Madison Beltline US 121418151, Project Report - Madison Beltline by yho59756

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									PROJECT REPORT

MADISON BELTLINE OPERATIONAL NEEDS ASSESSMENT
USH 12 From
USH 14 (University Ave) to CTH N
Dane County, Wisconsin
Wisconsin Department of Transportation, SW Region



Prepared for:




Wisconsin Department of Transportation
Southwest Region – Madison Office
2101 Wright Street
Madison, WI 53704



Prepared by:




Earth Tech, Inc.
1210 Fourier Drive, Suite 100
Madison, WI 53717
Phone: (608) 836-9800
Fax: (608) 836-9767


January 2008


Project No. 95251
WisDOT Project I.D. 5300-02-09
Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                                                                  January 2008


                          Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment 

                                           I.D. 5300-02-09 

                                                USH 12 

                               USH 14 (University Avenue) to CTH N 

                                            Dane County



Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 1

Project Background ........................................................................................................ 2

  Project Location............................................................................................................. 2

  Termini and Study Segments ........................................................................................ 3

Needs Assessment ......................................................................................................... 4

  Route Importance and System Linkage ........................................................................ 4

     National / Regional Importance.................................................................................. 4

     Local Importance ....................................................................................................... 7

  Crashes and Safety ....................................................................................................... 7

  Existing and Future Traffic Volume ............................................................................. 12

  Capacity and Level of Service ..................................................................................... 14

  Existing Highway Characteristics ................................................................................ 18

     Physical Conditions.................................................................................................. 18

     Horizontal Alignment................................................................................................ 18

     Vertical Alignment .................................................................................................... 19

     Vertical Clearance.................................................................................................... 21

     Cross Section........................................................................................................... 21

     Ramp Design ........................................................................................................... 21

     Other Geometric Conditions .................................................................................... 22

     Structural Conditions................................................................................................ 23

Summary........................................................................................................................ 24





EXHIBITS
Exhibit 1 – Existing Traffic Volumes
Exhibit 2 – 2015 Forecasted Traffic Volumes
Exhibit 3 – 2030 Forecasted Traffic Volumes
Exhibit 4-1 to 4-16 – Existing Transportation Detail

APPENDICES
(Bound Separately)

Appendix A – Data Inventory
Appendix B – Crash Analysis
Appendix C – Traffic Forecasting
Appendix D – Traffic Analysis
Appendix E – Geometric Deficiency Analysis
Appendix F – Structural Analysis
Appendix G – Travel Time Analysis




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Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment	                              January 2008



INTRODUCTION
The purpose of the project was to document existing conditions and identify needs for
the Madison Beltline (USH 12, 14, 18 & 151). The Madison Beltline was evaluated from
just north of the USH 12 & USH 14 (University Avenue) interchange in the City of
Middleton to the USH 12 / 18 & CTH N interchange in the Town of Cottage Grove.

The objectives of this study are to:

       •	 Identify existing and future safety and operational issues along the Beltline
       •	 Develop and prioritize short-term improvements to address areas with a
          sufficient level of need to provide a safe and efficient transportation corridor
          and extend the useful life of the Madison Beltline without adding capacity

The Madison Beltline has the following needs:

ƒ	 The Madison Beltline is a route of National, state and regional importance. Due
   to the importance of the route, the Madison Beltline is included in the National
   Highway System (NHS). The Madison Beltline is one of a very few United States
   locations where four US highways run concurrently on the same roadway (USH 12,
   14, 18 & 151). It is classified as a Wisconsin Corridors 2020 Backbone and
   Corridors 2020 Connector route, signifying its importance to through traffic and
   commodities transport. The Madison Beltline links the Interstate Highway (IH)
   system with the City of Madison, the capital of Wisconsin.

ƒ	 The Madison Beltline is a route of local importance. The Madison Beltline
   provides mobility for residents of the communities of the City of Madison, City of
   Middleton, City of Fitchburg, City of Monona, City of Verona, City of McFarland and
   other adjacent communities. The Madison Beltline is the only continuous east-west
   route in the project area and the only roadway providing east-west mobility south of
   Lake Monona. This lack of continuous parallel routes increase its important locally
   and is in part why it is so heavily used by for local traffic.

ƒ	 Crash rates are high on the Madison Beltline. Crashes on the Madison Beltline
   exceed the statewide average total crash rates in eight of the eighteen freeway
   segments and 43 of the 101 interchange areas studied. There are over 600 crashes
   a year on the Madison Beltline. There are more than 1.5 crashes per day within the
   project limits. In an average week, there are over 4 injury crashes within the project
   limits. There were 10 fatal crashes on the Madison Beltline between 2000 and 2004.
   The high crash rates in the project study area not only have the cost of property
   damage, injury and death, but also motorist delay as the crashes reduce the capacity
   of the roadway on a regular basis.

ƒ	 Existing and forecasted traffic volumes are high. The Wisconsin State Highway
   Plan notes that the Madison Beltline will have Severe to Extreme congestion levels if
   no capacity expansion occurs. The annual average daily traffic volumes on the
   Madison Beltline in 2005 range from 42,000 vehicles per day (vpd) on the west side
   to 115,000 vpd east of Verona Road. The daily traffic volumes are higher on
   weekdays and in the summer, peaking at over 135,000 vpd on Fridays in June (ATR
   east of South Towne Drive). Even without a capacity expansion, traffic volumes are


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   expected to increase more than 25% on the west side, approximately 15% in the
   central segment and over 100% east of IH 39/90. The Madison Area Metropolitan
   Planning Organization (MAMPO) travel demand model predicts drivers will increase
   their use of adjacent local and county streets as an alternative to the Madison
   Beltline congestion. The future traffic demand for the Madison Beltline cannot be
   served by the current facility.

ƒ	 Capacity and level of service are substandard. As a result of the high traffic
   volumes, the Madison Beltline cannot achieve an acceptable level of service during
   the AM and PM peak hours (7-9 AM, 4-6 PM). Congestion may spill into adjacent
   hours. The majority of the segments will operate at LOS “E” or LOS “F” in the design
   year 2030, this which is characterized by long backups and delay, causing driver
   frustration and forced vehicle maneuvers. Because all the segments of the corridor
   are interrelated, the worst capacity problems in the corridor will affect the entire
   corridor, producing stop and go traffic for the entire Madison Beltline by 2030. More
   and more traffic will likely divert to the local road system, resulting in increased safety
   problems and decreasing LOS there too.

