. This may be used to locate the mapping data later. You start the
engine (if it is not already running) and then adjust the engine status in order to move the ECU from site to site on the
map. You adjust the mapping box trim controls until optimal engine performance for that site is achieved. When you
are satisfied with the engine performance you press the space bar on the keyboard to log this state (this is called a
mapping hit). The green mapping indicator on the top-right part of the screen will flash and the hit count will increase.
Now the corner of the site will turn a dark green and the new site value will appear in the PC copy of the map. You can
keep adjusting this value while you keep the engine on this site. As soon as you move the engine onto another site, or
stop mapping, the new value from the previous mapping hit will be downloaded into the ECU for use and the site will
turn to normal mapping green (bright green).

Once you have visited all the required sites, you then stop mapping by selecting 'Stop Mapping' from the 'Mapping'
menu. Both the PC copy of the map and the ECU copy of the map now contain the new mapping data. If you need to
recreate the data you have produced at a later date, you can import the mapping session into the map, just like with
Pro-Map described above.

Summary of Different Mapping Strategies

All mapping methods are virtually identical and use very similar procedures. The following table summarizes the
differences between mapping strategies:

             Mapping Copy of map         Copy of map     Mapping      The point at which new data is sent to the
             box       data in the PC    data in the     session data ECU
             required? altered during    ECU altered     recorded on
                       mapping?          during          disk?
                                         mapping?
LIVE MAP NO              YES             YES             NO             When Page Up/Page Down key is released
PRO MAP YES              NO              NO              YES            After mapping is completed and logged data
                                                                        is imported, edited and then sent to ECU
QUICK        YES         YES             NO              YES            After mapping is finished and new PC map is
MAP                                                                     sent to ECU
DIRECT       YES         YES             YES             YES            Data sent to ECU as it moves from site to
MAP                                                                     site on the map
Choosing a Mapping Strategy

Answering the following questions will help you to decide which mapping strategy to use:

A. Do you have / want to use a connected mapping box? If the answer is NO then you must use the LIVE-MAP
   strategy. If YES then go to the next question.
B. Do you just want to fine-tune the map / make small adjustments? If the answer is YES then use LIVE-MAP. If NO,
   then go to the next question.
C. Do you want the changes you make during mapping to take immediate effect in the ECU? If the answer is YES then
   use DIRECT-MAP. If NO, then go to the next question.
D. Do you want the changes you make to be inserted into the PC copy of the map during mapping? If the answer is
   YES the use the QUICK map strategy. Otherwise use the PRO-MAP strategy.

To select a mapping strategy

Go to the software 'Mapping' menu and select 'Choose Strategy'. Select a strategy from the list and click 'OK.'

Setting-Up a Mapping Box

When using Quick Map, Direct Map or Pro Map you need to ensure that a mapping box is connected and correctly
setup. A mapping box is used to control the characteristics of the ECU, so that it can be tuned during mapping. This
works by setting a knob on the mapping box to control the level of trim on the output of a map. A trim value is a value
that is added or subtracted from the output of a map. When the mapping box is connected, the ECU adds a trim value
to the outputs of appropriate maps, based on the positions of the knobs on the mapping box and uses this as the
effective output of the map.

Example: You can set the FUEL knob on the mapping box so that it controls Throttle Vs Speed Fuel. When this
happens the ECU will take the output of the Throttle Vs Speed Fuel Map and add a trim value to it based upon the
position of the FUEL knob. If the knob is central (0% trim) the trim value will be 0 and the output of the map is used. If
the knob is below the central point, a negative trim value will be added to the output of the map (fuelling will be
reduced). If the knob is above the central point, a positive trim value will be added to the output of the map (fuelling
will be increased). The amount of trim will depend on the range set for the pot. If the range is set to –100% to +100%,
setting the knob to minimum will set the output of the map to 0 and setting the knob to maximum will double the output
of the map. During mapping, you adjust the trim until the fuelling is optimal and then press space to record a mapping
hit. The software will then record that this is the optimal value for this point in the map. When this new optimal value is
sent to the ECU depends upon the mapping strategy (see descriptions of mapping strategies).

Go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Setup Mapping Box'. Select a device to get the mapping box setup from and a
dialog box will appear. For each pot on the mapping box there is a drop down list of options. This drop down list
selects what function that pot on the mapping box controls. These functions are mutually exclusive, that is, if you set
one mapping knob to control a function, you cannot control the same function from another mapping knob. Another
drop down list allows you to select a mode or range of operation for the selected function.

Pressing the Default button will setup the mapping box with the default functions, supplied by the configuration file.
This is a good starting point as this default mapping box setup will be adequate for most uses.

You may need to disconnect the mapping box so that it does not affect the ECU. You can do this by pressing the
Disconnect All button. This sets the function for each pot to < Disconnected >, which means that the mapping box will
have no effect on the ECU.

You can load and save mapping box setups to chipfiles, however, the only setup that will affect mapping is inside the
ECU.
The mapping setup only takes effect when sent to the ECU.

To load the current mapping box setup

Go to the 'Mapping' menu, select 'Setup Mapping Box' and select the ECU as the device.

To disable the mapping box (from software)

In the Setup Mapping Box dialog box, click the 'Disconnect All' button or manually set each knob control function to
Disconnected. Click OK and select the ECU as the device to send the setup to.
To set the mapping box to default mode

In the Setup Mapping Box dialog box, click the 'Default Setup' button. Click OK and select the ECU as the device to
send the setup to.

To select a function for a mapping knob to control

Next to each mapping knob is a drop down list of functions that can be controlled. Select a function by clicking on the
down arrow and selecting a function from the list. The functions that you select should match the maps that you are
trying to map. For example, if you are mapping the Throttle Vs Speed Fuel map, one of the mapping knobs should be
set to Throttle Vs Speed Fuel. The mode list next to each control sets the range of trim for that knob. This can either
be set to full range control (-100% to +100%) or some finer level of control.

Once a function is set for one knob, this function disappears from the list of options for the other knobs.

To send a mapping box setup to a device

In the Setup Mapping Box dialog box, Click OK and then select the target device.

To cancel a change to the mapping box setup

In the Setup Mapping Box dialog box, Click Cancel.

Extra Mapping Parameters

It is possible to setup the software so that during mapping, it records the state of parameters, which don't directly
apply to the mapping situation. When the mapping session data is then imported, selecting View Imported Data on a
mapping hit site, will display the state of these parameters at the point of the mapping hit.

To set additional mapping parameters

Go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Choose Extra Parameters'. A dialog box appears which displays all available
parameters in a tree structure on the left and a list of selected parameters on the right. Select parameters from the
tree on the left and click 'Add' to add them to the selected list. Select parameters in the selected list and click 'Remove'
to remove them. Press OK when finished or Cancel to cancel the changes.

To view additional parameter information after mapping

Get a map from a device and import the mapping session data by clicking the Import menu item on the map window,
selecting the session and clicking OK. The mapped sites should appear in yellow if the mapping session is applicable
to this map. Right-clicked on one of the mapped sites and select 'View Imported Data' from the menu. The box that
appears will show the values of the additional parameters at the point of the mapping hit.


13.2 Using Live-Map

You can use Live Map in the following two ways:

1. Get a map from the ECU.
2. Make sure that the map window is the active window (click on its title bar) and press F4 to start Live-Mapping. The
   mapping info pane on the top-right corner of the realtime screen should turn green and display 'Live Map Mode ON'.
3. A blue box should appear on the map spreadsheet. This indicates the sites being used by the ECU. The darker the
   blue, the closer the ECU is to a site. When the ECU is running part way between sites the blue colour is distributed
   across the sites to indicate how much each site affects the output of the map.
4. Adjust the engine parameters to move the mapping cursor around the spreadsheet to the desired sites. Get as
   close to each site as possible.
5. Adjust the value of the site by pressing the PAGE UP key to increase the value and the PAGE DOWN key to
   decrease the value. Every time you release the PAGE UP and DOWN keys, there is a short pause while the new
   information is sent to the ECU.
6. When finished press F4 to stop mapping or go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Stop Mapping' or click on the
   green 'Live Map Mode ON' message.
An alternative way to Live-Map is:

1. Get a map from the ECU and click on the 'Mapping DISABLED' menu item so that it reads 'Mapping ENABLED'.
2. Go to the 'Mapping' menu, select 'Choose Strategy'. Select 'Live Map' and click OK. Now go to the 'Mapping' menu
   and select 'Start Mapping' or click on the 'Live Map Mode OFF' message. The mapping info pane on the top-right
   corner of the realtime screen should turn green and display 'Live Map Mode ON'.
3. A blue box should appear on the map spreadsheet. This indicates the sites being used by the ECU. The darker the
   blue, the closer the ECU is to a site. When the ECU is running part way between sites the blue color is distributed
   across the sites to indicate how much each site affects the output of the map.
4. Adjust the engine parameters to move the mapping cursor around the spreadsheet to the desired sites. Get as
   close to each site as possible.
5. Adjust the value of the current site by pressing the PAGE UP key to increase the value and the PAGE DOWN key
   to decrease the value. Every time you release the PAGE UP and DOWN keys, there is a short pause while the new
   information is sent to the ECU.
6. When finished go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Stop Mapping' or click on the green 'Live Map Mode ON'
   message.
You can also switch in and out of Live Mapping while you are mapping using another mapping strategy. Use F4 to
start and stop Live Mapping on a window.


