Anthropology 30 Critical Thinking by qfb12172

VIEWS: 38 PAGES: 13

									Anthropology 30: Critical Thinking
6:00-8:45pm, Tue., Room SS 209b,

James Mullooly PhD
Department of Anthropology             Office: Peters 251
Telephone: 278-7574                    e-mail: jmullooly@csufresno.edu
Office Hours: Tue./Thur. 10:45-12:30/1:45-2:30 and by appointment

Course Description
         Critical thinking includes a variety of deliberative processes aimed at making wise decisions
about what to believe and do, processes that center on evaluation of arguments but include much more.
This course integrates logic, both formal and informal, with a variety of skills and topics useful in making
sound decisions about claims, actions, and practices. Real life contexts are offered, both in the readings
and in lectures, to illustrate the important role critical thinking plays in today’s society, and how
frequently sound reasoning is replaced by sloppy thinking and manipulative persuasion.
         In this course, you will distinguish belief v. knowledge and fact v. opinion; examine relationship
between language/logic; use inductive/deductive reasoning; recognize informal/formal fallacies;
appreciate socio-cultural context of critical thinking. These skills will be applied to topics of
race/intelligence, religion/values, and social policy and will be assessed through oral and written
performance.
         This section of Critical Thinking is now a Web-enhanced course through the use of Blackboard
and my web site. Go to: http://blackboard.csufresno.edu/index.html to get started on the Blackboard
component of this course. As well, you can find the syllabus on my web site:
http://www.csufresno.edu/Anthropology/Faculty/Mullooly

Course Outcomes
This course also meets the General Education, Area A3
Goal for Area A3: Critical Thinking
An educated person must be able to read critically, communicate effectively, and think clearly.

Student Learning Outcomes for Area A3: Critical Thinking
Students completing courses in Area A3 will be able to:
1. Identify the relationship of language and logic.
2. Analyze criticize, and advocate ideas
3. Reason inductively and deductively
4. Reach factual or judgmental conclusions based on sound inferences drawn from unambiguous
   statements or knowledge or belief.
5. Recognize? Define? the structure of informal arguments
6. Identify and distinguish the most common formal and informal fallacies of language and
   thought
7. Distinguish matters of fact from issues of judgment or opinion.
8. Identify and provide examples of the role of critical thinking in society.

Texts: Critical Thinking (7th Edition), Moore and Parker
       Culture As Given, Culture As Choice (2nd Edition), van der Elst




                                                                                                           1
Detailed Course Objectives (by section)

Section 1: Comprehension/Cultural Context of Meaning and Understanding
Readings: Moore/Parker Chapters 1-3; van der Elst Chapters 1-3
Objectives:
1. Develop an understanding of critical thinking and its value to your education, life, and future
employment.
2. Understand the role of critical thinking in oral and written communication.
3. Distinguish fact from opinion and belief from knowledge, and extend the distinctions to cross-cultural
examples.
4. Examine the role of critical thinking in evaluating written sources and "expert" opinions.

Section 2: Informal Fallacies/Cultural Distractions and Diversions
Readings: Moore/Parker Chapters 4-6; van der Elst Chapters 4-6
Objectives:
1. Understand the role of connotation in language and the way it affects our judgment about claims.
2. Examine the nature of fallacies, why are they so deceptive, and how they undermine critical thinking.
3. Recognize fallacies in advertising, political discussions, and everyday life.
4. Understand how informal fallacies and persuasive language distract us in argumentation.
5. Evaluate the cultural context of language and its effect on our "view" of the world.
6. Consider the extent to which the model of "Western" reasoning is universal?

Section 3: Explanation and Science/Alternative Empirical Worlds
Readings: Moore/Parker Chapters 7, 10, and 11; van der Elst Chapters 7-9
Objectives:
1. Understand the structure of arguments and explanations.
2. Examine the relationship of theory, hypothesis, and validation in "knowing" the world.
3. Consider examples of non-Western reasoning used to explain events in other cultures.
4. Understand the structure of inductive arguments and their role in modern science and social policy.
5. Evaluate the relationship between cause and effect in the “macroscopic world” and its application to
everyday life. Assess its universal applicability.
6. Examine the role of science in explaining phenomena, contrasted with alternative views derived from
other cultures.
7. Understand the distinction between "folk" and scientific views of the world and their roles in everyday
life.