ƒ	 Many of the features of the Madison Beltline do not meet current design
   standards. There are numerous substandard loop ramps, substandard horizontal
   curves and vertical curves at interchanges. There is a narrow unshielded median in
   some segments, increasing the possibility of cross-over head-on crashes. The
   vertical clearance of some bridge structures is below standard, raising the risk for
   vehicles striking the bridge. Several bridges are in need of bridge maintenance in
   the next 15 years.

PROJECT BACKGROUND

Project Location
The Madison Beltline (USH 12) evaluated in this document is located in south central
Wisconsin, in Dane County. The project begins just north of the USH 12 & USH 14
(University Avenue) interchange in the City of Middleton and extends approximately 20
miles to the USH 12 / 18 & CTH N interchange in the Town of Cottage Grove. Four
federal highway routes (USH 12, USH 14, USH 18, and USH 151) are partially routed on
the Beltline. All four routes are concurrent on the Madison Beltline between the Verona
Road and Park Street interchanges. Within the project limits, USH 12 passes through
the cities of Madison, Middleton, Fitchburg and Monona. Figure 1 shows a project
overview map.




WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                      2
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                                                Figure 1 – Project Overview Map




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Termini and Study Segments
The west project terminus is at the USH 12 & USH 14 (University Avenue) interchange.
The freeway west of the project terminus was newly constructed as the Middleton by­
pass in 2006. The east project terminus is at the USH 12 / 18 & CTH N interchange.
USH 14 runs concurrently with USH 12 from the University Avenue interchange to the
Park Street interchange. USH 18 runs concurrently with USH 12 from the Verona Road
interchange through the eastern terminus of the project. USH 151 runs concurrently with
USH 12 from the Verona Road interchange to the Park Street interchange. The corridor
includes 18 interchanges as well as several at-grade intersections in the segment east of
IH 39/90.

The Wisconsin State Highway Plan, adopted in February 2000 notes USH 12 as a
Corridors 2020 Backbone Route from Verona Road to IH 39 / 90 and a 2020 Connector
Route west of Verona Road and east of IH 39 / 90. The Wisconsin State Highway Plan
notes that the Madison Beltline will have Severe to Extreme congestion levels if no
capacity expansion occurs.

For analysis purposes, the study broke the project into three segments; west, central,
and east. The west segment begins at the USH 12 & USH 14 (University Avenue)
interchange and ends at the USH 12 & USH 18 / 151 (Verona Road) interchange. The
west segment is a four lane rural cross section freeway constructed in the early 1960’s.
The west segment is a Corridors 2020 Connector route. The central segment begins at
the USH 12 & USH 18 / 151 (Verona Road) interchange and ends at the USH 12 & IH
39 / 90 interchange. The central segment is a six lane urban cross section freeway
constructed in the 1970’s and mid 1980’s. The central segment is a Corridors 2020
Backbone route. The east segment begins at the USH 12 & IH 39 / 90 interchange and
ends at the USH 12 & CTH N interchange. The east segment is a four lane expressway
with at grade intersections constructed in the 1990’s. The east segment is a Corridors
2020 Connector route.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT

Route Importance and System Linkage
The Madison Beltline serves as a critical east-west route in south central Wisconsin.
There are four US highways that run concurrently on the Madison Beltline (USH 12, 14,
18 and 151), providing important connections for national, regional and local traffic. The
Madison metropolitan area depends on the Madison Beltline for regional mobility.

National / Regional Importance
The Madison Beltline is included in Wisconsin’s National Highway System under the
1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Act (See Figure 2). The National Highway
System supplements the national interstate system. It was developed to respond to
demographic and travel demand changes that have occurred in the last 40 years.
Highways in the national system serve major population centers, rural areas, ports,
airports, and international border crossings; meet national defense requirements and
serve interstate and inter-regional travel.




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Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                  January 2008


                          Figure 2 – National Highway System




                   Madison Beltline Project




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USH 12 is an east-west highway that runs from downtown Detroit almost 2500 miles to
the Pacific Ocean in Washington State. In the Midwest, it runs through Chicago,
Madison and Minneapolis. As a long distance national route, it has been largely
replaced by IH 90 and IH 94, but still provides important connections to cities from the
interstate highway system. In the Madison area, USH 12 connects to Baraboo, Sauk
City, Middleton, Cambridge and Fort Atkinson.

USH 14 is an east west route that runs from Chicago to the east entrance of Yellowstone
National Park. USH 14 is one of the original US highways established in 1926. In the
Madison area, it connects Mazomanie, Cross Plains, Fitchburg, and Oregon.

USH 18 is an east-west route that runs from downtown Milwaukee to Orin, Wyoming.
USH 18 is also one of the original US highways established in 1926. In the Madison
area, it follows the USH 151 route along Verona Road until it connects to the Madison
Beltline and then follows the USH 12 route through the eastern project limits.

USH 151 is a north-south route that runs through Iowa and Wisconsin, starting at IH 80
and going through Cedar Rapids, Dubuque, Madison, Fond Du Lac and terminating in
Manitowoc. The part of USH 151 from Madison to Fond Du Lac is one of the original US
highways established in 1926. In the Madison area, it connects Mt. Horeb, Verona,
Fitchburg, Sun Prairie and Columbus. Trucks going from the Fox Valley to Iowa on USH
151 use the Madison Beltline to go from IH 39/90 to the Verona Road (USH 151)
interchange.

In recognition of its statewide importance, the Wisconsin State Highway Plan lists the
Madison Beltline from the Verona Road Interchange to IH 39 / 90 as a Corridors 2020
                                                             Backbone       route,    the
                                                             highest classification for a
                                                             roadway. The Corridors
                                                             2020 Backbone routes
                                                             are key multi-lane routes
                                                             that     connect      major
                                                             population and economic
                                                             centers     and     provide
                                                             economic links to national
                                                             and            international
                                                             markets. The remainder
                                                             of the Madison Beltline is
                                                             classified as a Corridors
                                                             2020 Connector route.
                                                             The      Corridors     2020
      Madison Beltline
          Project
                                                             Connector routes are
                                                             highways that connect
                                                             key communities and
                                                             regional          economic
                                                             centers to the Corridors
                                                             2020 Backbone routes.
                                                             The 3,650 mile Corridors
                                                             2020 system is shown in
            Figure 3 – Corridors 2020 System                 Figure 3.