13.3 Using Quick-Map

The full detailed procedure for using Quick-Map is described below:

1. If Quick-Map is not currently selected (look at the box in the top right corner of the realtime screen), go to the
   'Mapping' menu and select 'Choose Strategy'. Select 'Quick-Map' from the list and click 'OK'. If Quick-Map is not in
   the list, it may be disabled in the current user profile. See User Profiles for more information.
2. Get each map that you want to map in this session from the ECU by going to the 'Data' menu and using 'Get Data'.
3. For each map on screen that you want to map, click the map windows 'Mapping DISABLED' menu item so that it
   reads 'Mapping ENABLED'.
4. If your mapping box is not setup, go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Setup Mapping Box'. See the section 'Setting
   up a Mapping Box' for more details.
5. Now go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Start Mapping' or click on the box, which reads 'Quick-Map Mode OFF'.
6. A box will appear asking whether you want to create a new mapping session file (default), overwrite the last session
   (if you mapped since the software was started) or overwrite another session (this will allow you to select a previous
   session from a list).
7. The next box allows you to type a description for this mapping session. You do not have to include a date or time in
   this as the software logs that automatically. Your description should be long enough to allow you to identify the
   mapping session from a list later on.
8. Mapping will now start. The mapping info pane on the top-right corner of the realtime screen should turn green and
   display 'Quick Map Mode ON'.
9. A blue box should appear on the map spreadsheet. This indicates the sites being used by the ECU. The darker the
   blue, the closer the ECU is to a site. When the ECU is running part way between sites the blue colour is distributed
   across the sites to indicate how much each site affects the output of the map. You do not have to look at the map
   windows to map. You can minimize all the map windows on screen in order to view the realtime display and use this
   to determine which map sites you are on.
10. Adjust the engine parameters to move the mapping cursor around the spreadsheet to the desired sites. Get as
   close to each site as possible.
11. Adjust the trim values using the mapping box until the engine is at optimal performance for this site on the map.
   Now press the SPACE bar to record the mapping hit. Various parts of the software should flash green to indicate
   that there has been a hit and the hit count in the top-right corner of the screen should increase by one. The current
   site on the spreadsheet should turn green to indicate that this site has been mapped and the new site value will be
   placed at this site.
12. Repeat this for all required sites.
13. Stop mapping by going to the 'Mapping' menu and selecting 'Stop Mapping' or click on the mapping pane, which
   reads 'Quick Map Mode ON'.
14. Go back to the map window (restore it if you have minimized it).
15. The map should now contain a green site for each mapping hit and the optimal trimmed value should be in each of
   these sites. Either send the mapped data to the ECU now or import it at a later date by getting the map from the
   ECU, clicking on the 'Import' menu item, selecting the mapping session and clicking OK. The data will then be
   inserted into the map and be sent to the ECU.
13.4 Using Pro-Map

The full detailed procedure for using Pro-Map is described below:

1. If Pro-Map is not currently selected (look at the box in the top right corner of the realtime screen), go to the
   'Mapping' menu and select 'Choose Strategy'. Select 'Pro-Map' from the list and click 'OK'. If Pro-Map is not in the
   list, it may be disabled in the current user profile. See User Profiles for more information.
2. Get each map that you want to map in this session from the ECU by going to the 'Data' menu and using 'Get Data'.
3. For each map on screen that you want to map, click the map windows 'Mapping DISABLED' menu item so that it
   reads 'Mapping ENABLED'.
4. If your mapping box is not setup, go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Setup Mapping Box'. See the section 'Setting
   up a Mapping Box' for more details.
5. Now go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Start Mapping' or click on the box, which reads 'Pro-Map Mode OFF'.
6. A box will appear asking whether you want to create a new mapping session file (default), overwrite the last session
   (if you mapped since the software was started) or overwrite another session (this will allow you to select a previous
   session from a list).
7. The next box allows you to type a description for this mapping session. You do not have to include a date or time in
   this as the software logs that automatically. Your description should be long enough to allow you to identify the
   mapping session from a list later on.
8. Mapping will now start. The mapping info pane on the top-right corner of the realtime screen should turn green and
   display 'Pro Map Mode ON'.
9. A blue box should appear on the map spreadsheet. This indicates the sites being used by the ECU. The darker the
   blue, the closer the ECU is to a site. When the ECU is running part way between sites the blue colour is distributed
   across the sites to indicate how much each site affects the output of the map. You do not have to look at the map
   windows to map. You can minimize all the map windows on screen in order to view the realtime display and use this
   to determine which map sites you are on.
10.Adjust the engine parameters to move the mapping cursor around the spreadsheet to the desired sites. Get as
   close to each site as possible.
11.Adjust the trim values using the mapping box until the engine is at optimal performance for this site on the map.
   Now press the SPACE bar to record the mapping hit. Various parts of the software should flash green to indicate
   that there has been a hit and the hit count in the top-right corner of the screen should increase by one. The current
   site on the spreadsheet should turn green to indicate that this site has been mapped.
12.Repeat this for all required sites.
13.Stop mapping by going to the 'Mapping' menu and selecting 'Stop Mapping' or click on the mapping pane, which
   reads 'Pro Map Mode ON'.
14.Go back to the map window (restore it if you have minimized it).
15.The map should now contain a green site for each mapping hit. Import the map data now or at a later date by
   getting the map from the ECU, clicking on the 'Import' menu item, selecting the mapping session and clicking OK.
   The data will then be inserted into the map and can be sent to the ECU.


13.5 Using Direct-Map

The full detailed procedure for using Direct-Map is described below:

1. If Direct-Map is not currently selected (look at the box in the top right corner of the realtime screen), go to the
   'Mapping' menu and select 'Choose Strategy'. Select 'Direct-Map' from the list and click 'OK'. If Direct-Map is not in
   the list, it may be disabled in the current user profile. See User Profiles for more information.
2. Get each map that you want to map in this session from the ECU by going to the 'Data' menu and using 'Get Data'.
3. For each map on screen that you want to map, click the map windows 'Mapping DISABLED' menu item so that it
   reads 'Mapping ENABLED'.
4. If your mapping box is not setup, go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Setup Mapping Box'. See the section 'Setting
   up a Mapping Box' for more details.
5. Now go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Start Mapping' or click on the box, which reads 'Direct-Map Mode OFF'.
6. A box will appear asking whether you want to create a new mapping session file (default), overwrite the last session
   (if you mapped since the software was started) or overwrite another session (this will allow you to select a previous
   session from a list).
7. The next box allows you to type a description for this mapping session. You do not have to include a date or time in
   this as the software logs that automatically. Your description should be long enough to allow you to identify the
   mapping session from a list later on.
8. Mapping will now start. The mapping info pane on the top-right corner of the realtime screen should turn green and
   display 'Direct Map Mode ON'.
9. A blue box should appear on the map spreadsheet. This indicates the sites being used by the ECU. The darker the
   blue, the closer the ECU is to a site. When the ECU is running part way between sites the blue colour is distributed
   across the sites to indicate how much each site affects the output of the map. You do not have to look at the map
   windows to map. You can minimize all the map windows on screen in order to view the realtime display and use this
   to determine which map sites you are on.
10.Adjust the engine parameters to move the mapping cursor around the spreadsheet to the desired sites. Get as
   close to each site as possible.
11.Adjust the trim values using the mapping box until the engine is at optimal performance for this site on the map.
   Now press the SPACE bar to record the mapping hit. Various parts of the software should flash green to indicate
   that there has been a hit and the hit count in the top-right corner of the screen should increase by one. The current
   site on the spreadsheet should turn dark green to indicate that this site has been direct-mapped. The value on the
   spreadsheet should change to the new mapped value. This value will be sent to the ECU once you have left this
   site. When this happens there is a short pause as the new value is written to the ECU and the site should turn bright
   green to indicate that the data has been sent.
12.Repeat this for all required sites.
13.Stop mapping by going to the 'Mapping' menu and selecting 'Stop Mapping' or click on the mapping pane, which
   reads 'Direct Map Mode ON'.
14.Go back to the map window (restore it if you have minimized it).
15.The map should now contain a green site for each mapping hit. The new ECU data will have be sent to the ECU
   during mapping. If you need to, you can import the data into the map at a later data by getting the map from the
   ECU, clicking on the 'Import' menu item, selecting the mapping session and then sending the map to the ECU.


Importing Mapping Data

The mapping values created during mapping using Quick Map, Pro Map or Direct Map are stored on disk in a
mapping session file. You can recall this data at anytime in order to insert it into a map and send the map to the ECU.
Importing data is an essential part of Pro Mapping, but should not be necessary in Quick Mapping or Direct Mapping
unless the mapped map has been reset to its original state before mapping took place.

To import a mapping session into a map

Get the map from a device by using 'Get Data' in the 'Data' menu. Click on the 'Import' menu item on the map window.
Select the mapping session from the list and click OK. If the mapping session is applicable to this map, the mapped
site values should now appear as yellow on the spreadsheet. The map can now be edited and sent to the ECU.

To view the data associated with a mapped site

Move the spreadsheet cursor to the mapped site and right-click on it. Select 'View Imported Data' from the menu. All
stored information about the site will be shown in a dialog box.


Managing Mapping Sessions

During mapping with Quick Map, Pro Map or Direct Map, mapping hit data is recorded to files on disk in the Mapping
Sessions folder in the software folder. You can manipulate these files by using the 'Manage Mapping Sessions' menu
item in the 'Mapping' menu.

To view the properties of a mapping session

Go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Manage Mapping Sessions'.

Select the description of the mapping session from the list and click on 'Properties'. A box will appear that shows you
the filename, date, time, strategy and other information about the mapping session.

To delete a mapping session

Go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Manage Mapping Sessions'.

Note: When you delete a mapping session, the associated file is deleted. The file is not placed in the Recycle Bin and
is therefore permanently deleted.
Select the description of the mapping session and click on 'Remove'. Read the warning and then proceed to delete the
file.

To export a mapping session

Go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Manage Mapping Sessions'.

When exporting a mapping session, the software makes a copy of the mapping session file and saves it as a user
specified filename and location. To do this, select the description of the mapping session that you want to export and
click on 'Export'. Use the file dialog box to select a location and filename and click 'Save'.

To import a mapping session

Go to the 'Mapping' menu and select 'Manage Mapping Sessions'.

When importing a mapping session, the software makes a copy of a user specified file and places it in the mapping
session list. To do this, click on 'Import' and then select a .log file with the file dialog box and click 'Open'. If the file is a
valid mapping session file, the imported mapping session should now appear in the list.


14. Logging (Data Acquision and Analysis)

14.1 Overview




With an ECU connected and a realtime page displayed, the software logs the values of all the realtime parameters on
the page into memory. This data can then be saved to a file on disk and graphed at a later time. The status bar at the
bottom of the screen shows the size of the logged data and the time that logging has been running for.

The logged data in memory is cleared and logging reset whenever the following events occur:
   1. 'Reset' is selected from the 'Logging' menu.
   2. The user opens or moves to another realtime page.
   3. The software is closed.

Only the parameters on the current realtime page are logged. If you want to log a parameter, you add it to a realtime
page and reset logging.
Storing Logged Data

The logging system is automatically started when an ECU is connected and a realtime page is shown. The logger will
continue to store data until an overflow limit is reached (currently half a megabyte of data) at which point the logger
will begin to overwrite the start of the logged data.

To log a specific set of parameters

Add the required parameters to either the current realtime page or a new realtime page. Display the page and select
'Reset' from the 'Logging' menu to clear the memory buffer.

To save the logged data to disk

Go to the 'Logging' menu and select 'Save Data'. By default the two files associated with logged data are stored in the
Logging Sessions folder in the software folder. It is recommended that you keep all your logging sessions in this
directory. Select a filename for the logged data and click 'Save' to write the data to disk.

To clear logged data

Go to the 'Logging' menu and select 'Reset'. You should find that the logging time and size restarts from zero.


Graphing Logged Data

Access the graphing tool by selecting 'Graph Data' from the 'Logging' menu. Use the file dialog to select the filename
of the logged data that you want to view.

