All Lecturer's Biographies and A

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					                                         Society of Petroleum Engineers
                                 Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



Atul Arya ............................................................................................................................................................ 2
Bret L. Beckner................................................................................................................................................. 3
Prof. Steve Begg .............................................................................................................................................. 4
Paul L. Bondor .................................................................................................................................................. 5
Harold D. Brannon ........................................................................................................................................... 6
Ernie Brown ...................................................................................................................................................... 7
Kenneth G. Brown ........................................................................................................................................... 8
Ashok Baran Chakraborty .............................................................................................................................. 9
Roland E. Chemali ......................................................................................................................................... 10
Jim Crompton ................................................................................................................................................. 11
Global Upstream IT ....................................................................................................................................... 11
Jose Carlos (J. C.) Cunha ............................................................................................................................ 12
Dwyann Dalrymple......................................................................................................................................... 13
Jerry Dethlefs ................................................................................................................................................. 14
Robert Lee Dillenbeck III .............................................................................................................................. 15
Birol Dindoruk ................................................................................................................................................. 16
Hani Elshahawi............................................................................................................................................... 17
Murray R Gray ................................................................................................................................................ 18
David Handwerger ......................................................................................................................................... 19
Dr. Geir Hareland ........................................................................................................................................... 20
Dr. Younes Jalali ............................................................................................................................................ 21
David Hin-Sum Law ....................................................................................................................................... 22
Rick Lemanczyk, B.Sc. D.Phil. .................................................................................................................... 23
Audrey Mascarenhas, P.Eng., M.Eng. ....................................................................................................... 24
Colin McPhee ................................................................................................................................................. 25
Dr. Jennifer L. Miskimins .............................................................................................................................. 26
James E. Myers, P.E. .................................................................................................................................... 27
Tim O‟Sullivan ................................................................................................................................................ 28
Douglas Peacock ........................................................................................................................................... 29
Tony R. Pham................................................................................................................................................. 30
Lance Portman ............................................................................................................................................... 31
Dr. Hisham Saadawi ...................................................................................................................................... 32
Probjot Singh .................................................................................................................................................. 33
Dean A. Slocum ............................................................................................................................................. 34
Dr. Andrew L. Smith ...................................................................................................................................... 35
Roberto Suarez-Rivera                          ..................................................................................................................... 36
Randy C. Tolman ........................................................................................................................................... 37
Dr. Nathan Waldman ..................................................................................................................................... 38
Hong (Max) Wang.......................................................................................................................................... 39
Tim Whittle ...................................................................................................................................................... 40
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                        Will Demand for Oil Peak before a Supply Peak?

                                             Atul Arya
                                              Consultant

Abstract:

There is broad scientific consensus based on the findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change (IPCC) on the link between the CO2 emissions from the use of fossil fuels and
climate change. Governments around the world are engaged in developing and implementing
energy and climate policies including carbon price, energy efficiency targets and product mandates
to begin the transition to a low carbon economy. Today, transport sector contributes around 25%
of energy related emissions globally.

Government policies coupled with technological breakthroughs will have a major impact on the
future demand for energy and on the fuel mix. The most significant and disruptive change would
be for world oil demand to plateau and stabilize around 95-100 million b/d within next 15-20 years.
This could be before we reach a supply peak (of conventional and unconventional oil production)
leading to a stable balance between supply and demand.

Global oil demand could reduce significantly (by 15-20% below current forecasts by 2030), through
a combination of efficiency improvements in automobiles, oil substitutes such as bio-fuels,
increased penetration by hybrids and new approaches to mobility in both mature markets such as
the US, and those with rapidly growing automobile ownership such as China and India. The
presentation will discuss in detail the reasons behind this potential reduction in demand and the
strategic implications for our industry - the future of refining in OECD, rise in demand for gas as the
transition fuel to low carbon economy and the future of heavy oil in light of its high development
costs and high CO2 emissions.

One Idea for the members: “the world demand for oil plateaus and stabilizes around 95-100
million b/d within next 15-20 years”

Biography:

With over 25 years of experience in the energy industry, Atul Arya is an independent consultant in
oil & gas and renewables sectors specializing in strategy development, energy policies, planning
and technology commercialization. He holds B. Tech, MS and PhD degrees in petroleum
engineering and has been SPE member since 1980. In the early part of his career, Atul was an oil
industry consultant in the US, UK and the Middle East. From 1988 to 2009, he worked for BP in a
number of commercial, technical, planning and strategic roles in the Exploration & Production
business, BP Solar, Research & Technology and at the corporate headquarters. Atul serves on
the World Economic Forum's Council on Climate Change which is advising business and
government leaders on the future direction of climate and energy policy.

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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                               Next Generation Reservoir Simulation –
                                New Capabilities For New Challenges

                                             Bret L. Beckner
                                   ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company

Abstract:

Reservoir simulation capabilities have grown significantly over the past decade, coinciding with the
development of several next-generation reservoir simulators. The most distinguishing next-
generation reservoir simulation technologies recently developed are the use of unstructured grids,
the expansion of the modeling domain to include integration of surface facilities and multiple fields,
and the use of parallel and grid computing to reduce turnaround times. This new class of next-
generation reservoir simulation technologies is available to the reservoir engineer and presents
many benefits. Unstructured grids can more accurately model complex geologic features and
boundaries than is possible with rectilinear grids making fidelity with geologic modeling features
(sloped faults, pinch outs, sinuous boundaries) a reality. Extension of the modeling domain to
include surface facilities and other fields linked by common facilities allows simulations to model
the dynamic interaction driven by reservoir management strategies for fields with common surface
facilities. Recent advances in parallel simulation algorithms, coupled with parallel computers on
the desktop, make parallel execution easily attainable for the reservoir engineer. With compelling
illustrative examples of these new distinguishing technologies, this lecture will raise technology
awareness and spur reservoir engineers to begin to apply these technologies to their own
modeling problems.

Biography:

Bret Beckner is a Senior Consultant in reservoir simulation technology at ExxonMobil Upstream
Research Company. He has over 20 years of experience in reservoir simulation development and
application including 10 years as the Supervisor of Reservoir Simulator Development at
ExxonMobil‟s Upstream Research Company. He holds a BS in Petroleum Engineering from the
University of Texas at Austin and MS and PhD degrees in Petroleum Engineering from Stanford
University. He was the 2007 SPE Reservoir Simulation Symposium Program Chairman and has
been a Board Member of the Reservoir Engineering Research Institute since 2000. He has
authored many papers on reservoir simulation applications and simulation technology and has
made frequent invited talks on reservoir simulation technology in the U.S., Russia, and the Middle
East.




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



             Reliability of Expert Judgments and Uncertainty Assessments

                                           Prof. Steve Begg
                                           University of Adelaide

Abstract:

One idea I would like members to take away: human factors are big contributors to poor
uncertainty assessments, and thus decisions - perhaps more than technical issues.

Formal decision-making tools (e.g. probability theory, EMV, Monte Carlo simulation, decision trees,
etc) require the elicitation of expert opinions and uncertainty assessments. But our heads are just
not wired for uncertainty. Years of behavioral research on how people deal with uncertainty and its
consequences reveal a variety of cognitive biases leading to error-prone heuristics. Inappropriate
attitudes towards risk are major value destroyers and the way most organizations assess people‟s
performance tends to exacerbate these undesirable effects!

The lecture will start by exposing a common misunderstanding about the true nature of uncertainty
– the fact that it is in our heads, not in the systems we deal with. This has profound implications for
uncertainty assessment. Clarification of this mis-conception, combined with a decision-driven
focus, can free experts to express their knowledge with greater integrity and lead to more of a
value-creation mind-set.

Outcomes of recent research on the presence and impact of heuristics & biases, specifically within
oil and gas industry, will be reviewed. This research was motivated by criticism that the general
research results would not apply to experts dealing with their own subject matter. The results
suggest otherwise. A cognitive-science perspective can offer practical suggestions on how to
avoid them and thus lead to improved outcomes for individuals and corporations.

Although the topic is serious, the talk will be interactive, light-hearted and accessible to a broad
audience.

Biography:

Steve Begg is a Professor in the Australian School of Petroleum where his teaching and research
focus is on asset and portfolio investment decision-making under uncertainty. He spent 19 years
in the oil and gas industry before joining academia in 2002. First as a reservoir characterization
researcher with BP Research, then in a variety of senior engineering and geo-science roles with
BP in Alaska. He spent 5 years with Landmark where his last role was Director of Strategic
Planning and Decision Science. Steve frequently speaks at industry conferences and has
published many papers on evaluation and decision-making. In 2002 he was an SPE Distinguished
Lecturer on the topic “A new approach to investment decision-making” and in 2000 chaired an SPE
Forum on related topics. He has chaired the SPE Forum Series, was instrumental in starting the
new Economics and Management journal and has been a Technical Editor and Review Chairman.
Steve holds a Ph.D. in Geophysics and a B.Sc. in Geological Geophysics from Reading University.
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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                                        EOR – The Time is Now
                                  Its Contribution to World Oil Supply

                                            Paul L. Bondor
                                                BonTech

Abstract:

Enhanced oil recovery is perceived to have a history of unfulfilled promise. However, both thermal
and carbon dioxide flooding technologies have proven successful; surfactant and polymer flooding
less so as a result of the sustained oil price collapse of the 1980s.

Forecasts of world oil demand and supply include both undiscovered resources and EOR as
significant contributors. With a world resource of some 9 trillion barrels, and production of just 1.1
trillion barrels to date, EOR has the advantage of knowing where its resources are.

In addition, plans to reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide provides an impetus for the
implementation of CO2 sequestration projects - these can improve recovery factors worldwide, not
just in the Permian Basin. Advances in polymer and surfactant flooding technology, and in oil field
tools and techniques, make the application of those processes more robust.

EOR has not been present in the offshore; while applications present logistical as well as technical
challenges, the offshore represents a large EOR opportunity.

To achieve and exceed the expectations of EOR's contribution to supply, innovative political and
commercial approaches are needed; for example, agreements regarding CO2 capture and
transportation, NOCs and IOCs sharing the risk as well as the reward in EOR applications.

Key idea: Today's EOR is not your grandfather's EOR. It represents a major challenge and
opportunity, and efforts to realize this opportunity need to begin now.

Biography:

Paul Bondor retired from Shell after 35 years of technical and supervisory service. He has worked
in EOR both in research ( including 5 years as head of EOR research in the Royal Dutch/Shell
Group), and in operations, including thermal and CO2 miscible flooding projects, and in pilot tests
of polymer and surfactants. He has experience in primary development and waterflooding, both
onshore and offshore (including the deepwater GOM). He holds B.S., M.S., and PhD. degrees
from Case Institute of Technology. He has authored 14 technical papers.



