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Let’s Change a Life

VIEWS: 61 PAGES: 17

									Let’s Change a Life
Written by: A. Simons Pictures by: A. Simons Graphics by: A. Simons

What is Community Service?
• In my opinion, Community Service is a
way for a person to help the community through non-profit work. • It also teaches a sense of humility and responsibility • It can give a person a sense of accomplishment to know they have made their community a beautiful place to live

What I have done.
• I recently donated my hair, almost 2 feet,
to the organization of Locks of Love. • This organization gives patents of cancer treatment wigs after they have been through or are continuing cancer treatment which may result in hair loss.

Some Pictures of me doing the Deed.
As she was cutting my hair, I felt a weight being lifted off my shoulders. It was amazing!

Locks of Love
• “Locks of Love is a public non-profit organization
that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children under age 18 suffering from long-term medical hair loss from any diagnosis. We meet a unique need for children by using donated hair to create the highest quality hair prosthetics. Most of the children helped by Locks of Love have lost their hair due to a medical condition called alopecia areata, which has no known cause or cure. The prostheses we provide help to restore their selfesteem and their confidence, enabling them to face the world and their peers.” locksoflove.com

Locks of Love

(Con’t)

• “We meet a unique need for children by

using donated hair to create the highest quality hair prosthetics. Most of the children helped by Locks of Love have lost their hair due to a medical condition called alopecia areata, which has no known cause or cure. The prostheses we provide help to restore their self-esteem and their confidence, enabling them to face the world and their peers.” locksoflove.com

To Donate Hair
• • • • • • • • • • • •
We accept 10" minimum hair length (tip to tip). We cannot accept wigs, falls, or synthetic hair. Please bundle hair in ponytail or braid. Hair needs to be clean, dry, placed in a plastic bag, then padded envelope. We need hair from men and women, young and old, all colors and races. Hair may be colored or permed, but not bleached or chemically damaged (if unsure, ask your stylist). Hair swept off the floor is not usable. Hair cut years ago is usable if it has been stored in a ponytail or braid. Hair that is short, gray, or unsuitable for children will be separated from the ponytails and sold at fair market value to offset the cost of manufacturing. You may pull curly hair straight to measure the minimum 10". The majority of all hair donated comes from children who wish to help other children. Layered hair may be divided into multiple ponytails for donation. Please note: Anyone can cut your hair as long as the above guidelines are followed.

Some History
• When Locks of Love first began, it was connected with a forprofit wig retailer. In December 1997, the organization obtained its 501(c)(3) certification from the IRS. With the installation of a volunteer Board of Directors, the charity began operating as an entity unto itself under its bylaws and separated from the for-profit retailer. This initiative was spearheaded by Madonna Coffman, a retired cardiac nurse who had a great deal of volunteer experience working for notfor-profits in the surrounding Palm Beach area.When Mrs. Coffman was in her 20's she developed Alopecia after receiving a hepatitis vaccination. With medications, she recovered. 15 years later, her 4-year old daughter developed alopecia and lost all of her hair. Madonna said it was difficult to deal with her hair loss, but her daughter's loss was ten times harder. It was at this time that she quit all other charity work and took on Locks of Love as a full time volunteer cheered on by her daughter’s recovery as her inspiration. For some time the contents of Mrs. Coffman’s garage contained

Some more History
• After finally securing donated office space from a local
hospital and locating a manufacturer of the highest quality prosthetics, Locks of Love was off and running. Since the beginning, the charity has received a great deal of support by both the media and its volunteers throughout the country. Locks of Love has been featured or mentioned on television shows such as The Today Show, Entertainment Tonight, Oprah, 20/20, The View, Jay Leno, Maury Povich, Good Morning America, CBS Good Morning, CNN Espanol and Inside Edition and in national publications including USA Today, The NY Times, People, Seventeen, Glamour, CosmoGirl, Self, Redbook, Woman’s Day, ElleGirl, Child Magazine, and Ladies Home Journal. The number of hairpieces produced has increased significantly since its inception, from 21 the first year to over 2,000. Locks of Love has recipients in all 50 states and Canada and is working towards its goal to help every financially disadvantaged child suffering from long-term hair loss. Locksoflove.com

Before and After

Longest Hair Ever
• My hair, at the time it was
cut, measured over two feet. I had enough hair to donate twice!

Some Pictures

More Pictures

Still, More Pictures

The

Donors

Some Recipients

Amber Simons


								
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