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PEOPLES OF CENTRAL AND SOUTH AME

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					PEOPLES OF CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA
Anthropology 326
Fall Semester 2009


Prof. Kristin Norget, Dept. of Anthropology, McGill University
Tues. & Thurs., 11:30-1pm
Location: McDonald Eng 276
Office Hours: TBA

This course is designed to help you develop an understanding of the
peoples and cultures of Central and South America (or “Latin America”)
by means of ethnographic material focused on social life and culture at
the level of everyday life. Great ancient civilizations, slavery,
colonialism, revolutions, dictatorships, military regimes, dire social
inequality and tremendous intellectual and cultural effervescence have
all marked the past of the diverse peoples of Latin America and
continue to define their present. The short length of the course makes
it impossible to attend to Latin American social life and culture in
all its complexity and richness. I aim, however, to provide a basic
framework for an anthropological understanding of contemporary debates
in the region through a few fundamental themes; these emphasize the
social struggles and forces that have shaped the lives of people in
Latin America, as expressed in the arts, social relations, religion,
and political and economic structures. As such, many of the topics we
will cover in the course are rooted in particular geographic, social
and political regions, but they also transcend these boundaries: topics
include race, rural-urban relationships, modernity, violence, gender
and sexuality, popular culture, religion, migration, and
transnationalism.

Films and visits by guest researchers will complement the reading
material.

REQUIRED READING
Goldstein, Diana. 2003. Laughter Out of Place. Berkeley: University of
California
      Press.
De Genova, Nicholas. 2005. Working the Boundaries: Race, Space, and “Illegality” in
      Mexican Chicago. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

The above books are available at Paragraph Bookstore; 2220 McGill
College; (514) 845-5811; e-mail paragraphbooks@paragraphbooks.com). All
other readings are accessible via the WebCT coursepage. Supplementary
articles are also available as digital copies through McGill Libraries,
on the Course Reserves site: http://catalogue.mcgill.ca/F/?func=find-b-0&local_base=U-
COURSE_RESERVES.


EVALUATION
Map quiz
10%
Midterm (Short answer & short essay questions)
20%
Film Review
20%
Discussion Group Participation
10%
Final Exam
40%

MAP QUIZ
Knowledge of the location of specific countries and prominent
geological features of Central and South America enhances the
understanding of the nature of regional social and cultural patterns.
The map quiz, to be held in the second week of classes, will help you
develop this aspect of your knowledge base.

MID-TERM EXAM
The mid-term exam will consist of short answer and short essay
questions.

FILM REVIEW
The film review will be a critical review (i.e., not a description, but
a critical commentary) of one of the three films watched in class, OR
another documentary film made on Latin America (please check with me if
you are uncertain of suitability). The expected length is 700 words
(please respect it!). I will distribute a guide for writing these
reviews in the second week of classes.

DISCUSSION GROUPS
Discussion Group sessions will be held three times during the course,
in class time. These are intended to give you the chance to talk over
with your peers key aspects of the assigned readings once right before
the mid-term, and then twice leading up to the final exam. The class
will be divided into smaller groups and you will discuss questions I
will give you in order to orient the session. Attendance at Discussion
Sessions is expected; an attendance record will be taken.

FINAL EXAM
The Registrar will schedule the final exam, which will have short
answer and essay questions.