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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season


                               Hydraulic Fracturing Material Selection:
                                Application Trends & Considerations

                                           Harold D. Brannon
                                           BJ Services Company

Abstract:
Hydraulic fracturing is the preferred method for stimulation of most low permeability reservoirs. The
fundamental materials employed to fracture stimulate reservoirs are a fluid to provide the hydraulic
energy for fracture propagation, and a proppant to keep the created fracture from closing once the
hydraulic pressure has been relieved. The ideal fracturing slurry would facilitate proppant
placement in a conductive concentration throughout the created fracture area with the carrier fluid
vanishing once its function has been completed. Unfortunately, the materials necessary to
accomplish this ideal have not yet become available. Fluids and proppants have significantly
evolved and adapted over the history of hydraulic fracturing, influenced not only by improved
understanding of the fracturing process and the availability of new materials, but perhaps most
significantly by adaptation to satisfy reservoir properties encountered as new resources are drilled
and developed.

Evaluation of the materials which have been used over time in fracturing applications can expose
systematic trends, which when investigated are typically found to have been motivated by the
availability of new material chemistries, modifications dictated by improved understanding of the
fracturing process, or 'evolutionary adaptation' to satisfy reservoir properties encountered as new
resources are being drilled and developed. Included among these are low polymer fluid systems to
reduce residual damage to the proppant pack, and smaller-sized proppant to increase effective
fracture length. Recent developments have resulted in emerging new fracturing materials expected
to extend the benefits of the aforementioned, as well as, to resolve application limitations to
optimal stimulation in formations having extreme environments and in complex unconventional
reservoirs. Comparison of performance characteristics and associated application considerations
afforded by the traditional, current, and emerging fracturing materials provide critical information to
guide selection of fluids and proppants for successful well stimulation.

Biography:
Harold D. Brannon is Senior Advisor-Fracturing for BJ Services Company, based in Tomball,
Texas. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Baylor University and has 28
years of industry experience, over which he has held technical and management positions
including R&D, engineering support, marketing, operations, manufacturing, and intellectual
properties. He has authored over 60 technical publications and is an inventor on over 30 patents.
He has actively served the Society of Petroleum Engineers on various technical program
committees including those for the Hydraulic Fracturing Conference, ATCE Well Completions,
ATCE Well Stimulation (Chairman), and the Formation Damage Symposium, and is currently an
Associate Editor for the SPE Production & Operations Journal.

Note to reviewers: An extended discussion on this topic was delivered as a Keynote Presentation
at the 2009 SPE Hydraulic Fracturing Technology Conference.
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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                 Successfully Stimulating Complex Carbonate Reservoirs

                                           Ernie Brown
                                            Schlumberger


Abstract:

For nearly 80 years, stimulating carbonate reservoirs has been routine and deemed successful but
often involved little more than placing acid across the face of the formation. With approximately
half of the world's proven reserves of oil and gas in carbonate or fractured reservoirs, it is apparent
that new ideas and technologies are required to help increase both production and overall recovery
from these complex reservoirs. New approaches are being utilized for better petrophysical models
in carbonates and this information is leading to improved stimulation methods. This presentation
focuses on the key developments in stimulation that target carbonate reservoirs and the
appropriate completion methodologies required in these highly complex and heterogeneous
reservoirs.

Biography:

Ernie Brown, Advisor for Stimulation and Production services for Schlumberger‟s Middle East and
Asia Area is currently based in Dubai. Beginning his career in 1979 with Dowell as a field
engineer, he has held a variety of technical positions focused on reservoir stimulation and
production in various locations throughout the world. Additionally he has held positions in both
research and engineering, holds 18 patents, has co-authored over 25 technical publications, and
has contributed to three reference books relating to well stimulation and completions. He holds a
degree in Geology from Colorado State University in Ft. Collins, Colorado.




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season

           On the Road to Smart Technologies in Underground Gas Storage

                                           Kenneth G. Brown
                                               Schlumberger

Abstract:

The One Idea: Employing intelligent well technologies to optimize the design, operation,
and management of underground gas storage facilities can yield significant returns, even at
modest levels of deployment.

Intelligent technologies are helping underground gas storage (UGS) operators in their quest for
greater efficiencies, lower costs and innovative business methods. Consequently, this industry is
slowly, but steadily, moving towards the “digital oilfield”.

After presenting a brief review of the underground gas storage industry and simple definitions of
smart wells and smart fields, this presentation examines three different levels of intelligent
technologies being applied to underground gas storage operations in North America and Europe.
Level A intelligence involves automated assembly of data; collection and collation of data for
manual review by engineers and management. Level B intelligence involves benchmarking;
comparing/contrasting measured values with baseline values, typically generated from theoretical
models. Level C intelligence involves commanding field operations; responding to information
derived from data and controlling the downhole environment to optimize asset performance.

The presentation also includes case studies showing examples how various levels of smart
technology are being deployed in UGS facilities, including use of real-time data to identify and
track changes in well damage over time, and daily validation and use of real-time deliverability
models to update deliverability forecasts on a “continuous” basis.

Biography:

Ken Brown is a Principal Consultant with the Data & Consulting Services Division of Schlumberger
in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania USA where he manages the division‟s Gas Storage Technology
practice. He currently supervises projects in the area of underground gas storage (UGS) feasibility
studies, inventory analyses and deliverability, as well as full-field simulation studies to evaluate and
optimize design, development, and operations of UGS facilities. He also performs research
projects funded by industry consortia (Gas Technology Institute, Gas Storage Technology
Consortium) and governmental agencies (US Department of Energy, US Trade and Development
Agency, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority) and provides expert
witness testimony and litigation support involving UGS fields.

Mr. Brown joined Schlumberger in 1997. Prior to joining Schlumberger, Mr. Brown held positions
with S.A. Holditch & Associates, Michigan Consolidated Gas Company, Shell Oil Company, Inc.
and Marathon Oil Company. Mr. Brown graduated with a B.Sc.(1981) and M.Sc. (1986) in
Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering from The Pennsylvania State University.
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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                      Carbon Management and Sustainable Development

                                           Ashok Baran Chakraborty
                               Oil and Natural Gas Corporation Limited (ONGC)

Abstract:

Climate Change issues are becoming prominent with every passing day. It is increasingly
important for E&P Industry to safeguard against the consequences & effects of climate change, be
it mandatory or otherwise. It is imperative to adopt carbon management practices & sustainable
management strategy besides availing benefits that emerge from this global challenge. The
climate change issues are global in nature and so is mitigation & adaptation.

The presentation covers carbon management, sustainable development, global requirements,
trends & initiatives. The carbon strategy devolves around company‟s own perspective on the global
issues of climate change mitigation, adaptation & offsetting. There are voluntary initiatives as well
which are equally important & one among these is „Carbon disclosures‟. The regulatory
requirements are being introduced for compliance / commitments. At times these are associated
with built-in issues having effect on the economic aspects. The available options and follow-up
actions would lead to long term benefits for company sustainability. Internalizing the externalities
(external cost) i.e. taking into account the compensation payable for the loss of welfare is
important.


Biography:

A B Chakraborty, Chevening fellow, University of Cambridge 2009, is currently the Chief – Carbon
Management Group in ONGC & deals with CDM projects development, climate change and
sustainable development strategy. He has developed HSE procedures, guidelines & presented
papers globally. His core specialization includes environment management, sustainable
development & CDM. He is change agent with focused approach & initiative. He was successful in
development & registration of 5 CDM projects by UNFCCC, bringing out policy on climate change
& sustainable Development, formed „Carbon Management Group‟, and has set a role model for the
public sector institutions in India. He is BE (Mech.), M.Tech, MBA, MSc (Envl Science) & PG
Diplomas in envtl. mgt / economics. Received 2008 SPE HSE middle east region award. He is a
fellow „Institute of Engineers‟, Chartered engineer & Member SPE.




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                   Advanced Geosteering Methods for Optimal Recovery
                               of Hydrocarbon Reserves

                                                 Roland E. Chemali
                                           Halliburton Sperry Drilling Services

Abstract:

Optimal field development entails placing the wells in prescribed locations within the reservoir. An
error of a few meters in height above the oil-water contact or with respect to the roof may result in
leaving behind a significant portion of the producible reserves in later years. Early production rates
also depend on well placement and reservoir contact. Driven by these key requirements, new
technologies continue to emerge to help geologists, drillers, and reservoir engineers make well
informed geosteering decisions.

Best geosteering results are attained by integrating multiple real time measurements and images,
and interpreting them jointly. Shallow images of the borehole help recognize when a well path has
left the reservoir and determine the precise correction required for rapid re-entry. More proactive
methods rely on deeper reading propagation resistivity and real time modeling to avoid exiting the
reservoir altogether. In recent years more advanced proactive methods in the form of azimuthal
wave resistivity have gained rapid acceptance. Being azimuthal in nature and deep reaching they
anticipate reservoir exits well before they occur and advise in real time the most favorable change
of direction to stay within the confines of the reservoir. As the well progresses, interactive software
lets the geologist update the subsurface model with the new information. In some types of
reservoirs, additional data on oil viscosity, pore pressure and drilled rock properties help further
improve critical geosteering decisions.


Biography:

Roland Chemali is Chief Petrophysicist with Halliburton-Sperry Drilling Services. He holds
engineering degrees from the Ecole Polytechnique of Paris and the French Petroleum Institute
IFP. Roland has over 35 year experience in the logging and LWD industry, including
Schlumberger, Baker Hughes and a 17 year tenure at Halliburton. He has managed the design
and deployment of multiple innovative instruments. He has co-authored over 50 papers and
patents in formation evaluation including geosteering high angle wells, magnetic resonance and
formation pressure while drilling. Roland was Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff at
Halliburton; he has received the Meritorious Engineering Innovation Award from Petroleum
Engineer International, the Baker Hughes Technology Excellence Award and the SPWLA
Technical Achievement Award. He is currently SPWLA Distinguished Speaker.


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                                  Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season

                                          Putting the Focus on Data

                                               Jim Crompton
                                               Global Upstream IT

Abstract:
Data is a critical business asset which drives decisions on where to invest, when to divest and how to
operate more efficiently. The business wants to focus on using data and expects IT to manage data.
However, IT often focuses on the technology to capture, store data and even to visualize data but the
ownship of the lifecycle of data is often ill defined.

This is not a new problem. Many studies point out the productivity loss felt when a lot of time is spent
looking for data and making sure what is found is correct, complete and in the right format. While some of
the issues are mitigated by our current experienced workforce, what will happen when the experience
leaves? The new workforce is digitally literate with high expectations but can they perform at a high level
with a poor understanding of data? Can the new engineer recognize when critical data is missing or wrong?
Will they be able to recognize when a logical conclusion is not the right one?

The importance of data should be a business priority. Managing data in silos (structured data, documents,
transactions, models) increases the resistance to efficient data flow. As many different people are involved
in new workflows, a solution design for one specific discipline becomes a barrier for others. In some
applications, the need to see the bigger picture becomes more important than reaching specific answers.

Data silos continue to survive waves of new technology development. The data explosion and the
availability of powerful desktop tools create hundreds more data silos for the organization to manage. There
is not a simple answer or technology to fix the current situation but there are practical recommendations to
help us get back on the road to “‟trusted data, easily found.”

The approach starts through a better understanding of business process and how information flow leads to
decisions. Other practical steps include: data governance, common reference and master data, data quality
management, and looking at the data lifecycle by managing data from its capture/creation, storage, access,
use, archive and disposal.