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Local Importance
In addition to serving as a major regional transportation link, the Madison Beltline serves
as a local transportation corridor for the communities it passes through. Because of the
nature of the geography and development surrounding the Madison Beltline The
Madison Beltline is the only continuous east-west route on the south side of Madison.
The east-west routes on the north side of the Madison Beltline are severed by the
University of Wisconsin Arboretum / Lake Wingra and Lake Monona. The east-west
routes on the south side of the Madison Beltline go through residential neighborhoods
and are not continuous. As a result, the Madison Beltline is critical to the mobility of
local traffic.

The Madison Beltline provides local access at 18 interchanges in the project area. The
interchanges are shown in Table 1 with the interchange crossroad functional class:

       Table 1 – Madison Beltline Interchanges / Crossroad Functional Class
              Interchange Crossroad         Functional Classification
              USH 14 / University Avenue    Principal Arterial
              Greenway Boulevard            Collector
              Old Sauk Road                 Minor Arterial
              Mineral Point Road            Principal Arterial
              Gammon Road                   Minor Arterial
              Whitney Way                   Minor Arterial
              USH 18 / 151 / Verona Road    Principal Arterial
              Seminole Highway              Minor Arterial
              Todd Drive                    Collector
              Fish Hatchery Road            Principal Arterial
              USH 14 / 151 / Park Street    Principal Arterial
              Rimrock Road                  Minor Arterial
              John Nolen Drive              Principal Arterial
              South Towne Drive             Minor Arterial
              Monona Drive                  Minor Arterial
              USH 51 / Stoughton Road       Principal Arterial
              IH 39 / 90                    Principal Arterial
              CTH N                         Minor Arterial

In the east segment of the project (east of IH 39 / 90), USH 12 has at grade intersections
at Mill Pond Road, CTH AB, Siggelkow Road / Femrite Drive, Rothammer Road, Vilas
Road and Field View Lane. CTH AB is classified as a major collector and all other roads
are classified as local roads.

To the extent that the route continues to be congested, safety, mobility and economic
development within each community will be adversely affected.

Crashes and Safety
The study evaluated crashes along the Madison Beltline for the five year period 2000
through 2004. We divided the route at interchange bridges and used GIS for crash
locations and statistics. The statewide average for similar facilities around the state of
Wisconsin is 107 crashes per hundred million vehicle miles traveled (HMVMT). Table 2
shows a summary of the number of crashes that occurred on the Madison Beltline from


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2000 through 2004. Figure 4 compares the crash rates for each segment to the
statewide crash averages for urban interstates.

                 Table 2 – Madison Beltline Crash Totals and Rates
                                                              Crash Rates
                                         Raw Crashes
 Madison Beltline Segment                                      (HMVMT) *
                                     Total INJ     FAT      Total   INJ + FAT
 University Ave to Greenway Blvd       50     14     0      112         31
 Greenway Blvd to Old Sauk Rd          67     28     0       70         29
 Old Sauk Blvd to Mineral Point Rd.    70     33     0       61         29
 Mineral Point Rd to Gammon Rd        182     85     0      156         73
 Gammon Rd to Whitney Way             201     80     1       99         40
 Whitney Way to Verona Rd             183     76     0       87         36
 Verona Rd to Seminole Hwy            336    122     0      349        127
 Seminole Hwy to Todd Dr              405    141     0      188         66
 Todd Dr to Fish Hatchery Rd          106     38     0       64         23
 Fish Hatchery Rd to Park St         350     114     2      246         82
 Park St to Rimrock Rd                215     76     1      118         42
 Rimrock Rd to John Nolen Dr          155     36     0      170         40
 John Nolen Dr to South Towne Dr       79     31     0       45         18
 South Towne Dr to Monona Dr          243     87     1       83         30
 Monona Dr to Stoughton Rd            201     79     1      124         49
 Stoughton Rd to IH 39 / 90            78     20     1       42         11
 IH 39 / 90 to CTH N                  125     48     3       92         37
 5 Year Totals                       3046 1108      10      N/A        N/A
 Average Annual Total                 609    222     2      N/A        N/A
* Crash Rates shown in bold are higher than the Wisconsin statewide average crash rate for urban interstates
(Total = 104 Crashes per HMVMT, INJ + FAT = 33 Crashes per HMVMT)


There are more than 1.5 crashes per day within the project limits. In an average week,
there are over 4 injury crashes within the project limits. These crashes not only damage
the lives and vehicles that are involved, but the general public in terms of additional
delays of incidents in an already congested corridor.

The highest crash rate in the project area is between the Verona Road and Seminole
Highway bridges, with a rate over three times the statewide average. The majority of the
crashes at this location are in the westbound direction. The typical section of the
Madison Beltline goes from a six lane freeway east of Verona Road to a four lane
freeway west of Verona Road. In the westbound direction, the outside lane drops into
the exit to Verona Road, coming to a signalized intersection at the end off the off-ramp.
In the peak hours, this interchange ramp terminal regularly backs up to the freeway
lanes and causes additional congestion on the freeway. A high percentage of the
westbound crashes occur in the peak hours, when these queues are present. The
westbound queues from Verona Road extend east past Seminole Highway and are likely
responsible for the high crash rate in the segment from Seminole Highway to Todd Drive
(the third highest crash rate location).




WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                                    8
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                   Figure 4 – Comparison of Madison Beltline Crash Rates to Wisconsin Statewide Average




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The second highest crash rate in the project area is between the Fish Hatchery Road
and Park Street bridges, with a rate over double the statewide average. These two
interchanges include loop ramps, with weaving sections between the loops in the
eastbound direction. In the weaving segments, vehicles entering the freeway must
accelerate to get to freeway speed while exiting vehicles are decelerating to ramp
speeds in a short distance. These speed differentials are likely the cause of the
increased crash rates and injuries at this location.

The third highest crash rate (Seminole Highway to Todd Drive) is discussed in the
segment above from Verona Road to Seminole Highway. The fourth highest crash rate
in the project area is between the Rimrock Road and John Nolen Drive interchange
bridges. The Rimrock Road and John Nolen Drive interchanges are very close to one
another, with an auxiliary lane weaving section between them. In addition, the
eastbound off-ramp to John Nolen Drive is a loop with a low design speed, causing
vehicles to slow in the auxiliary lane to exit. The close proximity of the two interchanges,
with a weaving section between them is the likely cause for the high crash rate at this
location.

The remaining locations with high crash rates are between Mineral Point Road and
Gammon Road, Monona Drive to Stoughton Road, Park Street to Rimrock Road and
University Avenue to Greenway Boulevard. These locations have similar issues to the
more severe locations above, but to a lesser extent. The primary reasons for the crash
problems on the Madison Beltline are ramp terminals backing up to the freeway, close
interchange spacing, inadequate weaving distances and substandard geometry.

