Using Google Docs The Basics by dul70648

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									Using Google Docs:
    The Basics
  Paul Jude Beauvais
   August 31, 2009
         What Is Google Docs?
• Google Docs is a free online service that
  writers can use for composing and storing
  documents. The Google Docs site also allows
  writers to share their online documents with
  others so that several people may work on a
  single document without e-mailing it back and
  forth.
    Using Google Docs: Why? (1)
• Google Docs is free. Writers can use it without
  purchasing any software or paying any fees.
  (Students don’t need to buy Microsoft Office.)
• Google Docs users can access their documents
  from any computer because the documents
  are stored online. (Users also can download
  documents to work on them off-line.)
    Using Google Docs: Why? (2)
• Students can continue using Google Docs after
  they leave our classes. (Some other
  platforms—e.g., BlackBoard and the
  proprietary sites that publishers provide—are
  not available to students after they leave
  college.)
    Using Google Docs: Why? (3)
• Google Docs is a convenient platform for
  viewing drafts of work without making
  photocopies or e-mailing attachments.
• Google Docs is a convenient platform for
  teachers to use in responding to drafts.
• Google Docs is a convenient platform for
  students to use when composing and editing a
  group project (as long as the collaborators
  work sequentially instead of simultaneously).
 Using Google Docs: Why Not? (1)
• Google Docs does not work well for
  collaborative writing by multiple students
  working simultaneously (i.e., “in real time”) on
  a single document.
• Google Docs provides fewer format options
  than Microsoft Word.
• Some formatting is lost when documents are
  uploaded to or downloaded from Google Docs
  (but much of it can be restored).
 Using Google Docs: Why Not? (2)
• Microsoft is making Office available online. It’s
  now available in a beta version for users of
  live.com. If you really like using Microsoft
  Word, you may want to wait a year and see
  whether Microsoft Online Office meets your
  needs better than Google Docs.
      Setting Up an Account (1)
• Go to docs.google.com and bookmark this
  page.
• Click on the “Get Started” Button.
• Enter your e-mail address.
• Enter a password.
• Re-enter the password.
      Setting Up an Account (2)
• Uncheck “stay signed in” and “Enable Web
  History.”
• Type the provided verification word in the
  “Word Verification” box.
• Click the button labeled “I accept. Create my
  account.” (This should take you to the
  “Account Creation Confirmation” page.)
       Setting Up an Account (3)
• On the “Account Creation Confirmation” page,
  click the link labeled “Click here to continue.”
  (This should take you to your Google Docs
  “main” page, where you can create and
  manage documents.)
• Although you now can create Google Docs,
  you can’t share them with anyone until you
  verify your account. (The next few slides
  explain how to do this.)
       Verifying an Account (1)
• Sign out of Google Docs.
• Check your e-mail at the address you entered
  when registering for Google Docs. There you
  should find a message with the subject line
  “Google Email Verification.” Open this
  message.
        Verifying an Account (2)
• In the “Google Email Verification” message,
  click on the link that follows the sentence, “To
  activate your account and verify your email
  address, please click on the following link.” A
  window will pop up to confirm that you have
  verified your account.
• Click the button that says “Click here to
  continue.” This will return you to the sign-in
  page for Google Docs. Sign in again.
      Creating a New Document
          in Google Docs (1)
• After signing in, click on the “New” button.
  (It’s the left-most button in the blue toolbar.)
• Select “Document” from the list of options. (A
  blank document labeled “Untitled” will open.)
• To rename the document, click on the word
  “untitled.” (You will be prompted to give the
  document a new name.)
• Begin composing using the default settings.
      Creating a New Document
          in Google Docs (2)
• Google Docs are formatted for viewing on a
  screen, not a page. For this reason, they
  display without margins, page breaks, or page
  numbers. However, you can add some of
  these features while you’re working on a
  document, and you can add other features if
  you format the document for printing.
      Creating a New Document
          in Google Docs (3)
• The default settings for a Google Doc are ten-
  point Verdana type in a single-spaced
  document.
• To change these settings, click on the “Edit”
  button (in the light blue menu below the
  document name) and select “Document
  Style.” This will open a window that provides
  options for changing type face, type size, line
  spacing, and other features.
      Creating a New Document
          in Google Docs (4)
• If you want to make a Google Doc display in a
  page-like “portrait” format instead of a
  screen-like “landscape” format, click on
  “View” and select “Fixed width page view.”
