Biochemistry 3300 Laboratory Exercise Manual

Document Sample
Biochemistry 3300 Laboratory Exercise Manual Powered By Docstoc
					       Biochemistry 3300
   Laboratory Exercise Manual


                          Spring 2009
                    Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry




Biochemistry 3300                                            1
Biochemistry 3300   2
Table of Contents
Laboratory Outline.........................................................................................................................................5
   Contact Information:..................................................................................................................................5
   Laboratory Schedule:.................................................................................................................................6
   Evaluation:..................................................................................................................................................6
   Student Responsibilities:...........................................................................................................................7
1. Micropipet Calibration...............................................................................................................................9
   Introduction:...............................................................................................................................................9
         Reagents:...........................................................................................................................................9
         Equipment:.......................................................................................................................................9
   Protocol:.....................................................................................................................................................9
            Table 1. Micropipet volumes.....................................................................................................10
   Evaluation:................................................................................................................................................10
2. Reduction Potential of Cytochrome C.....................................................................................................11
   Introduction:.............................................................................................................................................11
         Stock Reagents:..............................................................................................................................12
         Equipment:......................................................................................................................................12
   Protocol:...................................................................................................................................................12
            Table 1. Solutions......................................................................................................................12
   Evaluation:................................................................................................................................................14
   Theoretical (mathematical) Appendix: ..................................................................................................15
3. Western Blotting and Detection...............................................................................................................17
   Introduction:.............................................................................................................................................17
         Reagents:.........................................................................................................................................18
         Equipment:......................................................................................................................................18
   Protocol:....................................................................................................................................................18
   Evaluation:................................................................................................................................................21
4. Structural Biology....................................................................................................................................23
   Introduction:.............................................................................................................................................23
         Stock Reagents:..............................................................................................................................24
         Equipment:.....................................................................................................................................24
   Protocol:...................................................................................................................................................24
   Evaluation:...............................................................................................................................................28
5. Experimental Design ...............................................................................................................................29
   Introduction:.............................................................................................................................................29
6. Cysteine Specific Fluorescent Labeling..................................................................................................33
   Introduction:.............................................................................................................................................33
         Reagents:.........................................................................................................................................34
         Equipment:.....................................................................................................................................34
   Protocol:...................................................................................................................................................35
            Table 1: Titration with GTP......................................................................................................37
   Evaluation:...............................................................................................................................................38

Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                                                               3
Appendix A: Preparing a Laboratory Report..............................................................................................39
Appendix B: Safety Agreement....................................................................................................................41
Appendix C: Preparation of a Lab Book.....................................................................................................45




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                                               4
                                                            Laboratory Outline


Contact Information:
COORDINATOR:
   Quintin Steynen    
   Office D887
   Phone: 403 329 2210
   E­mail: steyqj@uleth.ca 

INSTRUCTOR:
   Jeffrey Fischer
   Office: E722a
   Phone: 403 329 2307
   E­mail: jeffrey.fischer@uleth.ca
   Office Hours: Wednesday – 9:00 to 11:00

LABORATORIES
Lab 1: Monday – 13:00 to 15:50 
       Website: http://classes.uleth.ca/200901/bchm33001/

Lab 2: Tuesday – 13:40 to 16:20
       Website: http://classes.uleth.ca/200901/bchm33002/




Biochemistry 3300                                                                5
Laboratory Schedule:
January             12 ­ 13              Check In & Micropipet Calibration
January             19 ­ 20              Redox – Week 1
January             26 ­ 27              Redox – Week 2
February            02 ­ 03              Western Blotting and Detection – Week 1
February            09 ­ 10              Western Blotting and Detection – Week 2
February            16 ­ 17              Reading Week – No Labs
February            23 ­ 24              Structural Biology
March               02 ­ 03              Experimental Design
March               09 ­ 10              Fluorescence – Week 1
March               16 ­ 17              Fluorescence – Week 2
March               23 ­ 24              Fluorescence – Week 3
March               30 ­ 31              Final Laboratory Exam
April               06 ­ 07              Check Out




Evaluation:
Biochemistry 3300 lab is weighted as 30 % of your final course grade. The laboratory grade will be 
determined as follows:

Lab Reports                    55 %
      Redox                       10 %
      Western Blotting            15 %
      Structural Biology           5 %
      Experimental Design          5 %
      Fluorescence                20 %


Lab Notebook                   20 %   NB: Notebook checks will occur at random, unannounced 
                                      times during the semester. 
Final Lab Exam                 25 %




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                     6
Student Responsibilities:
All students will be required to sign and submit a Laboratory Safety agreement. 
In addition to the safety agreement, students will require:
    (1) A set of eye protection that is worn at all times within the laboratory.  The department will 
        provide eye protection that can be utilized during each laboratory.
    (2)  A laboratory coat that is worn at all times within the laboratory.
    (3)  A hardcover laboratory notebook.   

Any and all concerns about the laboratory (safety, evaluations, manual, instructors, etc.) must be 
brought to the attention of the laboratory coordinator.

ABSENCES: 
Single absences will be permissible without documentation. Additional, inexcusable absences will 
result in a failing lab grade. Judgment of excusable absences is at the discretion of the lab coordinator. 
No make­up labs will be offered.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                             7
Biochemistry 3300   8
                                              1. Micropipet Calibration


Introduction:
        In any laboratory experience, precise and accurate measurements are essential for obtaining 
meaningful data.  In the field of biochemistry, the macromolecules of interest are almost exclusively 
dissolved in a solvent system (generally aqueous).  Consequently, virtually all experiments will require 
the precise and accurate transfer of solutions.  In addition, most biochemical experiments involve 
relatively small volumes and very small volume transfers. The primary biochemical tool for delivering 
small volumes of a solution is the micropipet.
        In order to ensure the accuracy of the laboratory micropipets, a calibration curve will be 
generated for each micropipettor at the beginning and the end of the semester. 

Reagents:                                                     Equipment:
dd H2O                                                        Thermometer
                                                              Micropipets and tips
                                                              Microcentrifuge tubes
                                                              Gloves
                                                              Analytical Balance



Protocol:
Micropipet Calibration
   (1)  Record the temperature of the water. 

         Note: The density of water changes as a function of temperature (Table 2). Since the density is needed to calculate 
         the actual volume being delivered, the actual volume delivered is temperature dependent.