We also performed A more detailed crash analysis at each interchange in the project
area was also performed. For each interchange, the crashes were categorized into each
merge, diverge and ramp terminal influence area. We started with the GIS crash data
used in the segment crash analysis was then separated by individual crashes into each
influence area. Where there was doubt about the exact location of the crash, the
detailed police report was checked for additional information. Of the 3046 crashes from
2000 to 2004, 2941 of them occurred in interchange influence areas. The interchange
merge and diverge influence areas was defined as 1500 feet upstream and downstream
of a ramp gore. The ramp terminal influence areas include most of the off-ramp and
crashes on the adjacent street to approximately halfway to adjacent intersections. In
total, over 560 police reports (about 20%) were checked to make sure the crash
categorization is accurate. Appendix B shows the results for each interchange influence
area. Included in the results is a comparison to the crash data from the Backbone
Interchange Needs and Improvement Study, which used a similar categorization
methodology for interchanges around the state.

Of the 101 interchange influence areas in the project limits, 43 locations exceed the
average crash rate established in the Backbone Interchange Needs and Improvement
Study. A comparison of the Madison Beltline Crash rates and the Backbone Interchange
project crash rates are shown in Table 3.

Eighteen locations exceeded the average crash rate by more than one standard
deviation, indicating more severe problems. The eighteen most severe locations, in
order from most severe, are shown in Table 4:



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               Table 3 – Comparison of Interchange Crash Statistics
                          Backbone Interchange Statistics
                          Crash Rate                             Crash Severity
              Diverge    Merge    Weave    Terminal   Diverge    Merge   Weave    Terminal

 Average        63        83       402       0.63      0.34      0.32    0.32      0.33

 Average
               107       152       432       1.04      0.48      0.52    0.34      0.43
  + 1 SD
                               Beltline Interchange Statistics

 Average        90        67       402       0.62      0.39      0.37    0.32      0.37



                Table 4 – Most Severe Interchange Crash Rate Area
 Merge / Diverge Influence Areas
                                                                         Crash Rate
 Rank     Location
                                                                          (HMVMT)
   1     Fish Hatchery Road Eastbound Weave                                 432
   2     Park Street Eastbound Weave                                        371
   3     Todd Drive Eastbound Diverge                                       275
   4     University Avenue Eastbound Merge                                  231
   5     Fish Hatchery Road Eastbound Merge                                 215
   6     Verona Road Westbound Diverge                                      195
   7     Park Street Westbound Merge                                        175
   8     John Nolen Drive Eastbound Diverge                                 169
   9     Seminole Highway Eastbound Merge                                   165
  10     Verona Road Eastbound Diverge                                      146
  11     Whitney Way Eastbound Diverge                                      136
  12     Gammon Road Westbound Diverge                                      132
  13     Gammon Road Eastbound Diverge                                      126
  14     Seminole Highway Westbound Diverge                                 123
  15     Todd Drive Westbound Diverge                                       121
  16     CTH N Eastbound Diverge                                            118
 Ramp Terminal Intersection Influence Areas
                                                                         Crash Rate
 Rank     Location
                                                                           (MEV)
   1      Todd Drive Eastbound Ramp Terminal                                1.93
   2      University Avenue Westbound Ramp Terminal                         1.84


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Eleven of the sixteen most severe merge / diverge areas occur in the eastbound
direction. The worst locations are the eastbound weaving segments between the loop
ramps at the Fish Hatchery Road and Park Street interchanges. There is also more
congestion in the eastbound direction during the day than the westbound direction,
particularly in the PM peak hour. The high crash rates at the most severe merge /
diverge areas can be attributed to close interchange spacing, ramp terminal queues
extending back to the freeway, and poor geometry. In 2006, WisDOT constructed an
eastbound auxiliary lane between Seminole Highway and Todd Drive, which should
improve the eastbound Seminole Highway merge (#9) and the eastbound Todd Drive
diverge (#3). The auxiliary lane improvement provides more distance for merging and
diverging traffic to safely make their maneuvers.

Existing and Future Traffic Volume
The Wisconsin Department of Transportation collected the existing roadway traffic
volumes in 2002, 2005 and 2006 as part of the coverage count program. We
supplemented the coverage count data with turning movement counts at the interchange
ramp terminals and adjacent intersections.

For the forecasted traffic volumes, the Madison Area Metropolitan Planning Agency’s
(MAMPO) travel demand model was used. The travel demand model was updated to
reflect development that occurred between 2000 and 2005. Forecasts were prepared for
the short term design year of 2015 and the ultimate design year of 2030. Local units of
government were met with to obtain their latest land use projections for 2015 to update
the travel demand model. The approved 2030 land use plan directly from the MAMPO
model for the 2030 forecasts were used. The MAMPO travel demand model is for daily
traffic, so sub-area models of the project corridor were developed to forecast AM and
PM peak hour volumes. The sub area models were calibrated against 2005 traffic counts
to ensure the model was accurately representing current peak hour conditions.

The MAMPO travel demand model predicts future traffic for an average day, including
weekends. Since the Madison Beltline is a commuter route, the highest traffic volumes
are on weekdays. The typical weekday (Monday to Friday) traffic on the Madison
Beltline is approximately 7% higher than the average day (Sunday to Saturday) and 36%
higher than an average weekend day. The traffic forecasts are based on a capacity
constrained model. The MAMPO travel demand model included only existing lanes plus
committed construction projects for each forecast year. The traffic forecasts do not
represent the true demand for the Madison Beltline due to a growing number of drivers
that will take alternate routes because of congestion on the freeway. Figure 5 illustrates
the historical traffic growth and future traffic forecast for the Madison Beltline segment
between South Towne Drive and Monona Drive. Existing and forecasted average daily
traffic (ADT) for various sections of the Madison Beltline are shown in Table 5.




