Docstoc

Global Health Diplomacy Pedagogy for our Times

Document Sample
Global Health Diplomacy Pedagogy for our Times Powered By Docstoc
					Global Health Diplomacy

Pedagogy for Our Times

Africa's Malaria Death Toll Still "Outrageously High"

How AIDS Changed America

Globalization and Health




Both temporal and spatial dimensions National governance challenged by globalization





Transnational solutions are necessary Multi-national cooperation is critical

Driving Forces of Globalization
 





Market forces Movement of people, information, symbols, capital, and commodities Speed of media and growing consumerism, but unequal access to information Interdependence of world markets

Global Public Health Problems: No National Borders

Emerging diseases

Tobacco

Climate Change

Hazardous and Nuclear Waste

Obesity

Bioweapons

Global vs. International Health


Global Health: problems, issues, and concerns that transcend national boundaries and may best be addressed by cooperative actions.



International health: bilateral foreign aid activities, specific disease control projects in developing countries, and direct medical assistance.

Health Diplomacy—a New Domain


A political change activity with dual goals:
• Improve health outcomes • Improve international relations




Emphasis on health disparities Foundations in altruism, human rights, and bioethics

Fields within Health Diplomacy
 



Research (knowledge, technology) Pedagogy (global health education) Service (HEALTH)

What Can Be Done?


Political activism
• Stop the name calling (‘axis of evil’ etc) • Stop thinking sanctions and do more engagement





Health and science can assure global goodwill and domestic security Support UN agencies and embrace multi-nationalism.

Research and Information Gaps






Only 10% of research dollars are directed to the problems of poor countries that bear 90% of the world’s disease burden (10-90 Gap) 8 industrialized countries = 85% all scientific articles (north bias) (1997-2004) < 3% NEJM articles devoted to diseases of the developing world.

More to be done…




Improve cultural and political training in public health, medicine, pharmacy, nursing, and basic sciences to prepare GH leaders; Develop new models for public service: the Global Health Service Corps Act

US Global Health Service Corps--Institute of Medicine
  


Global Health Service Corps Fellowship Program Loan Repayment Program Twinning Program Clearinghouse
From: IOM:Healers Abroad. American Responding to the Human Resource Crisis in HIV/AIDS.The National Academies Press. 2005





More to be Done (US)






Strengthen and support UN agencies: Rescind Helms-Biden Act Embrace new forms of multinationalism: Change the Public Health Service Act Increase foreign direct assistance (0.7% of GDP)

Health as Independent Variable Securing Health (Rand 2006)








Role of health in winning hearts and minds Key component in establishing peace Health engagement can provide tangible evidence of concern Such programs should be designed to gain support for the HOST country agencies, not the US or other outsiders

Health in Nation Building






Evidence from WWII that small health investments yielded enormous goodwill and subsequent security Poor health conditions in Iraq (before and after war) contribute to antiAmericanism and support of insurgency Maybe health assistance would be an alternative to nuclear standoff in Korea

Clinical Diplomacy and Academia






Training for undergraduates, residents (Global Health Clinical Scholars, Areas of Concentration) Faculty release time for service/teaching Career development and opportunities

Models for Effective Health Diplomacy






MEDICC: Educational exchange and in the face of isolationist Cuba policy Physicians for Social Responsibility: 1985 Nobel Prize for work to avoid nuclear war Biotechnology Engagement: Weapons scientists of the FSU coopted to public health research

Private Public Partnerships






River Blindness: Merck, Carter Center, CDC, WHO • ‘Mectizan to all who need it for as long as they need it’ ) Sleeping sickness: • 2001 Aventis donated 25 million doses of eflornithine • 2006 Gates financed new drug development • Result 450,000  17,500 infected Oxford Health Alliance NCDs: pharma, food companies, government, a new NGO

Multinationalism








Preparedness: Global surveillance networks Treaties: The Framework Convention and Tobacco Control International law: The International Health Regulations (revised) The new philanthropy (Gates, Google, Clinton, etc)

UCSF-IGCC Initiative in Global Health Diplomacy


 



Conceptual Framework: March 2007 meeting of experts, diplomats, writers Monograph on health diplomacy Release and press conference June 2007 at Global Health Council Summer training program for health leaders, diplomats, politicians

Conclusions






Global public health problems demand improved health diplomacy in the 21st century New models abound, but lessons to be learned from history Global health engagement by developed countries can improve global security and economic stability


				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:80
posted:4/18/2008
language:
pages:22