Biography:
Jim Crompton holds the position of Manager of Upstream Architecture in the Chevron Global Upstream IT
organization. He earned a BS in Geophysical Eng., MS in Geophysics from the Colorado School of Mines
and an MBA from Our Lady of the Lake University. In 1993, as IT Manager for the Gulf of Mexico Business
Unit, Crompton led one of the first desktop PC standardization projects in Chevron. In 1997, Jim was
names the Principal Technical Advisor for IT, where he was responsible assessment of emerging
technology and strategic planning for the IT function. He served as chair of the API general committee for
electronic commerce ( PIDX) and was able to influence the direction of the standards setting activities
towards emerging technologies, such as XML, and new electronic business models in the industry.

Jim participated in the IT merger integration study team in 2001 as part of the Chevron & Texaco merger
which developed the IT organization structure and IT strategic direction for the corporation, where he
received a President's Award for this activity. In 2002, Jim was selected to be a Chevron Fellow. Jim also
works on Chevron‟s i-field program in the area of emerging solutions.

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                                  Society of Petroleum Engineers
                          Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season

            Economic and Risk Analysis Applied to Petroleum Engineering -
                  Recent Developments and Application Examples

                                            Jose Carlos (J. C.) Cunha
                                               Petrobras America Inc.


Abstract:

I would like attendants to this presentation to know that is possible to deal with uncertainties present
on a number of current technical and economic issues faced by our industry using relatively simple
economic and risk analysis tools.

The presentation will show actual examples of Risk Analysis applications for Drilling, Production and
Reservoir management as well as basic means to develop such applications.

Even though risk analysis has tremendous potential to be applied on various aspects of common
problems in petroleum engineering, its use is not as widespread as it could be. The presentation
shows some practical applications recently developed covering areas of well engineering,
drilling/completion and reservoir. The reason for presenting examples of such diverse areas is to
emphasize the broad range of applications available.

Emphasis of the presentation will not be on the petroleum engineering technical aspects of the
examples, but instead on the methodologies available to incorporate risk analysis techniques into the
solution of practical problems faced by the industry. Examples presented are mostly from actual
industry applications.

Specific applications can be developed to deal with uncertainties existent in a variety of common
problems, including well budgeting, special oilwell operations, estimation of reserves, oil and gas field
development, the feasibility of waterflooding projects, production forecast, etc.

Biography:

Jose Carlos (JC) Cunha is Operations Manager for Petrobras America in Houston where he is
involved in the ultra-deepwater drilling program for the company in the GOM. Previously Dr. Cunha
was, for 4.5 years, a professor of Petroleum Engineering at the University of Alberta, Canada, where
he taught courses on drilling, formation evaluation and petroleum economics and did research on
drilling optimization, managed pressure drilling and risk analysis. Prior to his tenure at the University
he has occupied several technical and managerial positions for Petrobras in drilling/completion
projects in South America, the GOM and Africa. He has authored more than 50 technical articles
(including 30 SPE papers) and also wrote chapters for the recent published SPE Advanced Drilling
book as well as for the new SPE Drilling Engineering textbook to be published in 2010. He has made
several technical presentations in conferences, seminars and short courses. An active SPE member,
Cunha is the Chair of the JPT Editorial Committee, an Associate Editor for SPE Drilling & Completion
and also the Chair of the SPE Drilling TIG. Cunha has a PhD. degree in Petroleum Engineering from
The University of Tulsa, USA.


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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                        Produced Water Management - “Waste to Value”

                                           Dwyann Dalrymple
                                               Halliburton


Abstract:

Produced Water Management has become a worldwide concern. There are a growing number
of mature fields, and many countries have already established strict discharge regulations in order
to prevent and/or eliminate pollution resulting from the discharge of produced water.

Local conditions and requirements vary significantly; with regional boundaries set geologically,
geographically or politically. Solutions developed to address these local conditions and
requirements many times must be solutions which are region-specific. As a result, the overall
solution may require several separate steps for complete resolution (reduction, chemical removal,
profile control, separation, treatment, disposal and water-flooding use, etc.). One point remains
true in all cases. The end result obtained of proper produced water management in the oil and gas
industry is that it is a savings to the company, not a cost.

Biography:

Currently with AOC, LLC as a consultant on Produced Water Management and serves the
PRODUCED WATER COMMUNITY (Middle East - Africa – Asia) Board of Directors as its Science
Advisor. He worked as a Scientific Advisor for HALLIBURTON‟S Conformance
Technology/Production Enhancement Group for over 30 years, in all phases of water control and
well preparation including conformance technology, clay control, and improved oil recovery
methods as well as the development and implementation of those technologies. He has
successfully consulted on procedures and job recommendations around the world. His most recent
work led to the development and application of several novel chemical systems for water shut-off,
gas shutoff, and improved wellbore integrity. He has authored hundreds of publications on these
topics and holds 30 patents related to Conformance technology, acidizing, sand control, fracturing
and cementing.




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                              Near Surface External Casing Corrosion;
                                Cause, Remediation and Mitigation

                                           Jerry Dethlefs
                                            ConocoPhillips

Abstract:

Surface casing failures on a group of relatively new wells prompted an investigation into the cause.
External corrosion had occurred on the surface casing near the cement top between the casing
and conductor and was caused by repetitive wetting events from water entering the unsealed
annulus. Testing of water and cement samples indicate that the presence of oxygenated water and
chemical salts that leach from the cement creates a low-resistance electrolyte resulting in an
extremely corrosive environment. The oxygenated water in this environment creates an electro-
chemical cell that corrodes the surface casing. Elevated casing temperatures and a high
temperature gradient between the casing and the conductor accelerates the corrosion rate by
creating a thermo-galvanic corrosion cell.
The damaged surface casing has been mechanically repaired on numerous wells by excavation
and installation of welded sleeve patches. Inhibiting the corrosion mechanism is considered an
important mitigation for surface casings not yet compromised by the corrosion mechanism.
This presentation will:
    1. Discuss the extent of shallow external casing corrosion observed in the field;
    2. Detail the mechanisms leading to the external corrosion;
    3. Detail the mechanical repair procedures used to return the wells to service;
    4. Discuss mitigation methods and remedial treatment to inhibit corrosion on new and existing
       wells.
This lecture illustrates that well barrier problems are not limited to being internal and deep in the
well and require expensive (i.e., rig) methods to repair. Inexpensive repair approaches "outside the
box" of traditional methods can be done safely, reduce risk and provide economic value for the
company. The corrosion mechanism discussion should be applicable to most oil and gas operating
areas around the globe.
Biography:
Jerald C. Dethlefs is a Well Integrity and Diagnostics Engineer with ConocoPhillips in the Global
Completions and Production Engineering Group in Houston, Texas. Jerald has 25 years
experience with well operations, intervention, production operations, and drilling. For the past 11
years his focus has been on well integrity issues including policy, diagnostics, best practices,
program management and regulatory compliance. Jerald has a Bachelor of Science in General
Engineering, a Master of Science in Civil Engineering and a Masters of Business Administration.


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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season


                                   Annular Isolation:
                 Moving from Rules of Thumb to Tomorrow’s Technology


                                           Robert Lee Dillenbeck III
                                      Chevron Energy Technology Company

Abstract:

Historically, the petroleum industry has relied on API tests for determining unconfined cement compressive
strength. The general rule of thumb has been that more is better. Given accurate mechanical properties
data, today‟s computer models can quantify stresses imposed upon triaxially confined annular sealant
sheaths, and it has become apparent that these complex induced stresses can often be either compressive
or tensile in nature. When simulation models predict mechanical failure of the sealant, the mode of failure is
often tensile in nature. This understanding, along with the need for accurate data to run induced stress
simulation programs, has driven our industry to develop testing procedures for determining confined
mechanical parameters such as Young's Modulus, Poisson's ratio and tensile strength. These parameters
should be considered as important as sealant compressive strength when determining the fit-for-purpose
suitability of an annular sealant design. Unfortunately, with no API guidelines beyond compressive strength,
most annular sealant mechanical behavior testing typically uses ASTM construction concrete test
methodology. With typical oilfield cements, ASTM tests suffer from many shortcomings. These tests don‟t
incorporate procedures to replicate the curing of the cement in downhole environments, and don‟t conduct
the actual static tensile testing under conditions similar to those occurring in wells. As an example, even
when oilfield cements are prepared and cured using API procedure in HTHP curing chambers prior to
ASTM testing, they must still be subjected to significant unwanted induced stresses. This occurs because
samples are cooled and de-pressurized back to ambient conditions before they can be subjected to ASTM
tests. Samples of annular sealants prepared and tested in such a manner may undergo sufficient induced
stress to exhibit signs of initial mechanical failure prior to even being placed in ASTM testing fixtures.
Clearly, improved methods and equipment are necessary to better be able to quantify mechanical
performance of annular sealants under actual downhole conditions. Luckily, efforts in that direction are
beginning to move forward today.

Biography:

Lee Dillenbeck has been active in the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) since 1981 as an industry
recognized expert in annular isolation technology, having been an author on over 20 technical papers on
the subject and holding nine U.S. patents with others pending. Publications in technical periodicals include
SPE “Drilling” Magazine, “JPT”, and “Harts E&P”. He has served on various committees for the SPE Annual
Technical Conference and exhibition (ATCE) and the Production Operations Symposium (P.O.S.) for the
last sixteen years. He was also a participant at the SPE North American and Russian Forum Series on
Cementing in Harsh Environments. Lee chaired cementing technical sessions at the 2003, 2004, 2005 and
2007 SPE ATCE events. He served as the Completions and Drilling technical coordinator for the 2006 SPE
ATCE and in 2006 began serving a three year term on the SPE Books publication committee, which he
currently chairs. Starting in 2008, he has served on the SPE ATCE Education, Professionalism and Training
(ETP) technical program committee and continues to do so today. Lee also served as the chairman of
drilling and completions technical program committee for the 2009 SPE LACPEC conference in Cartagena,
Colombia.

7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                                   15
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




             Reservoir Fluid Properties (PVT): Issues, Pitfalls and Modeling

                                             Birol Dindoruk
                           Shell International Exploration and Production Company

Abstract:

In reservoir studies, from material balance calculations to simulation, fluid properties are always
required to estimate in place volumes, EOR (Enhanced Oil Recovery) potential, and the transport
parameters that interact with the flow. The variations of PVT (Pressure-Volume-Temperature)
properties during depletion phase are also needed to evaluate the reservoir performance and to
design surface and subsurface facilities. In general fluid properties are central to almost all the
applications in the form of input.

In recent years, rising number of offshore projects has made the modeling of reservoir fluid
properties even more important. In addition to behavior of the fluids at reservoir/wellbore
conditions, behavior of the fluids at sub-sea conditions is also needed for modeling/flow assurance.
Some of the frequently encountered key issues are:

1. Sampling issues (near-saturated fluids, contamination and quality)
2. Laboratory and measurement related issues
3. Modeling issues (Equation of State, lean condensates, near critical fluids and integrated
   fluid characterization)

Fluid properties (or PVT properties) play important role in petroleum engineering applications. In
field-wide modeling, near-critical fluids, compositional variations from well to well/cluster to cluster,
and EOR applications pose challenging problems for fluid property modeling. The final goal of a
successful “PVT program” is to represent/model the reservoir fluid from reservoir to refinery with a
single set of adjustable parameters (modeling consistency).

