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Integrating Information and Crit_Comic

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					  The Scottish Information Literacy Project:
   working with partners to create an information literate Scotland




                                    Integrating Information and
                                    Critical Literacy across the
                                             curriculum

                                           Christine Irving
                                    Researcher / Project Officer,
                                Scottish Information Literacy Project



         17th March 2010 Information and Critical Literacy
Joint development event for Aberdeenshire Network Librarians and
                      Literacy Co-ordinators
                          Outline
Definitions:
• Information Literacy
• Critical Literacy
• Real and Relevant Information and Critical Literacy Framework

Curriculum for Excellence:
• Information and critical literacy - Literacy across learning experiences and
   outcomes
• Definition of texts
• Information and critical literacy - other experiences and outcomes
• Thinking Skills

Survey of Scottish school librarians and their knowledge and use of
Curriculum for Excellence:
• Some results

Current work:
• Information and Critical Literacy – Early and First Levels

Workshop Activity
                         Information Literacy is
                              for everyone

    “In an era of lifelong learning, this effectively means that
    information literacy has relevance for all ages from primary
    school to senior citizens. Information literate people
    understand more than how to find information, they
    understand its limitations and the need to examine how they
    use information, and they understand how to manage and
    communicate information. Information literacy is an essential
    and discrete dexterity – everyone relies on information
    everyday.” CILIP
www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/advocacy/learning/information-literacy/pages/introduction.aspx
                    Information Literacy
CILIP's definition of information literacy:

 "Information literacy is knowing when and why
    you need information, where to find it, and
    how to evaluate, use and communicate it in
                an ethical manner."

CILIP (2004)
www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/advocacy/learning/information-literacy/pages/definition.aspx
     Information Literacy skills and
            competencies
This definition implies several skills … (or competencies) that are
  required to be information literate … an understanding of:

    –   A need for information
    –   The resources available
    –   How to find information
    –   The need to evaluate results
    –   How to work with or exploit results
    –   Ethics and responsibility of use
    –   How to communicate or share your findings
    –   How to manage your findings

Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals
http://www.cilip.org.uk/get-involved/advocacy/learning/information-
   literacy/pages/definition.aspx
           Critical Literacy definition
Like information literacy there are several definitions of critical literacy.

Critical Literacy can be seen as:

   "the way that we interact with and make meaning from different texts"
         "involves the reader analysing and engaging with a text".

Text being defined as anything which communicates meaning

Critical questions to ask of texts include:
          • construction of characters
          • gaps and silences
          • power and interest
          • whose view: whose reality?
          • questioning the composer.

Department of Education, Tasmania, School Education Division (2207)
http://wwwfp.education.tas.gov.au/English/critlit.htm
                        Real and Relevant
                  Information and Critical Literacy
•   Louise Ballantyne, Primary School Teacher on secondment to
    Curriculum for Excellence Literacy Team as Development Officer

•   In looking at the importance of information / critical literacy skills for today’s learners she identified
    the answer to the question Why? as:
      – Vast array of information in a variety of forms – information rich society
      – Not the same as IT skills – crucial for lifelong learning and responsible citizenship
      – Promotes problems solving approach and thinking skills – ask questions – seek answers
      – Effective contributors and confident individuals form opinions, evaluate sources, make
         decisions
      – Learn to read – read to learn. Skills for life, learning and work.

•   Work on information literacy for Second and Third level learners Real and Relevant - literacy for 21st
    century learners suggested a basic framework and material based around: Planning; Locating;
    Gathering and Evaluating ;Creating and Sharing .

• Real and Relevant - Information Literacy Skills for the 21st century Learner -
2008 Scottish Learning Festival 2009 National Literacy Conference
• Real and Relevant: Information and Critical Literacy Training – a guide to Information and critical
Literacy skills for second – third level learners
       Real and Relevant Information and
          Critical Literacy Framework
“takes cognizance of established frameworks; however it, it adapts them to fit more closely with
Curriculum for Excellence and to strike a chord with the target learners and practitioners.” Real and
Relevant: Information and Critical Literacy Training – a guide to Information and critical Literacy
skills for second – third level learners.”

