Session 1 K-1 Self-esteem

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					Session 1 K-1 Self-esteem:
Objective: Students will realize that they are unique and have special
qualities.
    1. Counselor will discuss the rules in group and introduce the
       group. Students will get a sticker everyday they have good
       behavior in group and when they have four stickers, they will be
       able to go to the treasure box.
    2. Counselor will discuss how everyone is unique and has special
       qualities. No one has your fingerprints.
    3. Counselor will read “I Like Me”
    4. Students will tell one thing they like about themselves.
    5. Kindergarten students will draw a picture of themselves having
       a good day on page 1 in “Too Good for Drugs.” What does it
       take to have a good day? Smile at others. Say nice things to
       others. You don’t have to have your own way. First grade
       students will draw “Today I feel…” and tell why?
    6. Counselor will ask, “Do you ever not like yourself?” Everyone
       makes mistakes. No one is perfect. Tell yourself, “I love myself”
       even when you make a mistake.
    7. Print names on “Too Good for Drugs” book and keep all
       assignments inside.
    8. Give every student a sticker who has followed the rules.
Need: “I like me”
“Too Good for Drugs” workbooks
1st grade copy of “Today I feel” worksheet for every students

Session 1: 2nd grade Self-esteem:
Objective: Students will realize that they are unique and have special
qualities.
    1. Counselor will discuss the rules in group and introduce the
        group.
    2. Counselor will discuss how everyone is unique and has
        special qualities. No one has your fingerprints
    3. Counselor will read: “I Like Me”
    4. Students will tell one thing they like about themselves
    5. Students will complete the “I am Special” flower writing things
        they like about themselves on the petals of the flower.
    6. Students will share with the group what makes them special.
    7. Counselor will ask, “Do you ever not like yourself?” Everyone
       makes mistakes. No one is perfect Tell yourself, “I love
       myself” even when you make a mistake.
    8. Students will write names on “Too Good for Drugs” book and
       keep all assignments inside.
    9. Give every student a sticker who has followed the rules.
  Need: “I like Me”
  “Too Good for Drugs” workbooks
  Copy of “I am Special” flower for every student

  Session 1: 3rd grade Self-esteem:
  Objective: Students will realize that they are unique and have
  special qualities.
   1. Counselor will discuss the rules in group and introduce the
      group.
   2. Counselor will discuss how everyone is unique and has
      special qualities. No one has your fingerprints
   3. Students will make a list of 10 things that make them special.
   4. Students will share their list with others.
   5. Students will complete the “I am Special” flower writing things
      they like about themselves on the petals of the flower.
   6. Counselor will ask, “Do you ever not like yourself?” Everyone
      makes mistakes. No one is perfect Tell yourself, “I love
      myself” even when you make a mistake.
   7. Students will write names on folders and keep all assignments
      inside.
   8. Give every student a sticker who has followed the rules.

  Need: Folders for every student
  Copy of “10 things good about Me” and “I am Special” for every
  student

Session 1 4-5th grade-Self-esteem:
Objective: Students will realize that they are unique and have special
qualities.
  1. Counselor will discuss the rules in group and introduce the
       group.
  2. Counselor will discuss how everyone is unique and has special
       qualities. No one has your fingerprints
  3. Students will make a list of 10 things that make them special.
    4. Students will share their list with others.
    5. Counselor will discuss how families use to have family crests
       which displayed special traits the family had. Students will
       decorate their own crest drawing good things about
       themselves.
    6. Counselor will ask, “Do you ever not like yourself?” Everyone
       makes mistakes. No one is perfect. Tell yourself, “I love myself”
       even when you make a mistake.
    7. Students will write names on “Too Good for Drugs” book and
       keep all assignments inside.

    Need: “Too Good For Drugs” workbooks
    Copy of “10 things good about Me” and “My Shield” for every
    student

Session 2: K- Feelings: “Too Good for Drugs”
 Objective: Students will identify six feelings: happy, sad, angry, afraid,
 surprised, and excited.
 Students will discuss three ways that people show their feelings: with
 faces, bodies, words.
 Students will express their feelings verbally by using “I-messages”,
 such as “I feel sad.”
    1. We all have feelings. Sometimes we know how others feel by
        the looks of their faces. Sometimes we know how others feel
        by the way they hold their bodies. Sometimes we need to use
        words to say how we feel. We need to say “I feel sad.”
    2. Counselor will read “I Feel Silly” to students identifying the
        different feelings a student can have. Students will name as
        many feelings as they can from the story.
    3. Students will express their feelings verbally:
    When a friend moves away, how do you feel? I feel sad.
    When a friend comes to play, how do you feel? I feel happy.
    When you are in a strange place or when you think something bad
    might happen, how do you feel? I feel afraid.
    When someone takes something that belongs to you, how do you
    feel? I feel angry.
    When a parade is about to start, how do you feel? I feel excited.
    When someone jumps out from behind a door and yells “boo”, how
    do you feel? I feel surprised.
   4. Catch the Feeling: Students will complete page 6 in the “Too
      Good for Drugs” workbook.
   5. Students will make feeling faces in a mirror and complete the
      “Today I feel”. It is good to talk about feelings.

Need:”I feel Silly” (book)
Student workbook
Copies of “Today I Feel” for each student


Session 2: 1st grade-Feelings “Too Good for Drugs”
Objectives: Students will identify six feelings: happy, sad, angry,
afraid, excited, and proud.
Students will describe how a person might feel in different situations.
Students will express their feelings verbally by using “I-messages”,
such as “I feel sad.”
   1. Counselor will show students pictures on pages 15-20 of the
       teacher’s manual. Students must identify the feeling and make
       a face to show the same feeling. You feel proud when you do
       something special. When something really good is about to
       happen you feel excited.
   2. Students will turn to page 1 in their workbooks and point to the
       picture of how they would feel as the counselor reads different
       situations from teacher’s manual “How I feel” on page 11.
   3. You can tell people how you feel by saying, “I feel ___” and
       then naming a feeling. You may feel angry, but you do not have
       to act in angry ways like hitting, kicking, pushing, or teasing.
   4. Students will pull “fish” with different scenarios written on them
       from a bowl. They will read the scenario and tell how they
       would feel in this situation, like “I feel sad.”
   5. Students will complete the “How do you feel? Sad? Happy?
       Mad? page drawing what each different face looks like. It is
       good to talk about feelings.