The logging system is divided into three windows:

1. The data window. This shows the logged data as a series of line graphs. Time relative to the start of logging is
   shown as the horizontal axis. Two of the logged parameters are selected as vertical axes on the left and right sides
   of the graph and the parameters are labelled at the top of these axes. Surrounding the graph are four rulers, top,
   bottom, left and right. These rulers can be positioned to show the approximate value of a position on each axis.
2. The parameter window. This lists the logged parameters together with their line colours, units and current value at
   the position of the bottom ruler.
3. The zoom window. This allows you to zoom into the graph vertically and horizontally and move the zoomed window
   around the graph.
The base axis is a relative time axis showing the time since start of logging in hours:minutes:seconds.milliseconds
format.
By default the graph data is displayed non-interpolated. This means that the points on the line are not joined up with
straight gradients and constantly varying values will have a step or staircase appearance when the graph is zoomed
in. This reflects the actual resolution of the logged data as the size of the steps shows the time span between real
samples. If you want the software to draw straight-lines between the points, go to the graph windows 'File' menu and
check the 'View Graph As Interpolated?' menu item.

To graph logged data

Access the graphing tool by selecting 'Graph Data' from the 'Logging' menu. Use the file dialog to select the filename
of the logged data that you want to view.

To match lines on the graph to logged parameters

Match the colour of the line on the graph to the coloured blocks listed on the left on the parameter window next each
parameter.

To toggle whether a parameter is displayed or not

Go to the parameter window and click on the name of a parameter to turn its display on or off. A coloured box
indicating the graph line colour is shown next to parameters, which are being displayed.
Right clicking on the parameter in the parameter window and selecting 'Toggle Display' is another way to switch graph
lines on and off.

To find the value of logged parameters at a particular time

Click and hold the left mouse button down on the time box of the bottom ruler. Drag the ruler left and right. The time
box will show the approximate time that the ruler position corresponds to. In the parameter window, the value of the
graphed logged parameters is displayed and changes as the ruler is moved.

To find the value of a particular point on the graph

Use the horizontal and vertical rulers to cross over at a particular point on the graph. Read off the ruler values at that
point. The values are approximate and their accuracy is proportional to how big the graph is on screen and how much
you have zoomed in to the graph.

To change the parameters used for the left and right axis

Go to the parameter you want to use for one of the side axis on the parameter window and right-click on it. From the
menu that appears, click on either 'Use as Left Axis' or 'Use as Right Axis'. The axis scale should now match the
selected parameter.

To change the colour and line style of the graph lines

Go to the parameter in the parameter window whose line style you want to change and right-click on it. Select 'Line
Properties' from the menu. The box that appears allows you to select a colour, thickness (width) and style for the
graph line of the parameter.

To swap the colours of two lines

Go to one of the parameters in the parameter window whose line style you want to change and right-click on it. Select
'Line Properties' from the menu. Change the colour to the colour of the other line that you want to swap with. Click OK
and a message box will ask you whether you want to swap the line colours. Click Yes.

To zoom in to the graph

On the zoom window you have a horizontal pair of buttons and a vertical pair of buttons. Pressing the horizontal plus
button, zooms in, reducing the time interval displayed on the graph. Pressing the horizontal minus button, zooms out,
increasing the time interval displayed on the graph. The vertical buttons work in the same way for the vertical axis.
The rectangular scroll area in the zoom window shows what area of the total graph is being displayed in the graph
window.

To move the zoomed area on the graph

Once you have zoomed in on the graph you can click and hold the left mouse button on the raised rectangle in the
zoom window and move the mouse around. This changes which part of the graph is currently being displayed in the
graph window.

To view the graph as interpolated values (drawing straight lines between points)

Go to the logging graph windows 'File' menu and check the 'View Graph As Interpolated?' menu item.

To view the graph as noninterpolated values (show with real logging resolution)

Go to the logging graph windows 'File' menu and uncheck the 'View Graph As Interpolated?' menu item.

Processing Logged Data

The file menu on the logging chart window provides options for manipulating logging data. The options include:

1. Save Subset. This enables you to create a new logged data file from the current file, which contains less parameter
   data and/or a subsection of the logged time. This is useful for focusing on a particular area of some logged data.
2. Make Excel File. You can use this function to create a data file based on the logged data, which can be imported
   using Excel, or any other application that can read Comma Separated Value (CSV) files.
3. Delete. This enables you to permanently delete the files associated with this logged data.

To save a subset of the logged data

Select the time range of the subsection that you want to save by dragging the top and bottom rulers on the graph
window. If you want to save the entire time range of the file, make sure that the top and bottom rulers are positioned at
the start and end of the fully zoomed out graph.
Select 'Save Subset' from the 'File' menu on the graph window.
The time range to save start and end points are show in two edit boxes labelled new start and new end. The format of
the time values is +hours:minutes:seconds.milliseconds. The full range of the graph is also displayed. You can edit the
time range that you want to save using these boxes. If you enter a single value, the value will be interpreted as
seconds and reformatted accordingly. Entering a value followed by a colon followed by another value will be
interpreted as minutes and seconds, and so on.
Below the time range boxes is a list of all the logged parameters. Those highlighted in the list will be included in the
subset. By default, the parameters displayed on the graph will be highlighted and those that are not will not be
highlighted. You can highlight all the items in the list by clicking on the 'Select All' button. Toggle individual items in the
list by clicking on them.
Click OK to continue or Cancel to cancel the operation.
A file dialog box will appear which enables you to specify a filename for the new logged data. You can overwrite the
original logged data by selecting it as the filename.
A new logged data file will now be saved to disk, which represents a subset of the current graphed data. To view this
file, exit the current graph and select the file from the 'Graph Data' item in the 'Logging' menu.

To make an Excel compatible file

The file produced will be a CSV (Comma Separated Value) file. This is basically a text file, which lists rows of values
separated by commas. The time axis will be vertical (row for each time interval) with the parameter data as columns.
Go to the logging graph windows 'File' menu and select 'Make Excel File'.
A box will appear which enables you to control how the file will be produced. These options are explained below:
1. Time axis sample interval in milliseconds. This controls the resolution of the time axis produced in the file. An
    interval of 1 millisecond will produce 1000 spreadsheet rows for every second of logged data. This may produce a
    very large file for a long period of logging. Increasing the interval will reduce the resolution of the time axis and the
    number of spreadsheet rows produced. However logging events (a parameter going from one value and back
    again) that completely occur within this interval may be ignored. Due to the overheads of ECU and PC processing it
    is extremely unlikely that any logging events that occur completely within a period of time less than 10 milliseconds
    will have been recorded in the first place and therefore this could be considered as a reasonable basic interval
    value for most purposes.
2. Time axis offset. By default the time axis produced in the file will start at zero milliseconds. If you want it to start at a
    later time, enter it in this box. Note that this offset doesn't start at a later time in the logged data; it simply controls
    the time axis produced in the file.
3. Time axis units. Use the drop down list to indicate whether the time axis should be displayed in milliseconds or
    seconds.
4. The 'in parameter labels include' check boxes. The file produced will have a header for each parameter column.
    Use these check boxes to display how much information is included in this header.
When you have edited the options, click OK to continue or click Cancel to cancel the operation.
A file dialog box will appear which enables you to select the location and name of the csv file to save. Select the
filename and click 'Save'.
A box will now appear which informs you of the spreadsheet dimensions for the file. Pay particular attention to the
number of rows. If this is too large for your purposes, answer No to the box and reduce the amount of data, either by
using the Save Subset function to trim unwanted data or by increasing the time axis sample interval. If you want to
write the file, answer Yes to the message box.
The CSV file should now be written to disk after a short pause. To import the file into Excel, go to the 'File' menu,
select 'Open' and change the listed files to include .csv files. Now find the .csv file produced by the software and click
'Open'. This should open a worksheet, which can be cut and pasted into other worksheets as required.

To delete the current logged data

Note Deleting the current logged data will destroy the logging files associated with it. These files are not placed in the
Recycle Bin and are therefore permanently deleted.

Go to the 'File' menu on the logging graph window and select 'Delete'. Read the warning and then proceed to delete
the file.
15. Tools and System Specific Functions

15.1 Overview

Apart from the main mapping, editing and logging features, the software provides several tools and functions for
controlling and manipulating ECUs and Chipfiles. The following sections explain the use of these tools.

15.2 Search For Devices

This function forces the software to check the serial ports that it is set to search on to find ECUs. This is not usually
required, but could possibly help with some comms problems.

Go to the 'File' menu and select 'Search For Devices'. The software will reset communications with the serial ports.


15.3 Device Info (chip comments)

ECUs and Chipfiles can store a small amount of text, which acts as a comment field. In this comment you can enter
information, which explains the state of an ECU or chipfile. Selecting Device Info allows you to view and edit these
comment fields.

Go to the 'Data' menu and select 'Device Info'.

Select the device that you want to edit the comment field of.

A box will appear displaying the comment for that device. Note that if you are using the wrong configuration file for
your ECU or chipfile, this information may be garbled and editing may affect other areas of ECU data such as maps.

Edit the comment using the edit box. Each comment field has a maximum limit for the amount of text it can contain.
The edit box will prevent you from typing beyond this limit.

When you have finished editing the comment click OK and select a device to send it to.


15.4 Set Default Data

Setting up features inside the ECU often requires that several maps and setup parameters are filled with valid or initial
data. 'Set Default Data' sends default map data to ECUs and chipfiles to assist in this.

Whether default setups are available or not will depend upon the ECU type and software release. It requires that your
current configuration supports this feature and that default chipfiles are installed on your installation. It is possible that
there are no default setups for your configuration.

To use, go to 'Set Default Data' in the 'Data' menu.

A dialog box will appear. The box at the top of the dialog shows all the default setups available for this configuration.
The default setups are arranged in a tree structure or hierarchy. Below the selection box is a comment field. When you
select a default setup from the tree, this box will show the description of the setup.

Once you have selected a default setup from the tree press the 'Proceed' button to continue or 'Cancel' button to
cancel the operation. Now select a device to send the default setup.

The software will then show a list of all the maps and other parameters that will be changed by using this default
setup. Check the list and then click on 'OK' to write the new data or 'Cancel' to cancel the operation.
15.5 Device Hex Dump

This tool is provided in order to view all the ECU data within a device as hexadecimal data. This ex dump is shown as
a list of the address locations within the device memory and the value of the byte at each location in both hexadecimal
and ASCII form. Note that this function does not alter the data in the device. To use:

1. Select 'Device Hex Dump' from the 'Tools' menu.
2. A 'Select Device' dialog box will appear. Choose from the list of devices the device you want to look at, or click
   cancel to exit the function.
3. The software will now fetch the entire ECU data in the chosen device into memory. This may take sometime for an
   ECU device.
4. After a short wait, the device hex dump will appear on the screen. The first locations are at the top of the window.
   Each line shows the offset address of the first byte of the line at the start of the line. Following this are the next 16
   bytes in hexadecimal. The same 16 bytes are then shown as ASCII characters.
5. You can use the scroll bar on the box to scroll down the hex dump. You can also click inside the box to position the
   cursor and use the arrow and Page-Up/Page-Down keys to scroll through the data.
6. Click 'OK' when you are finished.