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               Figure 5 – Historical Traffic Growth and Future Traffic Forecast
                                        Madison Beltline AADT (EB & WB)

                            Automatic Traffic Recorder East of South Towne Interchange



            140000
                                Historical Counts            Traffic Forecast
                                                                                               128300
                                                                        121500
            120000
                                                    111300


            100000



             80000
     AADT




             60000   57500




             40000



             20000



                0
                     1990       1995      2000      2005      2010       2015    2020   2025    2030
                                                              Year




                   Table 5 – Madison Beltline Existing and Forecasted ADT
                                                    Existing    2015      2030
            Madison Beltline Segment
                                                     ADT        ADT       ADT
            West of University Avenue               26,600     36,100    45,800
            University Ave to Greenway Blvd         42,500     61,300    68,500
            Greenway Blvd to Old Sauk Rd            51,600     68,500    74,300
            Old Sauk Blvd to Mineral Point Rd.      58,200     70,800    75,800
            Mineral Point Rd to Gammon Rd           54,500     70,100    75,100
            Gammon Rd to Whitney Way                69,400     79,200    82,100
            Whitney Way to Verona Rd                85,900     95,600    96,300
            Verona Rd to Seminole Hwy              108,000    124,300   129,400
            Seminole Hwy to Todd Dr                115,000    133,200   138,500
            Todd Dr to Fish Hatchery Rd            111,000    124,400   128,300
            Fish Hatchery Rd to Park St            113,000    129,600   134,200
            Park St to Rimrock Rd                   91,900    121,000   125,100
            Rimrock Rd to John Nolen Dr            105,000    114,200   119,200
            John Nolen Dr to South Towne Dr        114,000    136,400   144,800
            South Towne Dr to Monona Dr            111,000    121,500   128,300
            Monona Dr to Stoughton Rd               99,900    106,100   114,400
            Stoughton Rd to IH 39 / 90              72,700     74,000    75,900
            IH 39 / 90 to CTH N                     15,000     25,800    39,500


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The highest existing daily traffic volume on the Madison Beltline is between Seminole
Highway and Todd Drive. In 2030, the segment between John Nolen Drive and South
Towne Drive is expected to have the highest traffic volumes. The segment between
John Nolen Drive and South Town Drive is expected to be the highest traffic volume
segment because it is the only route to go from the west side to the east side of Lake
Monona without going through the downtown Madison isthmus. Traffic volumes
increase at the highest rate at the ends of the corridor, indicating substantial expected
growth in development of unimproved land at both ends of the Madison Beltline.

The peak hour traffic volumes and forecasts represent the 100th highest hour on the
freeway and typical AM and PM volumes at the ramp terminal and side road
intersections. In general, the AM peak hour freeway volumes represent the 100th
highest hour in the westbound direction and the PM peak hour freeway volumes
represent the 100th highest hour in the eastbound direction. The study used the peak
hour volumes for the capacity and level of service analysis

The AM and PM peak hour forecasts are shown in Exhibits 1, 2 and 3.

Capacity and Level of Service
The study conducted capacity analysis to determine existing (2005) and design year
(2015 and 2030) level of service (LOS) for various sections of the Madison Beltline.
Roadway LOS is a measure of a highway’s response to the traffic demands placed on it.
Table 6 summarizes each LOS characteristic. Traffic factors such as peak hour
volumes, truck percentages, posted speed limits, number of driving lanes, lane widths
and interchange density affect the LOS. Levels range from “A” to “F” in order of
decreasing quality, similar to report card grades. Levels “A”, “B” and “C” are desirable,
Level “D” is acceptable and Levels “E” and “F” are considered poor.




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Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                                            January 2008


                             Table 6 – Level of Service Characteristics
               LOS A
                                     Unrestricted free flow
                                     Drivers virtually unaffected by others
                                     High level of freedom to select speed and maneuver
                                     Excellent level of driver comfort and convenience

               LOS B
                                     Slightly restricted stable flow
                                     Drivers aware of use by others
                                     Slight restriction in speed and maneuvering
                                     Good level of driver comfort and convenience

               LOS C
                                     Moderately restricted stable flow
                                     Driver operation significantly affected by others
                                     Moderate restriction in speed and maneuvering
                                     Fair level of comfort and convenience

               LOS D
                                     Heavily restricted flow
                                     Driver operation completely affected by others
                                     Severe restriction in speed and maneuvering
                                     Poor level of driver comfort and convenience

               LOS E
                                     Unstable flow (approach flow > discharge flow)
                                     Slow speeds and traffic backups; some stoppage
                                     Total restriction in vehicle maneuvering
                                     High driver frustration

               LOS F
                                     Forced flow (approach flow > discharge flow)
                                     Stop and go movements with long backups and delay
                                     Forced vehicle maneuvers
                                     Maximum driver frustration

Source: Highway Capacity Manual


The results, summarized in Table 7, indicate that as traffic increases, the level of service
will continue to deteriorate to unacceptable levels if no improvements are made. The
majority of segments will operate at LOS “E” or LOS “F”, which is characterized by
slower travel speeds and stop-and-go operations resulting in long backups and delay
causing driver frustration and forced vehicle maneuvers. Note the freeway level of
service results are from an unconstrained traffic model, meaning the ramp terminal and
side road intersections do not have a significant effect on the results. In reality, the ramp
terminal intersections will spill back to the freeway, causing nearly the entire Madison
Beltline to operate at LOS “F”. It is likely the both directions of the Madison Beltline will
operate at LOS “F” between Verona Road and Stoughton Road in the 2030 design year.




WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                             15
ET ID 95251
Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                                   January 2008


                 Table 7 – Existing and Forecasted Level of Service
                                       Existing LOS   2015 LOS                  2030 LOS
 Madison Beltline Segment
                                        EB      WB    EB      WB                EB    WB
 West of University Avenue             B (A) A (B) B (A) A (B)                 B (A) A (C)
 University Ave to Greenway Blvd       B (A) A (B) C (B) A (B)                 C (B) B (C)
 Greenway Blvd to Old Sauk Rd          C (C) C (D) D (D) C (D)                 D (D) D (D)
 Old Sauk Blvd to Mineral Point Rd.    C (D) D (D) D (E) D (D)                 F (E) D (D)
 Mineral Point Rd to Gammon Rd         C (D) D (C) E (E) D (D)                 E (E) E (D)
 Gammon Rd to Whitney Way              D (D) D (D) E (E) D (E)                 E (E) E (E)
 Whitney Way to Verona Rd              C (D) D (D) D (D) D (D)                 E (E) D (D)
 Verona Rd to Seminole Hwy             D (D) F (F) D (E) F (F)                 E (E) F (F)
 Seminole Hwy to Todd Dr               D (D) E (F) D (D) E (F)                 E (D) E (F)
 Todd Dr to Fish Hatchery Rd           D (D) D (D) D (D) D (D)                 E (D) D (D)
 Fish Hatchery Rd to Park St           D (D) E (C) D (E) E (C)                 E (E) E (C)
 Park St to Rimrock Rd                 E (F) D (D) F (F) D (E)                 F (F) D (E)
 Rimrock Rd to John Nolen Dr           C (D) D (C) D (D) D (D)                 D (E) D (D)
 John Nolen Dr to South Towne Dr       C (D) D (C) C (E) D (C)                 D (E) D (D)
 South Towne Dr to Monona Dr           D (E) E (D) D (F) E (D)                 D (F) E (D)
 Monona Dr to Stoughton Rd             C (E) D (C) C (E) F (C)                 C (E) F (C)
 Stoughton Rd to IH 39 / 90            C (D) C (B) C (D) C (B)                 C (D) C (C)
 IH 39 / 90 to CTH N                   A (A) B (A) B (B) C (A)                 B (B) C (B)
Legend: AM LOS (PM LOS) – Yellow is LOS D, Orange is LOS E and Red is LOS F.