   (2)  Place a clean microcentrifuge tube in the balance and once the reading has stabilized tare the 
       balance.

         Note: Once the balance is tarred, handle the microcentrifuge tube with gloves. The natural oils and dirt on a human 
         hand can transfer to the microcentrifuge tube and give inaccurate mass measurements. This is escpecially true for 
         the calibration of the 0.5­10 mL micropipet. 

   (3)  Set the volume delivered or apparent volume delivered on the micropipettor to the desired value 
       (Table 1).


Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                           9
   (4)  Fit a clean micropipet tip snuggly to the micropipet barrel.

   (5)  Remove the microcentrifuge tube from the balance and carefully transfer the indicated volume 
       of dd H2O to the microcentrifuge tube.

   (6)  Transfer the microcentrifuge tube to the balance and record the mass.

   (7)  Repeat steps 3­6 until the mass of each apparent volume has been measured in triplicate.

   (8)  Record all raw data measurements for each of your micropipets in your laboratory notebook.

Table 1. Micropipet volumes

       Micropipet                                  Apparent Volume Delivered
1 – 10 uL                       1.00           2.00             4.00            7.00          10.00
10 – 100 uL                     10.0           20.0             40.0            70.0          100.0
100 – 1000 uL                   100             200             400             700            1000




Evaluation:
       Construct a calibration curve for each of your micropipets by plotting the apparent volume 
delivered against the actual volume delivered.  Submit the raw data and each of your calibration curves 
to the laboratory instructor.  Clearly identify your micropipet number on each calibration curve.
Table 2. Water Density as a function of temperature.
            Temperature of Water (°C)                             Density of Water (g mL­1)
                         17                                                0.99880
                         18                                                0.99862
                         19                                                0.99844
                         20                                                0.99823
                         21                                                0.99802
                         22                                                0.99780
                         23                                                0.99757




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                     10
               2. Reduction Potential of Cytochrome C

Introduction:
        Oxidation­reduction (redox) reactions are ubiquitous in living systems and are essential 
components of oxidative phosphorylation: the metabolic process that generates the vast major of the 
energy required by cells.  Cytochrome c is involved in the penultimate step of respiration and transfers 
four electrons (one at a time) to cytochrome c oxidase which subsequently reduces O2 to H2O. 
Cytochrome c contains a covalently linked heme prosthetic group and it is the iron atom of the heme 
that carries electrons and interconverts between the +3 and +2 oxidation states.  
        The heme group of cytochrome c absorbs strongly in the visible range of the electromagnetic 
spectrum and the reduced and oxidized forms of cytochrome c have different absorption spectra. 
Consequently, the reduction potentials of cytochrome c ­ and indeed cytochromes in general ­ are often 
determined via spectrophotometric methods.
        The goal for this lab is to examine the electrochemistry of cytochrome c.  In particular, the 
reduction potential under standard conditions and as a function of pH and ionic strength.  The lab is 
based upon a published protocol1 and makes use of the differential visible absorption of reduced and 
oxidized cytochrome c and a second redox active compound, 2,6­dichloroindophenol or DCIP.  In 
particular, the reduced form of cytochrome c (Cytred) absorbs at 550 nm, and the oxidized form (Cytox) 
is monitored by following the absorption at both 550 and 570 nm.  DCIPred is invisible and DCIPox 
absorbs at 600 nm.  This allows us to determine the concentrations of each reactant and product in the 
following equilibrium expression:

              Cytred + DCIPox   <=>   Cytox + DCIPred 

        Using a modified form of the Nernst equation and knowing the standard reduction potential of 
DCIP we can determine the reduction potential of cytochrome c.  In general, these values provide 
information about the types of proteins or cofactors that can efficiently reduce or oxidize the heme 
group of cytochrome c.  In turn, this information sheds light upon electron transfer pathways and 
energy generation in living systems.
        Several of the reagents used in today's lab are irritants to both the skin and the respiratory 
system.  In addition to standard, proper laboratory techniques please use extra caution when handling 
strong reducing or oxidizing agents.  

 Cammack, R. (1995) Redox States and Potentials In “Bioenergetics ­ A Practical Approach” (G.C. 
1

Brown and C.E. Cooper, eds.), IRL Press, Oxford, pp. 93­95.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                      11
Stock Reagents:                                        Equipment:
cytochrome c (10.0 mg/mL in water)                 UV/Visible spectrophotometer
10 mM potassium ferricyanide (or other oxidizing  plastic cuvettes
agent)                                             pH meter
solid sodium dithionite (or strong reducing agent)
10 mM ascorbic acid (or other reducing agent)
10 mM 2,6­dichloroindophenol
1.0 M acetate (pH 4.0)
1.0 M citrate (pH 6.5)
1.0 M Tris (pH 9.0)
5.0 M NaCl




Note: Ascorbic acid is both heat and light sensitive

Protocol:
WEEK 1:  
Each student will perform the following protocol at two different concentrations of NaCl. Class data 
will be pooled and made available on the class web site.


Cytochrome C reduction potential as a function of NaCl concentration
   (1)  Prepare the following two solutions (from stock solutions) in a microcentrifuge tube:


Table 1. Solutions

                     Solution A                                           Solution B
0.60 mg/mL  cyctochrome c                              25.0 mM citrate (pH 6.5)
25.0 mM citrate (pH 6.5)                               0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 or 2.00 M NaCl
30.0 M DCIP 
15.0 M K3[Fe(CN)6] 
0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 1.00 or 2.00 M NaCl