  This will display the document as one
  continuous page that is 8.5 inches wide. (You
  can continue composing in this mode.)
       Saving a New Document
          in Google Docs (1)
• To save a Google Doc in your Google Docs site,
  click on the “Save” button in the upper-right
  corner. This saves the document in the “Web
  Archive” (*.mht) format, designed for viewing
  within the Google Docs site.
• You also can save by clicking the “File” button
  in the light blue menu below the file name,
  and then clicking “Save.”
  Downloading a New Document
     from Google Docs (1)
• You can download a Google Doc to work on it
  offline or save it on your own computer.
• A downloaded Google Doc may lose some of
  its formatting, but you can add features by
  editing the document with Microsoft Word or
  whatever other program you use to open it.
   Downloading a New Document
      from Google Docs (2)
• To download a Google Doc, click “File” (in the
  light blue menu below the document title)
  and then select “Download file as.”
• Select a file type for the document (e.g., PDF,
  Word, or Text). A window will open, giving you
  the option of saving the document. Click on
  the “Save” button.
  Uploading a Word Document to
         Google Docs (1)
• In addition to creating documents in Google
  Docs, you can upload Word documents to
  Google Docs from your computer.
• Some layout features are lost when a Word
  document is uploaded. Many (but not all) of
  these features can be restored when you work
  on the document in Google Docs.
• The simpler the Word document, the easier it
  will be to work on in Google Docs.
  Uploading a Word Document to
         Google Docs (2)
• On your main Google Docs page, click on the
  “Upload” button in the blue tool bar at the
  top of the page.
• Click on the “Browse” button, and select a file
  from your computer. Then click “Open.”
  Uploading a Word Document to
         Google Docs (3)
• Either keep the current name of the document
  or type a new name in the box marked “What
  do you want to call it?”
• Click the “Upload File” button. The file will
  open in Google Docs.
• You now can work on the file as a Google Doc
  and share it with others through Google Docs.
       Sharing a Google Doc (1)
• A Google Doc can be shared with other people
  who have Google Docs accounts. When you
  share a document with someone, it appears
  on the list of documents in the person’s main
  Google Docs page. The person can open the
  document from that page.
       Sharing a Google Doc (2)
• When you share a Google Doc with someone,
  you can designate whether the recipient will
  be a collaborator (i.e., someone who can
  change the document) or just a viewer (i.e.,
  someone who can see the document but can’t
  change it).
• If you do allow recipients to change a
  document, you can track the changes and
  accept or reject them.
       Sharing a Google Doc (3)
• To share a document with someone, begin by
  opening the document. (Do this by clicking on
  it in your list of documents on your main
  page.)
• When the document is open, click on the blue
  “Share” button in the upper right-hand corner
  above the document. Then select “Invite
  people.” This will open a window labeled
  “Share with others.”
       Sharing a Google Doc (4)
• In the “Share with others” window, type (or
  paste) the e-mail addresses of the recipients
  with whom you want to share the document.
• Click to select either the “To edit” button (if
  you want the recipients to be able to change
  the document) or the “To view” button (if you
  want the recipients to be able to read the
  document but not to change it).
       Sharing a Google Doc (5)
• You can share a document without notifying
  the recipient (in which case it will just appear
  in the person’s list of Google docs), or you can
  notify the person by e-mail.
• To share the document without notifying the
  recipient, click the link labeled “Add without
  sending invitation.”
• To notify the recipient, type a subject line and
  message. Then click the “Send” button.
       Sharing a Google Doc (6)
• After clicking the “Share” button, a window
  will appear to confirm that your message has
  been sent. Click the “Save & Close” button to
  conclude the “sharing” process.
       Sharing a Google Doc (7)
• To remove recipients or change their
  privileges, click on the “Share” button and
  then select the option “See who has access.”
  This will open a “Share with others” window,
  with recipients listed on the left.
• A drop-down menu appears following each
  recipient’s name. Select the “None” option in
  this menu to remove a recipient.
• After making changes, click “Save & Close.”
         Editing a Google Doc
         as a Collaborator (1)
• When someone shares a document with a
  recipient through Google Docs, the document
  appears in the list of documents on the
  recipient’s main Google Docs page.
• The recipient can click on the document to
  open it.
          Editing a Google Doc
          as a Collaborator (2)
• If a recipient has “collaborator” privileges,
  s/he can type changes right in the document,
  just as the owner of the document would.
• After changing a document as a collaborator,
  click “Save and Close.”