Planning:
Think about what you / they want to know prior to looking for information - what do I
want to know (identify key words); what do I know already (activate prior knowledge)
and where can I find information (appropriate source of information).
Planning tools – mind maps (spider / skeleton diagrams)

Locating
Look for possible sources of information – search strategies (different words / synonyms; narrowing
or broadening the term); search terms use quotation marks “ ”, plus + or minus – (Boolean terms)

Gathering and Evaluating
Organise information found and assess how useful it is (skimming and scanning; making notes;
evaluating information (alarm bells) – credible, bias, origins of text, authority)

Creating and Sharing
Information is transformed into an appropriate form and shared with an appropriate audience
(acknowledging / citing sources; plagiarism
                      Curriculum for Excellence
         Literacy across learning experiences and outcomes

Information literacy and critical literacy

• finding and using information - includes, reading, critical literacy
  skills within the Listening and Talking, Reading and Writing sections

• understanding analysing and evaluation - within the Listening and
  Talking, Reading and Writing sections

   “encourage progression in understanding of texts developing
       not only literal understanding but also higher order skills”

• Organising and using information – within the writing section.

Curriculum for Excellence Literacy across learning experiences and outcomes
http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/Images/literacy_experiences_outcomes_tcm4-
   539998.pdf
              Definition of Texts
   “the medium through which ideas, experiences, opinions and information can
   be communicated’ which covers all different formats as the table below
   demonstrates”.

Examples of texts:
    – novels, short stories, plays, poems
    – reference texts
    – the spoken word
    – charts, maps, graphs and timetables
    – advertisements, promotional leaflets
    – comics, newspapers and magazines
    – CVs, letters and emails
    – films, games and TV programmes
    – labels, signs and posters
    – recipes, manuals and instructions
    – reports and reviews
    – text messages, blogs and social networking sitesweb pages, catalogues
      and directories
               Information and critical literacy
             in other experiences and outcomes
Activities such as:

         •   Investigating / research
         •   Acknowledge sources
         •   Making notes
         •   Reliability of information
         •   Planning
         •   Select, organise and represent information and ideas
         •   Find, sort, summarise
         •   Communicate information
         •   Consider, reflect, evaluate
         •   Differences between fact and fiction
         •   Explain, debate, discuss, analyse
         •   Assess
  Linked to information and critical literacy
               is Thinking Skills

Thinking allows learners to explore text and information of all kinds critically and
to use them purposefully.

In Improving Scottish Education 2005-2008, HMIE states:

   “Curriculum for Excellence sets high expectations of rigour. This means that
   teachers should plan consistently for appropriate pace, challenge, depth and
   progression, and consciously promote the development of high order thinking
   skills.”

It is important that all learners are given appropriate opportunities to develop
their thinking skills. These skills can be developed across a range of contexts
including through more practical or applied learning opportunities:

   Curriculum for Excellence (2009) Building the Curriculum 4 ,
   http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/Images/BtC4_Skills_tcm4-569141.pdf
                      Thinking Skills
• Remembering involves such activities as recall, recognition or locating
   information
• Understanding might involve activities such as describing, explaining,
   summarising and translating
• Applying requires the learner to use or apply their knowledge and
   understanding in different contexts
• Analysing requires learners to break down information into component parts
   and search for relationships
• Evaluating involves making an informed judgement about something, for
   example an issue or method.
• Activities such as comparing, appraising, prioritising, rating or selecting,
   could involve learners in evaluating
• Creating happens when learners are required to generate new ideas and
   products through activities such as designing, creative writing, planning,
   reconstructing, inventing, formulating, producing and composing.
Curriculum for Excellence (2009) Building the Curriculum 4 ,
   http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/Images/BtC4_Skills_tcm4-569141.pdf
Survey of Scottish school librarians and their knowledge
          and use of Curriculum for Excellence
• Questionnaire was run between 16/07/09 and 04/09/09

• 74 responses - 72 secondary sector (375 Scottish secondary schools) =
  20%

• 64 (86% ) read Curriculum for Excellence (CfE): Learning Experiences and
  Outcomes, Principles and Practice papers - reasons for doing so included:

    – “I am a member of the Curriculum for Excellence Working Group in my
      school”

    – “I will be part of the school’s literacy team and will be using them in
      my information skills course…”

    – “…take advantage of the cross-curriculum opportunities this offers.”
Survey of Scottish school librarians and their knowledge
          and use of Curriculum for Excellence
Curriculum for Excellence (CfE): Learning Experiences and Outcomes,
   Principles and Practice papers – top ten read:
   Learning Experience and Outcomes                          Principles and
                                                            Practice Papers
1. Literacy across learning                 89%     (56)    62%       (39)
2. Literacy and English                     57%     (36)    36%       (23)
3. Numeracy across learning                 38%     (24)    25%       (16)
4. Health and wellbeing across learning 36%         (23)    25%       (16)
5. Expressive arts                          22%     (14)    13%       (8)
6. Science                                  19%     (12)    13%       (8)
7. Religious and moral education            16%     (10)    9%        (6)
8. Language                                 16%     (10)    8%        (5)
9. Mathematics                              13%     (8)     6%        (4)
10. Modern Languages                        11%     (7)     5%        (3)
Survey of Scottish school librarians and their knowledge
          and use of Curriculum for Excellence
• 33 respondents (75%) indicated that they had identified ways in which
  information literacy can be used to achieve or assist achievement of the
  experiences and outcomes.