Section 4: Argument and Moral Reasoning/Culture and Conviction
Readings: Moore/Parker Chapters 8, 9, and 12; van der Elst Chapters 10-12
Objectives:
1. Recognize patterns of deductive logic, including modus ponens, modus tollens, and categorical
syllogisms.
2. Understand the logic of classes, the use of Venn diagrams and their application to categorical
syllogisms.
3. Relate propositional logic and to natural language, including logical connectives and their translation
into symbolic form.
4. Practice the application of direct and indirect proofs and Reductio ad Absurdum (RAA) as means of
determining validity.
5. Recognize moral claims and "Western" perspectives of moral reasoning.
6. Appreciate the use of moral and legal reasoning in "Western" and "non-Western" contexts.
7. Understand criteria of aesthetic value and their cultural variation.



                                                                                                             2
Course Requirements
Attendance
Your prompt arrival and attendance are essential for the success of this class. Missing more than three
days of classes will lower your grade by one letter.

Participation
This course will only be as good as you make it. You have the power to make it meaningful, stimulating,
and educational. I trust you to use your power well, for the sake of both your own educational
experience, as well as that of your peers.

Writing Guidelines
Note: Writing assignments (other than in-class writing activities) imply typed, doubled spaced text of a
font comparable to Times New Roman 12 point (i.e., at least 250 words per page). Pages should have
one-inch margins on all sides and include page numbers. As well, correct spelling, grammar and uniform
scholarly citations are expected. As a writing intensive course, form and structure, as well as content, will
influence your grade. NOTE: You do not need a title page but all papers title MUST follow the
following guidelines. Your title must start with the name of the assignment, e.g., “Paper 1: (Write
your title here)”. If I cannot tell which paper assignment it is on the top of the first page, I will not
read it. I also want the papers stapled.

You are expected to write at least 2000 words during the course. That will be described in page numbers
for each paper rather than word lengths. Therefore, for the course, you are expected to write the
equivalent of at least 8 pages (250 per page). This is not a general guideline but a minimal expectation
with regard to this course. Therefore, for example, a two page paper will mean a paper that contains at
least 500 words. Writing assignment will be assessed based on the writing rubric attached at the end of
this document. There will be no opportunities to make up missed work.

Assignments are due on the dates given (date stamped by 11:30pm). Late assignments will be marked
down one letter grade (e.g., an earned A will become a B) for each week they are late and will NOT
receive comments. Feel free to e-mail papers to me to make this deadline. You will have to print them
out and hand them in for me to grade them though.

Course grades will be based on 500 points, described below.
Exams
You will be given three examinations. These equally weighted tests will be given after the completion of
Sections 1, 2, 3, and 4, and they shall constitute 60% of your final grade (i.e., 300 points).

The writing requirement for this class will be a minimum of 2,000 words or approximately 8 typed
pages, and will represent 40% of your final grade (i.e., 200 points). There will be one major paper (of
four pages for 100 points) and two minor papers (of two pages for 50 points each) each. The papers will
be mostly based on your reading of van der Elst's Culture As Given, Culture As Choice. An opportunity
will be given to rewrite the major paper towards the end of the term.

             Course Calendar                    Exam Grades        Course Grades
First Exam 4th week of the semester.             90--100 - A        450-500 - A
Second Exam 8th week of the semester.             80-89 - B         400-449 - B
Third Exam 13th week of the semester.             65-79 - C         350-399 - C
Fourth Exam scheduled for the final.              55-64 - D         300-349 – D
Major paper - 9th week of the semester
Brief papers – 5th week and 16th week



                                                                                                           3
                 Paper 1 Assignment (Where’s the logic in van der Elst’s arguments?)

The paper should be AT LEAST two pages in length (i.e., at least 500 words). I remind you that some of
you may need to actually write more than 500 words to fully clarify your points and earn a %100. If you
write more than two pages, do note write more than three pages total. Please use 1" margins, one and
one-half spacing, and a font size not to exceed 12 pts. See the schedule for due dates. You can e-mail it
to me if you miss class, but I will need a paper copy the following class to grade it.