Need: p. 15-20 in teacher’s manual
p.11 in teacher’s manual “How I feel”
Fish with Scenarios in a bucket
Copies of “How do you feel?” for each student
Session 2: 2nd grade: Feelings “Too Good for Drugs”
Objectives: Students will describe the difference between feelings
and actions.
Students will demonstrate stating feelings with I-messages.
Students will differentiate between I-messages and You-messages.
   1. Counselor will discuss the difference between how we feel and
      how we act. We might feel angry, but we don’t have to act in
      angry ways. We don’t have to call people names or hit anyone,
      or push or kick. Instead we can tell people how we feel.
   2. Counselor will show students the bone on page 56 in the
      teacher’s manual. This looks like the letter I. We should use I-
      messages to tell how you feel: “I feel sad when you call me
      names.” You should not use You-messages: “You are mean
      and ugly.” You-messages are hurtful.
   3. Students will pick “bones” on page 53 in the teacher’s manual
      out of a doggie bag and decide if the sentence is an I-message
      or a You-Message. The "You-message" will be thrown away.
   4. Students will be given page 55 in the teacher’s manual.
      Students will cut out the bones that have I-messages on them
      and glue them to page 5 in the student’s workbook.
   5. Students will complete p. 11 in the student’s work book
      crossing out the words which do not name a feeling and find
      the feeling words in the word search.

Need: p. 56 in teacher’s manual
Copy of p. 53 in teacher’s manual in a paper bag
Copies for each student of p. 55 in teacher’s manual
Students’ workbooks


Session 2: 3rd grade: Too Good for Drugs-Expressing your feelings
Objectives: Students will express their feelings verbally by using “I-
messages”, such as “I feel angry when you call me names. I want you
to stop.”
Students will identify body language and how to communicate better
through body language.
Students will learn how to respect the personal space of others.
   1. Counselor will discuss how our body speaks louder than our
      words. 90% of communication comes from body language.
  2. Counselor will discuss what our personal space is and how it
     offends others when we get into their personal space.
  3. Students will role-play welcoming and offensive body language.
  4. Students will learn how to use I-messages. Watch your body
     language. Do not get into the other person’s space by getting
     too close. Look at he person you are talking to. Speak with a
     clear, polite voice. Discuss your problem privately.
  5. Students will write I-messages for a certain scenario and then
     they will role-play the scenario using the I-messages.
  6. Students will complete page 7 in their workbooks using I-
     messages.

  Need: Copies of Role-play I-messages one set per group

Session 2: 4th grade Too Good for Drugs-Expressing your feelings
Objectives:
Students will demonstrate stating feelings with I-messages.
Students will differentiate between I-messages and You-messages.
Students will discuss the effect of zinger words on I-messages.
   1. Counselor will discuss the importance of using I-messages with
      friends. Sharing your feelings will keep a friendship strong.
      Even best friends have problems and need to share their
      feelings. You should always be honest with your friend.
   2. Counselor will define a zinger-when you feel angry or hurt, you
      may “zing” or lash out at a friend. Instead of saying how you
      feel and what you want out friend to do, you call names, yell
      and blame the friend for the problem. You call these name-
      calling, threatening, and blaming words “zinger words”
   3. .Counselor will discuss and give examples of You-messages.
      You creep! is a "you-message" and creep is zinger word.
      I feel that you are a dumb jerk- no feeling word in the statement
      and you have zinger words (dumb, jerk).
      I feel like slamming the door in your ugly face- no feeling word
      and you have a zinger word (ugly)
   4. Students will work page 3 in the student workbook editing I-
      messages.
   5. Students will finish the cross word puzzle on p. 3 using the
      vocabulary words they learned today.

  Need: Student workbooks
Session 2 5th grade Too Good for Drugs-Expressing your feelings
Objectives:
Students will express their feelings verbally by using “I-messages”,
such as “I feel angry when you call me names. I want you to stop.”
Students will identify body language and how to communicate better
through body language.
Students will learn how to respect the personal space of others.
   1. Counselor will discuss how our body speaks louder than our
      words. 90% of communication comes from body language.
   2. Counselor will discuss what our personal space is and how it
      offends others when we get into their personal space.
   3. Students will role-play welcoming and offensive body language.
      (Student hand-out page 19 in teacher’s manual.)
   4. Students will learn how to use I-messages. Watch your body
      language. Do not get into the other person’s space by getting
      too close. Look at he person you are talking to. Speak with a
      clear, polite voice. Discuss your problem privately.
   5. Students will write I-messages for a certain scenario and then
      they will role-play the scenario using the I-messages.

 Need: copy of p.19 in teacher’s manual cut into strips
Copies of Role-play I-messages one set per group
student work books

Session 3 K-2nd grade Expressing your Feelings
Students will describe how a person might feel in different situations.
Students will express their feelings verbally by using “I-messages”,
such as “I feel sad.”
Students will define bully and learn how to respond to teasing.
   1. Counselor will review I-messages and feelings (on the board).
      Did you tell others how you felt this week by using “I feel sad”
      or “I feel mad”? we are going to read a story about a caterpillar
      that is teased by others and feels sad.
   2. Counselor will read “Charlie the Caterpillar” using the caterpillar
      puppet.
   3. Students will discuss: What is a bully? (someone that continues
      to do or say mean things after you ask him to stop) What
      should you do if you are being teased? Charlie walked away
      from the teasers, but you can also state how you feel. Be sure
      to tell an adult about someone who continues to tease you.
   4. Students will discuss how Charlie felt by using I-messages.
      Each student will use the caterpillar puppet to role-play his I-
      message.
   5. Students will color the butterfly.

Need: caterpillar puppet
Charlie the Caterpillar
Butterfly coloring sheet for each student

Session 3: 3rd -5th grade Expressing Feelings
Objective- Students will identify feelings and how to express them.
Students will demonstrate stating feelings with I-messages. Students
will differentiate between I-messages and You-messages.
    1. Counselor will review I-messages, You-messages, and feelings
       on the board. Did you use your I-messages to tell how you feel
       this week? Who can give me an example of an I-message?
       Who can give me an example of a You-message?
    2. We are going to play a game that is similar to “Go Fish” where
       we match feelings. When you get a match, you will use an I-
       message using the feeling you have matched, such as “I feel
       happy when I go to recess.” The person that makes the most
       matches wins the game.
    3. Students will play the Feelings game stating an I-message for
       every feeling they match.

Need: Feelings game

Session 4: K-Making Good decisions “Too Good for Drugs”:
Objectives: Students will learn that they are responsible for making
positive choices.
Students will be able to follow the steps in the decision-making
process: Stop and think.
Students will be able to differentiate between substances that are
harmful to eat and drink from those that are safe to eat and drink.
Students will list at least three harmful substances: tobacco, alcohol,
and poison.
  1. Sometimes your parents are not around to help you decide
     what to do. You must learn to make decisions that will keep you
     safe and healthy.
  2. Counselor will read: ”Hunter’s Best Friend”
  3. Counselor will discuss the wrong choices that Hunter made
     when he did whatever his friend did even though he knew it
     was wrong.
  4. Discuss the decision-making process: STOP and THINK using
     hand signals. You are walking in the park. You see some
     cigarettes and matches. What should you do? Stop and Think.
     You see a beer in the refrigerator. No one is looking. What
     should you do? Stop and think.
  5. Students will complete page 8 in student workbook.
  6. Stop and think before you start to put things into your mouth.
     Poisons are not safe to eat or drink. Many things that are used
     to clean the house contain poison. Show picture of poison
     symbol on page 25. Students will be shown pictures on pages
     27-35 of teacher’s manual and students will decide what is safe
     to go into their mouth.
  7. Students will complete page 5 in workbook. Students will draw
     a line from what is safe to go into their mouth and put an X on
     those items that are not safe to go into the mouth.
  8. Treasure chest