Biography:

Birol Dindoruk is a Principal Technical Expert in Reservoir Engineering working for Shell
International E&P since 1997, and an adjunct faculty at the University of Houston, Department of
Chemical Engineering. He is a global consultant for Fluid Properties (PVT) & Miscible/Immiscible
Gas Injection EOR & Simulation. Before joining Shell, he has worked at Amoco Tulsa Research
Center on compositional simulator development projects. He holds a PhD degree in Petroleum
Engineering from Stanford University, an MBA degree from University of Houston. He is a recipient
of Society of Petroleum Engineers' (SPE) Cedric K. Ferguson Medal in 1994. He was one of the
Co-executive Editors of SPE Formation Evaluation/Reservoir Engineering Journal (2004-2006) and
currently the Editor-in-Chief for Journal of Petroleum Engineering Science and Engineering
(JPSE).


7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                               16
                                Society of Petroleum Engineers
                       Distinguished Lecturer 2010-2011 Lecture Season




        Real-Time Monitoring and Control in Formation Testing Applications

                                           Hani Elshahawi
                                                Shell


Abstract:

Modern wireline formation testers are capable of providing a wide range of downhole rock and fluid
properties at in-situ reservoir conditions and can help identify subtleties such as
compartmentalization and compositional grading. Increasingly more massive and complex strings
are being run to obtain a wealth of information under ever more challenging conditions. Even in
developed reservoirs, unexpected circumstances arise, requiring immediate response and
modifications to the pre-planned job procedures. Unexpectedly low or high mobilities, probe
plugging, unanticipated fluid types, presence of multiple phases, and excessive fluid contamination
are but a few examples of such circumstances that would require real-time decision making and
procedural modifications. Real-time decisions may include acquiring more pressure data points,
extending sampling depths to several zones, extending or shortening sampling times, repeating
micro-hydraulic fracture re-opening/closure cycles, real-time permeability interpretation, and
determination of optimum flow/buildup durations.

This lecture includes several examples to illustrate the power of real time monitoring and
interpretation. By the end of the lecture, the audience will walk away convinced that real-time
monitoring and control is required to ensure that the critical formation testing objectives are met on
any exploration, appraisal, or otherwise high profile project.

Biography:

Hani Elshahawi leads FEAST, Shell‟s Fluid Evaluation and Sampling Technologies center of
excellence, which is responsible for the planning, execution and analysis of global high profile
formation testing and fluid sampling operations. Hani has over 20 years of experience in the oil
industry and has worked in both service and operating companies in over 10 countries in Africa,
Asia, and North America. He has held various positions in interpretation, consulting, operations,
marketing, and product development. He holds several patents and has authored over 80 technical
papers in various areas of petroleum engineering and the geosciences. He has long been active
with the SPE and the SPWLA and is the 2009-2010 president of the SPWLA. Hani has a B.Sc. in
mechanical engineering and a M.Sc. in petroleum engineering from the University of Texas at
Austin. His email is Hani.Elshahawi@Shell.com.




7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                            17
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




            From Black to Gold: Nanotechnology in Upgrading of Heavy Oil

                                            Murray R Gray
                                           University of Alberta

Abstract:

Heavy oils are one of the most complex mixtures of components on earth. The largest molecules in
the crude oil, in the asphaltene fraction, dominate the properties that control production, including
viscosity and interfacial properties, and the options for upgrading the oil to higher API gravity.
These components make upgrading of heavy oil an expensive proposition, in terms of both capital
and operating expense. The key property of the asphaltenes is their tendency to associate with
each other, to form aggregates a few nanometers in diameter. Research in nanotechnology is
giving new insight into why the asphaltenes interact with each other, enabling new approaches to
remove unwanted contaminants, to develop new catalysts, and possibly to enable synthesis of
new materials derived from heavy oil. The key challenge in this area is to define the basic
molecular structures in the asphaltenes, and the nature of their interactions in the oil phase and at
interfaces. A wide range of new upgrading technologies have been proposed, but insight into the
behavior of heavy oil at the nanometer scale allows us to analyze which of these approaches can
be cheaper than current commercial technology, and which ones are unlikely to succeed.

Biography:

Dr. Murray Gray has over 20 years of research experience in upgrading of heavy oil and oil sands
bitumen. He is currently Director of the Centre for Oil Sands Innovation at the University of Alberta.
His success in collaborative research with industry has been recognized by numerous awards and
prizes, including the Syncrude Innovation Award (1996), and the Industrial Practice Award of the
Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering (2003). In 2005 he was elected a Fellow of the
Canadian Academy of Engineering. In 2006 he was awarded a Canada Research Chair and an
Industrial Research Chair in Oil Sands Upgrading. Gray obtained his Ph.D. in Chemical
Engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 1984. He also holds a M. Eng. degree
with a specialization in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Calgary (1980) and a B.Sc. in
Chemical Engineering (with honours) from the University of Toronto (1978).




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




                                   Drilling at the Bottom of the World:
                                   Adventures on a Frozen Continent

                                            David Handwerger
                             TerraTek, a Schlumberger Company, Salt Lake City

Abstract:

In conjunction with the International Polar Year (2007-8), two drilling campaigns took place in the Ross Sea,
Antarctica, near the US Antarctic Base McMurdo Station, under the auspices of the international ANDRILL
(ANtarctic Geologic DRILLing) program. The program‟s goals are to understand the evolution of the
Antarctic cryosphere through continent-proximal records. The first drilling season occurred during the
Austral summer of 2006-7, and the second occurred during the Austral summer of 2007-2008. I
participated as a borehole geophysicist during the more recent drilling campaign. The first season collected
1285 m of continuous core under the Ross Ice Shelf for a high-resolution record of the past 10 my while the
second season collected 1130 m of continuous core under the multi-year ice for a high-resolution record of
the mid-Miocene, covering the onset of widespread continental glaciation in East Antarctica. Together, the
two cores are being used to put together a record of glaciation and basin development within the Victoria
Land Basin to understand the controls and frequency of Antarctic glacial expansion and retreat. This is of
particular importance in this day and age as we enter a time of global warming. A complete collapse of the
Antarctic ice sheets would raise sea levels by >70 m, with disastrous affects to coastlines and populations
worldwide. By trying to understand the factors that led to ice sheet expansion during the mid-Miocene, and
its behavior since, we hope to be able to model how the ice sheet may respond to present circumstances.

In addition to the studies on glacial history, we also conducted a full logging program in the hole after coring
was completed, carried out a VSP, and also carried out the first successful hydrofrac experiment ever in
Antarctica. Hence we have made the first measurements of the state of stress anywhere in Antarctica,
more specifically in the Victoria Land Basin of the Ross Sea.

While the detailed science is still ongoing, I will present some data which suggest that the ice sheet has not
been as stable during the Cenozoic as distal marine records have suggested. I will also show some of the
stress data and how it relates to development of the Ross Sea. Lastly, I am aware that many people who
come to Antarctic talks, despite the scientific interest, want to see pictures of glaciers and penguins, so I will
show lots of pictures of “the ice” as well.

Biography:

I received my Ph.D. in geophysics from the University of Utah in 2003, using geophysical methods to study
Neocene sedimentation on the margins of the Southern Ocean. I conducted much of my research on two
cruises of the Ocean Drilling Program, one offshore New Zealand, the other offshore Prydz Bay, Antarctica
(the dent in the East Antarctic coast where India would fit). Prior to that, I received my M.S. in geology at
the University of Utah on cosmogenic isotope dating of paleo-fault scarps in Nevada and Utah. Currently I
am employed by TerraTek, A Schlumberger Co. in Salt Lake City working on core- and log- based modeling
of reservoir and mechanical properties of tight-gas shale and sand reservoirs, mostly in the US and
Canada. I am also treasurer of the Salt Lake City chapter of SPE. I took development leave from my
position with Schlumberger to participate in ANDRILL.


7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                                       19
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                   Drilling Optimization Simulation Reduces Drilling Cost

                                           Dr. Geir Hareland
                                           University of Calgary

Abstract:

Drilling simulation and optimization tools in drilling engineering was lacking behind the other three
petroleum engineering disciplines until a global drilling engineering optimization simulator was
developed in the late 1990s. The drilling simulator simulates the drilling of wells in advance using
offset wells drilling operational data, lithology description and bit records.
Based on this information the simulator generates drillability or rock strength log, which is
correlated to the formations to be penetrated on the new, planned well. The simulation of the new
well is done by trying different bit designs, pull depths, combination of bit operating parameters and
drilling hydraulics. The most economical bit selection and corresponding operating parameters are
then selected and sent to the field. During the drilling of the planned wells constant updates are
done and the progress monitored, comparing the field data to the pre-planned as well as updating
with daily new calculations of critical parameters like bit wear and rock strength.

The past 10 years this approach has been utilized by major operators in the North Sea and
Western Canada. The approach has been applied on more then 200 wells with an average depth
of 3000m. The results indicate that the drilling learning curve is sharply reduced and that more
consistency in the drilling days per well is seen. The cost reduction in total days has been shown
to be 15-25 percent in mature fields where more then 10 wells were previously drill and as much as
40-50 percent in areas where less then 5 wells were drilled. This presentation will give the general
information about the development and functionality of the drilling simulator technology and how it
has been and currently is applied with sample field cases.

The main idea for the members to take away from this presentation is that the drilling simulation is
here to stay with real time applications and that large drilling cost saving are possible today by
application of this simulation technology.

Biography:

Dr. Geir Hareland holds a BS in mechanical engineering from University of Minnesota, MS in
petroleum engineering from University of Tulsa and PhD in mechanical engineering from
Oklahoma State University. Dr. Hareland has worked with rate of penetration modeling since his
days at Amoco Research Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma in the late 1980s. During his tenure as an
associate professor at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in the 1990s and from
2000-2004 with Drops Technology in Norway he developed the drilling simulation technology
integrated in the DROPS drilling optimization simulator. Since 2004 Dr. Hareland has been the
CAODC (Canadian Association of Oilwell Drilling Contractors) and NSERC (National Science and
Engineering Research Council of Canada) Drilling Engineering Chair and is currently a professor in
the Schulich School of Engineering at the University of Calgary.

7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                           20
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                    Smart Wells – A Realistic Vision for the Next 10 Years

                                           Dr. Younes Jalali
                                             Schlumberger

Abstract:

More than a decade has gone by since the early days of smart well technology or intelligent
completions. Novel applications such as in-situ gas-lift, concurrent production of multiple targets
from a single well slot, concurrent injection, inflow control in horizontal wells, and remote
monitoring have made important contributions to the performance of specific assets and fields.
However, it is difficult to assert that these technologies have made a huge impact globally.

Global oil production is dominated by mature fields, and mature fields have been largely bypassed
by these technologies. The top 100 fields in the world are almost all mature (i.e., post primary
recovery), and yield nearly 50% of global crude oil production. Thus, it is clear that unless smart
technologies become relevant to these fields, they will remain largely a niche technology.

The objective of this talk is to highlight areas that need to be tackled in order to make smart
technologies relevant to mature fields, as well as measures that need to be taken to make these
technologies more effective in general. Focus will be on measures that can be realistically
achieved in the course of the next 10 years.