Total Volume = 1.500 mL                                Total Volume =  1.500 mL



Biochemistry 3300                                                                                       12
    (2)  Using the multiwavelength feature of the spectrophotometer, blank the spectrophotometer at 
       550 nm, 570 nm and 600 nm using solution B. 
       Note: The multiwavelength feature of the spectrophotometer allows more than one wavelength to be followed at the 
       same time. This step will set the absorbance due to the citrate buffer and NaCl to zero for all three wavelengths.
    (3)  Record the absorbance of solution A at 550 nm, 570 nm and 600 nm.  In the presence of 
       potassium ferricyanide, cytochrome c and DCIP are fully oxidized.
       Note: This step measure the absorbance at each wavelength due to fully oxidized cytochrome c and DCIP, and 
       represents the start of the titration.
    (4)  Add 2 L of ascorbic acid to solution A while in the cuvette.  Mix well, allow 2 minutes to 
       equilibrate and record the absorbance at 550 nm, 570 nm and 600 nm.
       Note: Ascorbic acid can reduce either cytochrome c or DCIP. At limiting concentrations, ascorbic acid will 
       preferrentially reduce the compound with the more positive standard reduction potential. Since we already know 
       the standard reduction potential of DCIP we will be able to calculate the standard reduction potential of cytochrome 
       c.
    (5)  Repeat step 4 until the absorbance at 600 nm is low and remains constant.
    (6)  Add several small crystals of sodium dithionite to the cuvette, mix well, allow 2 minutes to 
       equilibrate and take a final set of reading at 550 nm, 570 nm and 600 nm. These values 
       represent the fully reduced state of cytochrome c and DCIP.
       Note: In the presence of sodium dithionite we have an excess of reducing agent and all cytochrome c and DCIP are 
       converted to the fully reduced state. This represents the end point of the titration. The mathematical appendix walks 
       you through the conversion of the absorbance data to a standard reduction potential.




WEEK 2:
Each group will perform the following protocol at pH 4.0 & 9.0 at a different concentration of NaCl. 
Class data will be pooled and made available on the class web site. 
 
Cytochrome C reduction potential as a function of pH
The protocol is the same as that used in week one with the following exception:
    (1) Students will utilize 25 mM Acetate pH 4.0 and 25 mM Tris pH 9.0 for the respective protocols.
    (2) Students will utilize an assigned NaCl concentration for each protocol.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                        13
Evaluation:
Complete and hand­in a full lab write up for this experiment. Refer to Appendix A: Preparing a 
Laboratory Write Up on the Class Web Site. For this report, you are provided with detailed 
instructions for the laboratory writeup. 
(A) Introduction should explain
        Why
    (1)     the biological system being studied is interesting – Redox proteins in general and 
        cytochrome C in particular.
        How and what
    (2)                 experimental result is being determined  – The standard reduction potential of 
        cytochrome c is being determined by comparison to the known standard reduction potential of 
        DCIP.
        What
    (3)        may the experiment teach us about biological function – Role of cytochrome C in electron 
        transfer, pH and salt dependence of electron transfer reactions
(B) Materials and Methods should include
   (1) Any and all changes to the protocol
   (2) Sample calculation for converting measured data to plotted data. 
       a­ Use (A550 – A570) as your CytoC measurements and A600 for DCIP
       b­ In the presence of ferricyanide you are measuring CytoCox and DCIPox
       c­ In the presence of dithionite you are measuring CytoCred and DCIPred
       d­ You cannot take the log of zero or a negative number 
       Note: Your first four data points (at least) should be fine. After this your sample may be completely reduced and the 
       data unusable as there is no change in the absorbance values. 
    (3) Sample calculation for standard reduction potential
(C) Results should include
   (1) Tables of measured data (yours only)
   (2) Plot of your data including calculated standard reduction potential
   (3) Plots or tables of (provided) compiled data showing pH and NaCl dependence of standard 
       reduction potential.
(D) Discussion should include
   (1) How did the experimental protocol work (or fail to work)?
   (2) What did the experiment teach us (or suggest) about biological function – Role of cytochrome C 
       in electron transfer
   (3) What did the experiment teach us (or suggest) about the effect of pH and NaCl on the standard 
       reduction potential.

Your report is due in class one week after the completion of the experiment.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                        14
Theoretical (mathematical) Appendix: 
The Nernst equation describing difference in the reduction potential of cytochrome c and DCIP is :
              RT 1        [cyt r ]   1     [ DCIP o ]
  E = E o −         ln              ln            
               F n cyt [cyt o ] n DCIP [DCIP r ]
                                                                  (1)
where Eo  = Eocyt ­ EoDCIP ,, F is the Faraday constant, ncyt and nDCIP are the number of electrons 
transferred, and cytr , cyto , DCIPr and DCIPo are the concentrations of the reduce and oxidized species, 
respectively.
At equilibrium, 
          RT 1      [cyt r ]   1    [ DCIP o ]
  E o=         ln             ln            
          F n cyt [cyt o ] n DCIP [ DCIP r ]
                                                                        (2)
and we can determine the concentrations of cytr , cyto , DCIPr and DCIPo from the following relations:
  [cyt o ]  A cytr − A cyt  [ DCIP o ]  ADCIP − A DCIPr 
          =                             =
  [cyt r ]  Acyt − Acyto    [DCIP r ]  A DCIPo− ADCIP 

Generally, equation (2) is further rearranged yielding an equation for a straight line. As part of your 
write up you will plot 
    [ DCIP o ]       [cyt o ]
 ln            vs ln
    [ DCIP r ]       [cyt r ]

The slope of the resulting straight lines is nDCIP / ncyt and the intercept is ncyt F Eo / RT.
Knowing the standard reduction potential of DCIP is 0.237 V, the standard reduction potential of 
cytochrome c can be calculated.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                          15
Biochemistry 3300   16
                         3. Western Blotting and Detection


Introduction:
        The goal for this lab is to separate induction samples of aFib over­expressing Escherichia coli at 
different time points with SDS PAGE and visualize the sample via western blotting.  Cell lysate 
samples from aFib over­expressing E. coli at 15, 30, 45, 60, 120, and 180 minutes incubation times after 
the addition of 1mM isopropyl­beta­D­thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and a negative control will be 
provided.
        There are a wide variety of methods for detection of macromolecules;  each technique with 
specific advantages and disadvantages.  Western blotting, or immunoblotting, is a highly sensitive 
method to identify and obtain size information of a specific protein in a mixture of proteins. This 
technique requires that the protein of interest is antigenic and reacts specifically with an antibody. The 
protein mixture is first separated electrophoretically by SDS PAGE and then transferred to a solid 
support, such as a nitrocellulose, polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF), or cationic nylon membrane.  The 
membrane is then exposed to the primary antibody, which binds to the protein of interest. 
Subsequently, a secondary antibody, which is covalently attached to an easily assayed enzyme or 
radiolabel, binds to the primary antibody.
        Generally, either audioradiography, detection of a radioactive isotope, or chemiluminescence, 
detection of light produced from a chemical reaction, is used to visualize the presence of the protein of 
interest.  For the detection of over­expressed aFib on the western blot we will be using the 
chemiluminescent reagent luminol.
        Several of the reagents used in today's lab are irritants to both the skin and the respiratory 
system.  In addition to standard, proper laboratory techniques please use extra caution when handling 
the following: (1) TEMED, (2) Ponceau S stain, (3) diamino benzamidine (DAB) and (4) 30% H2O2. In 
particular, DABis a suspected carcinogen in its solid form (students will not handle DAB solid).




