Materials Language of Literature Anthology “Chinatown” U

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					Grade: 6 Unit: Acceptance                                                                        Materials
Section/Period:                                         Lesson Plan Guide                            Language of
                                                            Day 1 of 5                                   Literature
                                                           90 min class                                  Anthology:
                                                                                                         “Chinatown”
                                                                                                     United Streaming
Indicator:                                                                                               Clip:
     LA.600.10.06 Compare and contrast one’s personal view with the author’s view                        http://player.discoveryed
        of human experience and character.                                                                ucation.com/index.cfm?
                                                                                                          guidAssetId=7F273E42-
     LA.600.10.06a universal themes                                                                      3E51-4025-BCF6-
                                                                                                          2B8FAB22E638&blnFro
Objective:                                                                                                mSearch=1&productcod
    To write a friendly letter to your parents informing them of the information learned                 e=US
       about Chinatowns and fair housing laws.                                                           Graphic Organizer
                                                                                                         Fair Housing Laws

Assessment:
Graphic organizer


Scoring Tool:
FCPS ECR and LU rubric


Warm-Up (5 min.)

    1. Project: How do people choose where they live?
       Discuss answers as a class.

Direct Instruction: (see it) (40 min.)

    1. Ask students to help define what they believe the word “Immigrant” means. Give the students the dictionary
       definition and discuss how they were close or not to the actual definition. (Immigrant: a person who migrates to
       another country, usually for permanent residence.) Discuss how the United States is made up of Immigrants from
       around the world.
    2. Show students the United Streaming Clip titled: “How Customs and Heritage Shape Our Communities.” Discuss
       the information in the clip as a class. (Clip Length:16 mins.)
    3. Discuss: Ask the students if they have traveled to big cities and seen the impact large groups of Immigrants have
       had on cities in the United States. (Little Italy, Chinatown etc…)
    4. Students should read the “Historical Connection” on page 170 of the Language of Literature book.
    5. Discuss the reading as a class. Add any additional information to the discussion as needed.
    6. Pass out the “Fair Housing Laws” and “Review Graphic Organizers” papers to students. Have students pair off
                and read the “Fair Housing Laws” article. When they are finished the pairs should use the information they
                learned to complete the graphic organizer.
    7. Project: The “Review Graphic Organizer” Have the pairs of students share the information they used to complete
       the organizers. Teacher should ensure that all students have all written the information needed on their graphic
       organizers.

Independent Practice: (do it themselves) (10 min.)
    1. Have students read the text titled, “Chintatown,” from the start until page 174 before the red print.

Guided Practice: (do it with help) ( 10 min)
    1. Project: How did the information you learned about the Fair Housing Laws impact Laurence Yep during his
       childhood? Where in the text do we see this?
       Students should add the information from the text to their graphic organizers.

Independent Practice: (do it themselves) (10 min.)
    1. Have students read the text titled, “Chinatown,” in their Language of Literature books, from 174 until page 176 the
       paragraph that start,” Moreover…” Circulate the room to ensure all students are reading the text and have had
       enough time to complete the text.

Guided Practice: (do it with help) (5-10 min.)
   1. Project: Why does Laurence feel so different from his family? What examples does he give in the text to support
       this? Share responses from the class and add any text evidence they may not have remembered.

Closure: (5-10 min.)
   1. Exit Pass: Hand students the Exit Pass for today’s lesson. Have each student complete the pass and hand it in
       before they leave the room.


Homework:

    1. Answer the following question in paragraph form:
           Have you ever shared Laurence’s feeling of “not belonging” with your family? Why? Explain.
           If not, what characteristics do you share with your family that make you feel like you do “belong?”
                                    Fair Housing Laws




        In 1968, a Civil Rights law was passed that protected Americans from unfair housing
practices. This meant that for the first time ever, landlords could not refuse rentals to people
based on the color of their skin, their national origin, religion, gender, family status or
handicaps.
        Before this law was passed, people who rented properties could pick and choose who they
let live in their rentals based on their own prejudices. This is why Laurence and his family were
forced to live within the boundaries of Chinatown.



                                    Fair Housing Laws




        In 1968, a Civil Rights law was passed that protected Americans from unfair housing
practices. This meant that for the first time ever, landlords could not refuse rentals to people
based on the color of their skin, their national origin, religion, gender, family status or
handicaps.
        Before this law was passed, people who rented properties could pick and choose who they
let live in their rentals based on their own prejudices. This is why Laurence and his family were
forced to live within the boundaries of Chinatown.
                                                          Name: _______________
                                                                    Date: _________

                                    Graphic Organizer
                                      “Chinatown” Notes




What are Chinatowns?




Why were all the Chinese living
together in Chinatowns?




Examples of how Fair Housing Laws
affected Laurence during his
childhood. (These examples should
come from the text)




Other Information: (You may want to
includes some facts about the
information you learned about Fair
Housing Laws)
Grade: 6 Unit: Acceptance                                                                                 Materials
Section/Period:                                         Lesson Plan Guide                               Language of
                                                            Day 2 0f 5                                   Literature
                                                           45 min. class                                 Anthology:
                                                                                                         “Chinatown”
                                                                                                        Graphic Organizer
Indicator:
     LA.600.10.06 Compare and contrast one’s personal view with the author’s view
        of human experience and character.
     LA.600.10.06a universal themes



Objective:
    To write a friendly letter to your parents informing them of the information learned about Chinatowns and fair
       housing laws.


