A Review of Recent Research Findings in Juvenile Justice by zem19587

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									A Review of Recent Research Findings
    in Juvenile Justice Education
                        Ashley Arnio
                          Jim Clark
                       Colby Valentine

  The 12th Annual Juvenile Justice Education Institute and
             Southern Conference on Corrections
                      Tampa, Florida
                      August 4, 2009
                         Introduction


Defining best practices in the juvenile
justice educational setting is a difficult
task, as what may be presented as „best‟
is sometimes confused with the
processes that stakeholders in education
develop for regulating „quality‟
education.
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                                                                           Introduction

To differentiate between the various instructional practices,
Howell and Wolford (2002:4) created the following typology:
1.       Mandated practices describe what is required by law and
         regulation.
2.       Common practices refer to what is usually practiced in the
         classroom.
3.       Best practices are those that have been shown, or proven to
         work.
4.       Promising practices are those that make sense to trained
         educators, but might lack sufficient data to be classified as
         research-based.

Howell, Ken and Bruce Wolford. 2002. Corrections and juvenile justice: Current educational practice for youth with
behavioral and cognitive disabilities. College Park, MD: National Center for Education, Disability, and Juvenile Justice.
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                                      Introduction




This discussion presents research related to best and promising
practices in teacher quality and effectiveness, curriculum, and
transition.




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                              Teacher Quality vs.
                                 Effectiveness

•   Difference between teacher quality and effectiveness
•   Teacher quality: what a teacher brings to the classroom
       * Measured by degree and certification
•   Teacher effectiveness: how the teacher facilitates
    student learning
       * Measured through classroom observation,
         principle evaluation, instructional artifacts,
         portfolios, teacher self-report measures, student
         surveys, and value-added scores

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                                                           Teacher Quality vs.
                                                              Effectiveness
• Measuring teacher quality and effectiveness:
      1. Inputs- Teacher background
      2. Processes- Teacher-student relationship
      3. Outputs- Gains in student performance
• Inputs, therefore, are measures of teacher quality and
  processes and outputs are measures of teacher
  effectiveness.

Goe, Laura, Courtney Bell, and Olivia Little. 2008. Approaches to evaluating teacher effectiveness: A research synthesis.
      Washington, D.C.: National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality. Retrieved June 10, from
      http://www.tqsource.org/publications/teacherEffectiveness.php
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                     Teacher Quality vs.
                        Effectiveness

The future of JJEEP research:
• Continued measurement of teacher quality
  with a focus on differences between
  pedagogical and content-area knowledge
• Exploring the option of using value-added
  modeling to measure teacher effectiveness
• Linking teacher and student data

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                          Curriculum and Instruction
                              Learning Disabilities
Theories:
• School Failure theory
• Susceptibility theory
• Differential Treatment theory
• Social Cognitive Ineffectiveness and Social
  Maladjustment theory




                                                      8
              Curriculum and Instruction
                       Reading



Elements of Reading
• Decoding or Word Study
• Fluency
• Comprehension


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                          Curriculum and Instruction
                                   Reading

Experimental Studies:
Houchins, Jolivette, Krezmien, & Baltodano,, 2008;
Allen-DeBoer, Malmgren, & Glass, 2006; Coulter, 2004;
Drakeford, 2002; Malmgren & Leone, 2000; Brier, 1994.

Findings:
Direct learning, small learning groups, work on decoding,
short-time for impact.

Concerns:
Limited number of studies, Small sample size, short time
frame, heavy use of resources.
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                                 Transition
                                  Definition




Transition has been defined as “a coordinated set of
activities for the youth, designed within an
outcome-oriented process, which promotes
successful movement from the community to a
correctional program setting, and from a
correctional program setting to post-incarceration
activities” (Griller-Clark, 2006).



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                                                                              Transition
                                                               Juvenile Justice Guideposts


Guideposts for Success for Transition Age Youth Involved in the
                 Juvenile Corrections System
   •      School-based Preparatory
   •      Career-Preparation and Work-based Experiences
   •      Youth Development and Leadership
   •      Connecting Activities
   •      Family Involvement and Support

   Gagnon, J.C. & Richards, C. 2008. Making the right turn: A guide about improving transition outcomes of youth involved in the
   juvenile corrections system. Washington, DC: National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, Institute for
   Educational Leadership.

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                                                                                    Transition
                                                                   Promising Aftercare Programs

                                  IAP        Thomas                 Bethesda         Florida             Project         GROWTH
                                             O’Farrell              Day              Environment         CRAFT
                                             Youth Center           Treatment        Institute
Program Characteristics

Facilitates transitional          Yes        Yes                 Yes                 Yes                 Yes             Yes
Structure
Uses assessment and               Yes        Yes                 Yes                 No                  Yes             Yes
classification
Develops individualized           Yes        No                  Yes                 Yes                 Yes             Yes
case planning
Uses rewards and                  Yes        Yes                 Yes                 Yes                 Yes             Yes
sanctions
Links to community                Yes        Yes                 Yes                 Yes                 No              Yes
treatment services
Combines Intensive                Yes        Yes                 Yes                 Yes                 Yes             Yes
supervision and treatment


 Geis, S.V. 2003 Aftercare Services. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice
 and Delinquency Prevention.
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                                                                                  Transition
                                                        Policy and Research Recommendations

                                  Youth Development and Reentry
They focused on youth between the ages of 10 and 24 who were incarcerated as a result of
adjudication in the juvenile court or convicted in adult court and released before age 25.

Policy and Research Recommendations:

      • Reorient the Juvenile and Adult Justice System to Focus on Reintegration of Young
        Offenders into Society

      • Reentry Programs Should Reflect a Youth Development Perspective

      • Successful Reentry Depends on Building a Supportive Community and Family
        Network

      • Create a National Agenda for Public Education and Research


Mears, D. P. & Travis, J. 2004. Youth Development and Reentry. Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 2:3-20.

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                                        Transition
                                  Future JJEEP Research


• Goal:
   • What happens to youth after being released from juvenile
     justice educational facilities?

• Future Research
       • Merging data from multiple agencies
       • Track youth after release through:
           • Employment
           • College
           • Public School
           • Military
           • Re-arrest in the adult and/or juvenile system
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                  DJJ Education Profiles


Age and Grade Level for Residential and
  Day Treatment Programs 2006-2007




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                     DJJ Education Profiles


Student Grade Advancement by Facility Type




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                  DJJ Education Profiles


Student Grade Advancement by ESE Status




                                           18
              DJJ Education Profiles


Student Grade Advancement by Age




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                           DJJ Education Profiles


Student Grade Advancement by Gender in Residential Programs




                                                        20
DJJ Education Profiles




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       Thank you!

 Ashley Arnio aarnio@fsu.edu
  Jim Clark jdclark@fsu.edu
Colby Valentine clv07@fsu.edu

								
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