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                       17
Reagents:                                                   Equipment:
SDS PAGE resolving gel premix (15%) and                     SDS PAGE Gel Rig and Power Pack
stacking gel premix (5%)                                    Nitrocellulose Membrane
100 mg/mL Ammonium Persulfate                               Whatman Paper
TEMED                                                       Mini Trans­Blot Module
1x SDS PAGE Running Buffer                                  15 mL disposable, plastic tubes
Transfer Buffer: 48mM Tris­Base, 39mM Glycine,              Petri dishes
0.037% SDS                                                  Saran wrap
TBS: 10mM Tris­Cl (pH 7.5), 150mM NaCl
Blocking Buffer: 10mM Tris­Cl (pH 7.5), 150mM 
NaCl, 3% (w/v) low­fat dry milk
1˚ Antibody: 6X­HIS Epitope Tag.
2˚ Antibody: Goat Anti­Rabbit IgG­Horseradish 
Peroxidase conjugate
0.1 % (w/v) Ponceau S in 5% (v/v) acetic acid.
Diamino Benzamidine
NiSO4
30% H2O2




Protocol:
WEEK 1:
Protein Separation and Transfer
(1) Separate protein samples with 15% SDS PAGE at 200V for 45 minutes.
  Note: Discontinuous SDS­PAGE in the presence of a reducing agent (2­mercaptoethanol) breaks disulfide bridges and 
  denatures polypeptide chains prior to separating them.
(2) Immerse and incubate SDS gel in approximately 20 mL of transfer buffer for 10 minutes with gentle 
  shaking.
  Note: The SDS­PAGE running buffer is diluted away and the gel is equilibrated in Western Blot transfer buffer. 
(3) Cut four pieces of Whatman paper to the same dimensions as SDS gel and soak in transfer buffer.
(4) Assemble transfer apparatus as outlined in Figure 1.
  Note. The Blotting Sandwich holds the SDS­PAGE gel tight against the nitrocellulose membrane. Proteins elute from the 
  SDS­PAGE gel and are tightly and non­specifically bound by the nitrocellulose membrane.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                    18
(5) Transfer proteins from SDS gel to nitrocellulose by blotting at 4˚C and maximum of 5mA/cm2 at 
  10W. Transfer is complete after 45 minutes.
(6) After transfer is complete, disassemble transfer apparatus. Mark the side of the membrane that was 
  in contact with the gel.
(7) Stain membrane with Ponceau S to estimate transfer efficiency.  
  (a) Incubate membrane for 5 minutes with roughly 20 mL of Ponceau S staining  solution (0.1% w/v 
  Ponceau S in 5% v/v acetic acid). 
  (b) Destained by washing with ddH2O and store membrane at +4°C until next week.
  Note: This step ensures that protein has been eluted from the SDS­PAGE gel and bound to the nitrocellulose membrane. 




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                   19
WEEK 2: Antibody Binding

(1) Wash membrane twice for 10 minutes in TBS with gentle shaking.

(2) Block unreacted sites of the membrane by incubating in TBS(3 % milk) buffer for > 1 hour with 
   gentle shaking.
   Note:  Steps (1) and (2) will be performed by the laboratory instructor as complete blocking of unreacted sites can take 
   several hours and greatly reduces the background signal.

(3) Wash membrane in approximately 20 mL of TBS buffer for 10  minutes with gentle shaking or 
   rocking.
   Note: This step removes the milk proteins that have not bound to the nitrocellulose membrane.

(4) For detection incubate membrane in TBS(3 % milk) containing 1:1000 dilution of primary antibody 
   (6X­HIS Epitope Tag) for 40 minutes with gentle shaking or rocking. Decant buffer and SAVE for 
   future use.
   Note: Specific antibodies are reasonably expensive. Only a fraction of the 1:1000 dilution of primary antibody binds to 
   the antigen so the primary antibody solution can be saved and reused. Also note that milk proteins are present in the 
   primary antibody solution to reduce the background signal due to non­specific interactions between the primary 
   antibody and blocked nitrocellulose membrane.

(5) Wash membrane for 10 minutes with TBS with gentle shaking. (Time permitting this wash step can 
   be repeated.)

(6) To detect primary antibody incubate membrane in TBS(3 % milk) containing 1:5000 dilution of 
   secondary antibody (Goat Anti­Rabbit IgG­Horseradish Peroxidase conjugate) for 40 minutes with 
   gentle shaking. Decant buffer.
   Note: The secondary antibody binds the primary antibody with very high affinity and specificity. It is much cheaper to 
   produce and can be used at lower concentrations. 

(7) Wash membrane for 10 minutes once with TBS with gentle shaking. (Time permitting this wash 
   step can be repeated.)

Detection 

(1) Aliquot 20 mL of TBS into a conical tube.
(2) Add 0.040 mL of 1 M NiSO4 to the TBS solution.
(3) Add 0.2 mL of 100x DAB to the TBS NiSO4 solution.
(4) Finally add 15 L of 30% H2O2 to the above solution and mix well. The solution must be mixed 
   fresh and will be usable for ~15 minutes. 
   Note: Peroxides are relatively unstable and break down rapidly.
(5) Soak membrane in Detection buffer until bands are visible on the membrane.
   Note: The secondary antibody is covalently attached to a peroxidase. The peroxidase reduces peroxide to water while 
   oxidizing DAB (diamino benzidine). The oxidized DAB precipitates in the presence of divalent cations and is deposited 
   on the nitrocellulose membrane. 
(6) Instructors will photograph or scan membranes to provide a digital record.



Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                        20
Evaluation:
Complete and hand­in a full lab write up for this experiment. 
Refer to Appendix A: Preparing a Laboratory Write Up on the Class Web Site.


In this laboratory, the focus is upon the experimental technique and we have largely ignored the biology 
of the system being studied. Consequently, your laboratory write up should focus on the detection of 
proteins (the experimental technique). Overall students will be given less guidance for this write than 
for the initial write up.