Overall, your objective to apply the knowledge and terminology you have gained from the first three
chapters of our course text (Moore and Parker) to analyze the arguments made by van der Elst in Culture
as Given, Culture as Choice.

SOME of the questions you can address are listed here. If you would like to pursue other avenues of
analysis (i.e., not answer these questions) that is fine BUT YOU MUST DO THE ASSIGNMENT.

ASSIGNMENT: Define “culture” in van der Elst’s terms while addressing the issue of whether the
Nurture/Nature dichotomy is valid.
Use van der Elst’s first three chapters to illustrate your point.
The following might help you organize your thoughts. You do not need to use these points.
        -What makes learning so biological adaptive?
        -How can you consider culture to be the “behavioral equivalent of a gene pool? (ch 3)
        -Why don’t humans have instincts?
               -Distinguish between Drives and Instincts
               -Why is this distinction of Drives/Instincts important?

OTHER QUESTIONS THAT MIGHT HELP YOU:

-Why has van der Elst taken three chapters to define culture? As the explanation of culture is a primary
objective of the book, why did he not define culture until chapter 3?
Is this logical?

Is there any truth to the following (stated in chapter 1)?
For Humans:
1. Survival requires Adaptation
2. Adaptation requires Reproduction
3. Reproduction requires Sex
4. Sex requires Culture
If so, does this mean that Survival requires Culture?

-Analyze van der Elst’s claim: it is absolutely astonishing that you are here at all.




                                                                                                           4
           Paper Assignment 2 (Part II of “Where’s the logic in van der Elst arguments?”)

The paper should be AT LEAST four pages in length (i.e., at least 1000 words). I remind you that some of you may
need to actually write more than 1000 words to fully clarify your points and earn a %100. If you write more than
four pages, do not write more than five pages total. Please use 1" margins, one and one-half spacing, and a font size
not to exceed 12 pts. See the schedule for due dates. You can e-mail it to me if you miss class, but I will need a
paper copy the following class to grade it.

 Overall, your objective is to apply the knowledge and terminology you have
gained from the first seven chapters of our course text (Moore and Parker) to
      analyze the arguments made by van der Elst in Culture as Given.
SOME of the questions you can address are listed here. If you would like to pursue other avenues of
analysis (i.e., not answer these questions) that is fine BUT YOU MUST DO THE ASSIGNMENT.

ASSIGNMENT: Moving beyond our discussion of the “nature/nurture dichotomy”, discuss van der
Elst’s beliefs on language and kinship in terms of their further support (or refutation) of a Lévi-
Straussian or “nature/nurture” dichotomy on being human (i.e., that which is both nature and
nurture). Basically, explain how language and kinship are either only nature, only nurture, or both
(based on your well argued opinion). The examples below are to help you illustrate your point (use
them if you like).

   In a way, culture substitutes itself to life, in another way culture uses and transforms life to realise a
                         synthesis of a higher order. -Claude Lévi-Strauss, 1949

Suggestions Offered Below:
In Chapter 4, van der Elst argues that language is a prerequisite for culture. What facts AND
LOGIC justify this claim?
       *It would be wise to illustrate your points with information from chapter 4.
               e.g., from chapter 4
               -Why do languages disappear?
               -Does the Sapri-Worf Hypothesis shed light on these issues?
               -What are the “benefits of Babel” and how is this similar to biological
               survival?
               -Why are there many language, in stead of just one (i.e., the Babel effect”)?