Need: Hunter’s best friend (book)
Student workbook
Copy of p. 25-35 in teacher’s manual

Session 4: 1st grade: Too Good for Drugs-Making Good Decisions
Objectives: Students will learn that they are responsible for making
positive choices.
Students will be able to follow the steps in the decision-making
process: Stop and think.
Students will be able to differentiate safe and unsafe things for
children to do.
Students will be able to differentiate between medicine, alcohol, and
food.
   1. Sometimes your parents are not around to help you decide
      what to do. You must learn to make decisions that will keep you
      safe and healthy.
  2. Counselor will read: ”Hunter’s Best Friend”
  3. Counselor will discuss the wrong choices that Hunter made
     when he did whatever his friend did even though he knew it
     was wrong.
  4. Discuss the decision-making process: STOP and THINK using
     hand signals. You are walking in the park. You see some
     cigarettes and matches. What should you do? Stop and Think.
     You see a beer in the refrigerator. No one is looking. What
     should you do? Stop and think.
  5. Students will complete p. 4-5 in workbooks What do you see
     that is unsafe in the park? Put an X on these things. (wine,
     matches, cigarettes, Carmen not wearing a helmet) Draw a
     helmet for Carmen. What are some safe things for you to do in
     the park? Carmen stops and thinks before she picks up things.
  6. Counselor will show p. 64-67 in the teacher’s manual to help
     students differentiate between food, medicine and alcohol.
  7. Students will complete p. 6 in the workbook. Students circle
     what is safe to go into your mouth. Medicine should always be
     given by an adult. Children should not have alcohol. Stop and
     think before you put things into your mouth.

Need: Hunter’s Best Friend
Student workbooks
Copy of 64-67 in the teacher’s manual- cut into cards

Session 4: 2nd grade: Too Good for Drugs-Making Good Decisions
Objectives: Students will learn that they are responsible for making
positive choices.
Students will be able to follow the steps in the decision-making
process: Stop and think.
Students will be able to define consequence and predict possible
consequences.
Students will be able to differentiate between prescription and over
the counter drugs.
   1. Counselor will discuss consequences- what happens next after
       you do something. Every decision has consequences whether
       good or bad. You hit someone and you go to the office. You are
       nice to someone and you make a new friend. Some
       consequences are not very serious and some are very serious.
  2. Students will complete p. 2 in the student’s workbook
     discussing the bad consequences that happened to Wagner
     when he made bad choices
  3. Students will choose a card from the bag and decide what
     decision they should make from each scenario. (p. 17-19 in
     teacher’s manual)
  4. Counselor will discuss the difference between prescription and
     over the counter drugs. You can buy an over the counter drug
     at a store, but you must go to a doctor for him to prescribe a
     prescription drug. Both drugs should not be taken without an
     adult. You should stop and think before you take a drug.
  5. Students will complete p. 10 in the student workbook circling
     the correct answers about medicine.

Need: student workbooks
Copy of p. 17-19 in teacher’s manual cut in cards

Session 4 3rd grade- Too Good for Drugs-Making Good Decisions
Objective: Student will be able to define peer pressure.
Student will learn peer pressure refusal strategies-no, walk away,
ignore, a better idea, make an excuse, broken record
Students will demonstrate refusal strategies.
   1. Counselor will discuss the importance of planning ahead to
      know what you are going to say before a situation arises.
   2. Students will make decisions quickly by choosing a line to
      stand in: Go to Art class or music class? Work alone or work
      with a group? Read a book or watch a video? Ride a bike or
      skate? Play video games or play outside? How many of you
      were waiting for a friend to make a decision before you decided
      which line to get in? Often when you make decisions you are
      influenced by others. What do you call it when a friend
      influences you to do something you shouldn’t do or don’t want
      to do? Peer Pressure. You need to be prepared to make a
      decision based on what you really want to do.
   3. Students will put together the strategy cube on p. 32 in the
      teacher’s manual. Students will feel in the blanks naming each
      strategy as counselor explains each one. Say NO. Broken
      record-when you say what you mean and repeat it again and
      again. Walk away. Ignore. A better idea. Make an excuse-tell
     your friends you have other plans, or too much homework, or
     chores you have to do.
  4. Students will role-play each refusal strategy. Always stand tall
     and look your friend in the eye.
Need: Workbooks
Copy of p. 32 in the 4th grade teacher’s manual for every student

Session 4: 4th grade: Too Good for Drugs-Making Good Decisions
Objective: Student will be able to define peer pressure.
Student will learn peer pressure refusal strategies-no, walk away,
ignore, a better idea, make an excuse, broken record
Students will demonstrate refusal strategies.
   1. Counselor will discuss the importance of planning ahead to
      know what you are going to say before a situation arises.
   2. Students will make decisions quickly by choosing a line to stand
      in: Go to Art class or music class? Work alone or work with a
      group? Read a book or watch a video? Ride a bike or skate?
      Play video games or play outside? How many of you were
      waiting for a friend to make a decision before you decided
      which line to get in? Often when you make decisions you are
      influenced by others. What do you call it when a friend
      influences you to do something you shouldn’t do or don’t want
      to do? Peer Pressure. You need to be prepared to make a
      decision based on what you really want to do.
   3. Students will put together the strategy cube on p. 32 in the
      teacher’s manual. Students will feel in the blanks naming each
      strategy as counselor explains each one. Say NO. Broken
      record-when you say what you mean and repeat it again and
      again. Walk away. Ignore. A better idea. Make an excuse-tell
      your friends you have other plans, or too much homework, or
      chores you have to do.
   4. Students will complete p. 4-5 in workbooks writing the name of
      the refusal strategy for each situation.
   5. Students will role-play each refusal strategy. Always stand tall
      and look your friend in the eye.



Need: Workbooks
Copy of p. 32 in the teacher’s manual for every student
Session 4: 5th grade- Too Good for Drugs-Making Good Decisions
Objective: Student will be able to define peer pressure.
Student will learn peer pressure refusal strategies-no, walk away,
ignore, a better idea, make an excuse, broken record
Students will demonstrate refusal strategies.
   1. Counselor will discuss the importance of planning ahead to
      know what you are going to say before a situation arises. You
      should stop and think. List the choices and the consequences.
      Some decisions have very bad consequences and some don’t.
   2. Students will be given a “decision card” and asked to tell the
      other students what they will do in certain scenarios from p. 26-
      27 in the teacher’s manual.
   2. Often when you make decisions you are influenced by others.
       What do you call it when a friend influences you to do
       something you shouldn’t do or don’t want to do? Peer
       Pressure. You need to be prepared to make a decision based
       on what you really want to do.
   3. Counselor will discuss refusal strategies: Say NO. Broken
       record-when you say what you mean and repeat it again and
       again. Walk away. Ignore. A better idea. Make an excuse-tell
       your friends you have other plans, or too much homework, or
       chores you have to do. Steer clean-avoiding a situation
       completely because nothing good can come form it and it may
       be dangerous. Reverse the pressure-“Why are you pressuring
       me? If you were my friend, you wouldn’t ask me to do this.”
       State the facts: “We could get suspended for skipping school”
   4. Students will complete p. 5 in their workbooks writing in the
       refusal strategies for each scenario.
   5. Students will role-play each refusal strategy. Always stand tall
       and look your friend in the eye.



