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Director of Project Management Office (PMO) - Download as DOC by sjm50166

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									                        Tailor Your Resume to the Target Job Description
                                            from “Knock ‘em Dead 2008”

                                      Chris Moore, PMP, CSQE/A/M/E


Director of Project Management Office (PMO). Responsible for the operations of the organization's Project
Management Office. May also be responsible for the organization-wide integration of consistent project management
methodologies and terminology.

Portfolio Manager. In the extreme case, will be responsible for the management of the entire set of projects
undertaken by an organization or division in a manner that optimizes the ROI from these projects and ensures their
alignment with the organizations strategic objectives. Particularly in large organizations, a Portfolio Manager may
only have responsibility for a subset of the organizations projects and their alignment to organizational strategic
objectives. While the portfolio of projects may share resources, they may have diverse objectives and may be
operationally independent of one another. A Portfolio Manager may interact with senior managers, executives, and
major stakeholders to establish strategic plans and objectives for an organization. May also be responsible for the
organization-wide integration of consistent project management methodologies and terminology.

Program Manager. Responsible for the coordinated management of multiple related projects, and in many (most)
cases, ongoing operations which are directed toward a common objective. Works with constituent Project Managers
(who are responsible to the program manager for the execution of their project and its impact on the program) to
monitor cost, schedule, and technical performance of component projects and operations, while working to ensure
the ultimate success of the program. Generally responsible for determining and coordinating the sharing of resources
among their constituent projects to the overall benefit of the program. Usually responsible for stakeholder
management, particularly stakeholders external to the organization.

Project Manager III. Under general direction of either a Portfolio Manager or in some cases a Program Manager,
oversees high-priority projects, which often require considerable resources and high levels of functional integration.
In addition to duties of a Project Manager II, takes projects from original concept through final implementation.
Interfaces with all areas affected by the project including end users, distributors, and vendors. Ensures adherence to
quality standards and reviews project deliverables. May communicate with a company executive regarding the status
of specific projects.

Project Manager II. Under general supervision of either a Portfolio Manager or a Program Manager, oversees
multiple projects or one larger project. In addition to duties of Project Manager I, responsible for assembling project
team, assigning individual responsibilities, identifying appropriate resources needed, and developing schedule to
ensure timely completion of project. May communicate with a Senior Project Manager, Functional Area Manager, or
Program Manager regarding status of specific projects.

Project Manager I. Under direct supervision of a more senior project manager, a Portfolio Manager, or a Program
Manager, oversees a small project or phase(s) of a larger project. Responsibility for all aspects of the project over
the entire project life (initiate, plan, execute, control, close). Must be familiar with system scope and project
objectives, as well as the role and function of each team member, to effectively coordinate the activities of the team.

Project Management Specialist. Responsible for a specific area of project management (i.e., scheduling, cost
management, risk management, etc.). Supports the Project Manager and their associated projects.

Project Management Consultant. Acts as internal or external consultant to one or more levels of program or
functional management in the areas of project planning, management, best practices, execution and analysis. Is
likely to have held senior project management positions at one or more organizations before becoming a consultant.

Functional Manager. Responsible for the operations of any of the organization's functional groups (e.g., Accounting,
Human Resources, Information Technology, etc.). May also be responsible for the organization-wide integration of
policies and procedures related to the functional group.

Educator/Trainer. Primarily responsible for educating students, practitioners, or internal training professionals in the
field of project management. Usually highly experienced and/or educated in project management. An educator is
likely to work in a university or an educational institution setting. A trainer is likely to work as a part of a consulting
organization or work within an organization as an internal trainer.




      3674 Halter Court Sacramento CA 95821-3266 (916) h971-4868 c402-2756 chrismoorepmp@yahoo.com

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                       Tailor Your Resume to the Target Job Description
                                           from “Knock ‘em Dead 2008”

                                    Chris Moore, PMP, CSQE/A/M/E



Your resume will always be more effective if it begins with a clear focus on
and understanding of a specific target job.

1) Focus on a specific and realistic target job, one in which you can
   succeed based on the skills you possess today.

2) Your initial job is to surf job sites to collect half a dozen job postings for
   your chosen primary target job.

3) Deconstruct the collection of Target Job Descriptions (TJDs) in the
   following way:

    a)   Start a new Word document
    b)   Insert all job titles
    c)   Insert common requirements for six postings
    d)   Reduce to requirements common to five of six, then for of six.

4) Think about your TJD and add to the list of skills and deliverables from
   your personal experience doing the job.

5) Refocus each requirement to focus on problem identification, avoidance,
   and solution.

6) Career management:

    a) Describe the performance of the BEST person you’ve ever seen
       doing this job and what made them stand out.

    b) Describe the WORST example you’ve seen, and why.

7) Once you complete and review your TJD, you will have a clear idea of
   exactly what employers are seeking when they recruit for this position,
   the words they use to describe it, the specific skills and priorities of
   those skills, and what you bring to the table in each instance.


      3674 Halter Court Sacramento CA 95821-3266 (916) h971-4868 c402-2756 chrismoorepmp@yahoo.com

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