In Chapters 5 and 6, van der Elst discusses aspects of biological and social reproduction (i.e.,
making babies and keeping your name). Explain the “nature”(biology) behind the “nurture” of
marriage and kinship.
       *It would be wise to illustrate your points with information from chapter 5 and 6.
               e.g., from chapter 5
               - Why is group marriage (i.e., multiple men and women) NOT the norm?
               -Why do human females stand out?
               -Culture has increased not decreased the need for marriage - Why?
               e.g., from chapter 6
               -Why are clans normally exogamous?
               -What are the costs of illegitimacy in American society and would they be
               less “costly” if we had another form of kinship?


                                                                                                                    5
6
Paper Assignment 3 (Analyze "Blame It on Feminism")

The paper should be AT LEAST two pages in length (i.e., at least 500 words). I remind you that some of
you may need to actually write more than 500 words to fully clarify your points and earn a %100. If you
write more than two pages, do note write more than three pages total. Please use 1" margins, one and
one-half spacing, and a font size not to exceed 12 pts. See the schedule for due dates.

First, Read Susan Faludi’s, "Blame It on Feminism" (found on Blackboard in the document
section)

Second, write and essay responding to questions 1-6 in narrative form. I DO NOT want you to
answer the six questions directly, but rather think about them and incorporate them into your
essay. You may attach copies of the advertisements if you want me to see them. You may also
include a references page, but make sure these are IN ADDITION to the 2-3 pages of text.

Remember that advertisers are trying to persuade women to buy their products, so the
advertisements will display what advertisers think women want to see. Write an analysis of the
advertisements, formulating your thesis after you have done your research and after you have
written and thought about the questions above.

Questions for Exercise One:
Faludi writes that the idea that feminism is responsible for making women miserable has its
origin in a "closed system that starts and ends in the media, popular culture, and advertising
...." Analyze the portrayal of women in advertisements in at least five magazines, ranging from
sports magazines to fashion magazines to news magazines. Consider at least fifty advertisements
targeting women, and then use your analysis to answer the following questions in your essay:

(1) How do current advertisements that target female audiences approach the idea of the
liberated, equal woman?

(2) How do advertisements address the Superwoman concept?

(3) Do advertisements show women working in a serious manner, or do they make fun of women
at work?

(4) How do advertisers portray working women? Are women at work sexualized in
advertisements, or are women made to look more masculine?

(5) How do advertisers portray women who are homemakers and mothers? Who looks happier in
advertisements--working women or stay-at-home mothers?

(6) Do you see evidence of a backlash against women's equality in advertisements, or do you see
progress in the portrayal of women in advertising?