Two key ideas will be elaborated – (i) role of smart technologies in improving the effectiveness of
injection wells (hence secondary and tertiary recovery operations), and (ii) role of new
measurement and information technologies to help make the transition from smart wells to smart
operations.

The one idea I would like the members to take away is that smart technologies need not be limited
to green field or frontier field developments, or “exotic” operations, as these technologies have an
important role to play in enhancing recovery from mature fields, which dominate global oil
production.

Biography:

Younes Jalali is a Reservoir Engineering Advisor with Schlumberger. He has worked in both field
operations support and technology development over the past 20 years, with assignments in Libya,
Italy, France, UK, US and China. Prior to this he was an Assistant Professor of Petroleum
Engineering at Stanford University. He holds BS and MS degrees from the U. of Tulsa, and PhD
from the U. of Southern California, all in Petroleum Engineering. His involvement with "smart
wells" dates back to 1990s, working with major operators to deploy new technologies in land,
platform, and subsea fields – multizone completions, multilateral wells, permanent monitoring
systems, distributed sensors. He is the author of 30 SPE papers and holds a number of patents
related to smart wells
7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                              21
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



         A New Heavy Oil Recovery Technology to Maximize Performance and Minimize
                                   Environmental Impact

                                            David Hin-Sum Law
                                  Heavy Oil Technical Director, North America
                                                Schlumberger

Abstract:

Due to there are many types of heavy oils (API < 22.3) with viscosities ranging from hundreds to millions
centipoises, different recovery processes can be applied. Steam-based thermal recovery processes such
as, cyclic steam stimulation (CSS), steam flooding and steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) are most
extensively used. These thermal processes are very energy intensive and face the challenges of reducing
greenhouse gas emission and water usage from steam generation. In addition, traditional CSS and steam
flooding also have significant impact on the environmental footprint because of the use of vertical wells with
small spacing, very often less than 10 acres. The first part of the presentation will briefly describe the
steam-based thermal recovery processes, in terms of recovery efficiency and environmental impact.

The second part of the presentation will describe a new heavy oil recovery technology which has been
developed not only to maximize the performance but also to minimize the environmental impact. Replacing
vertical wells with horizontal (e.g., SAGD) or multi-lateral wells can reduce the surface footprint. On the
other hand, replacing steam with solvent for oil viscosity reduction can reduce greenhouse gas emission
and water usage. However, solvent-only processes have very slow oil production rate when compared with
steam-only processes. The newly developed hybrid steam-solvent process with solvent co-injected with
steam synergizes the advantages of steam-only and solvent-only processes to improve oil rates and steam-
oil ratio (SOR) that results in the reduction of greenhouse gas emission and water usage. Feasibility of the
new technology has been successfully proven based on laboratory and numerical studies. There is
evidence from field pilot tests that this technology is also technically success in the field.

There is continuous improvement on heavy oil recovery technologies to meet the challenges of
environmental and economic issues.

Biography:

David Law is currently the Schlumberger Heavy Oil Technical Director in North America with offices located
at both the DBR Technology Centre in Edmonton and the Heavy Oil Regional Technology Centre in
Calgary, Alberta, Canada. He has over 20 years experience in technology development in the heavy oil and
bitumen recovery area, with more than 100 publications as principal author and co-author in refereed
journals and conference proceedings. Before joining Schlumberger in 2005, he worked for the Alberta
Research Council (ARC) in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada for 18 years, holding the positions of Reservoir
Simulation Group Leader and Thermal Gravity Strategy Area Leader in the last few years. He holds a B.Sc.
degree from the National Taiwan University in Taipei, Taiwan and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from the
University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, all in Chemical Engineering. He is a registered
professional engineer with the Association of Professional Engineers, Geologists and Geophysicists of
Alberta (APEGGA) and a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) Canada.


7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                                    22
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                          Production Optimization – A Gas Lift Odyssey

                                       Rick Lemanczyk, B.Sc. D.Phil.
                                           Senergy International Sdn. Bhd.

Abstract:

Despite fluctuations in price, oil demand is expected to continue growing and the declining energy
of current reservoirs requires not only a wider use of artificial lift methods, but an intensification and
optimization of their application. In terms of volume of oil produced, gas lift remains one of the
principal means of increasing production. Competing uses for produced gas mean that ever-
greater efforts have to be made to optimize the use of available lift gas.

Using gas lift as an example, the underlying objective of the presentation is to illustrate how the
various facets of a production optimization process are inter-related so that engineers and
management are cognizant of the type and scale of gains that are achievable. The workflows,
lessons and pitfalls are not confined strictly to gas lift, but would also apply to other areas of
production enhancement.

This talk identifies the various “stages” of optimizing a gas lifted production project, and reviews
recent advances in equipment, software and concepts which are changing the way gas lift is
applied and engineered. The journey begins at the design level, examining how recent advances in
gas lift technology are widening and improving the application of the technique. The road moves to
optimizing production at the individual well level through improved diagnostics and surveillance.
From there it is a short but major step up to full field optimization using deterministic engineering
applications or data driven models. The importance of suitable surveillance, data acquisition and
management systems will be stressed.


Biography:

Since 2006 Rick is Principal Petroleum Engineer in Senergy‟s Asia Pacific operations, located in
Kuala Lumpur, and has a career spanning over 30 years in various aspects of production
technology.

After graduating with a D.Phil in Chemistry from Oxford, Rick worked for Schlumberger from 1977-
1992 in a variety of positions: wireline engineer, well stimulation R&D and regional laboratory
manager. In 1992-94 he was appointed Senior Research Fellow in the Department of Petroleum
Engineering at Heriot-Watt University. Between 1994 -2006 he held a variety of positions with
Edinburgh Petroleum Services (now a Weatherford company), providing technical support,
business development, consulting and training in the areas of production optimization, artificial lift,
sand management, well stimulation, completion analysis and formation damage.




7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                               23
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season


                   A Sustainable Solution to the Climate Change Dilemma
                                   “Eliminate the Flare”
                                  Audrey Mascarenhas, P.Eng., M.Eng.
                                           Questor Technology Inc.

Abstract:

The times have changed. The world, concerned about climate change has demanded that we all
reduce our carbon footprint and develop in a green sustainable manner. The cost of CO 2
emissions will increase considerably as countries implement either a tax or a cap and trade system
to address climate change, creating significant corporate liability.

One of the largest sources of greenhouse gas emissions in the oil and gas industry originates from
flared gas and fugitive hydrocarbon emissions. Globally, over 14.5 and 9.6 billion cubic feet of
gas, respectively, is flared and vented daily from oil and gas operations. This is a waste of a non-
renewable energy source that releases over 9,000 Trillion Btu of energy and adds over 1.8 billion
tonnes of CO2 each year to the atmosphere, which, if eliminated, would surpass all projects
accounted for under Kyoto‟s Clean Development Mechanism (CDM).

Technology can change this problem into an opportunity. There are practical, proven cost effective
solutions to not only significantly reduce the emissions but to also utilize the energy that is
presently being wasted from these valuable streams creating a mutually beneficial solution. Proven
technology exists that is smart business, builds public confidence, reduces the carbon footprint and
meets environmental regulations. This simple solution with immediate and significant impact is far
more effective than carbon capture and renewable energy. We will experience far greater success
by focusing on solutions for an increasingly efficient fossil fuel based economy.

If we are to engage the public, shareholders and attract new graduates to our industry, we have to
address the issue of sustainability and environment. The solutions are right in front of us!

Biography:

Ms. Audrey Mascarenhas is currently the President and CEO of Questor Technology Inc.(Questor)
an international environmental oil field service company focused on clean air technologies. Audrey
joined Questor in 1999 and was instrumental in developing Questor's engineering, financial and
marketing strategies. Prior to this, Audrey held various technical, commercial and management
positions during a17-year tenure with Gulf Canada Resources Ltd., presently Conoco-Phillips. She
is a graduate of the University of Toronto in Chemical Engineering and holds a Masters Degree in
Petroleum Engineering from the University of Calgary. Audrey has had the opportunity to share her
passion for the environment and the search for solutions to air quality with other audiences,
notably at the „World Petroleum Congress’ in Johannesburg, Rice Alliance Clean Technology
Conference in Houston and most recently in Amsterdam at the EPA/World Bank Global Gas
Flaring Reduction Forum. She is active in her community, serving as a Scout leader and as coach
for a variety of sport teams in which her children are involved. As an avid skier and hiker, her love
of the outdoors and commitment to the environment is ever present.

7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                           24
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2009-10 Lecture Season

                     Core Analysis – A Guide to Maximising Added Value

                                            Colin McPhee
                                           Senergy (GB) Limited

Abstract:

Routine (RCA) and special (SCAL) core analysis tests provide the only direct and quantitative
measurement of reservoir petrophysical properties and should provide the foundation for
integrated formation evaluation. Unfortunately, and too frequently, core analysis planning,
programme design and management are done poorly and the results are often confusing or
contradictory, with the result that around 70% of legacy SCAL data are generally unfit for purpose.
Variable data quality, the sensitivity of results to different test methods, and poor reporting
standards have all contributed to basic mistakes and poor data quality. However, in too many
cases, an inconsistent or inappropriate approach to the design, management and interpretation of
the core analysis program has been adopted and exacerbated by the conflicting requests of the
end users.

So how do we get better data? Firstly, review legacy data and understand the impact of rarely
reported experimental artifacts on fundamental rock property measurements. Can data be
corrected or are new tests required? Secondly, a multi-disciplinary core analysis management
strategy can deliver high quality data by developing a more effective relationship between
stakeholders and the data acquisition laboratory. Improved test and reporting specifications, pro-
active test program management which engages both the lab and the end user, and real time
quality control enables a more coherent and consistent approach to data acquisition and
maximizes value from core analysis investments.
Core analysis has uncertainties which are recognisable and manageable. The one idea that
members can take away from this lecture is how a pro-active and integrated management strategy
can eliminate data redundancy and reduce uncertainty in reservoir models.

Biography:

Colin McPhee‟s 30 years industry experience includes petrophysics, core analysis, geomechanics,
formation damage and sand management. Currently, Colin is Principal Petrophysicist for Senergy
(GB) Limited in Edinburgh, UK, advising clients on petrophysical and geomechanical aspects of
field development, asset evaluation and well construction.

Colin has managed over 40 core analysis programmes and audited over 20,000 SCAL
measurements. His active promotion of closer cooperation between stakeholders and core
analysis vendors and his innovative solutions in SCAL data interpretation. has ensured that core
data are more reliable, robust and representative.

Colin regularly presents at industry conferences worldwide. He has been a Technical Editor for
SPE Formation Evaluation, has authored several technical papers and, has taught over 50 core
analysis courses to over 800 industry professionals, worldwide. Colin has a BSc in applied geology
from Strathclyde University and a masters in civil engineering from Glasgow University.
7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                           25
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



               Unconventional Frac Jobs for Unconventional Reservoirs –
                       What Should You Be Concerned About?