*IMPORTANT DATES*
Map quiz: Tuesday, September 15
Midterm Exam: Thursday, October 8
Last day of classes and due date of Film Review:            Tuesday, December 1.
Final Exam: To be set by Registrar
OUTLINE
Sept.1    Introduction
Sept.3    I           WHAT MAKES ‘LATIN AMERICA’?: One People or many?
          Fuentes, Carlos 1996. “The Conquest and Reconquest of the New
          World”; 119-
                      147
          Stavenhagen, Rodolfo 1968 “Seven Fallacies about Latin
          America”, 13-31.
Sept.8     (Unit I, cont’d)
Sept.10   II         RACE, & MESTIZAJE: Inclusion and Exclusion
          Wade, Peter 1997 Race and Ethnicity in Latin America. London:
          Pluto Press.
                      (chapters 2 & 5)
          Hale, Charles R. 1987. “Inter-ethnic relations and class structure in Nicaragua's
          Atlantic Coast: A historical overview.” Ethnic groups and the nation state: the case
          of the Atlantic Coast in Nicaragua,(ed.) CIDCA/Development Study Unit.
          Stockholm: University of Stockholm.
Sept.15   (Unit II, cont’d)
          *MAP QUIZ
Sept.17   III        POWER, VIOLENCE, SEXUALITY (focus: Brazil)
          FILM: “Favela Rising” (80 minutes)
Sept.22   Goldstein, Laughter Out of Place
Sept.24   Goldstein, Laughter Out of Place
Sept.29   Goldstein, Laughter Out of Place
Oct.1     Guest speaker: Paula Godoy-Paíz
Oct.6     DISCUSSION GROUPS: Goldstein, Laughter Out of Place
          http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/columnists/doug-saunders/an-
          afghan-style-war-on-poverty-transforms-deadly-slums-of-rio/article1190352/
Oct.8     *MID-TERM EXAM- in class (short answer & short essays)
Oct.13    IV      LATIN AMERICAN MODERNITY: The Sacred and the Popular
          Rowe, William & V. Schelling 1991 Memory and Modernity
          (chapters
          Norget, Kristin 2006. Days of Death, Days of Life. NY:
          Columbia Univ.Press.
                  (chapters 5 & 6)
Oct.15    (cont’d)
Oct.20    V      THE INDIGENOUS CHALLENGE (focus: Bolivia)
          Varese, Stefano 1996 “The Ethnopolitics of Indian Resistance
          in Latin America”,
                  Latin American Perspectives, 89:2, 58-71.
          Canessa, Andrew 2006 “’Todos Somos Indígenas’: Toward a new
              Language of National Political Identity, Bulletin of
              Latin American Research, 25(2): 241-263.
Oct.22    FILM: “Cocalero” (94 minutes)
Oct.27    Conklin, Beth & Laura C. Graham, 1995. “The Shifting Middle
              Ground: Amazonian Indians and Eco-Politics”, American
              Anthropologist,97:4; 695-710.
Oct.29    Guest speaker: Erica Lagalisse
Nov.3     DISCUSSION GROUPS on Indigenous movements
Nov.5     VI.       WHERE IS ‘LATIN AMERICA’? (focus: ‘Mexican Chicago’)
          Stephen, Lynn 2008 “Reconceptualizing Latin America”. In A
          Companion to Latin American Anthropology, ed. D.Poole. NY:
          Wiley.
Nov.10    *(AAR meetings: class cancelled)
Nov.12      FILM: “The City/La Ciudad” (88 minutes)
Nov.17      De Genova, Nicholas Working the Boundaries
Nov.19      De Genova, Nicholas Working the Boundaries
Nov.24      De Genova, Nicholas Working the Boundaries
Nov.26      DISCUSSION GROUPS: De Genova, Working the Boundaries
Dec.1       Last day of class: REVIEW (Film Reviews due)

Contacting me
The best way to contact me is by coming during my office hours (times
noted above); if you cannot make my office hours, you can speak to me
in class to make an appointment. Due to the volume of email I receive,
please use email only for emergency reasons, such as detailed below.

Missed Exams and late Assignments
Acceptable reasons for missing the midterm exam or the Discussion
Sessions are illness or bereavement (these reasons must be
substantiated with documentary evidence). Late assignments (film
review) will lose 3 points per day late (assignment is out of 20).
Students absent from a discussion session will lose 3.5 points (out of
the 10 total). IT IS A STUDENT’S RESPONSIBILITY TO ADVISE ME VIA E-MAIL
BEFORE MISSING AN ASSIGNMENT/EXAM, ETC.

McGill Policy on Academic Integrity
The McGill Senate on January 29, 2003 approved a resolution requiring
that the following statement be included in every course outline:
“McGill University values academic integrity. Therefore all students
must understand the
meaning and consequences of cheating, plagiarism and other academic
offences under the code of Student Conduct and Disciplinary
Procedures.” See www.mcgill.ca/integrity/ for more details.”