K-20 Education Distance Learning and Collaboration using Second Life by tsu23398

VIEWS: 10 PAGES: 51

									K‐20 Education: Distance Learning and Collaboration 
                 using Second Life

          Cathy Arreguin, San Diego State University
             Stan Trevena, Modesto City Schools
Distance Learning and Collaboration

HIGHER EDUCATION
Higher Education in Second Life




      Ivory Tower on NMC Orientation Island
Educators MUST Collaborate




     Educators gather for Bransford Lecture
         Distance Opportunities




Distance Student in        a Brave New World
Learning Together




  EDTEC Students on a Field Trip
Collaboration Opportunities




       Campus/Distance Students Mix
Authentic Collaboration




  Virtual Morocco – Johnson & Wales University
Authentic Contribution




     Virtual Morocco – InfoFez
Collaboration With Experts




      Virtual BLAST – Johnson & Wales
Authentic Contribution




     Virtual BLAST – Virtual Flight
    Implications for NASA Goals
• Educators need Technical Support
• Educators need Pedagogical Support
• Learners need Authentic Ways To 
  Meaningfully Contribute
PACIFIC RIM EXCHANGE




A Foreign Exchange Program
Modesto City Schools and Kyoto Gakuen High School, Japan
       Virtual Cultural Exchange
• PacRimX was founded in December 2006
• The initial land mass was three islands on the 
  Teen Grid of Second Life (private islands).
• Goal: To provide a persistent virtual space for 
  communication, collaboration, and cultural 
  exchange between our students.
• Primarily an “English Learning” environment.
             Communication
• Initially students used a chat translator 
  scripted by Max Case, creator of the Babbler 
  HUD attachment, to communicate.
• Full spatial voice support was added in 
  October 2007.
• Video conferencing is used to supplement  
  communications between the students.
Face to Face Communications




  Modesto students engaged in a video conference with Kyoto
Video Conference with Japan




   The students interviewed each other with a set list of 
    questions, all students were required to take notes
 View from the Other Side




Students sometimes  laughed as new questions were added 
                 during the interviews
             Virtual Interviews




The next day the students went online to interview avatars and locate 
          their partner from the interviews the day before
                Personal Space




Students can claim personal dorm rooms on the island, and are free to
     decorate them as they wish (following the rules of conduct)
       Personal Expression




Students use their dorms to display their creations and personal 
       information about themselves and their avatars.
          Modesto Class Picture




The Modesto summer school class posing in the aquarium for a class picture
                 Collaboration
• Four Islands
  – Modesto Island
  – Kyoto Island
  – Shared Island
  – New island added January 2008
• Students and teachers have built everything 
  on the islands.
• Group projects and events are planned that 
  involve all of the students.
          Building Bridges




Modesto students built bridges halfway to the Kyoto Island.
   Each student was partnered with a Kyoto student.
         Meeting Halfway




Kyoto students had to ask (in English) for the dimensions and 
  coordinate numbers to complete their half of the bridge.
   Personal Expression




Once the bridge was completed, the students were free 
          to decorate their half of the bridge
                   Flag Raising




The next day the students did a similar exercise with flag poles and
                flags for a local Kyoto newspaper
           Working Together




Students often linger after these activities to chat with each other
          Kyoto Class Picture




          Kyoto students created this stage, their poses, and 
                  their avatars for their class picture 
(these students will attend summer school in Modesto, Summer 2008)
           Cultural Exchange
• Landmarks on the islands are influenced by 
  the host country’s architecture.
• Students are encouraged to share information 
  about themselves and their country with 
  other residents of the islands.
• Island events are focused on the sharing of 
  cultures (holidays, history and traditions).
Festival of Ages (Jidai‐matsuri)




Kyoto students built static displays, then narrated them during this event
    Virtual History Lesson




Modesto students interviewed the Kyoto students about their 
           displays, the history, and their outfits
       Historical Architecture




Many examples of Japanese temples were built by the Kyoto students
               and were on display for this festival
          Personal Interviews




Students were engaged in one to one conversations at the displays.  
   The Kyoto students would give copies of their outfits if asked.
              NASA Mission
• In preparation for this workshop our students 
  were asked to construct a virtual Mars colony.
• They were provided some NASA URL’s for 
  researching ideas for this project.
• The Mars colony was built by both Japanese 
  and American students over a one week 
  period.
 Colony Area on Modesto Island




A walled off area on the Modesto Island was the site of the construction project 
   Modesto Habitat Modules




The Modesto students went with a traditional design for their modules
Interior Corridor Modesto Habitat




    Just inside the airlock of the Modesto Mars Colony Module
 Environmental Suit Vendor




Students shared their creations with others through vendor devices
        Under Construction




The colony was made to look like it was still “under construction”
Kyoto Habitat Module




 Entrance to Kyoto Subterranean Habitat Module
    Interior of Kyoto Module




Kyoto obviously had a larger transport ship to bring items from home
 Kyoto Exploration Vehicle




A Modesto student hovering near a Kyoto vehicle near the colony
Kyoto Student Building Explorer




 A Kyoto student putting the finishing touches on his remote explorer
         Explorer at Night




The Second Life platform has user adjustable day night cycles
                    Telepresence




Chris Flesuras, co‐founder of PacRimX, spoke to the Modesto City Schools
    School Board live ‘in‐world’ during a presentation on the project.
                 (other teachers and students also spoke)  
          Student Engagement
• Virtual worlds will play a role in education in 
  the future.
• Students ‘learn by doing’.
• Virtual worlds allow for rapid prototyping of 
  student ideas in simulated spaces.
• Students are free to learn from their failures.
• Students engage in these environments 
  because they are fun.
             Student Creations




One Modesto student created a remote battlebot arena game over the 
        holidays, engaging other students in play testing it
      Students Created Bots




Creative use of scripts allow for any object to be remote controlled
       NASA Massively Multiplayer 
          Online Environment
• A realistically rendered virtual environment 
  would engage students in learning and exploring.
• Curriculum for math, science, engineering, 
  biology, and other specialties could be developed 
  in a quest (lesson) driven environment.
• Students would gain experience points and ‘level 
  up’ through the curriculum.
• Interest in the sciences could be reawakened in 
  the ‘gaming generation’.  
                       Questions?




Cathy Arreguin, SL: Mari Asturias   Stan Trevena, SL: Quidit OFlynn
San Diego State University          Modesto City Schools
cathy_arreguin@mac.com              trevena.s@monet.k12.ca.us
                                    http://pacificrimx.wordpress.com

								
To top