A Recipe for Mission and Vision Statements - DOC

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					                     A Recipe for Mission and Vision Statements
                                              by Eugen Tarnow

Human resource departments are often responsible for facilitating the creation of mission statements. Why
don’t you try my recipe next time you are asked to be the muse in your organization?

Suppose you are the human resource manager of an informal handball team of eleven-year-old boys. Add to it
that you know nothing about handball (who does?) but you really want them to win. What do you do? The
answer is -- you give them orange jerseys! The orange jerseys function two ways. First, they are a social
categorizer: by wearing the same clothes the team members obtain a sense of common belonging. Second, the
orange jerseys also suggest that the team is a sports team. The jerseys tie together two fundamental forces in a
company, being together with others and accomplishing a goal.

During the last few years I have been involved in writing mission and vision statements for organizations and I
have found that many mission statements do not function as well as the orange jerseys. In fact, the statements
are often so irrelevant that staff is hardpressed to remember them! Just consider this one:

"Continue our role and responsibility as the industry initiator and market leader for 70 years of bringing useful
           products to the marketplace while continually rewarding our customers and employees."

Is that a statement that makes you excited about work? As I look at it my eye lids feel heavy. And this statement
is not the only one trying to put us to sleep. A boring mission statement is the rule, not the exception.

Yet, it is so easy to come up with better ones. How about improving the one just mentioned and write:

                                    "With the help of our customers and staff
                                         we bring good things to life."

Sounds much better, does it not?

Instead of having to ask staff to memorize a mission statement that puts me to sleep, I have come up with a
recipe for how mission statements should be concocted. If you use it, I gurantee that your staff and colleagues
will find the product a little more tasty. Here is the recipe:

A mission statement should be a short statement constructed to (1) suggest an action, (2) identify this action
only vaguely, and (3) include a social categorization.

There are four reasons for the second criterion. First, a vague statement does not have to be rewritten every time
specific goals are obtained. Second, a too specific statement is hard to remember. Third, a vague goal statement
can be more inclusive of all organizational interests. Fourth, it can also allow for individually creative
interpretations.

Let us apply the recipe to already existing mission statements. Rather than embarrassing my clients, I found
sixteen vision statements from a research paper by Larwood et al. They are included in the table below in the
left hand column. In the right hand column, the statements have been rewritten using the recipe.

For example: The first vision statement quoted reads: "Lead in bringing interactive entertainment to a mass
market." It becomes more effective with a "we" in the beginning. This suggests a team effort that we all want to
be part of. Then we abbreviate the statement and make it less specific and end up with "we bring interactive
entertainment to the world."

Consider the second vision statement quoted: "Grow technically and geographically into a worldwide, world
renowned organization." Here we also need to add a social categorization, a "we will." This second vision
statement is also too complex -- taking out "technically and geographically" we end up with the enhanced
statement "We will grow into a world-renowned organization."

The third vision statement, "be a survivor and prosper in a heavily and unfairly regulated industry" can also be
edited. Including categorization and vagueness it becomes more motivational: "We will survive despite
regulations." The other thirteen statements can be similarly transformed, some with symbols other than words.

So let's get technical and look at the 'why' of what's under all of this ...

Let's begin with some background material in social categorization, a fundamental part of our argument.

Freud (1921) wrote in Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego that "in any collection of people the
tendency to form a psychological group may very easily come to the fore" (p. 40). He observed that
identification of a single common trait (p. 49) and the acknowledgement of the possession of a common
substance (p. 53) could help this group formation.

Social psychologists generalized this concept to "social categorization," group boundary criteria that tell an
individual who is “in” and who is “out”. They also experimentally verified the consequences of social
categorization.

In one particular type of research study, social psychologists try to minimize the strength of the social
categorization to find out at what point does the group formation disappear? How commonplace can you make
Freud's "common substance" or "common trait?" The answer seems to be that under many circumstances even
the weakest social categorization will lead to group formation, like a ball on the top of a hill will start rolling
down as soon as it gets the slightest push. Tajfel, Billig, Bundy, and Flament (1971) told subjects arbitrarily that
there were one group of people who overestimated the number of dots they saw on a screen, and another one
who underestimated. That was all that was needed for groups to form in the minds of the subjects as evidenced
by intergroup competition. The group members never even had to meet. Similarly, in Billig and Tajfel (1973)
coin tossing determined the categorization. There have been thirty more studies giving similar results (Tajfel,
1982).