                                           Dr. Jennifer L. Miskimins
                                            Colorado School of Mines

Abstract:

Unconventional reservoirs are just that – unconventional. Extrapolation of techniques that have been used
for decades in conventional reservoirs to unconventional reservoirs is dangerous and can prevent further
development by providing poor results and turning funding away to “safer” areas. This sequence of events
can be observed at all levels of petroleum engineering, from petrophysics to reservoir analysis to stimulation
techniques.

In order to avoid such misapplications, unconventional reservoirs call for unconventional thought processes.
In no place is this more evident than in the area of hydraulic fracturing, where an entirely different mindset
has to be developed, not just for unconventional reservoirs in general, but specifically for each individual
type of unconventional reservoir including shale gas, tight gas, and low permeability oil.

These changing approaches affect almost every aspect of unconventional treatment design from fracturing
materials to reservoir management. Increased use of “slickwater” and other minimally-loaded fracturing
fluids can be directly related to the desire to minimize damage in these tight, low permeability reservoirs.
However, these types of fluids have different proppant transport mechanisms that must be considered.
From a mechanical aspect, fracture growth in unconventional reservoirs can be extremely complex, beyond
our current capabilities to completely predict, and direct diagnostics coupled with mineback and laboratory
experiments are helping to improve the understanding of what causes these intricate patterns. Even from a
reservoir management standpoint, hydraulic fracturing has become more of a tool rather than just an event.
Diagnostic injection tests can provide information on reservoir characteristics; and reserve recoveries can
be enhanced through practices such as improved well spacing and reorientation of fracturing treatments.

This presentation reviews these changing perspectives and design considerations. The main “take-away”
from this lecture is that unconventional reservoirs have requirements very different and distinct from
conventional reservoirs and that we can improve our designs by considering these unique requirements and
“thinking unconventionally”.

Biography:

Jennifer L. Miskimins is an Associate Professor in the Petroleum Engineering Department at the Colorado
School of Mines (CSM) in Golden, Colorado, USA. Dr. Miskimins holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in
petroleum engineering. Prior to joining CSM, she worked for Marathon Oil Company in a variety of
locations. Dr. Miskimins is the founder and Director of the Fracturing, Acidizing, Stimulation Technology
(FAST) Consortium at CSM. She teaches a variety of courses including completions and stimulation
classes, geologic field camps, and petroleum economics courses at CSM and as industry short courses.
She is a member of SPE, SPWLA, AAPG, Sigma Xi, and ASEE and currently serves as the Executive
Editor for the SPE Production & Operations Journal.


7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                                   26
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                                              Water Reuse

                                           James E. Myers, P.E.
                                                 Chevron

Abstract:

This presentation is an introduction to water reuse in the petroleum industry. It presents a
systematic approach on how to evaluate the potential of water for reuse. Virtually any water can
be treated with off-the-shelf technologies and successfully reused for many different applications.
However, not all water reuse makes sense based on economics, energy consumption or local
need for the water. Other candidate waters for reuse include petrochemical wastewater, municipal
wastewater, ground water and storm water. Water treatment technologies are classified as
primary (gravity), secondary (biological) or tertiary (polishing step). Some of the reuse applications
include agriculture, aquaculture, silviculture, industrial processes, recreation, wildlife and municipal
non-potable. As easily accessible water resources become scarce and the human population
expands, the need for sustainable water reuse becomes paramount to both public and private
sectors. The petroleum industry can effectively reuse water to benefit the local communities in
which oil is produced and refined. Produced water that was once considered a throw-away by-
product of crude oil production can become an asset in agriculture, aquaculture and silviculture.

Key take-away: Basic knowledge of what, why, where, and how to re-use water from the oil / gas
industry in an environmental and economic responsible way.

Biography:

James Myers is a senior environmental engineer with 26 years of experience in the petroleum
industry. He is a biologist with a couple of degrees in engineering. His technical specialty is the
biological treatment of liquids and solids from worldwide upstream and downstream petroleum
operations. Some of his projects include treatment of produced water, refinery wastewater, ground
water and marketing terminal storm water, constructed treatment wetlands, water reuse,
landfarming and composting of sludge, spill response (domestic and international), natural
resource damage assessment, permit negotiations, wildlife habitat enhancement (duck nesting,
purple martin houses, wildflower planting), and environmental workshops on wastewater treatment,
constructed treatment wetlands, landfarming and solid waste management. He has used
prescribed burns to control plant succession for wildlife habitat enhancement and to clean up oil
spills. He has served on technical committees for API, PERF, OSRADP and TGLO. He has two
patents in landfarming and a volunteer award from USFWS for a waterfowl database. Jim‟s
wetlands have garnered awards from IOGCC and the Wildlife Habitat Council.




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season




Maximizing the Value of an Asset through the Integration of Log and Core data


                                              Tim O’Sullivan
                                                  Cairn India

Abstract:

The Mangala, Bhagyam and Aishwariya Fields were discovered in early 2004 in the northern Barmer Basin,
in northwestern India. The data acquired in the field wells (including almost two kilometers of core) enabled
a precise estimation of field stock tank oil initially in place (STOIIP). This talk summarizes the techniques
that allowed the estimate of STOIIP to be more precisely defined and to be revised upward by 12%, a
substantial increase when dealing with a billion barrel field (Mangala Field). Initial evaluation of the log data
indicated a sequence of clean, quartzose sandstones with porosity greater than 25%. High porosities together
with resistivity in the oil column over 5,000ohm-m, suggested that water saturations (Sw) were ~15% or
even less. An extensive core analysis programme was begun, with the objective of improved definition of
the actual reservoir STOIIP’s. In addition to routine core analyses and Dean-Stark Sw data, a sizeable set of
other special core analyses was conducted: including extensive capillary pressure data, laboratory NMR, and
core electrical properties measurements. The laboratory results challenge some of the traditional thinking
about the petrophysical properties of reservoirs such as these. It is indeed possible, that high quality
reservoirs can have initial water saturations lower than 5% of pore volume on average, and with some zones
less than 1%. Conventional log tools and analysis methods will not reveal these low levels without
integration with core data and appropriately designed core analysis programmes. Also, and perhaps more
importantly, this work clearly demonstrates the economic worth of extensive laboratory measurements and
analyses on high-volume, high-value reservoirs such as those of the Mangala, Bhagyam and Aishwariya
Fields.

Biography:

Tim O’Sullivan holds a B.Sc (Hons) degree in Geology from the University of Queensland, Australia. He
has been working in the petroleum industry for almost 30 years, primarily in Australia and Asia. Disciplines
include petro physics and development geology. Currently he is the Principal Petrophysicist for Cairn India
and is based in Delhi. He is a member of SPWLA, SPE and AAPG and has published and presented with all
three societies. Tim has been an SPE committee member in sections both in India and Australia. He also
conducts a five day petro physics course.




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                                  Let’s Model It!
                            3D Geoscience Modelling –
       Implications for Reserves Estimation and Field Development Planning

                                             Douglas Peacock
                                           Gaffney, Cline & Associates

Abstract:

3D geoscience modeling has now become such a standard technique in the petroleum industry that it is
inextricably interlinked with reservoir simulation. Software and hardware continue to advance, allowing
ever larger and more detailed models to be constructed. Yet, our understanding of these methodologies, their
uses and limitations has not evolved to the same extent.

To redress this situation, I shall review geoscience modeling as an initializing technology for
reservoir simulation and from the perspective of key deliverables such as recoverable volumes.
The input specifications for a model may actually have a greater impact than the ensuing range of
realizations. Modern reservoir models are rooted in statistical methods, which are essentially
extrapolative rather than interpretive. Stochastic methods alone do not utilize the experience and
skill of the geologist. Yet, they are being used more and more. Integration of a 3D geoscience
model with reservoir simulation is improving, but there are still difficulties. Selection of a lead
stochastic realization(s) to take forward into simulation is problematic. Any single realization is not
reality, and it is not usually feasible to simulate large numbers of geoscience realizations.

By correctly identifying rock that contributes to flow and honoring scale issues, the link between 3D
geoscience and engineering models becomes more seamless, a benefit that is manifested through
more readily attainable history matches. Moreover, many companies are now adopting an
approach to 3D modeling that involves a series of simpler “fit for purpose” models to capture key
uncertainties rather than focusing on a single or small number of models with excessive detail.

What I would like members to take away from this lecture is an awareness of the purpose of 3D
modeling especially at the static/dynamic interface, the assumptions that went into it, and the
ongoing need to challenge them.

Biography:

Doug Peacock is a Senior Geoscientist with Gaffney, Cline & Associates. He holds a B.Sc in
Geological Sciences from Leeds University, UK, and a M.Sc. in Petroleum Geology from Imperial
College, London. He has over 25 years experience in the oil industry in a variety of geoscience
positions, during employment with service companies, operators and consultancies. He has been
involved in integrated applications and 3D modeling throughout his career.




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



              Understanding of Fluid Flow and Recovery Mechanisms
          Leads to Technology Applications for Improving Well Productivity
                         and Reservoir Ultimate Recovery

                                           Tony R. Pham
                                           Saudi Aramco

Abstract:

The pre-requisite for an optimum field development starts with an understanding of the fluid flow
mechanisms in the reservoir. This understanding is an evolution that requires an in-depth
knowledge of the geological attributes, in-situ reservoir fluids interaction and skillful analyses of
information which could come in with conflicting and diverging pictures. Using a case example from
some of the largest carbonate oil fields in the Middle East, the paper presents the evolution over
time of careful observation of well behaviors, and reservoir performance analyses from an
immense collection of data taken in one of the world largest carbonate oil reservoirs.

There are three main paths of fluid flows in the reservoir as they are listed in increasing order of
their impacts on water breakthrough: matrix, super-permeability layers (super-K), and fracture
swarms/large scale faults with the latter two being the most influential. The paper will discuss the
evolution of this understanding over time as evidence, captured by improved technology and
analyses, and through the tremendous improvement in advance computational techniques, pointed
toward the super-K being the secondary medium with the fracture swarms or corridors taking over
as the role of the main conduit in the reservoir which, blessed with excellent matrix permeabilities,
gradually understood to be a “reservoir with fractures” and not a fractured reservoir”.

The paper also discusses the impact of this understanding related to the recovery mechanisms in
the reservoir with respect to viscous, gravity, and imbibition forces. Based on this understanding,
the paper will discuss how technologies can be deployed in terms of advanced well completion and
re-completion practices in horizontal, multi-lateral with active and passive down-hole control
capability, ready to turn the knowledge into beneficial endeavors in an effort to optimize the field
development and improve oil recovery.

Biography:

Tony Pham holds a 1976 BSc. degree in Petroleum Engineering from Texas A&M University, USA.
He has spent most of his career in Reservoir Management and Reservoir Simulation focusing
mostly in Ghawar, the world largest oil field, and now is a Sr. PE consultant with Southern Area
Reservoir Management Department in Saudi Aramco. He was the lead engineer in the successful
1.2 million Bbls/D Khurais Complex Development and also lead engineer in intelligent field
development with smart completion MRC wells in 300,000 Bbls/D Haradh field which won an IPTC
award. He has authored/co-authored 18 technical papers on the subjects of field development,
reservoir simulation applications, advance completions, residual oil, and oil recovery.