Introduction
       Why
   (1)     is the technique is important
       How and what
   (2)                 is being determined
       What
   (3)       can be learned
The Materials and Methods should include
   (1) Protocol changes
   (2) List of samples loaded in each SDS­PAGE lane
The Results should include
   (1) Figure of the SDS­PAGE gel (Coomassie stained)
   (2) Figure of the Ponceau S stained nitrocellulose membrane
   (3) Figure of the Western Blot
The Discussion should include
   (1) Did it work (or fail to work)?
   (2) What did we learn about the experiment?
   (3) What did we learn about aFib?
Note: aFib typically produces more than one band in SDS­PAGE experiments.
Your report is due in class one week after the completion of the experiment.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                          21
Biochemistry 3300   22
                                                 4. Structural Biology

Introduction:
        The biological function of proteins and nucleic acids is ultimately determined by their structure. 
As a result, an appreciation of macromolecular structure is essential for understanding their biological 
function at the molecular level. Complete atomic resolution structures of proteins and nucleic acids are 
highly complex three dimensional objects and the enormous amount of information associated with 
even the smallest structure is often overwhelming. These structures can only be conveniently viewed 
with modern computers and algorithms have been developed to provide simplified or modified 
representations of macromolecules that aid in their analysis. 
        In this laboratory, the structure and function of the L­arabinose binding protein (ABP) will be 
examined using the Swiss PDB­Viewer algorithm. ABP is one member of the bacterial periplasmic 
binding protein family that facilitates the concentration of dilute extracellular nutrients within the cell. 
The laboratory exercise will include (1) the classification of the overall fold and domain structure using 
simplified backbone atom representations, (2) examination of the binding protein specificity and (3) the 
effect of mutation on ABP structure and function.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                        23
Stock Reagents:                                              Equipment:
N/A                                                          Modern computer
                                                             Internet Access
                                                             Swiss PDB­Viewer 3.7



Protocol:
Getting Started
    (1)  Obtain the L­arabinose binding protein coordinates (PDB ID: 1ABE) from the Protein Data 
        Bank (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb)
        (a) Enter 1ABE in the 'Site Search' box to locate the L­arabinose binding protein
        (b) Download a text version of the 1ABE pdb coordinates  
    (2)  Start the 'Swiss PDB­Viewer' program located under “Start:Programs:Class Software”
    (3)  Open the 1ABE.pdb file inside 'Swiss PDB­Viewer'
        (a) Go to “File:Open PDB File” 
        (b) Browse to your saved 1ABE.pdb file


Q1: The program gives several error messages as the 1ABE.pdb file is loaded. What are the error 
messages and why do they occur?


Overall Fold and Domain Structure
    (4)  Once the structure is displayed, prepare and save each of the following figures. Figures can be 
        save by choosing “File:Save:Image” and providing a suitable name.
        (a) A Cα trace of the protein
Choose “Display:Show CA Trace Only” and then turn off the side chain display by unchecking the 'v' in the 'side' column of 
the Control Panel Window. You will also have to uncheck the 'v' in the 'show' column for residues ARA307 and ARA308.

        (b) A Cα trace of the protein with the secondary structures colored
Using the figure from above, choose “Color:By Secondary Structure”.

        (c) A Cα trace of the protein domains
Using the figure from above, choose “Color:By Secondary Structure Succession”. The secondary structures are colored 



Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                       24
according to their order in the primary sequence (Blues, then greens, yellows, oranges and finally red). Using the labeling 
button (Leu41 ?), identify the three connections between domains. Select all of the residues of one domain in the Control 
Panel Window and then choose “Color:By Selection”.


Note: You can select a continuous stretch of residues by selecting the first residue, scrolling to the last residue and holding 
the SHIFT key down as you select the last residue. To add residues to a selection, hold the CTRL key down while making 
your selection.



Q2: Where does the substrate bind in relation to the two domains?


Main chain Hydrogen Bonds
(5) Display the structure and prepare the following figure
         (a) Hydrogen bonds within a helix.
Compute the hydrogen bonds between main chain atoms by choosing “Tools:Compute H­bonds”. Hide all residue except 
110­128 by unchecking the 'v' in the 'show' column of the Control Panel Window. Display all main chain atoms for these 
residues by selecting “Display:Show Backbone Oxygens”. Make sure the “Display: Show CA Trace Only” is unchecked.



Q3: How many atoms in the helix are forming bidentate (more than one) hydrogen bonds?
Q4: Report the hydrogen bond distance for the first two hydrogen bonds of the helix.


Residue Distributions
(6) Display the structure and prepare the following figure
         (a) All residue surface accessibility
Starting with the complete model choose “Color:By Accessibility”. Each residue is colored according to the fraction of the 
residue that is exposed to solvent (Blue is least accessible while Red/Orange is most).
         (b) Surface accessibility of Phe
Starting with the above model choose “Select:Group Kind:Phe”. In the Control Panel Window there is a small triangle in 
the far right column ­  left click on the triangle and choose side chain. Now click on the show and side column titles. This 
will hide all residues except Phe.



Q5: What fraction of Phe residues are relatively exposed (ie. not blue) to the surface?
Q6: What fraction of Arg residues are relatively buried (ie. dark blue)?


Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                              25
Note: You will need to visualize the Arg residues as you did for Phe but are not required to save the figure. 



Substrate Binding
(7) Display the structure and prepare the following figure
         (a) L­arabinose VDW surface (slabbed)
Starting with the complete model, select the L­arabinose molecule by highlighting ARA307 in the Control Panel Window. 
Check the 'v' in  the 5th column of  the Control Panel Window (contains a triangle). Make sure the column has a small v 
above the triangle so a VDW surface is displayed.  Choose “Display:Slab” in order to visualize a thin slice of the protein 
centered about the substrate.
         (b) L­arabinose VDW surface (radii)
Starting with the model above, uncheck “Display:Slab”. Left click the mouse on the button containing a picture of an eye 
and circle. Once selected, left click the mouse on  the L­arabinose (any atom will work). In the resulting pop­up window, 
select “Display only groups that are within” and hit the 'OK' button.  This displays all residues within 6Å of the substrate.