Need: copy of p. 26-27 in the teacher’s manual cut into cards
workbooks
Session 5: K-Friendship “Too Good for Drugs”
Objective: Students will identify the characteristics of a friend.
Students will describe ways to start a conversation.
   1. What does a friend look like? (all different) What does a friend
   act like? Friends listen and care about each other. Friends must
   help each other, share and take turns, Friends have fun together.
   How can you make a friend? Smile and say “hello”.
   2. Counselor will read “Brand New Kid” How did one girl help out
   the boy who was different from everyone else? Should you look for
   someone that does not have a friend and include him in a game?
   3. Students will perform a play: “Act like a friend” on page 61 in
   teacher’s manual. Students will role-play how to meet a friend.
   4. A good friend smiles when he sees you. On page 7 in the
   student’s workbook, write your name and draw yourself smiling.
   Swap your workbook with a friend and write your name in his book
   and draw yourself smiling


Need: Brand New Kid
Copy of p. 61 in teacher’s manual
Student workbooks


Session 5: 1st grade-Friendship “Too Good for Drugs”-
Objectives: Students will identify the characteristics of a friend.
Students will demonstrate the skill of listening.
   1. What does a friend look like? (all different) What does a friend
   act like? Friends listen and care about each other. Friends must
   help each other, share and take turns, Friends have fun together.
   How can you make a friend? Smile and say “hello”.
   2. Counselor will read “Brand New Kid” How did one girl help out
   the boy who was different from everyone else? Should you look for
   someone that does not have a friend and include him in a game?
   3. Students will swap workbooks with a friend and take turns
   listening to each other. You will ask your partner questions and
   listen carefully to the answers on p. 3 in the student workbook.
   4. Students will practice introducing themselves to others. A good
   friend smiles when he sees you.
Need: Brand New Kid
Student workbooks


Session 5: 2nd grade-Friendship “Too Good for Drugs”-
Objectives: Students will identify the characteristics of a friend.
Students will discuss how to choose friends-not by outward
appearances or what they own.
Students will demonstrate how to give and receive compliments
   1. What does a friend look like? (all different) What does a friend
      act like? Friends listen and care about each other. Friends
      must help each other, share and take turns, Friends have fun
      together. Some reasons for choosing friends are better than
      others.
   2. Describe the type of friend you would like to have. Students will
      complete p. 7 in the student’s workbook checking the type of
      person they think is a good friend. Looking good, wearing nice
      clothes, living in a big house or having many toys does not
      make a person a good friend.
   3. Students will complete p. 8 in the student’s workbook crossing
      out anything that is not friendly and writing a friendly thing to
      say in the blank.
   4. Friends are all different, but there is one way that friends are
      the same-they all help each other and encourage each other.
   5. Students will complete p. 6 in the student’s workbook by writing
      a compliment to Wagner.
   6. Students will complete “Kindness-give a compliment”
      worksheet. Students will write their name in the middle and
      everyone in group will write a compliment on the petals of the
      flower.

Need: Student workbooks
Copies of “Kindness –give a compliment” for each student
Session 5: 3rd grade -Friendship
Objectives: Students will identify the characteristics of a friend.
Students will discuss how to choose friends-not by outward
appearances or what they own.
Students will demonstrate how to give and receive compliments.
1. Counselor will discuss: What does a friend look like? (all
   different) What does a friend act like? Friends listen and care
   about each other. Friends must help each other, share and take
   turns, Friends have fun together. Some reasons for choosing
   friends are better than others. Looking good, wearing nice
   clothes, living in a big house or having many toys does not
   make a person a good friend. Jealousy keeps you from making
   friends.
2. Counselor will read “Enemy Pie”
3. Counselor will discuss: How can you get rid of any enemy and
   gain a friend? Kindness, don’t judge a person before you take
   the time to know him, spending time with the person,
4. Students will practice showing kindness by completing
   “Kindness-give a compliment” worksheet. Students will write
   their name in the middle and everyone in group will write a
   compliment on the petals of the flower.


Need: “Enemy Pie” (book)
Copies of “Kindness-give a compliment” for each student


Session 5: 4th grade-Friendship
Objectives: Students will identify the characteristics of a friend.
Students will discuss how to choose friends-not by outward
appearances or what they own.
Students will demonstrate how to give and receive compliments.
1. Counselor will discuss: What do you look for in a friend? What
   does a friend act like? Friends listen and care about each other.
   Friends must stand up for each other, share and take turns,
   Friends have fun together. Some reasons for choosing friends
   are better than others. How do you choose your friends?
   Looking good, wearing nice clothes, living in a big house or
   having many toys does not make a person a good friend.
   Jealousy keeps you from making friends. What is the best way
   to make a friend? Show them kindness.
2. Students will practice showing kindness by giving compliments
   to the students in the group. Students will write their name in
   the middle of the flower and write a compliment for everyone in
   group on the petals of the flower. Students will give a petal to
   each student in the group. Students will glue the flower together
   and place on construction paper.



Need: copy of flower petals for each student
Construction paper for each student


Session 5: 5th grade-Friendship-Too Good for Drugs
Objectives: Students will describe a good friend-listening and
caring. Students will define communication and distinguish
between effective and ineffective communication techniques.
Students will demonstrate effective communication skills: look,
listen, and ask.
1. Counselor will discuss: “What do you look for in a friend? Do
    you look for someone who listens to you and cares about how
    you feel?
2. Counselor will discuss: What is communication? Sending and
    receive messages so that both the sender and the receiver
    understand the message. If I call your house and get your
    answer machine is that communication? If I speak to you in
    Spanish and you do not understand Spanish, is that
    communication? Communication is not just talking but
    understanding. How can you communicate without every
    saying a word? Letter, e-mail, text, body language. To
    communicate well you must look, listen, and ask.
3. Students will interview each other using the look, listen, and
    ask techniques on p. 2 in the workbooks.
4. Counselor will discuss how everyone needs someone to talk to
    about their problems. You need someone who will listen and
    care about how you feel.
  5. Students will complete p. 9 in their workbooks writing down
     someone they can talk to about each situation.

