EES 4201 Water Chemistry by zrn20302

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									 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING SCIENCES

EES 4201      Water Chemistry                                                                             Fall 2003

Instructor: Dr. Paul Chadik, Room 337 Engr. Bldg. 392-7970       e-mail: pchad@eng.ufl.edu

Teaching Assistant: Mike Witwer, 313 Black Hall, hlf@ufl.edu

Text: Water Chemistry, M. M. Benjamin
              The errata for the Water Chemistry text is available at the following website:
              http://www.mhhe.com/engcs/civil/benjamin/

        Copies of slides to be used in class available through SEE Room 108 Black Hall
        Available Monday 9 th period and Tuesday through Friday 4 th period

Prerequisites: CHM 2046
Lecture room: Room 315, A.P. Black Hall
Lecture times: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; 2 nd period (8:30 to 9:20 am)
Exam times: Exams will be held in the evening (periods E2-E3) Room TBA.

Course Objectives:
1. To develop in students an understanding of the chemical equilibrium and kinetic principles associated with
   natural and engineered aquatic systems.
2. To develop the capability and confidence in students to solve quantitative chemical equilibrium and kinetic
   problems in aquatic systems.
3. To provide students with the necessary aquatic chemical principles which are the basis for future design
   experiences in the environmental engineering academic program as well as in their environmental engineering
   or related professions.

Relationship of this course to Environmental Engineering Program Objectives:
With an understanding of aquatic chemistry, students will be better able to assess, prevent and solve environmental
problems in their professional careers and thereby contribute to the benefit of society. Portfolio development is
expected to help the student evaluate their progression in this course and the environmental engineering program in
general and increase their appreciation for life-long learning.

Homework:
Written homework will be assigned throughout the course, and will be collected and graded. Written homework
must be completed in a organized and neat manner and handed in before the beginning of the class following the
class in which it was assigned. Late homework will be accepted with a penalty: 20% penalty if the homework is
submitted between 8:30 and 9:30 am the day it is due, and 50% penalty if it is submitted between 9:30 am the day it
is due and the beginning of the next class period. No homework credit will be given if it is submitted more than one
class period late. Solutions to homework problems will be posted outside Room 313 in Black Hall for a period of one
week after the graded homework is returned to the students in class. A portfolio development assignment will be
explained in the first day of class and will constitute 5% of the final grade.
   Grades will be determined on the following            Office hours :
   basis:                                                Dr. Chadik
   Test 1             25%                                         Mon. - 9:30 to 10:30 am                            To be an
   Test 2             25%                                         Wed. - 1:00 to 2:00 pm
   Test 3             25%                                         Fri. - 2:00 to 2:45 pm
   Homework           20%                                Mike Witwer
   Portfolio          5%                                         To be announced


Class Attendance: Students are encouraged to attend all classes. Although attendance is not taken nor counted
toward the course grade, history indicates that students who do not attend class do poorly on examinations and
suffer the consequence of low grades.

Newsgroups: We will use a newsgroup in this course. When in Netscape mail or Outlook Express click on the link
below. This should set up the newsgroup in your computer e-mail system. If you choose to ask a question about the
course, please do so on the newsgroup. Others may choose to add to your question or reply. The instructor may
reply as well. All members of the newsgroup will be able to read the questions, responses, and comments.
                 news://news.ees.ufl.edu/ees.class.water_chemistry

Make-up Exams: Make-up exams are only given for medical reasons. A student may request a make-up exam if
they cannot attend the scheduled exam for medical reasons. The student must contact the instructor before the exam
to state that he/she will not be able to attend the exam.

Students with Disabilities : Students requesting classroom accommodation must first register with the Dean of
Students Office. The Dean of Students Office will provide documentation to the student who must then provide this
documentation to the Instructor when requesting accommodation.

Cell Phones: Cell phones must be turned off at the beginning of class; use of cell phones during class is prohibited.

Academic Honesty
We, the members of the University of Florida community, pledge to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest
standards of honesty and integrity. Violations of the Academic Honesty Guidelines include: cheating, plagiarism,
bribery, misrepresentation, conspiracy and fabrication. Academic Honesty Guidelines are available from Student
Services.

Software Use: All faculty, staff, and students of the University of Florida are required and expected to obey the laws
and legal agreements governing software use. Failure to do so can lead to monetary damages and/or criminal
penalties for the individual violator. Because such violations are also against University policies and rules,
disciplinary action will be taken as appropriate .
Mtg.      Date                               Topic                             Reading
1         8/25    Course Introduction
2         8/27    Expressing Concentrations                                      1 – 19
3         8/29    Chemical Reactivity                                           19 – 35
4          9/1    Labor Day – No Class
5          9/3    Kinetics                                                      35 – 51
6          9/5    Kinetics – Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD)
7          9/8    Free Energy and Equilibrium                                 104 – 127
8         9/10    Acids and Bases – Introduction                              131 – 150
9         9/12    Ionization fractions                                        150 – 161
10        9/15    Equations for solving equilibrium problems                  161 – 169
11        9/17    Numerical approaches to solving equilibrium problems        169 – 182
12        9/19    Use of log C – pH diagrams                                  188 – 202
13        9/22    Solving Acid-Base problems                                  218 – 230
14        9/24    Solving Acid-Base problems                                  218 – 227
15        9/26    Review for Test 1
16        9/29    Test 1 (Periods E2 – E3)
17        10/1    Titrations                                                  237 – 244
18        10/3    Titration of Weak Acids                                     244 – 257
19        10/6    Equivalence Points and Alkalinity                           257 – 267
20        10/8    Alkalinity                                                  268 – 276
21        10/10   Acid-Base Buffers                                           276 – 286
22        10/13   Problem solving in buffered systems
23        10/15   Gas – Liquid Equilibrium and Henry’s Constant                322 – 336
24        10/17   Effect of Ionization on Gas – Liquid Equilibria              337 – 347
25        10/20   Carbon Dioxide Dissolution, Alkalinity and Acidity           350 - 353
26        10/22   Ligands and Complexation                                     363 – 370
27        10/24   Metal Ion Buffers and Predominance Diagrams             370 – 381 383 – 386
28        10/27   Precipitation Reactions – Oxides and Hydroxides              394 – 404
29        10/29   Precipitation Reactions – Other than Hydroxides              404 – 413
30        10/31   Metal complexation and precipitation problem solving         417 – 430
31        11/3    Review for Test 2
32        11/5    Test 2 (Periods E2 – E3)
33        11/7    HOMECOMING—No Class
34        11/10   Redox Oxidation States and Balancing Reactions              464 – 472
35        11/12   Redox Half-Cell Reactions                                   472 – 480
36        11/14   eo and peo                                                  480 – 495
37        11/17   Energy changes accompanying redox reactions                 496 – 511
38        11/19   Oxidation and Reduction of Water                            516 – 525
39        11/21   pe – pH diagrams                                            525 – 532
40        11/24   Redox and Electrochemistry                                  533 – 545
41        11/26   Problems in Redox Chemistry
42        11/28   THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY -- NO CLASS
43        12/1    Adsorption Terminology & Mechanisms                         550 – 558
44        12/3    Adsorption Isotherms – Langmuir                             558 – 567
45        12/5    Adsorption Isotherms – Freundlich                           576 – 582
46        12/8    Problems in Adsorption
47        12/10   Review for Test 3              Test 3 (Periods E2-E3)
       There will be no final exam in final exam week

								
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