Q7: Identify all hydrogen bonds and ion­dipole interactions between the protein and substrate. (Recall 
both hydrogen bonds and dipole interactions are strongest when linear).
Q8: Why are there two separate L­arabinose molecules modeled in the substrate binding site?


Structure Quality
(8) Display the structure and prepare the following figure
         (a) Ramachandran Plot
Starting with the complete model, choose “Window:Ramachandran Plot”. A pop­up window of the Ramachandran plot will 
appear. Hover the mouse cursor over each dot that is not inside the blue curves defining the energetically favorable regions 
for non­Glycine residues. Identify each of the non­Glycine residue that have an unfavorable energy. Using skills developed 
above, prepare a figure that only shows the Ramachandran outliers.



Q9: Is there a simple structural reason for these residues adopting energetically unfavorable main chain 
conformations?
         (b) Thermal motion
Starting with the complete model, choose “Display:Color by B­factor”. Each residue will be colored according to their 
thermal motion (Blue have the least motion and Red/Orange the greatest).




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                               26
Q10: How does the thermal motion of individual residues compare to their accessibility?


Manipulating Residues
(8) Display the structure and prepare the following figure
           (a) In silico mutation of Glu14 to Lys
Starting with the complete model, choose “Display:Slab”. Rotate the molecule until you have located residue Glu14. Left 
click the 'Mutate' button , then left click and hold the mouse button down on Glu14. A drop down menu will appear with a 
list of amino acid residues; select Lys. Left click once more on the mutate button and accept the mutation.
           (a) Adjusting the Lys torsion angle
Select and display Lys 14 only. Left click the “Torsion” button and then left click Lys 14.  A set of black arrows will appear 
to the right of the torsion button. The top buttons rotate about the Cα­Cβ bond, the next rotates about the Cβ­Cγ  bond, and 
so on.  Adjust each side chain torsion angle so the angle is trans. Once completed, left click the 'Torsion' button to accept the 
changes.



Q11: The Lys14 mutation would appear to be a better electrostatic complement to the L­arabinose O 
than the naturally occurring Glu14. Provide a simple structural reason Lys does not normally occur at 
this position.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                             27
Evaluation:
This laboratory does not require a complete write up.


Submit an electronic document that contains each of your saved figures (with identifying legend) and 
your answers to each of the questions in the laboratory protocol.


Your report is due in class one week after the completion of the experiment.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                   28
                                               5. Experimental Design

Introduction:
        Experiments following the scientific method are the cornerstone of empirical approaches aimed 
at understanding the physical world. They attempt to generate a set of results or measurement that 
support or contradict a hypothesis concerning a given phenomenon. When designing an experiment, it 
useful to think in terms of the independent variable (factor being varied) and dependent variable (value 
being measured). The most easily interpreted experiments have a single independent variable that is the 
only factor being varied and while all other variables are controlled. Likewise, the dependent variable 
must truly represent the phenomenon being studies and be accurately measured. The following exercise 
is intended to give some experience generating a laboratory protocol to address several research 
questions.

                        The remaining details of this exercise will be 
                            handed out during your lab section




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                     29
                    This page has been intentionally left blank




Biochemistry 3300                                                 30
                    This page has been intentionally left blank




Biochemistry 3300                                                 31
Biochemistry 3300   32
             6. Cysteine Specific Fluorescent Labeling


Introduction:
        The goal of this three week laboratory is to introduce fluorescent labeling; a popular 
biochemical technique for detecting and characterizing protein dynamics (protein­protein and protein­
ligand interactions, conformational changes, etc).  It is an extremely sensitive method as the fluorescent 
properties of the fluorophore are dependent upon the local electrostatic environment.  In addition, 
proteins and most ligands have little or no intrinsic fluorescence to mask the signal of the label.  While 
beyond the scope of this laboratory, modern techniques such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer 
(FRET) are dependent upon fluorescent labeling.  FRET can yield structural information for the system 
that are resistant to X­ray crystallographic and multi­dimensional NMR methods.
        Fluorescent labels can associate non­covalently (and usually non­specifically) with the protein 
of interest or they can be covalently bonded to specific residues.  The specific fluorescent labeling of 
proteins is most effective when targeting a highly reactive residue that occurs infrequently or only once 
in the protein of interest.  The cysteine residue fulfills these criteria;  it is rare in protein sequences (< 
2.5 % of total residues) and its sulfhydryl functional groups is highly reactive.  Consequently, many 
smaller proteins have relatively few or even a single cysteine residue.  In other cases, recombinant DNA 
technology can be utilized to introduce (or remove) cysteine residues to facilitate their study using 
fluorescent based biochemical methods.
        In this laboratory, several recombinant, His tagged bacterial ribosomal elongation factor (EF­Tu) 
mutants that contains a variable number of cysteine residues will be specifically labeled with a 
fluorophore (5­iodoacetamidofluorescein).  The laboratory makes use of an affinity chromatography 
matrix, microconcentrators and scanning UV­Visible spectroscopy to quantify the extent of labelling.  If 
week 3, the intrinsic fluoresence of a separate elongation factor (EF­G), will be utilized to characterize 
its binding affinity for GTP.
        Several of the reagents used in today's lab are irritants to both the skin and the respiratory 
system.  In addition to standard, proper laboratory techniques please use extra caution when handling 
the following: (1) NH4Cl, (2) dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and (3) ­mercaptoethanol.

Please note that the fluorescent labels are moderately expensive ($ 8000­10,000 per gram) and present 
in a limited supply so we request you exercise extra care using these compounds.  The amount of label 
used in the laboratory is relatively small (< 15 mg).