Need: Workbooks


  Session 6: K- Anger Management
  Objectives: Students will learn three ways to calm down.
  Students will learn how to express feelings in a way that will not
  harm others.
  Students will learn how feelings affect their body.
  1. Counselor will review decision-making process: Stop and Think.
  2. Counselor will read: “Franklin’s Bad Day. “
  3. Counselor will use turtle to show students how to stop, think,
     and take deep breaths and count to ten to calm down. Students
     will demonstrate the technique by using turtle puppet.
  4. Counselor will discuss how anger affects the body. How do you
     feel when you get angry? In what parts of your body do you feel
     angry? Students will draw how anger affects their body.
     clinched fists, fast heartbeat, clinched teeth, headache,
     stomach ache, fast breathing, loud or mean voice, wanting to
     fight or break things, feeling down or depressed
  5. You should always express your feelings in a way that will not
     harm others. To make good decisions you must STOP and
     THINK. You are not bad, but sometimes you make bad choices
  6. Students will color the turtle coloring sheet reinforcing ways to
     calm down.

  Need: “Franklin’s Bad Day”
  Turtle puppet
  Copy of “turtle” coloring sheet for each student


   Session 6: 1st grade Anger Management
  Objectives: Students will learn three ways to calm down.
  Students will learn how to express feelings in a way that will not
  harm others.
  Students will learn how feelings affect their body.
  1. Counselor will review decision-making process: Stop and Think.
  2. Counselor will read: “Franklin’s Bad Day. “
  3. Counselor will use turtle to show students how to stop, think,
     and take deep breaths and count to ten to calm down. Students
     will demonstrate the technique by using turtle puppet.
  4. Counselor will discuss how anger affects the body. How do you
     feel when you get angry? In what parts of your body do you feel
     angry? Students will draw how anger affects their body.
     clinched fists, fast heartbeat, clinched teeth, headache,
     stomach ache, fast breathing, loud or mean voice, wanting to
     fight or break things, feeling down or depressed
  5. You should always express your feelings in a way that will not
     harm others. To make good decisions you must STOP and
     THINK. You are not bad, but sometimes you make bad choices
  6. Students will color the turtle coloring sheet reinforcing ways to
     calm down.

  Need: “Franklin’s Bad Day”
  Turtle puppet
  Copy of “turtle” coloring sheet for each student

Session 6: 2nd grade Anger management
Objectives: Students will learn how feelings affect their body.
Students will learn to make positive choices instead of negative
choices when they are angry.
   1. Counselor will review decision-making process: Stop and Think
   2. Counselor will discuss how anger makes your body feel:
      clinched fists, fast heartbeat, clinched teeth, headache,
      stomach ache, fast breathing, loud or mean voice, wanting to
      fight or break things, feeling down or depressed
   3. Students will draw where they feel anger in their body by
      completing “How does my body show anger?” You have to
      release the anger in your body or you will start to feel angry
      everyday. What are some ways to release your anger?
      Drawing, writing, singing, dancing, listening to music, etc.
   4. Your body has different ranges of anger. Some things make
      you angrier than others. You have to calm down whether
      something makes you frown or very, very angry. Students will
      complete “How angry would you feel?” and range their anger
      for each scenario from a frown to very, very angry.
   5. Students will take turns sharing how they calm down when they
      are very, very angry. You are not bad, but sometimes you
      make bad choices
   6. Counselor will discuss “the Anger Rules” It’s OK to be angry
      but don’t hurt others, yourself, or property and do talk about it
      to someone.


Need: copy of “How does my body show anger?” and “How Angry
would you feel?” and “Angry Rules”

Session 6: 3rd grade Anger management-part 1
  Objectives: Students will learn how feelings affect their body.
  Students will learn to make positive choices instead of negative
  choices when they are angry.
  1. Counselor will review decision-making process: Stop and Think
  2. Counselor will discuss how anger makes your body feel:
     clinched fists, fast heartbeat, clinched teeth, headache,
     stomach ache, fast breathing, loud or mean voice, wanting to
     fight or break things, feeling down or depressed
  3. Students will draw where they feel anger in their body by
     completing “How does my body show anger?” You have to
     release the anger in your body or you will start to feel angry
     everyday. What are some ways to release your anger?
     Drawing, writing, singing, dancing, listening to music, etc.
  4. Your body has different ranges of anger. Some things make
     you angrier than others. You have to calm down whether
     something makes you frown or very, very angry. Students will
     complete “How angry would you feel?” and range their anger
     for each scenario from a frown to very, very angry.
  5. Students will take turns answering questions from “Things that
     make me mad and alternatives” sharing how to make the right
     choices when they are angry. You are not bad, but sometimes
     you make bad choices
  6. Counselor will discuss “the Anger Rules” It’s OK to be angry
     but don’t hurt others, yourself, or property and do talk about it to
     someone.

Need: copy of “How does my body show anger?” and “Things that
make me mad and alternatives” for each student.
Session 6: 4th grade Anger management-part 1
Objectives: Students will learn how anger affects their body. Students
will learn what “triggers” their anger. Students will define a bully.
Student will learn what to do when a bully bothers them.
    1. Anger is a normal feeling. It is okay to be angry but it is not
       okay to hurt others.
    2. Counselor will discuss how anger makes your body feel: Anger
       causes physical changes in our bodies. Adrenaline is produced
       by the adrenal glands when we get angry. It is important to
       know when we are getting angry and what causes us to get
       angry. Examples of physical symptoms: clinched fists, fast
       heartbeat, clinched teeth, headache, stomach ache, fast
       breathing, loud or mean voice, wanting to fight or break things,
       feeling down or depressed
    3. Students will draw where they feel anger in their body by
       completing “This is how my body feels when I am angry!” You
       have to release the anger in your body or you will start to feel
       angry everyday. What are some ways to release your anger?
       Drawing, writing, singing, dancing, listening to music, etc
    4. Students will write down some things that bother them by
       completing “Things that bug me”. Students will share what bugs
       them and how they can handle them.
    5. What is a bully? (A bully is someone who continues to bother
       you after you have asked them to stop). What should you do
       when someone continues to bother you? Ignore the person.
       Move away from the person. Ask politely for the person to stop.
       Tell the person firmly to quit. Give warning and then get help.
       Students will role-play each technique

Need: Copy of “This is now my body feels when I am angry” and
“things that bug me” for each student

Session 6: 5th grade Anger management-part 1
Objectives: Students will learn how anger affects their body. Students
will learn what “triggers” their anger. Students will define bully.
Student will learn what to do when a bully bothers them.
    6. Anger is a normal feeling. It is okay to be angry but it is not
       okay to hurt others.
    7. Counselor will discuss how anger makes your body feel: Anger
       causes physical changes in our bodies. Adrenaline is produced
      by the adrenal glands when we get angry. It is important to
      know when we are getting angry and what causes us to get
      angry. Examples of physical symptoms: clinched fists, fast
      heartbeat, clinched teeth, headache, stomach ache, fast
      breathing, loud or mean voice, wanting to fight or break things,
      feeling down or depressed
   8. Students will draw where they feel anger in their body by
      completing “This is how my body feels when I am angry!” You
      have to release the anger in your body or you will start to feel
      angry everyday. What are some ways to release your anger?
      Drawing, writing, singing, dancing, listening to music, etc
   9. Students will write down some things that bother them by
      completing “Things that bug me”. Students will share what bugs
      them and how they can handle them.
   10.What is a bully? (A bully is someone who continues to bother
      you after you have asked them to stop). What should you do
      when someone continues to bother you? Ignore the person.
      Move away from the person. Ask politely for the person to stop.
      Tell the person firmly to quit. Give warning and then get help
      Students will role-play each technique