7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                           30
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



            High End Coiled Tubing Evolution - The Last and Next Ten Years

                                            Lance Portman
                                           BJ Services Company

Abstract:

Coiled tubing (CT) remains, at its simplest, a "hose" that can be run quickly in and out of a well,
while circulating fluids, against live well pressure where necessary. It is true that the coil equipment
has evolved substantially over time in reliability and size. This has enabled a change in the
possible range of coiled tubing applications. However, a bigger impact is the change in the wells in
which coiled tubing is called to service. Wells have gotten deeper, horizontal, extended reach,
multilateral and completing across multiple zones. This has led to a variety of bottom hole
assembly and process developments, and a significant shift in coiled tubing's "established"
operations. Annular fracturing is one example of a now common application for CT that did not
exist only a few years ago. A shift to long, horizontal wells in very tight reservoirs led to the need
for multiple zone, horizontal well fracturing methods. CT is presently one of the most cost-efficient
ways of finishing these wells. This presentation lists and explains the more common, higher end
CT applications in use today. It also predicts the new technologies that will come along over the
next decade, some of which are already seeing trial applications today. A member will take away
important learning‟s related to the latest / leading edge technology that CT is being used for today
such as difficult sand clean outs, world record perforating with CT, rotating jet technology, annular
fracturing with CT and acid tunneling with CT in carbonate formations to name a few.

Biography:

Lance Portman has spent 23 years in the oil and gas industry, most of which has been associated
with coiled tubing. Those 23 years have been spent with Nowsco Well Service and BJ Services,
spanning operational, engineering and marketing roles, in Europe, North America and the Asia
Pacific region.

Lance has authored 21 SPE papers on coiled tubing related topics, and been published several
times in industry journals such as JPT. He has also been granted four US patents. In 2008 Lance
was nominated by SPE to teach a SPE short course on coiled tubing titled "Coiled Tubing
Operations and Its Applications". In July 2008 Lance moved from his position in Singapore as
Region Business Development Manager – Coiled Tubing to his current position as Director of BJ
Services‟ Coiled Tubing Research and Engineering, Canada.




7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                             31
                                Society of Petroleum Engineers
                       Distinguished Lecturer 2010-2011 Lecture Season




                 Multiphase Pumping: Should This Be Your First Choice?

                                           Dr. Hisham Saadawi
                             Abu Dhabi Company for Onshore Oil Operations
                                              (ADCO)


Abstract:

Over the past decade, multiphase pumping technology has increasingly become an acceptable
alternative to conventional technologies. Indeed in many oil producing areas of the world,
multiphase pumping is considered best practice.

The key concept in this presentation is to demonstrate that multiphase pumping is now considered
a mature technology which offers numerous advantages in terms of HSE, operability, cost
effectiveness, capital and operating costs as well as improved oil recovery.

The presentation gives an overview of state of the art multiphase pumping technology. Topics
covered include: classification of multiphase pumps, the case for multiphase pumping, when not to
use multiphase pumping, shop and field testing as well as project implementation issues. The
presentation examines how multiphase pumping can be used for the development of both mature
and new fields. The theme of the presentation will be illustrated by field examples.

Biography:

Hisham is the Specialist Engineering / Conceptual Design Manager for Abu Dhabi Company for
Onshore Oil Operations (ADCO). He has some 30 years experience in the design, construction,
start-up and operation of oil and gas processing facilities. He worked on numerous multiphase
pumping projects and studies including some unique applications. These include the world‟s first
installation of multiphase screw pumps operating in series; the first helico-axial multiphase pumps
operating in series and mobile multiphase ram pump.

He served in several committees and sub-committees of SPE conferences and workshops. He is
the Instructor for the new SPE short course on Multiphase Pumping.

Hisham holds a PhD from the University of Manchester, UK and is a Fellow of the Institution of
Chemical Engineers and a Member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.




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                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season

                               Managing Paraffins for Flow Assurance

                                              Probjot Singh
                                           ConocoPhillips Company
Abstract:

Paraffin or wax (n-alkane) precipitation and deposition from crude oil, commonly referred to as "the
cholesterol of the petroleum industry," has cost billions of dollars in additional capital and operating
expenses. Paraffin deposition risk plays a significant role in development concept selection. On
land or in offshore shelf waters, paraffin buildup has been primarily controlled by thermal
management (insulation or active heating), routine pigging and wax chemicals or hot solvent
treatments. The cost and technical challenges of managing paraffin for deep-water and ultra deep-
water offshore prospects with marginal reserves are even higher. Long distances from the
reservoir to the host facility via subsea tiebacks, dry tree risers and extended export pipelines in
cold ambient water temperatures increase wax deposition potential. Industry is concerned about
failure of long umbilical and capillary lines that deliver paraffin inhibitor chemicals, and consequent
wax plugging. The traditional approach of installing dual flow lines, with round-trip pigging
operations routinely performed from the host platform, has a high capital cost that can adversely
impact the overall project economics. The offshore industry has a very limited experience with
subsea pig launchers for routine single-trip pigging operations. If not managed properly, a wax plug
may require the replacement of a pipeline, or lead to the premature abandonment of producing
wells. Both industry and academia have made significant progress not only in understanding the
physics of paraffin deposition and predicting the deposition rate in subsea pipelines, but also in
synthesizing effective paraffin inhibitors. The take away message from this presentation is that
industry and academia must continue their consolidated research efforts to promote novel ideas
and to develop new game-changing technologies in order to overcome the deep-water challenges
that lie ahead.

Biography:

Probjot Singh is currently employed by ConocoPhillips as a team lead of Fluids Technology within
Production Assurance Technology group which provides integrated flow assurance solutions to the
company's upstream business and its joint ventures. He is involved with providing flow assurance
solutions to major upstream projects and operations worldwide. He has been responsible for
developing and maintaining centralized technical expertise to provide technical support in the area
of wax and waxy gel control. He has also provided fluids related technical support in asphaltenes,
heavy oil, multiphase flow, and produced fluids PVT to worldwide upstream operations. Prior to
joining ConocoPhillips, Probjot served as a senior process engineer in GE Plastics. He earned a
Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Michigan. He has authored more than
20 papers in scientific journals and holds six patents related to engineering applications. He has
chaired paraffin modeling committee in the Tulsa University Paraffin Deposition Project and has
served as a committee member for 3 graduate theses related to paraffin research in separate
universities. Singh has visited several industrial and academic research organizations as invited
speaker. He is the receipient of 2009 ConocoPhillips Technology Sharing Award, 2008
ConocoPhillips Technology Achievement Award, 2005 ConocoPhillips Outstanding Young
Scientist Award, 2001 GE Management Award, and 1999 University of Michigan Distinguished
Achievement Award.

7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                             33
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                             Next Generation Stakeholder Engagement

                                             Dean A. Slocum
                                           Acorn International, LLC


Abstract:

Managing social and stakeholder concerns is becoming more critical to the success of international exploration
and production (E&P) programs. As in-country demands for having a “stake” in these programs and pressure for
local content rise, successful stakeholder engagement will require a balance between the need for international
best practices and local leadership. Adopting this “Next Generation Stakeholder Engagement” will help the oil
and gas industry realize more sustainable investments in the face of increasingly complex social and political
risks worldwide.

International practitioners in stakeholder engagement (SE) are seeing the following critical trends emerging:
   There has been significant progress in developing SE best practices/methods in recent years;
   Few host country social experts have been exposed to these developing practices/methods; and
   Despite this, experts from within host countries are typically in the best position to execute these programs
      because they:
      - Understand the social customs, language, and culture
      - Are known and more trusted by regulators and residents

The lecture will elaborate on how international oil and gas companies and their consultants can better manage
this balance by committing to two-way capacity building that simultaneously:
   Conveys best practices from international oil companies, financial institutions and ESHIA practitioners to
      capable local consultants; and
   Communicates to international parties and practitioners the value of stakeholder engagement being led by
      qualified local experts.

The lecture will review a series of case studies to demonstrates how the challenge of effectively managing
international SE programs can impact development projects and applying the Next Generation Stakeholder
Engagement can help meet this challenge. It will provide attendees with recommendations for how to improve
capacity building activities and optimize opportunities for local involvement, and ultimately success, in stakeholder
consultation

Biography:

Dean Slocum, SPE, is the Principal and founder of Acorn International and a former director of the energy and
environment practices of Arthur D. Little and Battelle Memorial Institute. He has more than 25 years of
experience in leading and executing complex environmental and social assessment and performance
improvement programs for oil and gas industry activities worldwide, many in areas with high profile stakeholder
concerns. Dean has a Bachelors degree in Sociology and a Masters degree in Public Administration/Health. He
has applied this training in leading stakeholder engagement and environmental/social impact assessments in 27
countries on major oil and gas, power, mining, and related development programs. Mr. Slocum is the editor of
SPE‟s 2009 Best Practices in HSE publication, and has served as an active member of SPE HSE Conference
program subcommittees since 2000. Dean speaks and presents in English and Spanish.


7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                                    34
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season

                   NORM - Lessons to be Learnt - Past, Present & Future

                                             Dr. Andrew L. Smith
                                           Risk Management Systems Ltd.

Abstract:

Lessons learned over the last 20 years must be clearly understood as new challenges require a
combination of current best practice and innovative thinking.

The first reports of NORM associated with mineral oil & natural gases appeared in 1904. Helium in
natural gas and its radiogenic origins was exploited during the 1920‟s, while radium in reservoir water
from oil & gas fields was reported from the 1930's. Later reports were overlooked until the 1970's &
1980's when several observations prompted renewed interest. By 2008 the IAEA stated that 'A great
deal of progress had been made nationally and internationally in identifying the problems associated
with NORM and in identifying a practical way forward'. Dr. Smith's paper "Radioactive Scale
Formation" was presented to the RSC in Manchester, UK; at the OTC in 1985 and published in JPT
June 1987. During the 1980's Dr. Smith developed the original Low Specific Activity Radioactive Scale
[NORM] radiological standards and procedures within the UKCS. He prepared a Briefing Note on
NORM submitted to the UK House of Lord‟s enquiry on the Decommissioning of Oil & Gas Installations,
1995/6.

The IAEA has acknowledged that his review made a most valuable contribution to the development of
Safety Reports Series No. 34, "Radiation Protection and Management of Radioactive Waste in the Oil
and Gas Industry", 2003. An October 2008 Louisiana Court has highlighted that the JPT June 1987
paper contributed to the body of scientific literature by demonstrating the first correlation between API
GR units and radiological dose. Prior to this the oil & gas industry had not recognized the potential
topside health concerns from radioactive scale in tubulars. Dr Smith has been retained as an oil & gas
industry litigation consultant with particular expertise on NORM.

Biography:

Dr. Smith is a Risk [HSSE & SR] consultant in Aberdeen, U.K. He holds a BSc in Applied Chemistry
from De Montfort University and a PhD in Organic Chemistry from UMIST in U.K. His career spans
over 30 years of international executive leadership of HSSE&SR, integrated risk and life-cycle
management gained in engineering, fabrication, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance
and decommissioning projects associated with the global chemical, petrochemical and oil & gas
industry in S.America, Europe, S.Africa and Middle East. Dr. Smith is a European Engineer, European
Chemist, a Chartered Scientist, Environmentalist, Chemist, Fire Engineer, Petroleum Engineer,
Radiation Protection Professional and Health & Safety Practitioner. He is an accomplished speaker
and has presented at international conferences for the RSC, SPE, SRA and ASME with publications in
JPT and OMAE. Andrew is a 25yr SPE member and has served several terms as an Aberdeen
Section Board Director.