Assessment:
Responses to post reading question.


Scoring Tool:
FCPS ECR and LU rubric

Warm-Up (5 min.)
   1. Project: In “Chinatown” Laurence has an aunt who tries to rent a cottage. Why wasn’t she allowed to live there?
      Discuss class’ answers to question, add any additional information as needed.
   2. Teacher should collect student’s writing responses completed for homework during this time.

Direct Instruction: (see it) (10 min)
    1. Review the information from the “Graphic Oraginzer” students completed in class the day before.
    2. Allow students to ask questions as needed or add any information to their graphic organizers after discussion.

Guided Practice: (do it with help) (25 min.)
   1. Students should go back to the text, “Chinatown.”
   2. Have them read the remainder of the text from page 176.
   3. Project: Post reading question: At the end of the text, Laurence says the following: “In trying to find solutions, I had
       created more pieces to the puzzle.”
   4. With a partner, have students discuss the quote above and answer the following question on notebook paper:
           a. How would you describe the puzzle Yep is trying to solve?

Closure: (5 min.)
   1. Paired groups should share aloud their responses to the question: How would you describe the puzzle Yep is trying
       to solve?
   2. Have students hand in their responses to the post reading question.

Homework:
   1. Answer the following question in paragraph form:
What “puzzles” are you trying to solve about your family?
Grade: 6 Unit: Acceptance                                                                             Materials
Section/Period:                                   Lesson Plan Guide                         Language of Literature
                                                      Day 3 of 5                             Anthology: “Chinatown”
                                                    90 min. class                           Graphic Organizers
                                                                                            The Writer’s Craft
                                                                                            “Friendly Letter Checklist”
Indicator:                                                                                  Example of “Friendly Letter”
LA.600.40.06 Write letters that address audience needs, stated purpose, and                 “Friendly Letter” pieces Cut-
context in a clear and efficient manner, and adhere to stated purposes.                      apart



Objective:
    To write a friendly letter to your parents informing them of the information learned about Chinatowns and fair
       housing laws.


Assessment:
Drafts of ECR (Letter)


Scoring Tool:
FCPS ECR and LU rubric


Warm-Up: (5-10 min.)
   1. Student should take out their written responses to the homework question:
      What “puzzles” are you trying to solve about your family?
   2. Select students to share their responses to the question. Make connections for students from their responses to the
      puzzles that Laurence was working to put together.


Direct Instruction: (see it) (15 min.)
    1. Have students turn to page 42 in The Writer’s Craft and read the section titled, “Friendly Letter.” They should look
        at the “Keep in Touch” chart 1-4.
    2. Review with the students the format for friendly letters and what needs to be included.

Guided Practice: (do it with help) (30 min.)
   1. Put students into groups of three or four. Pass each group an envelope with the “Friendly Letter” example cut into
       pieces inside.
   2. Ask each group to use their copies of the Writer’s Craft to determine what order the pieces inside the envelope
       should be placed into. Circulate around the room to ensure that all groups are using the correct resources and are
       able to complete the activity.
   3. Project” “Friendly Letter” example. Go through the letter and discuss each part in the correct order. Students should
       be following along to see that they were able to put the letter together correctly.
   4. Project: Write a letter to your parents informing them of what you have learned about Chinatowns and Fair Housing
       Laws after reading the text, “Chinatown.”
   5. Ask students to take out their Graphic Organizers they completed with notes on Chinatowns and Fair Housing
       Laws.
   6. Have students get into pairs and brainstorm information they could share in their letters.
    7. Project: Have pairs share out some of their ideas for information to include in their letters.

Direct Instruction: (see it) (10 min)
    1. Give each student a copy of the “Friendly Letter Checklist.”
    2. Project: “Friendly Letter Checklist” and review with the students. Allow students to ask any questions they may still
        have about format etc…

Independent Practice: (do it themselves) (20 min.)
    1. Ask the students to create their letter using the “Friendly Letter Checklist,” Graphic Organizer, Writer’s Craft, and if
       needed “Chinatown.” While students are writing, circulate the room and aid students in formatting, etc…

Closure: (10 min.)
   1. Choose students to share their letters aloud with the class. Discuss the work shared, make suggestions, and give
       feedback that may benefit the rest of the class in the creation of their letters.
   2. Allow the class to make changes as needed as they hear other student’s work.

Homework:
   1. Ask the students to complete the rough draft of their letters.
                                                 Friendly Letter Checklist



           Did you remember to do all of the following?
      Use this checklist to make sure your letter is complete.




Tell about yourself

Ask some questions

Share facts from “Chinatown” graphic
organizer

Share information about the Fair Housing
Laws from graphic organizer

Error Free- Make sure to edit your letter
carefully as it will receive an LU grade.