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                          33
Reagents:                                         Equipment:
Fluorescein­dye (30 mM)                          Refrigerated, preparative centrifuge
        (12.5 mg in 0.5 mL DMSO)                 15 mL disposable, plastic tubes
TAKM7 buffer 
        50 mM Tris HCl pH 7.5 (4° C)             Ice
        70 mM NH4Cl                              Pasteur pipettes and bulbs
        30 mM KCl
                                                 Ultra filtration device
         7 mM MgCl2
Equilibration buffer                             UV spectrophotometer
        TAKM7 buffer                             Fluorescent spectrophotometer
        + 10 mM ­mercaptoethanol
Labeling buffer                                  Cuvette (quartz)
        25 mM Tris HCl pH 7.5                    1.5 mL centrifuge tubes
        30 mM KCl                                Kimwipes
          7 mM MgCl2
        20 % (v/v) Glycerol
Elution buffer 
        25 mM Tris HCl pH 7.5 
        300 mM KCl
          7 mM MgCl2
        250 mM Imidazol
        20 % (v/v) Glycerol
Ni­NTA slurry
Elongation Factor Tu (His tagged EF­Tu) 0.030 mM
50 mM MgCl2
E. coli Elongation factor G (his­tag) in TAKM7, 
(EF­G), 30 µM
GTP (0.25 and 2.5 mM) in TAKM7




Biochemistry 3300                                                                       34
Protocol:
WEEK 1:  
                                                      
        Labeling EF­Tu with 5­iodoacetamidofluorescein


Prepare the Ni­NTA resin for EF­Tu binding
(1) Transfer 2.5 mL of Ni­NTA slurry (50 % w/v) into 15 mL disposable, conical centrifuge tube.
(2) Centrifuge (5 min @ 500 x g) at 4° C to pellet Ni­NTA resin and discard supernatant.
(3) Add 10 mL of equilibration buffer to the Ni­NTA resin.  Carefully invert the tube to mix and 
   centrifuge  (5 min @ 500 x g) at 4° C to pellet Ni­NTA resin prior to removing and discarding the 
   resin.
(4) Repeat step 3 two more times to complete the preparation of the resin for binding.


Binding of His tagged EF­Tu to Ni­NTA resin
(5) Add 4 mL of 0.030 mM His tagged EF­Tu in TAKM7 buffer to the Ni­NTA resin.
(6) Incubate EF­Tu with Ni­NTA resin at 4° C for up to 1 hour to allow the His­tagged protein to bind 
   to the resin.
(7) Centrifuge (5 min @ 500 x g) at 4° C to pellet Ni­NTA resin.  Remove and store the supernatant at 
   4° C as unbound protein can be recovered.
(8) Add 10 mL of labeling buffer to the Ni­NTA resin.  Carefully invert the tube to mix and centrifuge 
   (5 min @ 500 x g) at 4° C to pellet Ni­NTA resin prior to removing and discarding the supernatant.
(9) Repeat step 8 at least two more times to remove unbound protein and prepare for the labeling 
   reaction.
Labeling reaction
(10) Add 3.5 mL of labeling buffer to the resin.  Carefully invert the tube to mix.
(11) Add dye solution dropwise to an approximate 20 fold molar excess (0.080 mL maximum)
(12) Incubate at room temperature for 2 hours and overnight at 4° C.  (Instructor will transfer reaction 
   to 4° C and perform step 13)
(13) The reaction is stopped by washing the resin with labeling buffer until the supernatant is colorless. 
   (Recover and store the supernatant)




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                       35
WEEK 2: Extent of 
                                                     
                  5­iodoacetamidofluorescein labeling


Eluting the labeled protein
(1) Remove supernatant and add 1.5 mL of elution buffer.  Carefully invert the tube and incubate for 20 
   min on ice.
(2) Centrifuge (5 min @ 500 x g) at 4° C to pellet Ni­NTA resin.  Remove and store the supernatant in 
   a fresh disposable conical tube at 4° C.
(3) Add 1.5 mL of elution buffer, carefully invert tube and repeat step 15.  Perform this step twice.


Exchanging labeled protein buffer
(4) Add 0.5 mL of TAKM7 buffer to ultra filtration device and spin (5 min @ 5000 x g) at 4º C. 
(5) Add eluted protein sample to ultra filtration device and spin (10­20 min @ 5000 x g) at 4º C until 
   the sample volume is ~ 0.4 mL.
(6) Discard the liquid (elution buffer) that has passed through the ultra filtration membrane. 
(7) Add ~ 4 mL of TAKM7 buffer to protein sample retained by the ultra filtration device. 
(8) Repeat steps 19 and 20 twice yielding a dilution of the elution buffer of ~ 1:1000.


Determine the concentration of labeled protein
(9) Blank the UV spectrophotometer at 490 nm with TAKM7.
(10) Determine the absorption of 2, 5 and 10 fold dilutions of the labeled protein at 490 nm.  The molar 
   extinction coefficient of fluorescein and EF­Tu are 63 x 103 AU M­1 cm­1(490 nm) and 32.9 x 103 AU 
   M­1 cm­1(280 nm), respectively.


WEEK 3:  
        GTP binding to EF­G 
(1)  Prepare a solution of 5 µM EF­G (his­tag) in 270 µl TAKM7, store on ice
(2)  Transfer 250 µl of EF­G solution into small quartz cuvette, place cuvette into cuvette holder and 
   then into fluorescence spectrometer, consider orientation of windows
(3)  Prepare fluorescence spectrometer (while protein solution is adapting to room temperature)
(4)  Software “Scan”


Biochemistry 3300                                                                                         36
(5)  Go to Setup, Cary: set to measurements to “Fluorescence”, “Emission” (i.e. to record emission 
   spectra),
(6) Excitation wavelength: 290 nm (excitation of Trp)
(7) Emission wavelength: Start = 310 nm, End = 390 nm
(8) Go to Setup, Auto­store: Save data as ASCII (csv) with log
(9) Record blank emission spectrum: press on “Start”
(10) Save data on C / Data / Bchm 4200A / yourname 1
(11) Press “Zero” to set start point of blank spectrum to intensity “0” (arbitrary units – a.u.)
(12) Record again the blank emission spectrum (as in (5) )
(13) Add GTP (Volume and Concentration see Table 1), mix well by carefully pipetting (100 µL), place 
   cuvette back into fluorescence spectrometer and wait 2 min before recording emission spectrum (as 
   in (5) )
   Note: Binding of GTP quenches fluorescence of Trp



(14) Repeat step (9) according to Table 1


Table 1: Titration with GTP
 Data point        Volume of EF­G to add in µL                     Stock Concentration of GTP
 0 (Blank)         ­                                               ­
 1                 2                                               0.25 mM
 2                 2                                               0.25 mM
 3                 4                                               0.25 mM
 4                 6                                               0.25 mM
 5                 6                                               0.25 mM
 6                 2                                               2.5 mM
 7                 4                                               2.5 mM
 8                 4                                               2.5 mM
 9                 4                                               2.5 mM
 10                4                                               2.5 mM


