Oceans by P-IndependentPublis

VIEWS: 33 PAGES: 5

Investigating the planet's biomes and examining the modern threats to each ecosystem, this interactive series challenges young readers to look at how their own actions affect the planet's health. With compare-and-contrast facts and vocabulary-building sidebars, each engaging guide reveals how environmental threats—both human and natural—affect plants and animals.Detailing the largest biome, this guide surveys the environmental threats to the earth's oceans. Teaching students about coral reefs—the rainforests of the ocean—this educational resource explores topics such as the connection between increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the bleaching of the reefs. By comparing the size of an island of floating plastic and other trash in the middle of the Pacific Ocean to the state of Texas—and how that floating island impacts ocean life—the guide shows young environmentalists why consuming less plastic is important.

More Info
									Oceans
Endangered Biomes

Author: Donna Latham



Age Group: 9 to 12 / 4 to 7
Table of Contents

Introduction: What is a Biome?
What is the Ocean? Landscape and Climate
Plants Growing in the Ocean: How Plants Have Adapted
Animals Living in the Ocean: How Animals Have Adapted
Environmental Threats: Human and Natural
Biodiversity at Risk: How Plants and Animals are Endangered
A Changing Environment: The Future of the Ocean
Conservation Challenge: What Can You Do?
Glossary
Further Investigations
Index
Description

Investigating the planet’s biomes and examining the modern threats to each ecosystem, this interactive
series challenges young readers to look at how their own actions affect the planet's health. With
compare-and-contrast facts and vocabulary-building sidebars, each engaging guide reveals how
environmental threats—both human and natural—affect plants and animals.

Detailing the largest biome, this guide surveys the environmental threats to the earth’s oceans. Teaching
students about coral reefs—the rainforests of the ocean—this educational resource explores topics such
as the connection between increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the bleaching of the
reefs. By comparing the size of an island of floating plastic and other trash in the middle of the Pacific
Ocean to the state of Texas—and how that floating island impacts ocean life—the guide shows young
environmentalists why consuming less plastic is important.
Excerpt

Landscape and Climate of the OceanAnother word for ocean is marine. The marine biome is the salt
water surrounding all the continents. It includes the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic, Indian, and Southern
Oceans. The ocean water is always moving because of the wind and the way the earth spins as it moves
around the sun. Wind is moving air that starts with heat from the sun. As the sun heats up the land, the
air above it heats up and rises. Cooler air over oceans moves in to take the place of the warm air as it
rises. This shifting, moving air is the wind. When wind blows over the ocean, it pushes water on the
surface. The water changes shape, forming waves. The stonger the wind, the bigger the waves.Currents
are masses of water that are always on the move!Ocean currents on the surface are caused by wind and
by the earth’s spinning. North of the equator in the earth’s Northern Hemisphere, circular currents flow in
a clockwise direction. South of the equator in the Southern Hemisphere, currents move
counterclockwise.Some scientists compare currents to streams or rivers within the ocean.The world’s
tallest known wave clobbered Lituya Bay, Alaska, in 1958. This destructive wave, called a tsunami,
towered 1,750 feet (525 meters). That´s higher than the Taipei 101 Tower, the world’s second-tallest
building. Tsunamis are caused by underwater earthquakes.Although the water of the marine biome is
constantly moving and mixing, water temperatures still vary quite a lot depending on location.Polar
waters, in the far north and south near the poles, are as low as a frosty 28 degrees Fahrenheit (-2
degrees Celsius). Tropical waters, close to the equator, are more like 85 degrees Fahrenheit (29 degrees
Celsius). The temperature at the bottom of the ocean is much colder than at the surface.
Author Bio
Donna Latham
Donna Latham is a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators and the Illinois
Reading Council. She is the author of Amazing Biome Projects You Can Build Yourself, Ellen Ochoa:
Reach for the Stars!, Fire Dogs, and Hurricane!: The 1900 Galveston Night of Terror. She lives in St.
Charles, Illinois.<br/>

								
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