Under these conditions, it is likely that a significant volume of traffic will divert to local
city, town and county routes, placing additional traffic demands on routes not intended to
function as regional and statewide travel routes. The Madison Beltline corridor will not
operate efficiently and it is likely the crash frequency will increase if no improvements
are made to the existing roadway.

As a corridors 2020 Backbone and Connector Route, the WisDOT Facilities
Development Manual (FDM) recommends designers should design for LOS “C” on the
Madison Beltline. The FDM lists the upper traffic limit for an arterial at 90,000 vpd, a
threshold exceeded from Whitney Way to Stoughton Road in the 2030 design year.
Many of the segments exceed 120,000 vpd.

The study also measured travel times on the Madison Beltline from University Avenue to
Stoughton Road in 2006. The study measured westbound travel times in the AM peak
and eastbound travel times in the PM peak. The study measured travel times on a
variety of days and conditions. On days the study classified as “No Incidents”, the travel
time was just over 14 minutes in the AM peak westbound and 14.5 minutes in the PM
peak eastbound. If there was a crash or disabled vehicle, the travel times increased by
more than 2 minutes. On days with heavy volume, the travels times rose to over 23
minutes in the PM peak eastbound. The longest travel time was 1 hour, 9 minutes,
logged during a snow event in the PM peak. The wide variability in travel times indicates
the facility has reached its capacity in the peak hours. To illustrate the variability in
travels speeds and times, Figure 6 compares the speeds of each section in the “No
Incident” condition to when there was a disabled vehicle. Even the smallest disruptions,
like a disabled vehicle on the shoulder have a significant effect on the travel speeds and
reliability of the travel times on the Madison Beltline.



WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                     16
ET ID 95251
Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                                                             January 2008


                                           Figure 6 – Travel Speed Comparison

                                Mainline Speed for WB Beltline Traffic During AM Peak With No Incidents

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WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                                              17
ET ID 95251
Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                               January 2008


Existing Highway Characteristics
The analysis and evaluation of existing conditions serves a number of objectives. First,
it identifies the extent of substandard freeway elements that are a result of revised
policies or design standards. Second, it highlights the area where operational problems
and crash frequency may be prevalent, and it provides the opportunity to determine
whether the problems are attributable to geometric design. Third, it identifies features of
the freeway system that currently meet only basic or minimum design standards, which if
incorporated into the overall rehabilitation or short-term “fix,” could be improved to full
standard at marginal additional cost.

The evaluation of existing Madison Beltline infrastructure is based on the latest update of
the WisDOT Facilities Development Manual (FDM). The 2001 AASHTO Policy on
Geometric Design of Highways and Streets (GDHS) was used when referenced by the
FDM or when topics were not addressed in the FDM.

Most of the Madison Beltline was designed using FDM standards that evolved from 1984
or earlier AASHTO policies. Over the past few decades, design policies and guidelines
have been revised in response to highway safety research, economics, and changes in
vehicle characteristics. The 2001 AASHTO Policy, coupled with recent revisions to the
FDM, reflect many changes in geometric design standards.

The existing highway characteristics analysis breaks the Beltline into various sections
and describes, by feature, the physical conditions, geometric conditions, crash
experiences, and service levels as “Good,” Acceptable,” or “Poor.” The methodology,
definitions, rating thresholds and comprehensive results are shown in Appendix E. The
results are summarized in Exhibit 4.

The study   evaluated the following categories for the existing highway characteristics
analysis:
       •    Physical Conditions
       •    Horizontal Alignment
       •    Vertical Alignment
       •    Vertical Clearance
       •    Cross Section
       •    Ramp Design
       •    Other Geometric Conditions
       •    Structural Conditions

Physical Conditions
Physical condition of the Madison South Beltline infrastructure is generally “good” to
“acceptable”.    Pavement condition is generally “acceptable”, reflecting good
maintenance practices. However, the underlying concrete pavement structure for the
west end is approximately 50 years old, which is beyond the life span of this pavement
type.

Horizontal Alignment
The mainline roadways demonstrate good horizontal geometry throughout the corridor
except for two curves with excessive superelevation and one spot location where the
centerline includes an inflection angle greater than that allowed for freeways. The two
locations with excessive superelevation are located between just east of Mineral Point

WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                  18
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Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                             January 2008


Road and west of Seminole Highway. The inflection angle higher than standards is
located west of Rimrock Road

In general, about half of the ramps include horizontal curves with substandard radii for
the expected vehicle design speeds and current standard for 6% maximum
superelevation. Ramps with radii that produce a design speed of 25 mph include:
Whitney Way eastbound off-ramp, Whitney Way westbound off ramp, and Park Street
eastbound on-ramp. Generally, most of the remaining ramp curves had excessive or
insufficient amount of superelevation.

The available horizontal stopping sight distance did not meet current standards at the
following ramps:
        Whitney Way westbound off-ramp,
        John Nolen Drive eastbound off-ramp,
        John Nolen eastbound on-ramp,
        IH90 northbound to eastbound on-ramp,
        IH90 eastbound to southbound off-ramp,
        IH90 northbound to westbound on-ramp.

Vertical Alignment
The mainline roadways currently meet standards for vertical geometry, with some
exceptions. Those exceptions includes areas where continuous grades were less than
0.3% grade.

For the eastbound lanes, these areas are:
       Just west of Mineral Point Road,
       Just west of Todd Drive,
       From Rimrock Road to John Nolen Drive.

For the westbound lanes, these areas are:
       Just west of Todd Drive,
       From Rimrock Road to John Nolen Drive,
       West of Monona Drive.

Where the eastbound and westbound lanes share the same profile, these areas are:
      East of IH90,
      From the IH90 interchance to County AB,
      Near Vilas Road.

There are 14 vertical curves where the K-value for sag curves does not meet the 60 mph
design speed criteria.