                                                                                                      7
Course Schedule
The following is a tentative course schedule with topics for lectures and discussions, assignments, and weekly
reading assignments. The instructor reserves the right to make changes in the syllabus.
        Date       Week                                Topic                               Reading Assignment
       (8/22)         1                            Introduction
                                Section 1: Comprehension/Cultural Context of
                                          Meaning and Understanding
                               Readings: Moore/Parker Chapters 1-3; van der Elst
                                                   Chapters 1-3
       (8/30)         2                         Thinking Critically                       Moore/Parker, chapter 1
                                                                                           van der Elst, chapter 1
                                   Thursday 9/1 Last day to DROP CLASSES
        (9/6)         3                Critical Thinking and Clear Writing                Moore/Parker, chapter 2
                                                                                           van der Elst, chapter 2
       (9/20)         4                             Credibility                           Moore/Parker, chapter 3
                                   TO DO: Hand out short paper 1 Assignment                van der Elst, chapter 3
       (9/27)         5                FIRST EXAM (M/P Chapters 1-3)
                              Section 2: Informal Fallacies/Cultural Distractions
                                                 and Diversions
                              Readings: Moore/Parker Ch. 4-6; van der Elst Ch.4-6
       (9/27)         5                   Persuasion Through Rhetoric                     Moore/Parker, chapter 4
                                                                                           van der Elst, chapter 4
       (10/4)         6                      More Rhetorical Devices                      Moore/Parker, chapter 5
                               DUE: Paper 1 (two pages) on van der Elst, ch.1-3)           van der Elst, chapter 5
      (10/11)         7                           More Fallacies                          Moore/Parker, chapter 6
                                                                                           van der Elst, chapter 6
      (10/18)         8              SECOND EXAM (M/P Chapters 4-6)
                                Section 3: Explanation and Science/Alternative
                                                Empirical Worlds
                               Readings: Moore/Parker Ch. 7, 10, and 11; van der
                                                    Elst Ch.7-9
      (10/18)         9                    The Anatomy of Arguments                       Moore/Parker, chapter 7
                                                                                           van der Elst, chapter 7
      (10/25)        10                        Inductive Arguments                       Moore/Parker, chapter 10
                              DUE: Paper 2 (four pages) due 10/25 (van der Elst,           van der Elst, chapter 8
                                                      ch.1-7)
       (11/1)        11                         Causal Arguments                         Moore/Parker, chapter 11
                                                                                           van der Elst, chapter 9
       (11/8)        12                   Causal Arguments (continued)                   Moore/Parker, chapter 11
                                                                                          van der Elst, chapter 10
      (11/15)        13             THIRD EXAM (M/P Chapters 7,10,11)
      (11/15)        13                       Deductive Arguments I                       Moore/Parker, chapter 8
                                                                                          van der Elst, chapter 11
      (11/22)        14                       Deductive Arguments I                       Moore/Parker, chapter 8
                                                                                          van der Elst, chapter 11
      (11/29)        15                  We will not meet in class. AAA
       (12/6)     16 Last                    Deductive Arguments II                       Moore/Parker, chapter 9
                   Day of Conclusion and Final Examination Preparation Review             van der Elst, chapter 12
                    class       DUE: Paper 3 (two pages) 12/6 (on van der Elst,
                                                      ch.1-12
       (12/8)                      Consultation (dead) days during office hours
     Tuesday                   FOURTH EXAM (M/P Chapters 8,9,12) GIVEN
       12/13                  DURING FINAL EXAM PERIOD 08:00P-10:00P




                                                                                                                     8
                        Anthro 30, Critical Thinking -- Writing Rubric
          Writing assignments will be graded using the following four-component rubric..
Issue Selection and         Organization               Writing (includes tone,        Argumentation (the support
Development (the main       (the internal structure)   sentence flow, word choice,    from premises with clear
Claim and its                                          phrasing, and adherence to     documented evidence, logically
development)                                           conventions of grammar,        entailing the conclusion)
                                                       punctuation, paragraph,
                                                       structure, etc.

6. The issue is clearly     6. The organization is     6. The essay is lively,        6. Thoughts are clearly and
stated and deeply           compelling and moves       expressive, engaging,          powerfully defined. Analysis
explored; thoughts are      reader through the         personable. Word choice is     of the evidence is sound.
clear and focused.          paper. The issue,          precise, original, concise,    Counterarguments are
Trivia and irrelevancies    premises and analysis      and rich. Sentences flow       considered is space permits.
aren’t found. The issue     of evidence smoothly       nicely; phrasing               Evidence is documented with
lends itself to known       leads to the concluding    conventions enhance            citations as appropriate.
criteria useful in          paragraph. Details are     readability Errors in          Rhetoric, if present, is not
exploring the               correctly placed.          grammar, punctuation, or       substituted for argument.
reasonable claim.                                      paragraphing don’t exist.
4. Issues are explored      4. Reader can readily      4. The writing is pleasant,    4. Thoughts are supported, but
somewhat superficially;     follow essay, but          acceptable, and, for the       support is incomplete or
ideas tend to be general,   organization is            most part, mechanically        unpersuasive. Rhetoric is
insubstantial, and          ineffective or even        correct, but it lacks punch.   sometimes used in place of
occasionally even           somewhat confusing.        An occasional awkward          argument. Premises are not
trivial.                                               construction may distract      documented with sound
                                                       the reader from the content.   evidence. Counterarguments
                                                                                      are not considered.