Note: Some laboratory groups will record data corresponding to data points 1,3,5,7 and 9. Other groups 
will record data corresponding to data points 2,4,6,8 and 10.  This provides multiple measurements that 
can be averaged.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                     37
Evaluation:
Complete and hand­in a full lab write up for this experiment.  Refer to Appendix A for instructions on 
preparing a full write up. Your report is due on April 7 or 8 depending upon your section. For the final 
laboratory report you will be expected to identify suitable introduction and discussion topics without 
the aid of the instructors. You will need to report the extent (or fraction) of protein labelled for each of 
the posted EF­Tu mutants.
Fluorescein Molar Extinction Coefficient       63 x 103 AU M­1 cm­1           (490 nm)
EF­Tu Molar Extinction Coefficient             32.9 x 103 AU M­1 cm­1         (280 nm)
You will also need to report the EF­G association constant.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                          38
                      Appendix A: Preparing a Laboratory Report
When preparing a full lab write up for Biochemistry 3300 you will be expected to adhere to the 
following guidelines:

Format – the reports must be typed, double spaced, size 12 “Times New Roman” font, with 1'' margins 
on  8.5 x 11'' paper.

Title Page – should include you name and student ID number, the date, your instructor's name, the lab 
section (including semester and year), and last but not least a concise yet descriptive title.

Abstract  – should be a short (< 200 words) summary of what is presented in the paper, including 
important results. No references are included in the abstract 

Introduction – must include the objective of the lab, background information introducing the reader to 
the subject area, and one sentence at the end of the paragraph indicating what you are presenting in the 
paper.   You must cite relevant literature (as recent as possible i.e. stay away from the 70's, 80's, early 
90's unless necessary).MAXIMUM LENGTH: 2 PAGES double spaced.

Materials and Methods – this section only contains information on how the experiment was carried 
out and sample calculations to reproduce your data. Students may reference the laboratory protocol. It 
should be written so that the reader can repeat your results by reading the laboratory protocol and this 
section. MAXIMUM LENGTH: 4 PAGES double spaced.

Results – this section contains what you found.  You do not describe the significance of your results, or 
put forward hypothesis based on the results in this section.   Just state the facts.   Here you should 
generate and reference appropriate figures and tables in a  neat  fashion.  MAXIMUM LENGTH: 2 
PAGE of text double spaced.

Discussion  – this is the section that you can put forward hypothesis and interpret your results.   This 
section should also include references to relevant literature. MAXIMUM LENGTH: 2 PAGES double 
spaced.

References – in text references should be of the form (authors last name, date) and the references at the 
end of the text should be formated as specified by the Journal of Biological Chemistry (www.jbc.org 
instructions to authors). As many as you want! The more the better.

Figures and Tables – append your figures and tables at the back of the report, do not insert them into 
the text.

NOTE:  You must be concise! Any text beyond the allowed page limit will not be marked.


Biochemistry 3300                                                                                       39
Biochemistry 3300   40
                                           Safety Agreement


                                              Appendix B: Safety Agreement

 This form must be completed, signed  and submitted to your laboratory instructor at the beginning of 
                                    the first laboratory period.




                                        * * * * * * * * * * * * *




  I have read and understood the safety rules in this manual, recognize that it is my responsibility to 
                   observe them and agree to abide by them throughout this course.




                    Name (please print) _________________________________



                    Date ________________    Signature ___________________




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                          41
Biochemistry 3300   42
                                             Safety Regulations



Please ensure that you are familiar with the following safety guidelines prior to the start of your first 
lab.

(1)Know and follow all protocols.

(2)Understand the materials you are working with.

(3)Wear eye protection, lab coats and gloves when working in the lab.

(4)Tie back long hair.

(5)Do not eat or drink in the lab.

(6)Use all concentrated acids, bases and volatile chemicals in the fume hood.
    
(7)Dispose of environmentally harmful reagents in appropriate waste containers.

(8)Maintain a clean working area (benches and floor space), clear from coats, bags or excess 
   notebooks.

(9) Report all glass breaks, spills or injuries to your instructor.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                            43
Biochemistry 3300   44
                                  Appendix C: Preparation of a Lab Book

Your lab book provides you with a detailed record of your experiments performed.  This record proves 
invaluable   when   preparing   manuscripts   for   publication,   or   more   immediately,   when   preparing   lab 
reports.  This lab book, as with all graded material, is an individual effort.

Choice of Lab Book

Standard black lab books can be purchased from the book store but these are not required for this 
course. The only required features are;
(10)Pages are non­removable (no spiral bindings)
(11)All pages must be numbered in the top outer corner
        1. page numbers may be hand­written on EVERY page in INK

In General

    ➢   all entries must be made in blue or black ink 
    ➢   date EVERY entry
    ➢   never remove a page or use white­out
             •   if an entry needs to be deleted, strike out the entry with a single straight line (the deleted 
                 entry must be readable)
    ➢   keep up to date, a lab book is meant to be filled out as the experiments are carried out and NOT 
        after the fact
    ➢   record anything that may be useful to you when preparing your lab reports
    ➢   leave plenty of space throughout the lab book to add comments after the fact


Table of Contents

Designate the first 2 pages as the Table of Contents
      ➢ record information and pages numbers as you go


Lab Entries

For each lab be sure to include the following;
    (1) Objective

    (2) Method Summary
        ➢ do not rewrite the protocol from the lab manual
        ➢ highlight any specific changes to the lab protocol
        ➢ include times and dates for when work was performed


Biochemistry 3300                                                                                                45
       ➢   record product names and manufacturers used
               •  enzymes, chemicals, equipment (micropipettors, baths)
       ➢   include incubation conditions for cultures and reactions

   (3) Observations & Results
       ➢ record any observations, this goes beyond number results
       ➢ include diagrams, gel pictures, and any other form of raw data
       ➢ include calculations as appropriate


   (4) Conclusions
       ➢ did you achieve your objective? Why or why not?
       ➢ use your results to support your conclusions



Supply List

You may find it helpful to reserve the last page or two of the lab book to be used as a supply list for 
materials utilized throughout the experiments.   This can be particularly useful for bacterial strains, 
DNA, and enzymes utilized.  Listing details such as the supplier, growth conditions, concentrations, etc. 
can save you a lot of time searching for this information at a later date.




Biochemistry 3300                                                                                     46