15.6 Compare Devices

The compare devices tool is used to check the consistency of data across an ECU and a chipfile or two chipfiles.

To use, go to the 'Tools' menu and select 'Compare Devices'. A device selection dialog box will appear which allows
you to select the first device. Following this, another device selection box will appear which allows you to select the
second device.

The data will now be fetched from each device and after a pause the result of the comparison should appear in a
separate window.

The compared devices are referred to A (the first device you selected) and B (the second). The names of the two
devices are defined at the top of the report. After this, every parameter that differs across the two devices will be listed
as title followed by data.

Single value parameters are shown as the value in device A followed by the value in device B. If the parameter is
numeric, the difference between the two values is also shown.

With maps, every site on the map that differs across the two devices is listed. For each site a line is shown. The first
item on this line is the coordinates of the site as non-indexed linear values, horizontal first and vertical second. If the
map is indexed, the values of the index maps at this site for devices A and B are shown next. This is followed by the
site values for devices A and B in scaled engineering units with the raw hexadecimal value in brackets. The difference
between the values in A and B is shown at the end of the line.

At the end of the report, the comments for each device are shown.

Press the close box on the report window when finished.

Advanced Compare Devices

This function provides extra functionality to the compare devices function.

To use, go to the 'Tools' menu and select 'Compare Devices'. A device selection dialog box will appear which allows
you to select the first device. Following this, another device selection box will appear which allows you to select the
second device.

The compare devices dialog box should now appear. At the top of this box, is shown the two devices (A and B) that
you selected. Below this is a parameter tree for each device. Inside these parameter trees, every parameter that
differs across the two devices is displayed. Below the parameter trees is a box that shows how many parameters
differ in the two devices.

You can load maps and other parameters for viewing by selecting a parameter from one of the parameter trees and
clicking on the 'View' button for that device. A map window should appear with the selected data for that device. Use
the checkbox at the bottom of the dialog box to control whether single value parameters are uploaded as groups or
not.

Selecting parameters and clicking on the 'Report' button produces an individual report for that parameter across the
two devices. See 'Compare Devices' for a description of the format of this report.

Clicking on the 'Full Report' button has the same effect as selecting 'Compare Devices' from the 'Tools' menu. See
'Compare Devices' for help on this.
Click on 'Exit' when finished with this function.


15.7 PIN Control

If you are working in a multi-user environment, you may wish to prevent unauthorized access to map data. Usually any
person with an ECU/chipfile and a copy of the mapping software can access the data inside that ECU/chipfile.
However, the software allows you to set a four-digit PIN code (Personal Identification Number) inside a particular ECU
or chipfile. After this code has been set, any attempt to read and write data to the device or perform any kind of
function that alters ECU code or data will be blocked until the user enters the correct PIN code. Once the correct PIN
code is entered, the user is then free to access the device until either the mapping software is restarted or the PIN
code is changed or removed. Once this happens, the PIN code will be required again for further access.

It is important to note that once a PIN code has been set inside a device it cannot be removed without knowing the
current code. This ensures that the security system cannot be bypassed. A consequence of this is that if you forget
the PIN code for a device, you will not be able to access the data inside the device. PIN coded ECUs may have to be
returned to the ECU manufacturer for unlocking. However, if you have PIN coded an ECU, but previous to doing this
you backed up the ECU data in a chipfile, you can select 'Erase Device' from the tools menu and then erase the
contents of the ECU. After that you can download the chipfile to the ECU and the device should then be unlocked.

PIN codes are communicative, that is, they are transferred with map data when using the 'Transfer Chip Data' function
in the 'Chipfile' menu. Therefore, if you have a PIN coded ECU and copy the data into a chipfile, this chipfile is now
protected with the same PIN code. The software allows you to transfer chipfiles that are PIN coded into ECUs without
knowing the PIN code for that chipfile. However, the ECU will then be PIN coded as well, and you cannot view or edit
maps in either device unless you know the code.

To PIN Code a device that has no current code

Select 'PIN Control' from the 'Tools' menu. When the 'Select Device' dialog box appears, select the device that you
want to PIN code from the list. The PIN code dialog box will appear.

Leave the OLD code box blank and type in a four-digit number in the NEW CODE and CONFIRM CODE boxes. Click
'Set PIN Code' to protect the device or press 'Cancel' to exit without making changes.

To change the PIN code in a device

Select 'PIN Control' from the 'Tools' menu. When the 'Select Device' dialog box appears, select the device that you
want to change the PIN code of, from the list. The PIN code dialog box will appear.

Enter the old code into the OLD CODE box. Enter the new code into the NEW CODE and CONFIRM CODE box. Click
'Set PIN Code' to change to the new code or press 'Cancel' to exit without making changes.

To remove the PIN code from a device

Select 'PIN Control' from the 'Tools' menu. When the 'Select Device' dialog box appears, select the device that you
want to remove the PIN code from; from the list. The PIN code dialog box will appear.

Enter the old code into the OLD CODE box. Leave the other two boxes blank. Click 'Set PIN Code' to remove the
current code or click 'Cancel' to exit without making changes.


15.8 Erase Device

You can use the 'Erase Device' function to scramble the data inside an ECU or fill a chipfile with blank data. If you
have forgotten the PIN code for your ECU and you have the ECU data backed up in a chipfile, you can use this
function on the ECU to disable the PIN coding and then copy the data to it from a chipfile (Chipfile menu – Transfer
Chip Data). Note that using 'Erase device' to erase a chipfile does not delete the file itself, it simply fills it with 'blank'
data. Use the 'Delete' menu item in the 'Chipfile' menu to delete the file.

Warning! Erasing a device will leave it in an unusable state until it is filled with valid data from another device. When a
device is erased, the data is permanently lost.

If you erase an ECU, it must not be managing an engine at the time of the erase. Attempting to do this will damage the
engine.
Go to the 'Tools' menu and select 'Erase Device'. Read the warning message and then continue. Select the device
that you want to erase from the device selection box. If you want to clear a chipfile from disk, select 'Other Chipfile'
and use the file dialog box to select the file. When the confirm box appears, type ERASE in the text box and click on
the Erase button to perform the operation.


15.9 Download ECU Code

To change the code in the ECU you must first be supplied with a program code file from your software supplier. This
should be located in one of the folders on your hard-drive or USB key, etc.

Warning! The ECU must not be managing an engine when you download code to the ECU. Attempting to do this may
damage the engine.
Important! Shut down all other applications before performing a code download.

1. Select 'Download ECU Code' from the 'Tools' menu.
2. Read the warning message and then click on 'Continue'.
3. Click on the 'Select File.' button. A file dialog box will appear. Find the code file that you want to download to your
   system and click 'Open'.
4. Choose a baud rate (download speed) from the list of options available. Unless you are directed otherwise you can
   use the highest baud rate there. If you know that the connection is unreliable, either wait until you have a reliable
   connection (strongly recommended), or select a slower baud rate.
5. Click 'Proceed' to start the download or 'Abort' to cancel the operation.

If an error message appears immediately after pressing proceed, it is likely that your ECU does not support code
downloads. If this is not the case then check the communications link with the ECU.
The software may inform you that it doesn't recognize the ECU and will ask you for an ECU type. If you do not know
the type to select then you should seek advice before continuing.
Once the code download has started the code erase stage then the code download cannot be reversed. Any failures
at this stage may leave the ECU in an unpredictable state. If the ECU fails to operate after a code download it may be
necessary to perform a reboot. Seek advice from your ECU distributor.


15.10 Reboot ECU

This function is used to restore an ECU to an operational state after a terminal failure such as a failed code download
or some other problem that corrupts the code inside the ECU.

Important! You must only use this function under advice from a registered distributor. Using this function on an
operating ECU may cause it to fail. Rebooting will be very rarely required and so you should never casually
experiment with this feature. Many ECUs do not support code downloads or ECU reboots. Some ECUs may require
hardware intervention in order to reboot and therefore reboots can only be performed by the ECU manufacturer.

Before attempting the reboot, it is necessary to switch off device searching. Go to the 'Options' menu and select
'Preferences'. Remove all ticks next to the COM port names, click OK and restart the software.

Warning! You must make sure that the ECU is disconnected from the engine before using this function.

To use, go to the 'Data' menu and select 'Reboot ECU'.

A box will appear that allows you to select the type of ECU to reboot, the code file to download as the application code
and a speed to perform the download at.
Important! It is essential that the type of ECU selected is exact. You should seek advice if you do not know what type
to select.

Select the code file by clicking on the 'Browse' button and using the file dialog to open the file.

You can use the fastest baud rate available unless advised to do otherwise.

When you are ready to proceed, click 'Reboot'. A box may appear stating that the id of the ECU is not recognized and
allowing you to select an appropriate id. Seek advice if you do not know what id to use.

During the reboot process a report box appears which shows you the progress of the reboot. If there are any errors,
these will be displayed in a report at the end.

Once the reboot is complete, switch device search back on by going to the 'Options' menu, selecting 'Preferences',
checking the COM port option appropriate for your PC, click OK and restart the software. The ECU should now be
restored to an operational state.


15.11 Adaptive Map Control

If appropriate for your ECU, functions may be listed in the tools menu for manipulating adaptive maps. The two
common functions are:

Zero/Reset Adaptive Maps.

This function allows you to automatically set the values in the ECU adaptive maps to zero. This is usually done before
the adaptation process starts. If two options are provided, 'Zero Adaptive Maps' and 'Reset Adaptive Maps', these two
functions do the same job with 'Zeroing' being performed by the software and 'Resetting' being performed by the ECU.

To use, go to the 'Tools' menu and select 'Zero Adaptive Maps' or 'Reset Adaptive Maps'. If 'Zero Adaptive Maps' is
used, you have to select a device to zero the adaptive maps of.

Merge then Zero Adaptive Maps.

Once an adaptive map is produced by the adaptive process in the ECU, it can then be combined with other maps.
This function will automatically do this.
To use, go to the 'Tools' menu and select 'Merge then Zero Adaptive Maps'. Select a device to use as the source of
the adaptive maps and the maps to merge. You may then be able to select the maps to merge, although this option
will not be presented if there are only a limited number of adaptable maps in the ECU.

The merge process should now start; this may take some time, as many data transfers are required.