1. Lacks clear issue or     1. Organization is         1. The writing is flat,        1. Premises are weakly
coherency; difficult for    haphazard and              lifeless, stiff, turgid, and   supported if at all. Emotional
reader to follow the        disjointed. Ideas are      dull. Sentences are choppy,    appeals or fallacies appear;
reasoning. Irrelevant       strung together helter-    incomplete, rambling, or       questions are begged, rhetoric
statements, lacking         skelter.                   awkward. Errors in             frequently is used in place of
development with                                       conventions are common.        argument. Premises are
claim.                                                 Essay is difficult to          irrelevant, weak, unsound, and
                                                       comprehend without             difficult to comprehend or
                                                       rereading. Essay resists       paraphrase, or leave big gaps
                                                       being read aloud.              for the reader to try to fill in by
                                                                                      guesswork.




                                                       Comments:

  Issue S and D             ________
  Organization              ________
  Writing                   ________
  Argumentation             ________
  TOTAL                     _____/25_




                                                                                                                        9
Critical Thinking Paper Scoring System
   Rubric                              50pt    100pt
     score      Grade Percentage       scale   scale
       25         A        100%         50      100
       24         A         98%         49       98
       23         A         96%         48       96
       22         A         95%         48       95
       21         A         93%         47       93
       20         A         90%         47       90
       19         B         89%         46       89
       18         B         88%         45       88
       17         B         87%         44       87
       16         B         85%         43       85
       15         B         84%         42       84
       14         B         80%         40       80
       13         C         78%         39       78
       12         C         76%         38       76
       11         C         74%         37       74
       10         C         73%         37       73
        9         C         72%         36       72
        8         C         70%         35       70
        7         D         68%         34       68
        6         D         66%         33       66
        5         D         65%         33       65
        4         D         63%         32       63




                                                       10
NEW Critical Thinking Paper Scoring System
   Rubric                           50pt     100pt
    score     Grade Percentage      scale    scale
      24        A                    50       100
      24        A                    49        98
      23        A                    48        96
      22        A                    48        95
      21        A                    47        93
      20        A                    47        90
      19        A                    46        89
      18        A                    45        88
      17        B                    44        87
      16        B                    43        85
      15        B                    42        84
      14        B                    40        80
      13        C                    39        78
      12        C                    38        76
      11        C                    37        74
      10        C                    37        73
       9        C                    36        72
       8        C                    35        70
       7        D                    34        68
       6        D                    33        66
       5        D                    33        65
       4        D                    32        63




                                                     11
                                             University Policies

Cheating and Plagiarism: It is the responsibility of each student to know the University's policy on
cheating and plagiarism (see pp. 479 - 480 of the 1999 -2000 General Catalog). Any form of cheating,
including plagiarism, can result in expulsion from the University, an F in the course, and/or an F on the
paper or examination.

Students with Disabilities: Upon identifying themselves to the instructor and the university, students
with disabilities will receive reasonable accommodation for learning and evaluation. For more
information, contact Services to Students with Disabilities in Madden Library 1049 (278-2811).

Cheating and Plagiarism: "Cheating is the actual or attempted practice of fraudulent or deceptive acts
for the purpose of improving one's grade or obtaining course credit; such acts also include assisting
another student to do so. Typically, such acts occur in relation to examinations. However, it is the intent
of this definition that the term 'cheating' not be limited to examination situations only, but that it include
any and all actions by a student that are intended to gain an unearned academic advantage by fraudulent
or deceptive means. Plagiarism is a specific form of cheating which consists of the misuse of the
published and/or unpublished works of others by misrepresenting the material (i.e., their intellectual
property) so used as one's own work." Penalties for cheating and plagiarism range from a 0 or F on a
particular assignment, through an F for the course, to expulsion from the university. For more information
on the University's policy regarding cheating and plagiarism, refer to the Schedule of Courses (Legal
Notices on Cheating and Plagiarism) or the University Catalog (Policies and Regulations)

Computers: "At California State University, Fresno, computers and communications links to remote
resources are recognized as being integral to the education and research experience. Every student is
required to have his/her own computer or have other personal access to a workstation (including a modem
and a printer) with all the recommended software. The minimum and recommended standards for the
workstations and software, which may vary by academic major, are updated periodically and are available
from Information Technology Services (http://www/csufresno.edu/ITS/) or the University Bookstore. In
the curriculum and class assignments, students are presumed to have 24-hour access to a computer
workstation and the necessary communication links to the University's information resources."