Format matters! Have you followed the
correct letter writing format? Double
check in your Writer’s Craft
                                                  Friendly Letter Example
                                                               7/12/09
Dear Cindy,

       How are you? I miss you so much! I can’t believe we had to do this stupid road trip this
summer. Driving hours a day in a camper with my sister and parents is probably the most painful
punishment I can think of. Did your mom say that you could go to the pool party at Missy’s
house? My mom said there was no way we were changing our plans to be back for a “silly party.”
She is so clueless!
       Jess has spent the entire time on her cell phone with Ryan. Mom threatened to take it
away, so now she sneaks into the bathroom to call him. She is so lame, like we don’t know what
she’s doing in there for an hour at a time. We have visited five of our eight destinations; the
last was the Grand Teton Mountains. Have you heard of them? It was beautiful, but after you’ve
seen five mountain ranges they all start to look the same.
       Gotta go. Make sure you email me photos from Missy’s party.

                   Love ya,




                   Amanda
Student Cut and Paste Example

                                                                7/12/09
Dear Cindy,

      How are you? I miss you so much! I can’t believe we had to do this stupid road trip this
summer. Driving hours a day in a camper with my sister and parents is probably the most painful
punishment I can think of. Did your mom say that you could go to the pool party at Missy’s
house? My mom said there was no way we were changing our plans to be back for a “silly party.”
She is so clueless!




       Jess has spent the entire time on her cell phone with Ryan. Mom threatened to take it
away, so now she sneaks into the bathroom to call him. She is so lame, like we don’t know what
she’s doing in there for an hour at a time. We have visited five of our eight destinations; the
last was the Grand Teton Mountains. Have you heard of them? It was beautiful, but after you’ve
seen five mountain ranges they all start to look the same.



      Gotta go. Make sure you email me photos from Missy’s party.



              Love ya,




                    Amanda



Teachers: Cut the letter out in the boxes above. Put each piece into an envelope, and then pass
each group of students ONE envelope to put together in the correct order.
Grade: 6 Unit: Acceptance                                                                               Materials
Section/Period:                                         Lesson Plan Guide                           Language of
                                                           Lesson 4 of 5                               Literature
                                                           45 min. class                               Anthology:
                                                                                                       “Chinatown”
                                                                                                    Graphic Organizers
Indicator:                                                                                          The Writer’s Craft
     LA.600.40.06 Write letters that address audience needs, stated purpose, and                   “Friendly Letter
        context in a clear and efficient manner, and adhere to stated purposes.                        Checklist”
                                                                                                    Example of “Friendly
Objective:                                                                                             Letter”
     To write a friendly letter to your parents informing them of the information learned about Chinatowns and fair
        housing laws.

Assessment:
Rough drafts of ECR (letter)

Scoring Tool:
FCPS ECR and LU rubrics

Warm-Up (5 min.)
   1. List three ways you could close your letter:
           a. Share examples from the class.

Direct Instruction: (see it) (5 min.)
    1. Have students take out their completed first draft of their letters.
    2. Discuss: Where did the students run into problems? Is anyone having format issues? Etc…
    3. Pass out copies of the FCPS ECR and LU rubric.

Guided Practice: (do it with help) (10 min.)
   1. Put students into pairs. Ask the students to read their partner’s letters, checking it against the “Friendly Letter
       Checklist,” the Writer’s Craft, and copies of the FCPS ECR and LU rubrics.
   2. Instruct the students to make at least one positive comment on their partner’s paper and at least one comment
       suggesting an improvement.
   3. Students should give their partner’s paper back, and discuss comments.

Independent Practice: (do it themselves) (20 min.)
    1. Allow students time to implement changes to their drafts and begin to write their final drafts.

Closure: (5 min.)
   2. Have students choose what they think is the best sentence from their draft and underline it.
   3. Have them turn to a neighbor and share the sentence. Allow them time to discuss.

Homework:
Students should complete their final drafts of letter.
Grade: 6 Unit: Acceptance                                                                                Materials
Section/Period:                                   Lesson Plan Guide                                    Final drafts of ECR
                                                     Day 5 of 5                                        FCPS ECR and LU
                                                     20in. class                                        rubrics


Indicator:
     LA.600.40.06 Write letters that address audience needs, stated purpose, and context in a clear and efficient
        manner, and adhere to stated purposes.

Objective:
    To write a friendly letter to your parents informing them of the information learned about Chinatowns and fair
       housing laws.

Assessment:
Final draft or ECR (letter)

Scoring Tool:
FCPS ECR and LU rubrics

Warm-Up: (2 min.)
   1. Take out your final drafts. Underline the sentence in your final draft that you chose as your best in yesterdays
      lesson.

Direct Instruction: (see it) (2 min.)
    1. Ask students to take out their final drafts of their ECRs.
    2. Pass out the FCPS ECR and LU rubrics.

Guided Practice: (do it with help) (5 min.)
   1. Ask the students to read the rubrics and their ECR and give themselves a writing and LU score.

Closure: (10 min.)
   1. Take student volunteers to share their final drafts of ECR.

Homework:
  1. None

				
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