He is currently on the HSE Management Committee for the 10th SPE HSE International Conference in
Oil & Gas E&P, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, April 2010 where he is presenting SPE 125661 on NORM: The
Lessons to be Learned, New Challenges and Innovative Thinking with Decommissioning and
Radioactive Waste.
7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                           35
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                            Worldwide Unconventional Shale Gas Resources:
                              Principal Drivers of Successful Production

                                            Roberto Suarez-Rivera
                                       TerraTek, A Schlumberger company

Abstract:

Unconventional gas production in the continental USA grew from 2.8 TCF in 1998, to
approximately 10 trillion cubic feet in 2008, with overall reserve estimates for shale gas rising as
much as 250 TCF1. This success has created great interest for exploration of unconventional gas
plays worldwide, and a strong demand for specialized shale gas services. Unconventional gas
reservoirs are formed by interbedded, fine-grained, lithofacies of varying texture and compositions,
and exhibiting significant post-depositional alteration. Although an obvious characteristic is their
low permeability, a most important property is their high vertical and lateral heterogeneity. In
unconventional plays, the same depositional unit represents the reservoir, the seals, the petroleum
source, and the containment for hydraulic fracturing1. This means that minor changes in texture
and composition result in measurable changes in reservoir and mechanical properties, leading to
these various roles. Success in unconventional gas production results from understanding the
subtle variations in rock properties for identification of two basic interrelationships: the distribution
of lithofacies with best reservoir quality, and their stacking patterns with units offering resistance to
fracture propagation. This relationship does not exist across the entire play; however, in locations
where the relationship is favorable, economic production is possible. Understanding these drivers
of successful production is fundamental for the successful development of the gas shale plays
worldwide.
The drivers for unconventional gas shale production are lateral heterogeneity and the associated
variability in reservoir quality and completion quality. Fortunately, there is a method for
investigating this variability across the field, and using the information for efficient production.
Biography:

Roberto Suarez-Rivera is a Scientific Advisor and Head of the Innovation Center for TerraTek, A
Schlumberger company. He holds a PhD degrees in Rock Mechanics from the University of
California, Berkeley and has 25 years experience in the petroleum industry, including 7 years of
field service engineering with Dowell Schlumberger, 13 years of engineering consulting and
research with TerraTek/Schlumberger, and 5 years of research and engineering with the
Norwegian Institute of Rock Mechanics IKU, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr.
Suarez-Rivera has authored 300 reports and papers in mechanical property evaluations and on
analysis of geo-material mechanical behavior and has six patent solicitations on technologies for
enhancing shale gas production.




1
    The American Oil and Gas Report, Dec 2008
7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                               36
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                      Simultaneous Stimulation Of Multi-Well Pads using
                             Multi-Zone Stimulation Technology

                                           Randy C. Tolman
                                              ExxonMobil
Abstract:

ExxonMobil has developed novel reservoir stimulation technologies involving dynamic perforating
and annular coiled tubing fracturing that enable the rapid delivery of numerous high-quality
stimulation treatments within a single cased wellbore. These technologies were developed for the
purpose of improving, or enabling, economic hydrocarbon recovery from formations that contain
multiple stacked reservoir intervals or require the stimulation of long productive intervals. These
technologies: (1) enable the stimulation of multiple target zones via a single deployment of
downhole equipment; (2) enable selective placement of each stimulation treatment so that they
may be designed specifically for each individual zone to maximize well productivity; (3) provide
positive isolation between zones to ensure each zone is treated per design and previously treated
zones are not inadvertently damaged; (4) allow for treatments to be pumped at high flow rates to
facilitate efficient and effective stimulation; (5) Perform these operations simultaneously on wells to
achieve maximum equipment utilization. This presentation will describe the background leading to
the conception and development of these technologies, reveal lessons learned and refinements in
their deployment, and disclose information on field implementation and economic impact.

Take-away: Performing numerous stimulation treatments selectively, rapidly and in a cost-efficient
way is essential to the economic viability of exploiting thick and multi-layer low permeability
reservoirs.


Biography:

Randy C.Tolman is currently project coordinator for ExxonMobil's Piceance Development Project
located in western Colorado. As a native of the Rocky Mountains, he joined Exxon's Oklahoma
City District in 1982 with primary responsibilities for on site supervision of completion operations in
the Rockies. In 1985 he joined the start up team for Exxon's LaBarge Project as first line
supervisor. 1988-94 was spent in West Texas working secondary and CO2 flood oil recovery
operations. He subsequently returned to Exxon's LaBarge project in 1994 as Sr. Field Supt., and in
1999 began working with Exxon's Upstream Research Company, assisting in development of the
technology he will be presenting. He is listed as the Lead Inventor for 7 of the patents covering
Multi Zone Stimulation Technology. In 2001 he transferred to Houston, Texas to work full time on
tight gas sand development in ExxonMobil's Production Dept.




7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                            37
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                  Pressure Transient Analysis Using Well-Head Pressures

                                           Dr. Nathan Waldman
                                           Data Retrieval Corporation


Abstract:

Pressure Transient Analysis (PTA) is the most important tool available to the engineer trying to
characterize and manage the productivity of his reservoir. The PTA test has traditionally relied on
data from down-hole pressure gauges which are expensive to run, risk tool loss in the well bore,
and expose personnel to injury. Because of these factors, critical reservoir management decisions
are often made without adequate PTA testing.

Using surface pressures for PTA dramatically reduces costs, eliminates risk and allows frequent
testing. However, pressure transient testing presents several technical challenges in conversion of
surface pressures to reservoir conditions. This presentation discusses these challenges and
presents examples of Pressure Transient Analysis from simultaneously acquired surface and
down-hole pressures. The key idea to take away from this lecture is that it is possible to perform
non-intervention Pressure Transient Tests on most naturally unloading gas wells using surface
pressures.

Biography:

Nathan Waldman graduated from the University of Cincinnati with a degree in Chemical
Engineering. He received his Masters and Doctorate degrees in Polymer Physics at Virginia
Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Waldman joined Dow Chemical Company in 1967 and worked in
Research and International Business Development. Waldman left Dow in 1979 for the Presidency
of Cathodic Protection Services (CPS) in Houston, Texas. While at CPS, Dr. Waldman became
familiar with data acquisition procedures for Pressure Transient Analysis in oil and gas reservoirs.
He recognized that this critically important technique failed to take advantage of new computer
technologies that could improve the quality and efficiency of the service. Based on that
recognition, he founded Reservoir Dynamics to introduce the latest electronic technologies to
Pressure Transient Testing. Dr. Waldman then developed a process for non-intervention reservoir
testing and founded Data Retrieval Corporation to market that process which is the basis of this
Distinguished Lecturer presentation.




7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                          38
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



                     Preventive Wellbore Strengthening – LCM or Casing

                                             Hong (Max) Wang
                                           Halliburton Energy Services

Abstract:

Lost circulation is still hampering our drilling performance in many areas. However, from rock
mechanics analysis backed by improved field practice and success, in many cases lost circulation
has been effectively prevented by manipulating near wellbore stress concentration with specifically
formulated drilling fluids. In this lecture, members can learn about the basics of the new technology
- "preventive wellbore strengthening" in terms of data requirement, design process, pros and cons
of the technology, and how related issues are currently handled. It is anticipated that this lecture
will give members an understanding of when they should use the technology, how to benefit the
most from the technology, and how to fit it into their daily drilling work smoothly.

The lecture is to include the following:
1. Review of the wellbore strengthening mechanism studies
2. Review of the engineering design process
3. Demonstration of typical applications
4. Discussion of the scope of application and concerns
5. Review of data requirement
6. Explanation of how to increase benefit

Biography:

Dr. Hong (Max) Wang is a Global Technical Advisor on Wellbore Management with Baroid at
Halliburton. During his 20 years in the drilling industry, Max‟s experience has ranged from his early
days of checking mud and mixing cement at land and offshore rigsites to product development on
fluid solutions in the lab. In the last 7 years, Max has focused on rock mechanics. He has
conducted extensive studies on lost circulation prevention and control and wellbore
strengthening/stabilization by integrating rock mechanics into fluid mechanics and chemistry. His
current interests are on those new technologies that reduce visible and invisible non-productive
time, including wellbore pressure capacity, hole cleaning and rock fragmentation. Max holds a
number of US patents and he won the prestigious Hart‟s E&P Special Meritorious Award for
Engineering Innovation in 2004 on wellbore strengthening. He has authored/coauthored about 30
technical papers.

Max is a professional petroleum engineer licensed in Texas with a Ph.D. in petroleum engineering
from the University of Wyoming. He also has an MS degree in chemical engineering from South
China University of Technology.




7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                           39
                                 Society of Petroleum Engineers
                         Distinguished Lecturer 2010-11 Lecture Season



   The Determination Of Minimum Tested Volume And Future Well Production
           From The Deconvolution Of Well Test Pressure Transients

                                           Tim Whittle
                                             BG-Group


Abstract:

Much effort has been placed on developing increasingly complex models to describe increasingly
complex well and reservoir configurations. Regardless of the complexity of the system, pressure
transients remain quite simple in character and consequently, despite considerable expenditure of
time and effort, it may not be possible to obtain a unique analysis model from them.

The use of the derivative is now a standard technique in pressure transient analysis.
Deconvolution is a more recent method that, thanks to improvements in the algorithms, is
becoming accepted practice. The combination of these two powerful methods has significant
implications on how pressure transient data can be analyzed. Before attempting to find a plethora
of models that fit the observed data, there is much information that can be obtained from the data
directly.

The deconvolved pressure derivative is a representative signature of the well and reservoir
response over the period of pressure and rate measurements. It can be used to quickly and easily
calculate the minimum connected reservoir volume in place and furthermore, by simple
extrapolation, it allows a prediction of the well‟s future production.

Tested volumes and future well production can be estimated from pressure transient data without
building complex models.

Biography:

Tim Whittle is a Principal Consultant Reservoir Engineer at BG-Group in Reading, UK. He has a
Masters degree in Engineering Science from Cambridge University, England and has worked in
the oil industry for more than 25 years. Starting as a field engineer with Flopetrol Schlumberger, he
gained practical experience in well testing operations and then moved to an R&D role where he
was instrumental in developing the derivative analysis method with Dominique Bourdet. In 1985 he
joined Scientific Software-Intercomp as a reservoir engineer focusing on numerical simulation. In
1990 he spent several years with Norsk Hydro as a well test analysis specialist and then became
responsible for the development of SSI‟s well test analysis software product – Interpret. He has
written several papers on well test analysis and has given many industry courses on the subject
worldwide. He joined BG-Group at the beginning of 2007 and is the group‟s expert on well test
interpretation.




7cda3051-3a66-4e39-a954-e9860e68c665.doc                                                           40

				
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