Need: Copy of “This is now my body feels when I am angry” and
“things that bug me” for each student

Session 7: K-1 Tattling
Objective: Students will be able to tell the difference between tattling
and reporting.
  1. Counselor will discuss” What is a tattletale? Someone who
      wants to get others in trouble for little things. This is a story of a
      tattle tale.
  2. Counselor will read “Armadillo Tattletale” using puppet
  3. Counselor will discuss how the armadillo lost his friends
      because he was always tattling on others. When should you tell
      an adult about something that someone has done? (when
      someone is doing harm to himself, others, or property) This is
      called reporting.
  4. Students will be given different scenarios and students have to
      decide if this is tattling or reporting by showing their thumbs up
      or thumbs down.
  5. Students will color the “Don’t be a Tattletale” Alligator.
Need: “Armadillo Tattletale”
List of tattles and reports
Copy of Alligator coloring sheet for each student


Session 7: 2nd-3rd grade Anger management- part 2
Objectives: Students will learn positive ways to express their anger by
deep breathing, counting, self-talk (talking to yourself), and changing
how you feel
  1. Counselor will review I-messages: Did anyone use an I-
     message to tell how they felt this week? Is it okay to be angry?
     Did anyone use a positive way to release their anger this week?
  2. Counselor will use turtle to show students how to take deep
     breaths and count to 10 when angry. When you are angry you
     hold your breathe and your muscles become tense, but if you
     take deep breathes you will relax and can Stop and Think.
  3. Counselor will show students how to use self-talk using
     DYNAMITE stick.
  4. Students will complete ”Tell yourself to Calm Down” by writing
     down the things they would say to themselves to make
     themselves calm down. Students will share with the group what
     they wrote.
  5. Counselor will discuss how you can change being angry to
     being calm. You have control over your feelings. You do not
     have to stay angry all day. You can use one of these
     techniques to calm down and think about your feelings.
  6. Students will complete “Changing how I feel” telling the group
     how they would change their feelings from being very angry to
     calm.
  7. Students will color “Stop and Think” turtle.

Need: Turtle puppet
DYNAMITE stick
Copy of “changing how I feel” and “tell yourself to calm down”
Stop and Think” coloring sheet
Session 7: 4th grade-Management part 2
Objectives: Students will learn positive ways to express their anger by
deep breathing, counting, and self-talk (talking to yourself)
  1. Counselor will review I-messages: Did anyone use an I-
     message to tell how they felt this week? Is it okay to be angry?
     Did anyone use a positive way to release their anger this week?
  2. Counselor will show students how to take deep breaths and
     count to 10 when angry. When you are angry you hold your
     breathe and your muscles become tense, but if you take deep
     breathes you will relax and can Stop and Think.
  3. Counselor will show students how to use self-talk using
     DYNAMITE stick.
  4. Students will complete ”Tell yourself to Calm Down” by writing
     down the things they would say to themselves to make
     themselves calm down. Students will share with the group what
     they wrote.
  5. Counselor will discuss: You have control over your feelings.
     You do not have to stay angry all day. You can use one of
     these techniques to calm down and think about your feelings.
  6. Students will complete “Manage your anger Wisely.” Students
     will write what makes them angry and some positive ways to let
     out their anger without harming others.

Need:
DYNAMITE stick
Copy of “Manage your anger wisely” and “tell yourself to calm down.”
Be wise Stop and Think coloring sheet.


Session 7: 5th grade-Positive/negative influences-Too Good for Drugs
Students will discuss the way other people such as friends influence
our choices, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors. Students will
distinguish between positive and negative influence. Students will list
a variety of safe and healthy activities friends can do together.

  1. Counselor will discuss: Have you thought of how many choices
     you make in a day? how many choices are influenced by your
     friends and family?
  2. Students will complete p. 6 in the workbook listing all their
     favorite things and placing a check mark by who influences
     them the most when they make their choices. How many of you
     were influenced mostly by your friends? Family? Self? How can
     you make decisions based on what you want to do?
  3. Counselor will review refusal strategies: Say NO. Broken
     record. Walk away. Ignore. A better idea. Make an excuse.
     Steer clear. Reverse the pressure. State the facts.
  4. Students will list some better ideas for friends to do from the
     following categories: places to go, things to make or build,
     sports, toys to play with, books to read, TV shows, things to
     collect, things to cook, indoor games, outdoor games, songs,
     movies to watch.
  5. Students will complete p. 7 in the work book drawing a filmstrip.
     In the second frame draw a picture of you and your friend. In
     the third frame draw your friend forcing you to do something
     that you know is wrong (cigarette, beer, stealing, breaking
     school rules). In the last three frames draw three better ideas
     that you could suggest to your friend.


  Need: workbooks


Session 8: K-1 Lying/Stealing
Objective: Students will learn how to correct a situation where they
have lied. Students will learn about conscience- the inner voice that
tells you what is right and wrong. Students will define stealing and
what to do to correct a situation where they have stolen from others.
1.     Counselor will discuss: What is a lie? What happened when
you lie? Do you lose your friends when you lie? Do others lose their
trust in you?
2.     Counselor will read: Lucy Lettuce using ladybug puppet (Lucy’s
conscience)
3.     Counselor will discuss: What is a conscience? Have you ever
heard your conscience? What can you do instead of lying? What can
you do if you have lied to someone? What can you do instead of
stealing? What can you do it you have stolen something?
4.     Counselor will give different scenarios of stealing or lying and
students will tell what they should do in each case.
5.    Students will color Lucy Lettuce and Lindy Ladybug

Need: Ladybug puppet
“Lucy Lettuce”
Scenarios for stealing

Session 8: 2-3rd grade –Setting Goals
Objectives: Students will define goal setting. Students will distinguish
between short-term goals and long-term goals. Students will discuss
why it is important to set personal goals. Students will develop a
personal goal for the future.
   1. Counselor will discuss: What is a goal? Something you want to
      happen in your life, something you want to do or achieve. Goals
      you achieve in a short amount of time are short-term goals, like
      making your A/R points for the 9 weeks. A long-term goal takes
      a long time to achieve, like becoming President of the United
      States.
   2. Students will decide which goals are long or short term: bake a
      cake, publish a best-selling book, and learn to play a new video
      game, graduate from high school. Some people expect to reach
      their long term goals very quickly so they did discouraged. You
      have to be patient and set small goals for yourself along the
      way. You should never give up,
   3. Students will complete “Dreams do come true.” Imagine that
      today is actually 15 years in the future. Write the date of that
      day at the top of the paper. Draw a picture about yourself being
      a success in the future. Complete “If I work at it hard enough, I
      can….” Tell how you will reach your goal. Students will share
      their dream with the group.
   4. Students will complete “Group survey”


