Joint Comprehensive Community Assessment by usvoruganti

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									Denver Head Start Joint Comprehensive Community Assessment

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Comprehensive Community Assessment Background
 City and County of Denver
 554,636 overall population  2.4 million Denver metro population

 Denver Public Schools (one school district)
 Serves 72,489 students

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Comprehensive Community Assessment
Race & Ethnicity in Denver, 2003
White Non-Latino
Latino Non-White African-American 49%

35% 11%
3%

Asian
American Indian

1%

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Comprehensive Community Assessment
Race & Ethnicity in Denver for Children < 5, 2002
White Non-Latino
Latino Non-White African-American 10%

32%
51%

Asian
2 or more

5%
2%

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start Organization
Denver’s Great Kids Head Start

 1,083 funded slots  30 sites/43 classrooms with 200 staff  Grantee/delegate model
 A program of the Mayor’s Office for Education and Children

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start: Grantee/delegate model
Mayor’s Office for Education and Children
Denver’s Great Kids Head Start

Catholic Charities

Clayton Family Futures Mile High Montessori Early Learning Centers

Denver Public Schools

Volunteers of America Colorado

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Rocky Mountain SER Organization
Rocky Mountain SER - Service, Employment, Redevelopment

 812 funded slots with 24 sites
 Throughout Colorado, Rocky Mountain SER operates 65 Head Start Centers serving 1695 children and their families.  Rocky Mountain SER is sponsored by the American G.I. Forum and the League of United Latin American Citizens. These two organizations are the oldest Hispanic organizations in Colorado.

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Comprehensive Community Assessment
Race & Ethnicity for Head Start, 2003-2004
Denver’s Great Kids Head Start 4% 29%

57%

10% Rocky Mountain SER 2% 3% 4%
91%

White Non-Latino Latino Non-White African-American Other

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Comprehensive Community Assessment
Primary Language Spoken at Home, 2003

English
DGK 54 %

Spanish
39 %
57 % 21 %

Other
7%

RMSER
Denver

42 %
75 %

1%
4%

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start & Rocky Mountain SER
Rationale:  RMSER and DGKHS grantees are largest urban Head Start programs in Colorado and Region VIII
 Co-located in one city/one county with same funding cycle  Resource for other community agencies, including three Early Head Start programs in Denver  Support from ACF Region VIII

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Request For Proposal (RFP) process
RFP Consultant requirements
 Consultant with expertise in areas including, but not limited to, the following:
 Community-based research and analysis;
 Program evaluation;  Best practices in early childhood education;  Cultural competency;  Diverse populations and communities; and

 Low income children and families.

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

RFP Consultant requirements
 Contract with City and County of Denver  Scope of work
 Include Head Start performance standards  Provide information on cultural demographics including relevant data concerning immigrant and/or undocumented families
 Provide written monthly reports detailing the progress of work and a summary of data

 Coordinate and participate in scheduled conference calls or meetings to provide progress updates

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

RFP Consultant requirements
Deliverables:  Full Comprehensive Community Assessment  Executive Summary  Briefing paper  Power Point presentation  Spanish translation

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

RFP Timeline
 RFP published March 5  Applications due March 26  Technical Assistance Workshop March 11  Interviews March 29  Selection April 1  Completion October 1

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

RFP Submission process
 Published RFP in local newspapers  Mailed RFP to 20 program evaluation experts  Technical assistance workshop - two hours
 Review Scope of Work  Timeline

 20 workshop participants  5 organization/partnership applications submitted

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

RFP Decision-making process
 Selection committee - Representatives from RMSER, DGKHS, Denver Mayor’s Office for Education and Children and ACF Region VIII
 Applications Rated- 100 point scale
 Proposer Qualifications and Expertise  Project Approach/Proposer Resources  Proposed rate of compensation

 Discussion and Consensus

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

RFP Selected consultant
JVA Consulting LLC  Sixteen years experience with 20 consultants, facilitating community collaborations and conducting organizational and community-wide strategic planning  Providing planning, capacity-building, research and evaluation services for nonprofit organizations, school districts, foundations and government agencies

 Alta Mira Consulting, Latino-focused arm of organization, with 10 years experience working with Latino community organizations

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Assessment process Advisory Committee
 Collaborative effort  Real-time/Continuous improvement process  Interpreting and analyzing data  Progress reports/updates
 Provide local expertise and resources

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Advisory Committee Representatives
 RMSER and DGKHS Head Start Directors  ACF Region VIII Early Childhood State Lead (Colorado)

 Mayor’s Office for Education and Children  Head Start Delegate  Early Head Start  Experts in:
 Early Childhood Care and Education  Immigration  Philanthropy/Foundation
 Research/Evaluation

 Mental Health

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Goals/objectives
Developed through joint process with RMSER, DGK, ACF Region VIII, consultant and Advisory Committee

 Goal
 To provide in-depth information and analysis focused on families with children birth to 5 years old in the City and County of Denver

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Objectives
 Identify gaps among existing community services  Provide baseline on current status of Head Start eligible children, families, and services in Denver

 Inventory community’s strengths and available resources  Enhance understanding of cultural demographics and diverse groups within Denver
 Initiate new community partnerships