After the process is complete, the adapted maps are shown on screen. The sites on the maps spreadsheet are colour
coded to show the effect of the adaptation. The sites coloured red show an increase in the values of the maps
(positive adaptation). Sites coded blue show a decrease in the values of the maps (negative adaptation). You do not
need to send these maps to the device (unless you want to edit the maps) as this has already been done by the
software.


15.13 Comm Port Test

The Comm Port Test function is provided for you to analyse the COM (serial ports) on your system.

Note that realtime features such as logging, monitoring and mapping are disabled while the com port test dialog box is
in use.

The test function will test all existing COM ports from 1 to 6 on your computer. Typically, the average PC will have only
one or two external serial ports and will have COM3 and COM4 reserved for internal devices such as modems.
External serial ports will be male D-type connectors, 9-way for COM1 and either 9-way or 25-way for COM2, if it
exists.

Go to 'Comm Port Test' on the 'Tools' menu. A dialog box will appear. You can now either click 'Test' to run the test or
'Exit' to close the dialog box.
When you click on 'Test' the application will pause while it runs through the test routine. The test should only take
around 10 seconds. There are four possible reports for each COM port:

1. An ECU device is found on the port and the device ID is returned.
2. The port failed to open, either because it doesn't exist on your system or is being used by another application.
3. The port opened, but nothing is connected to it.
4. The port opened and a loop-back (see below) was detected.

A loop-back is when the data sent out of the port is received back into the same port. You can use this to test the
COM port. Take a bare serial plug (one with the pins exposed) and short-out pins 2 and 3. You must make sure that
you do not short out any other pins. Connect the plug to the COM port and run the test. If the port is working properly,
a loop-back should be detected.

Note that some devices, such as modems and terminals, echo data back to the sender and will create a loop-back.
If your port is not working, you can check that it is setup properly by going to Start / Settings / Control Panel / System /
Device Manager / Ports, clicking on the icon for the port in question and clicking on 'Properties'. The dialog box should
tell you whether the port is working properly.




16. Software Options

16.1 Preferences

The preferences dialog box allows you to adjust global features of the software. The preferences box is split into
sections, selected by clicking on the tabs at the top of the box. Each section is described below:

Communications

Map Transfer Upper Baud Rate.

This is the speed at which the software will try to get map data from the ECU. The default speed is 19200 baud. If you
experience persistent problems with getting map data from the ECU, i.e. it keeps failing mid-transfer; you could try
selecting a slower baud rate (smaller number). If you are experiencing persistent problems, you should check the
connector leads for faults and possible interference.
If your connection is proving to be very reliable, you could try increasing the speed to boost performance (select a
bigger number). If you start to get frequent transfer problems, reduce the speed again.
You have to restart the software for changes to the speed to take effect.

Map Transfer Packet Size.

This is the largest chunk of map data that the software will attempt to get from the ECU in one go. The default is 4096
bytes (4 Kb). Change this according to the same guidelines as described above for the upper baud rate. Unreliable
connections may need a smaller number; reliable connections can use a bigger number. In most cases, setting this
number to its maximum (64 Kb) is reasonable.
You have to restart the software for changes to the value to take effect.

Auto-Search For Devices

This is an important section because it controls what COM (serial) ports are checked by the software when searching
for ECUs. Many computers may have only one external COM port (COM1). Some may have two (COM1 and COM2).
For best results, choose a serial port that you want to connect your ECU to (if there is only one it will have to be
COM1) and place a tick by port number in this preferences dialog box. Make sure that no other port boxes are ticked.
The more boxes are ticked, the slower the software will run when there is no ECU connected, because the more work
it has to do to search for ECUs. Also, if you select non-existent, or internal ports, it can stop searching properly and
may not find ECUs.
If you don't select any COM ports, the software will not search for ECUs. This can be useful if you want to use the
software without an ECU and you want maximum performance. Remember to turn the searching back on again when
you want to connect an ECU.
You have to restart the software for changes to these settings to take effect.
Colours

This section allows you to change the colours used for the graph interface in map editing windows. The current
colours are shown and can be changed by clicking on the 'Select' buttons. Note that The 'All-lines mode colour' also
forms the base colour for the 3D graph mode.

Updates to the colour scheme are only made to map windows loaded after the changes have been made. Map
windows already on screen will still use the old colours.

It is recommended that you keep the graph line colours the same or similar to the original settings. Radically altering
these colours may make phone support difficult when trying to describe the contents of map windows.

Configuration

These two options control the configuration behaviour of the software. You can uncheck 'Auto load configuration file' if
you need to prevent the software from selecting a configuration file at start-up. You can uncheck the 'Prefer EC2'
option if you need to work with legacy configuration files.
It is strongly recommended that you leave both these items checked when unless advised otherwise. The software
should be allowed to select the best file on start-up and the correct operation of the software is not guaranteed when it
is configured from legacy ECF files.
You have to restart the software for changes to these settings to take effect.

Miscellaneous

The 'Default display mode is Always on Top for data windows' checkbox selects the default mode for displaying map
and data windows. When this item is checked, windows always open so that they are constantly in front of non-map
windows. This stops the data from disappearing from the screen when you need to switch between windows. If this is
a problem, because a data window is obscuring a window that you need to see, you can disable this option. You can
also toggle this option on individual data windows by going to the 'Windows' menu on that window and selecting
'Always On Top'.

The 'Save Map Window States' checkbox allows you to enable or disable the feature of the software, which displays
each map window in the same state as when the map was last loaded. If you disable this feature, the maps will be
displayed in the default state when loaded. Use the 'Clear Map States' button to reset all maps to their original states.

The default folder checkbox and edit box allows you to specify and use an initial folder to start in when using file dialog
boxes, e.g., opening chipfiles, page files, etc.


15.2 Language

The software can be setup to be used in a different language. To select a language and see what languages are
available on your installation, go to the 'Options' menu and select 'Language'. A list of languages will appear. Select
one from the list and click 'OK'. Restarting the software shouldn't be necessary.


16.3 Background

The lowest 'layer' of the realtime screen is the background. You can customize this, either for aesthetic reasons or to
suit the lighting conditions of your screen. The background can consist of a solid background colour, a bitmap image
or a combination of both.

Go to the 'Background' menu item in the 'Options' menu. Here you can select the background colour and/or bitmap
image.

The background colour rectangle shows the current background colour. Click 'Select' change select a different colour.
The colour dialog box shows a series of fixed colours and also allows you to create your own. Click 'Restore' to
change the colour back to the default colour.

Bitmap images can be in four display states:

1. Not displayed at all.
2. Displayed in the centre of the window.
3. Displayed tiled, which means that the bitmap, if smaller than the screen is repeated all over it.
4. Displayed stretched, which means that the bitmap image is resized to fit the size of the window exactly.

Note that displaying a large bitmap with lots of colours will noticeably reduce the speed performance of the software.

On the background dialog, click 'Browse' to select the bitmap image. The image must be in Windows bitmap format
(.bmp extension).

Use the alignment box to select the display mode of the bitmap.

Click OK when you have finished.


16.5 Select User Profile

A user profile is a customized mode of the software, which restricts access, and display of certain features, either to
simplify the software for novice users or as a security feature.

In a user profile, menu items, toolbar buttons, boxes on the info and status bars, maps and other parameters in the
ECU, mapping strategies and various other features can be blocked or hidden from view.

The current operating user profile is shown in the bottom right corner of the realtime screen. The top level profile is
always present on the system and is called the 'Master' profile. If this is selected the software is in a totally
unrestricted mode, i.e. all features, menus, maps and parameters are available for use.

Some user profiles, may be pass-worded and therefore cannot be selected or edited without knowing the password. If
you do not know the password you should contact your ECU distributor for help.

You can switch between user profiles by going to the 'Options' menu and selecting 'Select User Profile'. Alternatively
you can click on the name of the profile on the bottom right corner of the realtime screen.

A list appears which shows the 'Master' profile at the top and all other installed profiles underneath. Select the
required profile and click 'OK' to activate it. You will be warned if the current profile is pass-worded, as you will not be
able to switch back into the current profile without knowing the password. You may need to enter a password for the
profile that you are selecting. You do not need to restart the software for the new profile to take effect.
You may be supplied with new user profiles (in the form of a .key file) for you to use on your system. You can add
these to your system by selecting 'Select User Profile' from the 'Options' menu, selecting 'Add New' and then selecting
the .key file using the file dialog box.


Edit User Profiles

A user profile is a customized mode of the software, which restricts access, and display of certain features, either to
the software for novice users or as a security feature.
In a user profile, menu items, toolbar buttons, boxes on the info and status bars, maps and other parameters in the
ECU, mapping strategies and various other features can be blocked or hidden from view.
The current operating user profile is shown in the bottom right corner of the realtime screen. The top level profile is
always present on the system and is called the 'Master' profile. If this is selected the software is in a totally
unrestricted mode, i.e. all features, menus, maps and parameters are available for use.
The 'Edit User Profiles' menu item only appears when using the 'Master' profile. It enables you to manipulate the user
profiles installed on the system. This will usually only be done by an authorized distributor.
To use, select 'Edit User Profiles' from the 'Options' menu.
A dialog box appears which shows the current operating user profile followed by a list of all the profiles installed on the
system. The 'Master' profile will always be on the system and at the top of the list.
A list of control options is presented at the right hand-side of the box. Some of these options are only enabled when a
profile is selected from the list and others can only be accessed when the current operating profile is 'Master'.
Described below are the user profile control options available. Click on 'Exit' when finished with editing the user
profiles.

To switch to a new profile

Select the profile from the list and click on the USE button. You will need to enter a password if this profile is pass-
worded.
To remove a user profile

Select the profile from the list and click on 'Remove'. Note that the 'Master' profile or the current operating profile
cannot be removed. You will need to enter a password if the profile is pass-worded.

Note that the file associated with the profile will be permanently deleted.

To export a user profile

When you export a profile a copy of the .key file associated with it is copied and saved as a user specified filename.
This file can then be distributed and added to another system.

Select the profile from the list and click 'Export'. A file dialog box will appear. Use this to select a filename to save the
copy as and click 'Save'.

The exported file can be added to another system by using 'Import' or 'Add New' in the select user profile dialog box.

To import a user profile

When you import a profile a copy of the imported file is made and placed in the user profile list. This profile can then
be used on the system.

Click 'Import' and a file dialog box will appear. Find the profile .key file to import and click 'Open'. The new profile
should now be added to the list.

Note that this is the equivalent of selecting 'Add New' from the 'Select User Profile' menu item in the 'Options' menu.

To duplicate a user profile


You may want to design a new user profile based upon another one. To do this, select the user profile from the list
and click on 'Copy'. A duplicate profile should appear in the list. The title will be distinguished from the original by the
use of a * (asterisk) symbol.


To edit or create a new a user profile

Click 'Add' to create a new user profile or select a profile from the list and click 'Edit' to change an existing one.
You will need to enter a password to edit a pass-worded user profile.