Need: copy of “Dreams do come true”
Group survey


Session 8
4th grade –Setting Goals-Too Good for Drugs
Objectives: Students will define goal setting. Students will distinguish
between short-term goals and long-term goals. Students will discuss
why it is important to set personal goals. Students will develop a
personal goal for the future.
   1. Counselor will discuss: What is a goal? Something you want to
      happen in your life, something you want to do or achieve.
      Goals you achieve in a short amount of time are short-term
      goals, like making your A/R points for the 9 weeks. A long-term
      goal takes a long time to achieve, like becoming President of
      the United States.
   2. Students will decide which goals are long or short term: bake a
      cake, publish a best-selling book, and learn to play a new video
      game, graduate from high school. Some people expect to
      reach their long term goals very quickly so they did
      discouraged. You have to be patient and set small goals for
      yourself along the way.
   3. Students will complete p. 1 in their workbooks designing the
      front page of a newspaper. Imagine that today is actually 15
      years in the future. Write the date of that day at the top of the
      paper. Write a headline about you reaching your future goal.
      Draw a picture about yourself achieving the goal in the box. Fill
      in the blanks with your name, your goal, and the steps you took
      to reach your goal. Tell how you will celebrate reaching your
      goal. Students will share their goal with the group.
   4. Counselor will discuss: You will need friends along the way to
      encourage you to meet your goals. These people are called
      goal boosters. You do not want friends who will discourage you
      but will encourage you to be your best.
   5. Students will complete p.2 listing their short term goal and the
      people that will be their goal boosters.
   6. Students will complete “Group survey”


   Need: Work books
   Group survey

Session 8: 5th grade –Setting Goals
Objectives: Students will define goal setting. Students will distinguish
between short-term goals and long-term goals. Students will discuss
why it is important to set personal goals. Students will develop a
personal goal for the future.
  1. Counselor will discuss: What is a goal? Something you want to
     happen in your life, something you want to do or achieve. Goals
     you achieve in a short amount of time are short-term goals, like
     making your A/R points for the 9 weeks. A long-term goal takes
     a long time to achieve, like becoming President of the United
     States.
  2. Students will decide which goals are long or short term: bake a
     cake, publish a best-selling book, and learn to play a new video
     game, graduate from high school. Some people expect to reach
     their long term goals very quickly so they did discouraged. You
     have to be patient and set small goals for yourself along the
     way. You should never give up.
  3. Students will complete “Dreams do come true.” Imagine that
     today is actually 15 years in the future. Write the date of that
     day at the top of the paper. Draw a picture about yourself being
     a success in the future. Complete “If I work at it hard enough, I
     can….” Tell how you will reach your goal. Students will share
     their dream with the group.
  4. Students will complete “Group Survey”


Need: copy of “Dreams do come true”
Group survey


Session 9: K-1 Manners
Students will distinguish the difference between good manners and
bad manners.
Students will be able to give a compliment.
   1. Counselor will read “Clifford’s Good Manners”
   2. Counselor will discuss: What did Clifford do that showed he
      had good manners? He said “please,” “thank you,” did not talk
      while others were talking, threw away his trash, etc.
   3. Students will role play saying please and thank you.
   4. Students will role play what they should do when two people
      are talking.
   5. What is a compliment? Something you say to a person that is
      nice.
   6. Students will practice giving compliments to each other.
   7. Students will color Clifford saying please and thank you.
  Need: Clifford’s Good Manners
  Clifford coloring sheet

Session 9
2nd grade-Peer Pressure “Too Good for Drugs”
Students will be able to define peer pressure. Students will discuss
why it is important to refuse peer pressure. Student will be able to
recite at least three ways to handle peer pressure.
   1. Students will perform the “Peer Pressure Play” on page 84 in
      teacher’s manual.
   2. Counselor will discuss what happened in the play. This story is
      about peer pressure. Peers are someone who is about your
      age. Peer pressure is when your peers pressure you into doing
      something that you really don’t want to do.
   3. Students will perform the play again and change the ending so
      Wagner makes the right decision.
   4. Counselor will discuss ways to handle peer pressure: ignore,
      say no, broken record (say no over and over again like a
      broken record), walk away. What are other ways you can
      handle peer pressure?
   5. Counselor will give scenarios of peer pressure to the group and
      students must decide which way to refuse the peer pressure.
   6. Students will work the Peer Pressure Puzzle on p. 9 in the
      student workbook.

Need: p. 84-94 in teacher’s manual
Name tags for play
Workbooks

Session 9: 3rd-5th grade- Good and Bad Attitudes
Students will learn the difference between a good and bad attitude.
Students will discuss the ways having a good attitude can change
their day.
   1. Counselor will discuss:
What does someone do who has a good attitude? Do not let little
problems ruin your day. Use good manners. Behave in ways that are
nice and polite. Do not harm yourself or others. Obey school rules.
What must you have before you have a good attitude? Self-control.
When you have self-control you make better decisions and you feel
proud of yourself. What does someone do who has a bad attitude?
Let little problems make you very angry. Act very rude to others. Hurt
other’s feelings or make them angry
   2. Counselor will read two scenarios:
John usually has a good attitude and uses his self-control at school.
Yesterday John had some really frustration things happen to him. He
woke up late for school, missed the bus, Mom yelled at him, and he
forgot his homework. These things could definitely have put him in a
bad mood all day. Even though John could have chosen to act very
angry, rude, grouchy at school, he used his self –control and had a
good attitude. Every time he felt frustrated, he reminded himself that
he could have a better day if he would “keep his cool.” John simply
took a few deep breaths, tried to calm down, and told himself that
tomorrow will start out better.
Yesterday Brittany hurriedly grabbed a glass of milk before school.
She spilled some milk on her good jeans. Her face turned red. She
started fussing at her mother. “Look at my good jeans,” she screamed
as she stomped around the kitchen. Brittany’s mother told her to stop
being rude or she would be grounded. when Brittany arrived at school
that day, she was still grouchy, if Brittany continues to be grouchy,
she will be have bad attitude, and she and everyone around her will
have a bad day. If you use self-control, you will not ruin your day.
   3. Students will play the “Keep your Cool” game. If you draw an
        OH NO! card (bad attitude), you must move backwards. If you
        draw a SMART CHOICE card (positive attitude), you move
        forward. Just like in the game, people with a good attitude move
        forward during the day, but people with a bad attitude do not.
Need: “Keep your Cool” game

Session10: K-1st grade Teasing
Students will be able to identify the difference between put-ups
(words that build you up) and put-downs (words that tear you down).
Students will give examples of put-ups and put-downs.
Student will identify emotions that we feel when we hear put-ups and
put-downs.