For eastbound lanes, the VPI of these curves are:
       Just east of Verona Road,
       East of Fish Hatchery Road,
       West of Park Street
       East of Stoughton Road,
       East of IH90.

For the westbound lanes, the VPI of these curves are:
       west of Greenway Boulevard,

WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                               19
ET ID 95251
Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                           January 2008


       Just west of Todd Drive,

       Just west of Fish Hatchery Road, 

       There are two west of Park Street, 



Where the eastbound and westbound lanes share the same profile, the VPI of these
curves are:
       Just west of Greenway Boulevard,
       West of IH90

Vertical alignments for ramps were split between a “good” rating and “poor” or
“acceptable” rating. Poor ratings involve ramp areas where continuous grades were less
than 0.3% grade and some ramp segments where K-value for sag curves, and in rare
cases for crest curves, do not meet the minimum criteria for the expected design
speeds.

Ramps rated poor for continuous grade of less than 0.3% include:
     Greenway Boulevard westbound off-ramp,
     Gammon Road eastbound off-ramp,
     Whitney Way westbound off-ramp,
     Todd Drive westbound off-ramp,
     Fish Hatchery Drive eastbound on-ramp,
     Fish Hatchery Drive westbound on-ramp,
     Park Street eastbound off-ramp,
     Park Street eastbound on-ramp,
     Park Street westbound off-ramp,
     Park Street westbound on-ramp,
     John Nolen Drive eastbound off-ramp,
     Monona Drive westbound on-ramp,
     USH 51 westbound on-ramp,
     IH90 westbound to southbound off-ramp,
     IH90 eastbound to southbound off-ramp,
     IH90 northbound to westbound on-ramp,
     IH90 southbound to westbound on-ramp.

Ramps rated poor for K-value:
     Greenway Boulevard eastbound on-ramp,
     Mineral Point Road westbound off-ramp,
     Mineral Point Road eastbound off-ramp,
     Gammon Road eastbound off-ramp,
     Gammon Road westbound off-ramp,
     Gammon Road westbound on-ramp,
     Seminole Highway westbound off-ramp,
     Park Street westbound off-ramp,
     Rimrock Road eastbound off-ramp,
     Rimrock Road eastbound on-ramp,
     Rimrock Road westbound off-ramp,
     Rimrock Road westbound on-ramp,
     John Nolen Drive eastbound off-ramp,
     John Nolen Drive westbound on-ramp,
     South Towne Drive eastbound on-ramp,

WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                             20
ET ID 95251
Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                             January 2008


       Monona Drive westbound on-ramp, 

       Monona Drive westbound off-ramp, 

       USH 51 westbound on-ramp, 

       USH 51 westbound off-ramp, 

       USH 51 eastbound on-ramp, 

       IH90 northbound to westbound on-ramp. 


Vertical Clearance

Structures over or under mainline were split between “good”, “acceptable” and “poor” 

ratings. Three bridges over the Beltline, located at High Point Road, Seminole Highway,

and Fish Hatchery Road, include substandard vertical clearances. Bridges carrying 

Beltline traffic were too low over Mineral Point Road, Whitney Way, Verona Road, Todd 

Drive, Park Street, South Towne Drive, and CTH N. 


Cross Section
The mainline roadways demonstrate good cross sectional features throughout the
corridor except for an area east of USH 51 where median shoulders are 8.5 ft wide, vs.
the 10-ft standard for a 6 and 8-lane freeway. The west part of the project, between
Gammon Road and Fish Hatchery Road has substantial area where the median is less
than 60 ft median, with no barrier protection. Combined, this gives a “poor” rating for
about half of the project.

The ramps generally include good cross sectional features whenever rural cross
sections were used. However, there are substantial ramp segments where urban
sections with non-mountable, 6-inch curbs were used in combination with expected
travel speeds in excess of 40 mph. In other areas, barriers are used with no shoulders.
This produced a “poor” rating for most ramp urban sections, except those sections at the
immediate cross road intersection.

Ramp Design
Ramps were split equally under the three ratings for ramp lengths and ramp designs at
the mainline junction. Poor ratings were found for about one-third of ramps due to ramp
length since they provided insufficient distances for deceleration.

These ramps are:
       Mineral Point eastbound off-ramp,
       Gammon Road westbound off-ramp,
       Gammon Road eastbound off-ramp,
       Fish Hatchery Drive eastbound off-ramp,
       Park Street eastbound off-ramp,
       IH90 southbound to westbound off-ramp,
       IH90 northbound to eastbound off-ramp,
       IH90 northbound to westbound off-ramp,
       IH90 southbound to eastbound off-ramp.

Some ramps were rated “poor” because they were left-side entrance or exit.

These ramps are:
       IH90 northbound to westbound off-ramp,
       IH90 northbound to westbound on-ramp,

WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                               21
ET ID 95251
Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                              January 2008


       IH90 eastbound to northbound off-ramp.

Many ramps were rated only “acceptable” since their ramp taper style do not conform to
current design criteria.

When this ramp design is combined with horizontal geometry, vertical geometry and
cross sectional features, there are only a few remaining ramp segments which could be
rated “good” or acceptable”.

Other Geometric Conditions

We evaluated several other geometric conditions such as route continuity, lane balance, 

freeway guide signing and interchange spacing. 


For the USH routes that follow the Madison Beltline, USH 12 has good route continuity,
but the other routes (USH 14, USH 18 and USH 151) have poor route continuity. Good
route continuity is desirable because it simplifies the driving task by reducing lane
changing, simplifying signing, and delineating the through lanes. USH 12 has good
route continuity because all through lanes in the corridor are dedicated to USH 12. USH
14 has poor route continuity because the eastbound driver is expected to turn off the
mainline onto a diamond interchange to continue to his destination on USH 14. Later on,
the driver turns off the freeway on an outer ramp to continue his eastbound trip. The
complimentary moves are similar for the westbound USH 14 drivers. USH 18 has poor
route continuity because drivers must turn off the mainline roadway and then drive
through a signalized intersection at the Verona Drive interchange if they desire to
continue on USH 18. USH 151 has poor route continuity for similar reasons as USH 14
and USH 18.

There is a lane balance deficiency in the westbound direction at the Verona Road
interchange. The outside lane of the three westbound lanes drops into an exit only to
Verona Road. To have acceptable lane balance, the outside lane would need to be
extended through the interchange and then dropped.