 Viewing the Revision History of a
          Google Doc (1)
• The owner and recipients (viewers and
  collaborators) of a Google Doc can view the
  revision history of the document. The owner
  and collaborators also can choose whether to
  accept changes or revert back to earlier
  versions of the document.
 Viewing the Revision History of a
          Google Doc (2)
• To view the revision history of a document,
  click on the “File” button in the light blue
  menu below the document name. Then select
  “Revision history.” This will display a
  chronological list of all changes made to the
  document, along with the name of the person
  who made the changes.
 Viewing the Revision History of a
          Google Doc (3)
• To the left of each listed change is a link that
  will open the version of the document that
  contains that change, as well as any changes
  made earlier.
• When a revised version of a document is
  opened through “Revision History,” the
  version number is displayed in the tool bar
  above the document (e.g., “Showing revision
  #5).
 Viewing the Revision History of a
          Google Doc (4)
• To the right of the version number (e.g.,
  “Showing revision #5”) are buttons labeled
  “Older” and “Newer.” These allow the viewer
  to switch to versions of the document that
  were produced before or after the one
  containing the changes in the displayed
  version.
 Viewing the Revision History of a
          Google Doc (5)
• To the right of the “Older” and “Newer”
  buttons is another button labeled “Revert to
  this one.” Clicking this button makes the
  displayed version the “most current” version
  of the document. (Reverting to an older
  version eliminates changes made after that
  version was produced.)
 Viewing the Revision History of a
          Google Doc (6)
• Clicking the “Revert to this one” button also
  closes the “Revision history” display, returning
  the viewer to the standard display of the
  document.
• Click “Save and Close” to preserve changes
  and exit the document.
    Comparing Two Versions of a
         Google Doc (1)
• To compare two versions of a Google Doc, first
  open the current version of the document.
• Click “File” and then select “Revision history.”
• In the “Revision history” list, each link for a
  numbered revision is preceded by a box.
  Check the boxes next to the two versions that
  you want to compare (e.g., check “Revision 5”
  and “Revision 2”).
    Comparing Two Versions of a
         Google Doc (2)
• Click the “Compare Checked” button (in the
  light blue tool bar above the list of revisions).
• A single document will open, and it will
  contain a merged display of the versions. Any
  differences between the versions will be color
  coded. (Content that is in Version 2 but not in
  Version 5 will be highlighted in one color;
  content that is in Version 5 but not in Version
  2 will be highlighted in a different color.)
    Comparing Two Versions of a
         Google Doc (3)
• A key for interpreting the color coding appears
  at the right end of the light blue tool bar
  above the document.
• The “Compare Checked” mode is useful for
  comparing versions, but it is not possible to
  edit in this mode. To resume editing, click
  “Back to revision history.” Then click “Back to
  editing.” This will return you to the current
  version of the document.
       E-Mailing a Google Doc
        as an Attachment (1)
• To email a document to a recipient, begin by
  opening the document.
• Click on “Share” and then select “Email as
  attachment.” This will open a window labeled
  “Email Document.”
• In the “Email Document” window, enter the e-
  mail address of the recipient. You may also
  want to type a message in the message box.
        E-Mailing a Google Doc
         as an Attachment (2)
• In the “Email Document” window, click the
  button labeled “Email document as,” and then
  use the drop-down menu following the button
  to select a file type for the document (e.g.,
  Word document or PDF).
• Click “Send.” (Notice that you didn’t need to
  attach the document. If you e-mail a
  document that you’ve opened, it attaches to
  the e-mail message automatically.)
       Printing a Google Doc (1)
• The default settings for a printed Google Doc
  are one-inch margins all around and no page
  numbers. To change these settings, click on
  “File” (in the light blue menu below the
  document name) and select “Print Settings.”
  This will open a window where you can
  change all four margins and add page
  numbers.
       Printing a Google Doc (2)
• Changes in the “Print” options for a Google
  Doc do not display automatically, but you can
  preview features such as margins, page
  breaks, and page numbers.
• Click on “Edit” and then select “Print Preview.”
  This will display all print features of the
  document (including page breaks and page
  numbers); however, you cannot compose in
  this mode.
       Printing a Google Doc (3)
• To print a document, begin by opening the
  document.
• Click on the “File” button (in the light blue
  menu below the name of the document), and
  then select “Print.” This will open a Print
  window where you can make the usual
  choices (i.e., which pages to print, how many
  copies to print, and so on).

								
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