  1. Counselor will ask a student to describe a soft and fuzzy object
     and a student to describe a cold and sharp object. “What does
     this feel like?” Words are like these objects. Some make us feel
     warm and fuzzy and some cold and sharp and hurt our feelings.
  2. Counselor will discuss put-ups and put-downs. “How do we feel
     after we hear a put-up or put-down?
  3. Read: Rainbow Fish to the Rescue
  4. Discuss how the put-ups and put-downs made the little striped
     fish feel in the story.
  5. Discuss how put-downs affect our heart. Ask students to give
     examples of put-downs. Use a paper heart and wrinkle the
     heart each time the students give a put-down.
  6. After each student has given a put-down ask: “What happened
     to this heart? What does it look like now? How might we feel if
     our heart looked like this?”
  7. Ask the student to give examples of put-ups. As each student
     gives a put-up, unwrinkled the heart.
  8. Compare a new heart to the wrinkled heart. “What is different
     about them? What does this tell us about the effects of put-
     downs and put-ups? (Not easy to undo a put-down, they last for
     a long time.) What do we need to be sure to do? STOP and
     THINK before we speak.
  9. Students will color the Rainbow Fish to remind them not to
     tease others.
  Need: Rainbow fish to the Rescue
   2 Paper hearts
  Rainbow fish coloring sheets
  Hard and soft objects


Session10: 2nd-3rd grade Teasing
Students will be able to identify the difference between put-ups
(words that build you up) and put-downs (words that tear you down).
Students will give examples of put-ups and put-downs.
Student will identify emotions that we feel when we hear put-ups and
put-downs.
   1. Counselor will ask a student to describe a soft and fuzzy object
      and a student to describe a cold and sharp object. “What does
      this feel like?” Words are like these objects. Some make us feel
      warm and fuzzy and some cold and sharp and hurt our feelings.
   2. Counselor will discuss put-ups and put-downs. “How do we feel
      after we hear a put-up or put-down?
   3. Read: Andrew’s Angry Words
4. Discuss how the put-ups and put-downs made people in the
   story feel.
5. Discuss how put-downs affect our heart. Ask students to write
   examples of put-downs on a paper heart. Have the students
   wrinkle the heart for each example of a put-down that they
   wrote on the heart.
6. After each student has given a put-down ask: “What happened
   to your heart? What does it look like now? How might we feel if
   our heart looked like this?”
7. Ask the student to write examples of put-ups on the other side
   of the heart. Ask each student to unwrinkled the heart for each
   put-up they wrote.
8. Compare a new heart to the wrinkled heart. “What is different
   about them? What does this tell us about the effects of put-
   downs and put-ups? (Not easy to undo a put-down, they last for
   a long time.) What do we need to be sure to do? STOP and
   THINK before we speak.
9. Students will paste the heart to a piece of construction paper
   and write: Give put-ups not put-downs.
Need: Andrew’s Angry Words
Paper hearts for each student and counselor
Construction paper

Session 10: 4th -5th grade Bullies
Students will be able to identify bullying behavior.
Students will be able to learn how to change their bullying
behavior.
1. Counselor will discuss “What is a bully? Have you ever been
   bullied? How did you react?”
2. Students will role-play scenarios where students are required to
   confront bullying behavior.
3. Students will discuss what happened in each scenario.
4. Students will complete “Bullying Behavior Change Worksheet.”
   Each student will identify a bullying behavior he may have and
   make a plan to change it.
5. Students will be asked to imagine themselves with improved
   behavior and state: From now on I will ….
6. Students will draw a picture or make a reminder note of the
   behavior they would like to change. Students will keep the note
   or picture where they can see it everyday.
   Need: Bullying Behavior Change Worksheet
   Bullying Role Play

Session #11 K-1st grade Positive Attitude

Students will identify positive statements. Students will practice
saying positive statements. Students will learn benefit of endurance.
Counselor will discuss: We all have days when we make mistakes or
things go wrong. Should you let little problems ruin your day? When
things go wrong should you stop using good manners or stop obeying
the school rules? Should you continue to behave in ways that are
nice and polite? Should you harm yourself or others when things go
wrong? Should you ever give up and stop trying?
Counselor will read The Little Engine That Could.
Counselor will ask: How did the engine get up the mountain? What
did the other engines say about the little engine? How does
discouraging words from others affect you? How does encouraging
words from others affect you? What is something that you could not
do last year? What is something new that you can do this year? What
is something hard for you to do that you have not learned to do yet?
What can you learn from the little engine when you are trying
something new or you are trying to do your work in the classroom and
can’t quite understand how to do it? Talk to yourself and tell yourself
to have a good day and forget about what has happened so far. Tell
yourself that you can do it.
Students will make hats that say “I think I can” (option: color “I Can
Do It” train)
Students will form a train and walk around the room, saying “I think I
can” going up the mountain (very slowly) and “I know I can” going
down the mountain (faster).

Need: The Little Engine That Could
“I think I Can” Hats or “I can do it” color sheets
Session #11 2nd-3rd grade Tattling vs. Reporting

Students will be able to tell the difference between tattling and
reporting. Students will learn how to talk out their differences with
friends instead of tattling to an adult. Students will be able to
distinguish when a person is threatening them.
Counselor will discuss” What is a tattletale? Someone who wants to
get others in trouble for little things. Does anyone want a tattletale for
a friend? Should you try to work out your differences with your friend
first before you go tell an adult to intervene? How can you do this?
(Tell the person how you feel. Use an I-message.)
When should you tell an adult about something that someone has
done? (when someone is doing harm to himself, others, or property)
This is called reporting.
Counselor will discuss words that should not be spoken at school: kill,
murder, bomb, blow up, cut you up, or choke you. You should not
threaten anyone, and if someone threatens you, you should tell an
adult. You can ignore people that call you names, but not a person
that threatens to harm you.
Counselor will read “Tattling or Telling” cards using different
scenarios and students have to decide if this is tattling or telling.
Students will complete the Telling and Tattling worksheet.
Students will color “Work out your own problems. Do not tattle to an
adult.”

Need: Tattling or Telling Cards
“Telling or Tattling” worksheet
Copy of “Work out your own problems” coloring sheet for each
student


Session 11: Responsibility 4th-5th grade

Objective: Students will discuss ways to be responsible. Students will
discover in what areas they are responsible and in what areas they
need to improve. Students will write a goal for the week to work on to
become more responsible.
What does it mean to be responsible? Taking care of one's self and
others; to carry out a duty or task carefully and thoroughly: be able to
count on one, depend or trust. How can you be responsible at
home? With friends? To yourself? In school? In the world?
Students will discuss various ways to be responsible.
Students will take a survey “Am I Responsible?” Students will
discover in what areas they are responsible and in what areas they
need to improve. Students will write a goal for the week to work on to
become more responsible. Students will share their goals for the
week.
Students will play “Responsibility Bingo” reinforcing the ways to
become responsible.
Need: Responsibility Bingo
“Am I responsible?” survey for each student