Whether adding a new profile or editing an old one, the edit user profile dialog box will appear. The box is divided into
the following sections, selectable by clicking on the tabs at the top of the box.

1. General. This allows you to select a title and description for the profile and allows you to setup the password
   options.
2. Settings. Allows you to control global features of the software such as mapping strategies and data transfer.
3. Menus. Allows you to select which menus and menu items are visible in this profile.
4. Parameters. Allows you to select which parameters are visible in the current configuration.

If you are editing the 'Master' profile, only the General options will be presented and only the password options are
changeable.
Click on OK when finished editing or Cancel to cancel the changes.

General

The top two boxes allow you to specify a title and description for the profile. If you are creating a new profile, you must
supply these before you can edit the rest of the setup.

The password system is enabled or disabled using the 'Password Controlled' check box. The password is entered
using the two bottom boxes, one to supply the password and one as a confirmation of the password.

Settings
On this page is a list of check boxes, which control global features of the software. You can disable data transfers,
mapping strategies and other features by checking these boxes.

Menus

On this page a tree structure is shown representing the menu system. The menus are shown as folders with the menu
items inside them. If a menu contains one or more items that are locked out in this profile, a key symbol will be shown
on the folder icon.
The menu items can be locked and unlocked as necessary. Locked items are not visible in the menu system and
menus with all items locked will not be shown. A locked menu item is shown in the tree by a key symbol.
To lock or unlock a menu item, select the item and press space or click on the 'Lock/Unlock' button. Entire menus can
be locked/unlocked by selecting the menu folder and pressing space.

Parameters

On this page a tree structure is shown representing the parameter system of the current configuration on the software.
If a parameter group contains one or more parameters that are locked out in this profile, a key symbol will be shown
on the folder icon.
The parameters can be locked and unlocked as necessary. Locked items are not visible when loading data and
parameter groups with all items locked will not be shown. A locked parameter is shown in the tree by a key symbol.
To lock or unlock a parameter, select the item and press space or click on the 'Lock/Unlock' button. Entire groups can
be locked/unlocked by selecting the group and pressing space.
Note that there may be multiple references to a parameter in the tree. Locking or unlocking such a parameter will do
the same to all the references of the parameter.

17. Keyboard Reference

General Keys
CTRL + U                               Get data from device (equivalent to going to the 'Data' menu and selecting 'Get
                                       Data'.
CTRL + S                               Start mapping (equivalent to going to the 'Mapping' menu and selecting 'Start
                                       Mapping').
CTRL + T                               Stop mapping (equivalent to going to the 'Mapping' menu and selecting 'Stop
                                       Mapping').
CTRL + left arrow                      Move to previous window
CTRL + right arrow                     Move to next window
TAB                                    Move to next realtime page
SHIFT+TAB                              Move to previous realtime page

Alphanumeric Panel Keys
To use click on the title bar of an alphanumeric panel and press one of the following:
N                                        Set display to normal mode (scaled engineering units).
H                                        Set display to unscaled hexadecimal.
D                                        Set display to unscaled decimal.
B                                        Set display to unscaled binary

Map Spreadsheet - Basic Editing Keys
Up / down / left / right          Moves cursor around the spreadsheet
SHIFT + Up / down / left / right  Selects an area of the grid
Page Up / Page Down               Increases/Decreases (nudges) the value of the selected cell(s) by 1% of the full
                                  range.
CTRL + Page Up / Page Down        Increases/Decreases the value of the selected cell(s) by 10% of the full range.
SHIFT + Page Up / Page Down       Increases/Decreases the value of the selected cell(s) by the smallest value
                                  possible.
CTRL+SHIFT+Pg Up/Pg Down          Sets to maximum/minimum the value of the selected cell(s).
Escape                            Deselect current selected area / Stop editing.
Numeric and symbol keys           Begins editing current cell.

Map Spreadsheet - Function Keys
F2                              Toggles display of map rows and columns on the graph
F3                              Clears all tagged cells.
F4                              Starts Live Map mode for this map
F6                                     Changes the position/display of the spreadsheet/graph
F8                                     Performs interpolation. If an area is selected on the graph, it interpolates this
                                       area. Otherwise interpolation is performed on the tagged cells.
F9                                     Tags or untags the selected cell(s)
SHIFT + F2                             Cycles through the options for the number of displayed lines on the graph.
SHIFT + F3                             Toggles the 3D mode on the graph.
SHIFT + F5                             Sets up the graph display limits.
SHIFT + F6                             Toggles the zoom mode on the spreadsheet.
SHIFT + F7                             Cycles through the spreadsheet format options
                                       (normal/decimal/hexadecimal/binary).

Map Spreadsheet - Selection and Editing Keys
CTRL + A                         Select entire spreadsheet
CTRL + E                         Select line
CTRL + Q                         Select to start of line from cursor position
CTRL + W                         Select to end of line from cursor position
CTRL + C                         Select selected cell(s)
CTRL + V                         Paste cell(s)
CTRL + Z                         Undo last action

Map Spreadsheet - Location Keys
Home                                   Move cursor to start of line
End                                    Move cursor to end of line
CTRL + Home                            Move cursor to top left corner
CTRL + End                             Move cursor to bottom right corner

Map Spreadsheet - Map Index Control (indexed maps only)
CTRL + I                         Edit line axis value.
Insert                           Add a line after current line.
Delete                           Delete current line.

Map Spreadsheet - Editing commands (entered into a map cell)
Note that references to {a number} indicate a value. Do not type the curly brackets { }. Also note that 'selected cell(s)'
refers to either the cell that the cursor is currently on, or an area of cells that you have selected.
{a number}                                Sets the selected cell(s) to a specified value.

=-{a number}                           Sets the selected cell(s) to a negative number.

+{a number}                            Adds the specified value to the value of the selected cell(s).

-{a number}                            Subtracts the specified value from the value of the selected cell(s).

*{a number}                            Multiplies the specified value with the value of the selected cell(s).

/ {a number}                           Divided the value of the selected cell(s) by the specified number. Zero is
                                       ignored.
%{a number}                            Sets the value of the selected cell(s) to the specified percentage of their original
                                       value(s).
+%{a number}                           Adds the specified percentage of the original selected cell(s) to their value.
                                       (e.g., To add 10% type +%10).
-%{a number}                           Subtracts the specified percentage of the original selected cell(s) from their
                                       value.
*%{a number}                           Multiplies the specified percentage of the original selected cell(s) with their
                                       value.
/%{a number}                           Divides the selected cell(s) with the specified percentage of their original value.

Map Spreadsheet - Miscellaneous Keys
[                                Move splitter bar upwards
]                                Move splitter bar downwards

Parameter Group Editor Keys
Up / down                              Moves cursor to next and previous parameters
Right                                   Starts editing the current parameter
Page Up / Page Down                     Increases/Decreases (nudges) the value of the selected cell(s) by 1% of the full
                                        range.
CTRL + Page Up / Page Down              Increases/Decreases the value of the selected cell(s) by 10% of the full range.
SHIFT + Page Up / Page Down             Increases/Decreases the value of the selected cell(s) by the smallest value
                                        possible.
CTRL+SHIFT+Pg Up/Pg Down                Sets to maximum/minimum the value of the selected cell(s).
Escape                                  Deselect current selected area / Stop editing.
Numeric and symbol keys                 Begins editing current cell.

Windows Keys
ALT + Tab                               Move to next program / select program.
Windows Key + E                         Start Windows Explorer
Windows Key                             Access start menu
ALT                                     Move keyboard focus to the menu bar
ALT + {letter}                          Open menu whose name has the {letter} underscored.
ALT + F4                                Close current window / application
ALT + space                             Open the system menu for this window
F1                                      Open the help contents
Tab                                     Move to the next item in a dialog box


18. Trouble-Shooting

18.1 Problems Installing The Software


My PC does nothing when I put the install disk in the CDROM drive

Windows can be setup so the CD Auto Run feature is disabled. You can either enable auto run on your system and
then reinsert the CD or you can run the setup program manually.
If you want to run the install program manually, go to Start/Run. A box will appear asking you for the program file to
run. Click 'Browse' and a file open dialog box will appear. Change the item in the 'Look in' list box to look at your
CDROM / DVD-ROM drive (this will be drive D: on most systems). In the list of files, find 'Setup' or 'Setup.exe', select
it and then click 'OK'. Now click 'OK' on the run box and the install program should start.
If you want to enable Auto Run in Windows, go to Start/Settings/Control Panel and select the 'System' icon. Now go to
the 'Device Manager' tab and find the CDROM icon. Expand this icon and click on the icon for your CDROM/DVD-
ROM drive. Now click 'Properties' and click on the 'Settings' tab. There is a checkbox called 'Auto insert notification'.
Make sure this is checked and click 'OK'. Windows needs to reboot in order for this change to take effect.

When I put the CD in the drive / manually run setup, instead of the install program starting, a box appears
asking me whether I want to Modify/Repair or Remove The Software.

This is because the software is already installed on this PC. Try selecting Remove and then reinstalling.

The installer reports missing files when going through the install process.

This shouldn't happen, but if it does it is caused by compatibility problems. The best thing to do is to carry on with the
install process (Skip File). Run the software and if there are any problems with it, try uninstalling and the reinstalling.
Contact your distributor for help with persistent installation problems.

The installer reports that a file has failed to self-register.

This indicates that your PC is lacking one or more components that assume to be present at the time of installation.
Continue with the installation and if there are problems running the software, you may need to contact your distributor
for help.


18.2 Problems Uninstalling The Software
Uninstaller reports 'locked' files when removing the software

This is normal. A locked file is a file that has been changed since the program was installed. The original files may
change as you use the software. You can usually click on 'Ignore' and the uninstallation will continue. Locked files are
left unaffected on the hard-drive after uninstallation is complete.


18.3 Problems Starting The Software


Doesn't start and reports a Kernel32.dll : GetDiskFreespace error.

This may happen when you try to run the software on Windows 95 release 1. The software is not specified to run on
Windows 95. You must have at least Windows 98.

Doesn't start and reports an unsupported function or toolbar error, or reports a missing DLL file.

Again, this may happen when trying to run the software on Windows 95. Internet Explorer 4 or later (which is part of
Windows 98) is required for some components of the software to work properly.

Produces an error box that says COM port 'x' is unavailiable.

When starting, the software searches for ECUs on all the computers serial ports on which it is specified to search. If a
serial port doesn't exist or is being used by another application, this error will appear. If you intend to connect an ECU
to this serial port, you must shut-down any applications (including any copies of the software which you have
intentionally or unintentionally opened) which use this COM port. If you don't want to use an ECU on this port and you
want this message to stop appearing when the software starts, go to the 'Options' menu, select 'Preferences' and
deselect the checkbox next to the COM port in question. When you restart, the software will no longer attempt to look
for an ECU on the COM port.