The orange jersey is a particularly obvious social categorizer: by wearing the same clothes the team members
obtain a sense of common belonging. But common belonging is not enough to explain why the jerseys made the
team play better. The orange jerseys also suggested that the team was a sports team. The social categorization
was based on an implied action. The statement of the orange jerseys was “you are in with us by playing sports.”
Our underlying hypothesis in this paper is that the orange jersey, a symbol we term a “Unifying Action
Declaration,” channels group formation forces into task performance. The everpresent potential of social
categorization is purposefully used by tying group membership to an associated action.

The Unifying Action Declaration Defined

We define a UAD as a short statement constructed to (1) suggest an action, (2) identify this action only vaguely,
and (3) include a social categorization. The purpose of the statement is to obtain task performance (by
suggesting an action) using group formation forces (by vaguely socially categorizing).

As mentioned above there are four reasons for the second UAD criterion. First, the vagueness suggests a longer
lasting goal and thus a longer lasting group (Canetti, 1960, p. 41). Second, the vagueness criterion prevents a
too specific group boundary: social psychologists find empirically that categorization along one dimension is
just enough to create group formation. Two dimensions are often one too many (see review by Messick and
Mackie, 1989). Third, a vague goal statement can be more inclusive of all organizational interests. Fourth, it can
also allow for individually creative interpretations.

"We need to re-engineer the corporation," said by a CEO of a company at a meeting is a UAD. It implies that
anybody who agrees is in and anybody who disagrees is out. It suggests a plan of action: layoffs and
reorganization. It is vague--the words could really mean anything. Other examples of UADs include "we stand
for quality," "all animals are equal but some are more equal than others (from Animal Farm by George
Orwell)," "as professional psychologists we do such and such," "business as usual is out," "drivers wanted"
(from a Volkswagen advertisement), "we bring good things to life" (from General Electric advertisements) and
"teamwork." Some of these UADs come with the social categorization implicit ("business as usual is out if you
want to be part of our corporation") and some with an explicit social categorization. Note that the vagueness
criterion is important: "drivers wanted" sounds intuitively better (for the reasons mentioned above) than "taxi-
drivers wanted;" "high-speed drivers wanted" is better than "ambulance drivers wanted;" "as professional
psychologists we do such and such" is better than "as professional school psychologists we do such and such."

TABLE 1. Real vision statements changed using the UAD construction.

Vision Statement as in Larwood et al              Using UAD Construction

Lead in bringing interactive entertainment to a   We bring interactive entertainment to
mass market.                                      the world.


Grow technically and geographically into a        We will grow into a worldwide, world-
worldwide, world renowned organization.           renowned organization.


Be a survivor and prosper in a heavily and        We survive despite regulations.
unfairly regulated industry.


Maintain a manageable number of clients           We grow conservatively.
whereby top management is involved in all
continued but controlled growth.


Create an environment in which satisfied          Our quality customers and products
customers, quality products, and bottom line      make us money.
profits go hand in hand.


Be a major force in high performance banking      We give out high tech savings boxes to
in the community bank arena.                      employees.


Lead in providing applications to the             We provide the world's builders.
construction industry throughout the world.


Be the single source software provider to the     We are financeware.
financial services industry.


Be the leading African American owned             PR and promotion the African-
promotional and public relations firm in the      American way--that's us!
USA.

Be a technical services firm, with blue chip      We are the Mercedes of electricity and
utility clients, that has a "Mercedes" image, Boy always at your service.
Scout principles, and is fun.
Transform our American flag ocean hulk              We grow by going abroad.
shipping fleet to foreign flag operations by
1996, while increasing market share to become
the largest, best managed carrier on the Great
Lakes.

Become the most customer responsive producer        We trim interiors the way our
of automobile interior trim in North America.       customers want them.


Be the recognized world leader in national          We secure outer space.
security space system architecture and
engineering.

Continue our role and responsibility as the         With the help of our customers and
industry initiator and market leader for 70 years   staff we bring good things to life.
of bringing useful products to the marketplace
while continually rewarding our customers and
employees.

Double in size within five years.                   We double in five years.


Enhance our established leadership position and
make more money while doing so.

				
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