Disruptive Classroom Behavior: "The classroom is a special environment in which students and faculty
come together to promote learning and growth. It is essential to this learning environment that respect for
the rights of others seeking to learn, respect for the professionalism of the instructor, and the general goals
of academic freedom are maintained. ... Differences of viewpoint or concerns should be expressed in
terms which are supportive of the learning process, creating an environment in which students and faculty
may learn to reason with clarity and compassion, to share of themselves without losing their identities,
and to develop and understanding of the community in which they live . . . Student conduct which
disrupts the learning process shall not be tolerated and may lead to disciplinary action and/or removal
from class."




                                                                                                            12
Area A3: Communication in the English Language and Critical Thinking

I. The following need to be demonstrated in the syllabus                 Week               How Assessed
for this area of General Education.
Provide theory and practice in reaching factual or judgmental        Weeks 1-16       First Examination
conclusions based on sound inferences drawn from
unambiguous statements of knowledge or belief.
Provide theory and practice in identifying the relationship of       Weeks 8-13       Second Examination
language and logic.
Provide theory and practice in the structure of informal             Weeks 8-13       Second Examination
arguments and development of deductive and inductive
reasoning skills with oral or written critiques by the instructor.
Provide theory and practice in identifying and distinguishing        Weeks 2-7        First Examination;
the most common formal and informal fallacies of language                             Writing Exercise
and reasoning with oral or written critiques by the instructor.
Provide theory and practice in identifying and providing             Weeks 1-16       All Examinations;
examples of the role of critical thinking in society.                                 Writing Exercises
Instruction is designed to achieve an understanding of the           Weeks 1-4, 9-    Third Examination
relationship of language and logic which should lead to the          15
ability to analyze, criticize, and advocate ideas, to reason
inductively and deductively, and to reach factual or judgmental
conclusions based on sound inferences drawn from
unambiguous statements of knowledge or belief.
Minimal competence to be expected should be the                      Weeks 1,         First, Second, and Third
demonstration of skills in elementary inductive and deductive        9-15             Examinations
processes, including an understanding of the formal and
informal fallacies of language and thought, and the ability to
distinguish matters of fact from issues of judgment or opinion.
II. General syllabus requirements.                                       Weeks             How Assessed
Exposes students to primary source readings and material             Research for     Scoring Rubric for Papers
where appropriate.                                                   Papers
Name of instructor, office location, telephone number.               Syllabus, p. 1   N/A
Course title and number, number of units and brief course            Syllabus, p. 1   N/A
description.
Course description.                                                  Syllabus, p. 1   N/A
Course calendar with approximate dates, deadlines, and/or            Syllabus, pp.    N/A
periods of time for topics, readings, projects, exams, etc.          4-5
Course requirements and basis for final grade.                       Syllabus, p. 3   N/A
Textbooks, equipment, etc. required.                                 Syllabus, p. 1   N/A
Statement regarding students with disabilities.                      Syllabus, p. 6   N/A
Statement regarding cheating/plagiarism.                             Syllabus, p. 6   N/A
Statement on attendance and makeup work for absent students.         Syllabus, p. 3   N/A
Statement regarding disruptive classroom behavior.                   Syllabus, p. 6   N/A
Computer usage.                                                      Syllabus, p. 6   N/A
III. Writing requirement.                                                Weeks             How Assessed
Have a 2000 word writing requirement.                                syllabus, p. 3   Papers (Scoring Rubric)
Should contain a complete description of the components,             syllabus, p. 3   Papers (Scoring Rubric)
methodology, and goals of the assignment, as well as the
criteria/standards against which they shall be evaluated.
Should include a structured iterative revision process.              syllabus, p. 3   Papers (Scoring Rubric)
Journals constitute partial satisfaction of the writing              Not used         Not used
requirement. Journals comprised of class notes may not be
used to meet this requirement.




                                                                                                                  13

								
To top