Produces an error that says it cannot find a valid configuration file.

This error should only occur if you connect an ECU to the software for which you have not been supplied any
configuration files for. You cannot start the software without selecting a configuration file. Your only option is to select
a configuration file for another ECU. Choose 'Select File' from the error box, go to the software folder on your hard
disk and select a ECU folder, (e.g. 941). Now select a configuration file from the folder, software should now restart.
Using an incorrect file for a particular ECU will lead to some serious problems when trying to use the ECU. Using a
configuration file for a different type of ECU will almost certainly mean that most maps will be invalid. You should not,
therefore, try to use the ECU with the incorrectly configured software unless you have been advised otherwise. You
should contact your distributor for details on how to obtain the correct upgrade file.

Reports that it cannot find parameters on the page that it is loading.

This happens when the page that is being loaded contains panels on it that reference parameters which cannot be
found in the configuration file. You can either remove the parameters from the page so that you can continue or cancel
loading that page. If you remove the parameters and continue, you will find that the software will ask you whether you
want to save the page when you come to close it. Click 'No' if you don't want the parameters removed from the stored
copy of the page file.


18.4 Problems Communicating with the ECU

Flashes 'No Device' on the screen on startup.

Whenever the software cannot retrieve a valid device identifier from the serial ports that it is searching, it will flash 'No
Device' at the top of the realtime display. Below are the common caused for this:

There is no ECU connected

If there is nothing connected to the serial ports on your PC, the software cannot communicate with anything. The
software can be used with no ECU connected but the realtime display will remain in demo mode and all interaction
must be with chipfiles. You may notice a slight performance loss when using the software with no ECU connected.
This is because the software is dedicating some time to searching for ECUs. If this is a problem you can stop it
searching for any ECUs by de-selecting all COM ports in the 'Preferences' item in the 'Options' menu and restarting
the software. Remember to turn the search back on again before you connect an ECU.

The software is not configured to search on the serial (COM) port that the ECU is connected to

Go to the 'Options' menu and select 'Preferences'. There are a series of check-boxes which indicate which ports the
software is searching for ECUs on. Make sure that the appropriate box is checked, click OK, then close and restart the
software.
There is another copy of the software (or some other application that uses COM ports) running on your system
The software cannot share serial ports with any other application, including other copies of the software that you have
intentionally or unintentionally started. Shut down all other applications using serial ports and try again.

The ECU is connected incorrectly to the PC or the connectors/leads are faulty

If the connection between the ECU and the PC is broken, no data can be transmitted or received. Try reconnecting
the lead from the ECU to the PC serial port. Try testing the leads and connectors with a meter. Any faulty leads or
connectors must be replaced.

The ECU has no power or has low power

The PC does not provide the ECU with any power, even for communications purposes. The ECU must be connected
to the vehicle power source (or other operating level power source) in order to communicate with the PC.

The serial (COM) ports on the PC are broken/wrongly setup

This is unlikely, but you can test the status of your PC's COM ports using the 'Comm Port Test' item 15.14 in the
'Tools' menu. To perform a 'loop-back' test on a Comm port, connect a bare serial plug (one with the pins exposed) to
the port and link pins 2 and 3 together whilst running the test (you must avoid shorting out any other pins). The test
should report a loop back (i.e. the data that the test sent out was received back through the same port). If no loop
back is detected the port may be broken. If the test reports that the port doesn't exist, check that no other application
is running that uses the port (including other copies of the software) and that the port is setup correctly in Windows (go
to Start/Settings/Control Panel/System/Device Manager/Ports).

The ECU is faulty

An ECU will rarely fail in a way that completely disables communication with the PC. If all other tests fail it may be
necessary to return the ECU to your distributor for repair. Contact your distributor for advice.

Flashes 'Unknown Device' on the screen on start up.

The software will flash this message when it is receiving unrecognisable information through one of the serial ports
that it is searching for devices on. In addition to some of the causes of the 'No Device' message:

There may be another device connected to a serial port

Check that you do not have other types of peripherals connected to the external COM ports of your PC. External
modem devices may cause the 'Unknown Device' error to occur as well as other systems such as terminals and
electronic measuring equipment. If you don't want the software to search on the COM port that the other device is
connected to, go to 'Preferences' in the 'Options' menu and disable that port. Otherwise you will have to disconnect
the other device when using the software. In some cases you may need to uninstall the software associated with that
device. Check the help information for your peripheral device.

The PC has lost synchronization with the ECU

Although unlikely, it is possible that the PC and ECU might be communicating out of sync. Powering down and then
restarting the ECU (obviously, while the engine is stopped) may solve the problem. In addition, closing and then
restarting the software or using the 'Search for Devices' menu item in the 'File' menu may force the software to
resynchronise with the ECU.
Finds the ECU but occassionally flashes 'No Device' on the screen.

This indicates that the ECU is having communications problems with the PC and that the communications link keeps
resetting. Possible reasons include:

An inappropriate page/configuration file is being used

Some ECUs have realtime parameters stored in places that are inaccessible to other ECUs. Trying to use a
configuration file and realtime view for the wrong ECU type may result in requests for realtime data that the ECU
cannot handle. You must obtain and use the correct configuration and realtime views for your ECU.

The ECU to PC lead/connectors are faulty

Intermittent failures may indicate loose or badly soldered wires on the connectors at the ends of the ECU to PC lead.
Check the connectors for evidence of this.

Getting map data from the ECU fails before any data is transferred.

If this happens consistently try going to the 'Options' menu, selecting 'Preferences' and reducing the Upper Map Baud
Rate. If the problem still occurs check for the following:

1. Wrong configuration file for your ECU.
2. Faulty PC connecting lead.
3. Low ECU supply voltage.
4. High engine speed (the higher the engine speed the less time the ECU can dedicate to communicating with the
   PC).

When I try to get a map from the ECU it asks me for a code.

If an ECU is PIN coded, the software will prevent any access to the ECU data until the PIN code has been entered
correctly. See the section 'PIN Control Problems 18.6' if you do not know the PIN code.

Getting map data from the ECU keeps failing midway through transferring data.

If this happens consistently try going to the 'Options' menu, selecting 'Preferences' and reducing the Upper Map Baud
Rate. If the problem still occurs check for the following:

1. Wrong configuration file for your ECU.
2. Faulty PC connecting lead.
3. Low ECU supply voltage.
4. High engine speed (the higher the engine speed the less time the ECU can dedicate to communicating with the
   PC).

Map transfers pause for a long time or proceed very slowly

The software will always try to send and load map data at the high speed rate set in the Preferences. If if fails, it tries
again at a much slower speed. If the problem occurs often it may be best to bypass the retry by going to the 'Options'
menu, selecting 'Preferences' and reducing the Upper Map Baud Rate.


18.5 Problems with Editing Data


When typing a number in a map, the software doesn't store the exact value typed.

This is not an error. The ECU has a finite number of steps in which to represent numbers. For example, if the ECU
uses 8 bits (a sequence of 8 on or offs) to represent a number in a map, this means that there are 2 to the power of 8,
or 256 levels to represent the number. When you type in a number into a map, the software will find the closest
number that the ECU can store and place this in the map instead. This is especially evident in some maps where you
try to store a zero and the number stored is around 0.01. This is because this may be the closest value to zero that the
ECU can store in that particular map.
When moving points up and down on the graph, I cannot increment/decrement the resolution of the number
to a fine enough amount.

Using the graph to edit maps is only an approximate way of editing. Also, the editing resolution is relative to the size of
the graph, so increasing the window size, or switching off the spreadsheet (keep pressing F6) might improve the
resolution. Use the spreadsheet for more precise editing.

When I import a mapping session into a map, nothing happens.

This is due to the mapping session not containing any information relevant to that particular map. You can check the
relevant maps for a particular mapping session by going to ‘Manage Mapping Sessions’ on the 'Mapping' menu,
clicking on the mapping session description and clicking 'Properties'. It’s also worth checking by the same means, that
the session actually contains some data (it is possible to produce a session with no mapping hits).

When I open some data in a window, the window always stays on top, hiding another window that I am trying
to look at.

By default, data windows open so that they always remain above other windows. This is so that you can arrange the
windows on screen above the realtime view. If you want to disable this feature, go to the 'Window' menu on the data
window in question and remove the tick next to the item 'Always On Top'. The window will then only be above other
windows when it is the active window. If you always want 'Always On Top' to be disabled, Go to the 'Preferences' item
in the 'Options' menu select 'Miscellaneous' and remove the tick next to the 'Always On Top' item.


18.6 PIN Control Problems


I do not know/have forgotten the PIN Code for an ECU.

If, for whatever reason, you cannot access the ECU because you do not know the PIN code for the ECU, you have no
option but to erase the device and reload the data from a chipfile. This requires that you have backed up the data
inside the ECU to a chipfile while you still had access to the ECU. If you have this chipfile, you can go to 'Erase
Device' in the 'Tools' menu and erase the ECU. Then go to 'Transfer Chip Data' in the 'Chipfile' menu and select the
source device as your backup chipfile and the target as the ECU. The ECU should now be returned to normal
operation.
If you have no backup of the ECU data and it is vital that you gain access to this specific data, you may have to return
the device to your distributor for decoding. This will mean that your ECU is unavailable to you for a period of time. Ask
your distributor for advice.

I do not know/have forgotten the PIN Code for a chipfile.

Sorry, but it is not possible to access a PIN coded chipfile without either knowing the code or having a non-PIN coded
backup. If the data is vital, it is possible that your ECU distributor may be able to help you.


18.7 Tools Menu Problems


The default setups are empty in 'Set Default Data'.

It is possible that there are no default setups for your current configuration. Default setups require that the current
configuration supports the feature and that the default data chipfiles are installed correctly.

The chipfile converter tool fails to convert most maps.

The success of the chipfile converter tool is heavily dependant upon the source and target configurations used. If they
are badly matched then the function is unlikely to be successful. A good template chipfile is important in situations
where the conversion is not very successful.
Note that the chipfile converter does not setup new maps with correct data, unless a template is provided with correct
data in it.
Compare Devices or Advanced Compare Devices reports a parameter is out of address range.

This is caused by trying to compare one or more devices, which are inappropriate for the current configuration. The
configuration is referencing a variable that is not present in one of the devices being compared.

Download code fails immediately after clicking on 'Proceed'.

It is likely that your ECU does not support code downloads and so this function cannot be used. You should not use
the code download feature unless you know that your ECU supports it.

The ECU stops responding after a code download.

Contact your ECU distributor for advice on this.


18.8 Options Menu Problems


I cannot find some of the menu items/functions/parameters I have seen on another system/in the manual, on
my copy of the software.