The freeway guide signing on the Madison Beltline in mostly acceptable, with a few poor
locations. The signing deficiencies are caused by inconsistent messages on the freeway
guide signs. For instance, the “Fitchburg Exits” signs show the county highway
designation for the interchanges while all of the other signs use the local street names.
The signs for the Verona Road and IH 39 / 90 interchanges have distances rounded to
1/3 of a mile instead of the ¼ mile as specified in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control
Devices (MUTCD).

In an urban area, the acceptable minimum for interchange spacing is one mile or more.
There are many segments of the Madison Beltline that do not meet acceptable
interchange spacing criteria. In general, areas that do not have adequate interchange
spacing experience higher levels of congestion and experience higher crash rates.
Table 8 summarizes the areas with substandard interchange spacing.




WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                22
ET ID 95251
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                    Table 8 – Substandard Interchange Spacing
 Madison Beltline Segment                              Interchange Spacing
 University Avenue to Greenway Boulevard                     0.50 miles
 Verona Road to Seminole Highway                             0.50 miles
 Todd Drive to Fish Hatchery Road                            0.80 miles
 Fish Hatchery Road to Park Street                           0.65 miles
 Park Street to Rimrock Road                                 0.60 miles
 Rimrock Road to John Nolen Drive                            0.45 miles
 John Nolen Drive to South Towne Drive                       0.80 miles
 Monona Drive to Stoughton Road                              0.85 miles
 NOTE: Distances measures from bridge to bridge

Structural Conditions
Condition of bridges is generally “good”, reflecting good maintenance practices. We
evaluated the bridge inspection records and as-built plans for each bridge on the
Madison Beltline to determine the condition and future maintenance needs. Our
analysis determined there are five bridges in need of maintenance before 2025. The
bridge maintenance needs are shown in Table 9. Details of the structural analysis are in
Appendix F.

                        Table 9 – Structural Maintenance Needs
 Bridge No.    Roadway Over               Maintenance Need Comment
               Roadway Under
               EB Beltline                Deck Replacement Bottom of deck in poor
 B130016
               Park Street                                   condition
               WB Beltline                Deck Replacement Deck replacement
 B130191
               Park Street                                   based on twin
               Seminole Highway           Deck Replacement Top and bottom of
 B130264
               Beltline                                      deck in poor condition
               High Point Road            Deck Replacement Bottom of deck in poor
 B130223
               Beltline                   and Widen          condition
               Whenona Dr. Ped Bridge Deck Replacement Bottom of deck in poor
 B130305
               Beltline                   and Widen          condition




WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                23
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Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                                January 2008



SUMMARY
The operational needs assessment was an extensive research effort based on local and
expert input, future land use analysis and projected traffic volumes. The following
transportation characteristics and needs have been identified in the Madison Beltline
corridor.

The Madison Beltline is a route of National, state and regional importance. Due to the
importance of the route, the Madison Beltline are included in the National Highway
System (NHS). The Madison Beltline is one of the very rare locations where four US
highways run concurrently on the same roadway (USH 12, 14, 18 & 151). It is classified
as a Wisconsin Corridors 2020 Backbone and Corridors 2020 Connector route,
signifying its importance to regional through traffic and commodities transport. The
Madison Beltline links the Interstate Highway (IH) system with the City of Madison, the
capital of Wisconsin.

The Madison Beltline is a route of local importance. The Madison Beltline provides
mobility for residents of the communities of the City of Madison, City of Middleton, City of
Fitchburg, City of Monona, City of Verona, City of McFarland and other adjacent
communities. The Madison Beltline is the only continuous east-west route in the project
area and the only roadway providing east-west mobility south of Lake Monona. There
are no continuous parallel routes to the Madison Beltline, making it a vital, and heavily
used corridor for local traffic.

Crash rates are high on the Madison Beltline. Crashes on the Madison Beltline exceed
the statewide average total crash rates in eight of the eighteen freeway segments and
43 of the 101 interchange areas studied. There are over 600 crashes a year on the
Madison Beltline. There are more than 1.5 crashes per day within the project limits. In
an average week, there are over 4 injury crashes within the project limits. There were
10 fatal crashes on the Madison Beltline between 2000 and 2004. The high crash rates
in the project study area not only have the cost of property damage, injury and death, but
also motorist delay as the crashes reduce the capacity of the roadway on a regular
basis.

Existing and forecasted traffic volumes are high. The Wisconsin State Highway Plan
notes that the Madison Beltline will have Severe to Extreme congestion levels if no
capacity expansion occurs. The annual average daily traffic volumes on the Madison
Beltline in 2005 range from 42,000 vehicles per day (vpd) on the west side to 115,000
vpd east of Verona Road. The daily traffic volumes are higher on weekdays and in the
summer, peaking at over 135,000 vpd on Fridays in June (ATR east of South Towne
Drive). Even without a capacity expansion, traffic volumes are expected to increase
more than 25% on the west side, approximately 15% in the central segment and over
100% east of IH 39/90. The Madison Area Metropolitan Planning Organization
(MAMPO) travel demand model predicts drivers will increase their use of adjacent local
and county streets as an alternative to the Madison Beltline congestion. The future
traffic demand for the Madison Beltline cannot be served by the current facility.


Capacity and level of service are substandard. As a result of the high traffic volumes,
the Madison Beltline cannot achieve an acceptable level of service during the AM and


WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                   24
ET ID 95251
Madison Beltline Operational Needs Assessment                                January 2008


PM peak hours (7-9 AM, 4-6 PM). Congestion may spill into adjacent hours. The
majority of the segments will operate at LOS “E” or LOS “F” in the design year 2030, this
which is characterized by long backups and delay, causing driver frustration and forced
vehicle maneuvers. Because all the segments of the corridor are interrelated, the worst
capacity problems in the corridor will affect the entire corridor, producing stop and go
traffic for the entire Madison Beltline by 2030. More and more traffic will likely divert to
the local road system, resulting in increased safety problems and decreasing LOS there
too.

Many of the features of the Madison Beltline do not meet current design standards.
There are numerous substandard loop ramps, substandard horizontal curves and
vertical curves at interchanges. There is a narrow unshielded median in some
segments, increasing the possibility of cross-over head-on crashes. The vertical
clearance of some bridge structures is below standard, raising the risk for vehicles
striking the bridge. Several bridges are in need of bridge maintenance in the next 15
years.

The next phase of the study will determine and evaluate short term improvements to
extend the useful life of the Madison Beltline. The short term improvements will be
focused on the needs identified in this document and will improve the safety and
efficiency of the Madison Beltline corridor.




WisDOT I.D. 5300-02-09                                                                   25
ET ID 95251

								
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