• 26 respondents (53%) replied that they are or have been involved in any
  piloting activities, created any new activities or updated existing activities
  based upon the experiences and outcomes.

Full results and findings are to be written up for publication:

Crawford, John and Irving, Christine (2010) The Scottish Information Literacy
   Project and school libraries, Aslib proceedings, forthcoming Spring 2010

Irving, Christine (2010) The Curriculum for Excellence: knowledge,
    engagement and contribution by Scottish school librarians, The School
    Librarian, forthcoming Summer 2010
  Survey of Scottish school librarians and their knowledge
            and use of Curriculum for Excellence
Ways in which information literacy can be used to achieve or assist
achievement of the experiences and outcomes:

   “Due to undertaking an S1/S2 Library Audit I have identified a number of
   information literacy skills in the programme which can be directly related to the
   Literacy Outcomes”

   “I’ve found the Literacy Experience and Outcomes paper most useful because so
   much of it fits with library and information skills. I am line managed by the Head
   who has agreed to make me a key member of the Literacy Strategy working group
   and will support efforts to take library skills to even hard to reach departments”

    “I am currently looking at courses I provide within the Library to determine where
   they fit into the experiences and outcomes”

   “Mapped library services to the four capacities for citizenship, as part of our
   information literacy strategy. Purpose is to inform various stakeholders - teachers,
   curriculum managers , CLD [Community Learning and Development], other
   learning partners - of how the library sits in relation to CfE”
    Survey of Scottish school librarians and their knowledge
              and use of Curriculum for Excellence
Specific examples given of cross departmental work / projects:

•   Project about the local community - tied into the 40th anniversary of the housing
    estate in which the school is located. Project involved local history research;
    creation of a blog for the public to read and contribute to; visits to local gallery,
    museum and archives; presentation of work to local community. It is hoped the
    project will continue and include a community action element, giving pupils the
    opportunity to effect change in the community.

•   Interdisciplinary week - Rich Task. Working with Humanities and Languages
    departments on a 3 day task based on Lachlan Macquarie, Father of Australia. This
    was with S1/2. It involved planning the task, finding resources to be used, then
    working with students to look at primary and secondary sources of information;
    plan, carry out research and communicate results at the end of the week.

•   Piloting development of a cross departmental programme of research and
    investigation skills for all S1 pupils developed and taught by a range of subject
    teachers and the librarian. It is hoped that this will be made available through
    GLOW soon.
Real and Relevant – Information and
Critical Literacy Skills for the 21st Century
Learner’ (Early and First Level)

 Kimacolm Nursery
 • Questioning – Kilmacolm’s innovative Blooming Blooms approach

 St Margaret’s School, Edinburgh
 • Information Literacy in Junior (Primary) 1
 • Information Literacy in Junior (Primary) 2

 Lasswade Primary School
 • Critical Literacy @ Lasswade Primary School

 Information Literacy skills and competences and opportunities highlighted
 within the Curriculum for Excellence Experiences and Outcomes
 http://curriculumforexcellence.pbworks.com/
 Workshop activity – 40 mins
Participants in mixed groups:

• choose a Curriculum for Excellence Learning Experience and
  Outcome – Science or Health and Well Being

• unpack it using CfE template created by Edinburgh Science
  QIO and used by Holy Rood High School, Edinburgh (link to
  case study and template)
   • unpacking is effectively a mapping exercise which allows
     the opportunities within the learning outcome to be
     explored.
   • link to Literacy across learning experiences and outcomes
     specifically ‘information and critical literacy’ activities
       • identify relevant ‘information and critical literacy’
         resources
             Contact details &
            further information
Email
scotinfolit@googlemail.com

Project website
www.caledonian.ac.uk/ils/

Project blog
http://caledonianblogs.net/information-literacy/

National Information Literacy Framework (Scotland)
http://caledonianblogs.net/nilfs/

				
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