There are three possible reasons for this:

Your current user profile restricts this feature

A particular user profile can be setup to hide menu items and other features. Go to the 'Options' menu and select
'Select User Profile'. The profile 'Master' enables all features of the software. If you cannot enable these features,
because they are pass-worded, you will have to contact your distributor for advice.

Your version of the software is out-of-date

Its is possible that you are using an older version of the software than the one that you have seen.

The feature is not applicable to your ECU

The software can add items to the Tools menu when running certain ECUs. It is possible that the feature you have
seen is not available on your ECU.

The software asks for a password when I try and change to another user profile.

User profiles can be pass-worded, either for data security reasons or to prevent access to advanced features. You
cannot use a locked profile without the password. Contact your distributor for the password.

My changes to the preferences have not had any effect.

Some changes to the preferences require that the software is restarted in order to take effect. Changing the map
colours will not have any effect on map windows already loaded. Only maps loaded after the colours have been
changed will be in the new colour scheme.

After setting a background bitmap, the software switches between realtime pages and moves panels very
slowly.

If the bitmap you have set as the background is large or has lots of colours, screen drawing speed will be seriously
affected. Try installing a smaller or less colour dense bitmap.




19. Glossary of Terms

1D Map                        A map that has a single site or value and no axes.
2D Map                        A map that has one axis, ie, it has many columns and one row.
3D Map                 A map that has two axes, ie, it has many columns and many rows.
4D Map                 A collection of 3D maps.
Adaptive Map           A map inside the ECU whose values are programmed by the ECU during engine
                       operation and is then combined with another map in order to 'fine-tune' it for use with that
                       engine.
Alarm                  Similar to an alert, but non-user programmable.
Alert                  A user programmable event on the real-time display, which changes the colours of the
                       panels on the real-time display to indicate some problem or event has occurred.
Alphanumeric Panel     A type of panel on the real-time display that displays parameters only as numbers or text
                       values. This is the 'basic', 'standard' or default panel type.
Alternate (Alt) Key    On English keyboards a key that accesses menus. The name and position of this key
                       may vary from country to country.
Anchored Panel         A panel with a minimum of buttons, which is in a fixed position on a real-time page.
AutoRun                In Windows, a feature in Windows which automatically starts installation when an
                       installation CD is placed in the CD or DVD drive.
Axis (of a map)        A list of numbers that indicate what rows and columns in a map represent.
CAB File               See Upgrade File.
Cell                   A number in a spreadsheet.
Chipfile               A complete copy of an ECUs memory, stored as a binary file on a PC. Chipfiles contain a
                       copy of all maps and setup data present in the ECU at the time of the chipfiles creation.
Clicking               In Windows, clicking on something means positioning the mouse pointer over something
                       on the screen and pressing and releasing the left mouse button.
Code File              A file that contains new programming information for an ECU.
COM (Port)             A 9-way (or more rarely, a 25-way), D-type connector on a PC, which allows serial
                       (RS232) communication with other devices. This type of communication is currently the
                       standard method of communicating with ECUs.
Configuration (File)   Because the software must work with a wide range of ECUs, it needs to be configured
                       specifically to work with a particular device. Configuration files describe the structure of
                       an ECU to the software so that it can access it properly. A correct file for your particular
                       ECU/software issue is essential.
Control                A software module, which is part of the software system and provides a view-type or
                       editing system in the software.
Control (Ctrl) Key     Key on the bottom left corner of English keyboards. The name of this key may vary from
                       country to country.
Control Panel          A program provided with Windows, which allows you to setup and configure various
                       options on your computer. Accessed via the Start/Settings menu.
Data Window            A window, separate to the main window, which appears when you get data from an ECU
                       or chipfile.
Device                 In the context of this software, the term device refers to ECUs and chipfiles or any object
                       that can read, write and store ECU data.
Dialog Box             A window, usually with a grey background, which presents options to the user.
Dimension (of a map)   The number of axes in a map.
Direct Map             A type of mapping strategy in the software. When using Direct Map, the user runs an
                       engine over the sites in a map and adjusts fuelling, ignition, boost, etc until optimal
                       performance is achieved at that site. Pressing the space bar produces a mapping hit
                       which is recorded in a file on disk. As the engine is moved away from the site hit, the new
                       value is sent to the ECU for use. If necessary, the data can be imported later from file.
Double-clicking        In Windows, double-clicking on something means positioning the mouse pointer over
                       something on the screen and rapidly pressing and releasing the left mouse button twice,
                       in quick succession.
Drop-down Box          A box in Windows that allows you to select an item from a list of items. Typically the
                       selected item is shown next to a down arrow. When you click on the down arrow, a list of
                       options appears from which an item can be selected.
ECC file               See Chipfile.
ECF File               The type of configuration files that are used with legacy versions of the software.
EC2 File               The type of configuration files that are used with this software.
ECU                    Engine Control Unit or Electronic Control Unit.
ECU Data               In the context of this software, ECU data refers to the maps and set-up data stored inside
                       an ECU or chipfile.
Edit Box/Control       A box that allows you to type in a number or some text.
EMS                    Engine Management System.
File Extension         The (normally) three-letter code added to a windows filename to describe the type of file.
                       Extensions are separated from the name with a full stop. E.g. with the filename
                         'example.txt' the extension is 'txt' and shows that the file is (probably) a text file.
Hex Dump                 The contents of an ECUs data area, displayed as a list of hexadecimal (base16)
                         numbers.
Histogram                A 2D map inside the ECU that logs the distribution of time spent by the ECU across the
                         range of a realtime parameter.
Index Map                A 2D Map that is used as the axis of another map.
Indexed Map              A map, which has one or more index maps as its axes.
Info Bar                 The three boxes of text at the top of the main window.
Interpolation            Interpolation is the process of filling in missing data between two or more known points.
                         The type of interpolation used by the ECU and the software is linear interpolation, i.e. a
                         straight-line or gradient is drawn between known values.
List Box/Control         A box in Windows that allows you to select items in a list.
Live Map                 A type of mapping strategy in the software. When using Live Map, the user can increment
                         and decrement values in the map spreadsheet on the PC and these new values are sent
                         immediately to the ECU for use. Live-mapping doesn't require a mapping box.
Log File                 A file with a .log extension that stores mapping session data.
Logging                  The process of recording the activity of an ECU over a period of time, so that its
                         performance can be analysed.
Map                      A table of values used as a basis for controlling actuators in a management system.
Mapping                  The process of determining appropriate values to put in maps to produce optimal engine
                         performance within specified limits. Mapping is often called calibration.
Mapping Box              A unit with knobs on it for adjusting fuelling, ignition characteristics, boost pressure, etc.,
                         during mapping.
Mapping Data             Information about mapping hits, collected during mapping.
Mapping Hit              A record or snapshot of the state of an ECUs inputs, taken when the person who is
                         mapping an engine determines that the engine is running at optimal performance.
Mapping Session          A record of mapping data for a particular session of mapping.
Mapping Stragegy         A particular method of collecting mapping data. In the software, mapping strategies are
                         characterized by the point at which new mapping data is written to the ECU.
Menu                     In Windows, a list of options that appears on a screen when you click on a menu bar or
                         menu button.
Menu Item                An option in a menu.
Monitoring               Using the realtime display to view the status of an ECU as it runs.
Page                     A particular arrangement of panels on the realtime display.
Page File                A file on disk that describes a realtime page.
Panel                    A rectangular window on the realtime display that shows the state of some realtime
                         variable.
PIN (code)               Personal Identification Number. A multi-digit pass code used to protect data inside ECUs
                         and chipfiles
Parameter                A piece of information stored inside an ECU or chipfile, either a realtime variable, a map
                         or a setup value.
PC                       An IBM compatible desktop machine or laptop.
Programs Menu            In Windows, a submenu of the Start menu, which allows you to access the installed
                         programs on your machine.
Pro Map                  A type of mapping strategy in the software. When using Pro Map, the user runs an engine
                         over the sites in a map and adjusts fuelling, ignition, boost, etc until optimal performance
                         is achieved at that site. Pressing the space bar produces a mapping hit which is recorded
                         in a file on disk. These mapping hits can then be later imported into the map and sent to
                         the ECU.
Proteaus Variable        A realtime variable, which changes its appearance depending on the state of the ECU.
                         These are used as the basis for alarms.
Quick Map                A type of mapping strategy in the software. When using Quick Map, the user runs an
                         engine over the sites in a map and adjusts fuelling, ignition, boost, etc until optimal
                         performance is achieved at that site. Pressing the space bar produces a mapping hit,
                         which is recorded in a file on disk and onto the PC copy of the map. After mapping the
                         new map can now be then sent to the ECU, or the data can be imported at a later date
                         from the file.
Raw (values/data)        The term 'Raw Data' refers to the original data stored inside ECUs and chipfiles. The
                         software uses information inside the configuration file to display this information in
                         meaningful units such as degrees, RPM, etc.
Real-time Display/View   The main window of the software. Allows monitoring of the ECU.
Real-time                A value stored inside the ECU which changes over time to reflect the state of some ECU
parameter/Variable       input (e.g., engine speed, throttle position) or ECU calculations. These are sometimes
                  called channels in other systems.
Right-clicking    In Windows, right clicking on something means positioning the mouse pointer over
                  something on the screen and pressing and releasing the right mouse button.
Setup Data/Maps   Individual settings that control overall features of the ECU, such as the engine and trigger
                  wheel type, etc.
Site              A singe value or cell in a map. Also refers to an arbitrary scale of reference for a variable,
                  such as throttle input.
Start Menu        In Windows, the menu accessed by clicking on the Start button in the bottom left corner of
                  the screen.
Status Bar        The information area at the bottom of the software window.
Shortcut          In the context of Windows, an icon on the desktop screen, which is double, clicked to start
                  a program. In the context of this software, an icon on the realtime display, which
                  performs, some task, such as getting a map, when you click on it.
Spreadsheet       A program or part of a program that allows you to edit, process and manipulate grids of
                  numbers.
Tree (Control)    In Windows, a box that allows you to select an item from a hierarchical or tree-like
                  structure of items. Data is arranged into groups and subgroups. This system is used
                  throughout Windows to represent the file structure of your computer and throughout the
                  software to represent the parameters inside an ECU or chipfile.
Trim (Level)      A value that is added or subtracted to the output of a map.
Upgrade File      A file that contains new program and data files for upgrading or adding features to the
                  software.
User Profile      A particular customized mode of the software. User profiles affect what data can be
                  accessed and what menus and features can be seen and used. User profiles are used,
                  either to simplify the mapping software or as security measure for protecting data.
View Type         The graphical display type of a panel, i.e., the method by which it displays a realtime
                  variable, e.g., as a number, in the form of a dial, etc.
Window            A movable, resizable rectangular area on the screen for presenting information to the
                  user.