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Quantitative and qualitative information
 Demographics  Economics  Health
 Education  Program Information  Unmet Need  Head Start parents

 Head Start staff  Community leaders

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Quantitative Data Sources include:
 U.S. 2000 Census  American Community Survey  Department of Local Affairs
 Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Population Survey  Colorado Department of Public and Environmental Health  Piton Foundation Neighborhood Facts Website

 The Colorado Children’s Campaign  Denver Public Schools  Colorado Department of Education
 Head Start Program Information Report (PIR)  Annie E. Casey Foundation Kids Count! Website
Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Qualitative Data Community leader interviews
 Youth service program  Community health  Elected official – Denver City Council  Mexican Consulate  Business - marketing  Denver Public Schools administrator

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Qualitative Data Focus groups
 Pre-survey  8 focus groups
 Conducted in English and Spanish by consultants

 6 structured interviews
 Individual community leaders/15-30 minutes
 Interviewed by consultants

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Qualitative Data Focus groups
Participants:  Head Start Families  Head Start Staff  Early Head Start Staff  Head Start Eligible Families (not currently enrolled)  Drawn from RMSER/DGKHS

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Ongoing review meetings
 Monthly meetings with Advisory Committee  Reviewed and refined data
 Unmet need  Student Outcomes

 Provided additional resources and contacts
 Immigration resources  Health statistics

 Refined areas of focus and interest
 Facilities  Cost of quality
Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Quantitative Data Demographic trends Immigration
As of 2003,

 16% of Denver’s population is foreign-born.  Of those, 70% are from Latin America, which includes Mexico.  75% of the immigrants in Denver were not citizens.  57% of Denver’s foreign-born population entered the United States after 1990.

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Quantitative Data Children < 6 with parents in the labor force

76% 64% In the labor force 24% Not in the labor force

36%

2002

2003

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Quantitative Data Births to teen mothers
In 2003:  The fertility rate for teens (ages 15-19) in Colorado was 40.5 (41 births out of 1,000 female teens).
 Denver’s teen fertility rate was 75.6, with higher rates for RMSER and DGK neighborhoods.  74% of teen births were to Latinas.

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Quantitative Data Mother’s education status
In 2003:  22% of all births in Colorado were to mothers with no high school diploma.
 37% of births in Denver were to mothers with no high school diploma.

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Education trends Graduation rate
Denver Public Schools (2003)  Denver Public Schools has the lowest graduation rate in the metro area.

 Latino Non-Whites (57% Denver Public Schools student population) have a graduation rate of 29%.  African Americans have a 38% graduation rate.
 Source: The Colorado Children’s Campaign

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Student achievement: Project ID
 Denver Public Schools student identification number (1997-98).  DPS Early Education Department found that former Head Start students:
 Represented the highest percentage of low-income students.  Demonstrated steady Colorado Student Achievement Program improvement from 2002 to 2004.

 Since 2005:
 Secondary School Reform Commission (March 2005)

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Program information Head Start families, 2003-2004
 Families evenly divided between two-parent and single-parent households.  Most families work.

 Highest educational level achieved by most families was less than a high school degree, followed by a high school diploma or GED.

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Unmet need Current capacity
Estimation of eligible population currently served
DGKHS 47%

RMSER

76%

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Unmet need Projected number of children, birth to 4
 The number of 3-year-olds in Denver is projected to increase from 10,066 in 2004 to 12,158 in 2008.
 Additional 2,092 children

 Denver’s 4-year-olds are also projected to increase from 8,577 in 2004 to 12,150 in 2008.
 Additional 3,573 children

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Unmet need Future capacity
Eligible population served by 2006 if funded slots are not added:
DGKHS 36%

RMSER

57%

(estimate)

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment General trends What parents, staff and community leaders say about Head Start…
 Parents, staff and community members expressed positive opinions of Head Start.
 Parents and staff identified pre-academic, social and independence skills as important reasons for children to attend Head Start

 However, parents and community members were unfamiliar with Head Start’s range of services.

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Overall analyses Implications for Head Start
 Head Start services are needed, and this need will increase over the next three years.  Head Start promotes school readiness--ready child, ready family, ready school and ready community.

 Since 2005:
 The 5 By 5 Project  Milestones Project

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Implications for Head Start
 Four- and five-day-a-week center-based programs, more than six hours per day are essential for working parents.
 Head Start will continue to be an important health resource for Denver’s low-income families and their children.

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Implications for Head Start
 Through public awareness and education, Head Start can highlight its mission and the comprehensive services available through the program.
 Since 2005:
 Published program overview  Early Childhood Education briefs – Second Language Development

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Community Assessment Implications for Head Start
Head Start services need to include:  Culturally competent programming for diverse families  Staff bilingual in English and Spanish  Immigration and naturalization support services  ESL/GED classes  Outreach to teen parents

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006

Denver Head Start Joint Comprehensive Community Assessment
For more information, contact: Pamela Harris, PhD (720) 913-0880 Pamela.Harris@ci.denver.co.us

Denver’s Great Kids Head Start/Rocky Mountain SER | Head Start Hispanic Institute February 27 – March 3, 2006


								
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