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Title II FH Mozambique by vgs12124

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									          Mozambique/Food for the Hungry FY 2010 Pipeline and Resource Estimate Proposal




FY 2010 PREP: Pipeline and Resource
Estimate Proposal


Title II
FH Mozambique
FFP-A-00-08-00086-00




Submission Date: October 29, 2009


   FH Headquarters Office Contact:                      FH Mozambique Contact:
            Andrew Barnes                                  Mapanza Nkwilimba
       Director of Food Security                            Country Director
   236 Massachusetts Ave, Suite 305                   No. 288 Avenida Cahora Bassa
        Washington, DC 2002                        Sommerschield I, Maputo, Mozambique
          Tel: 202-547-0560                                 Tel: (258) 49 1850
          Fax: 202-547-0523                                 Fax: (258) 49 7894
     e-mail: andy.barnes@fh.org                        e-mail: mnkwilimba@fh.org
             Mozambique/Food for the Hungry FY 2010 Pipeline and Resource Estimate Proposal



List of Acronyms
ADS            Automated Directives System
AER            Annual Estimate of Requirements
AMODEFA        Associacao Mocambicana para Desenvolvimento da Familia
BEO            Bureau Environmental Officer
CBO            Country Backstop Officer
CCB            Community Capacity Building
CDC            Community Development Committee
CS             Cooperating Sponsor
DAP            Development Assistance Program
DCHA           Bureau of Democracy, Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance
DIP            Detailed Implementation Plan
EGPAF          Elisabeth Glacier Pediatric AIDS Foundation
ENA            Essential Nutrition Actions
EHA            Essential Hygiene Actions
ER             Emergency Resources
ESR            Environmental Status Report
FFLG           Farmer Field and Life Group
FFP            Office of Food for Peace
FFP/W          Office of Food for Peace-Washington
FFPIB          Food for Peace Information Bulletin
FFW            Food for Work
FGD            Focus Group Discussion
FH             Food for the Hungry
FY             Fiscal Year
IEE            Initial Environmental Examination
IIAM           Instituto De Investigacao Agraria De Mozambique
IPTT           Indicator Performance Tracking Table
ITSH           Internal Transport, Storage, and Handling
JAM            Joint Aid Management
LOA            Life of Agreement
MCA            Millennium Challenge Account
MOH            Ministry of Health
MT             Metric Ton
MUAC           Middle Upper Arm Circumference
MYAP           Multi-Year Assistance Program
NER            Non-Emergency Resources
NICRA          Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement
PREP           Pipeline and Resource Estimate Proposal
PSO            Program Support Officer
PVO            Private Voluntary Organization
REO            Regional Environmental Officer
RFFPO          Regional Food for Peace Officer
SG             Savings Group
TA             Transfer Authorization
USAID          United States Agency for International Development

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NARRATIVE:

1. Introduction: Food Aid Program Implementation and Responsiveness

The FH MYAP in the province of Cabo Delgado officially began on August 1, 2008. As FH was
not operational in the province prior to the MYAP, many activities were related to start-up and
the commencement of programming in the selected communities of Nangade, Mocimboa da
Praia, and Palma Districts. By the end of the 2008 calendar year, FH had selected target
communities, hired staff, transferred vehicles from the previous DAP to the province, and
established field offices. By the completion of Year 1 the agriculture component had completed
its first season, the CCB component had formed and trained CDCs, and the health/nutrition
component had hired its core staff and developed the first training modules. Initial uncertainty
regarding budgetary cuts due to the drop in price of monetized commodities did result in a slow
start-up of some activities and a reduction in the planned number of staff. Despite the budgetary
constraints, significant progress was made towards initiating activities that contribute to
achieving the program’s strategic objectives.

Program Successes to Date:

   ♦ The program baseline survey took place in January/February. A 30-cluster sample design
     was used with thirty communities selected for clusters. Critical indicator levels were
     established and programmatic recommendations were taken into account.
   ♦ A partnership agreement was signed between the provincial government and FH
     facilitating smooth progress and cooperation.
   ♦ Logistical set-up for programs took place including the purchase of 5 vehicles, 23
     motorbikes, 16 computers, health program materials (salter scales, MUAC tapes), and
     general staff equipment.
   ♦ The agriculture team identified 77 leader farmers who worked with 182 FFLGs,
     surpassing the annual target of 100 groups. A total of 3,276 farmer group members
     received technical training on improved agricultural practices. A total of 152 hectares of
     improved seed varieties were cultivated, surpassing the annual target of 62.5 hectares.
   ♦ 24 village savings groups were formed with 440 members saving $3,740.
   ♦ Health and nutrition staff were hired including the program manager, 3 liaison
     community coordinators, 7 program officials and 36 community facilitators.
   ♦ A barrier analysis study was conducted on complementary feeding and hygiene
     behaviors. The results were applied to the content design of the modules.
   ♦ Modules 1-3 were developed for the Care Groups. Module 1 flipcharts were printed.
   ♦ Three main HCAs (Holistic Community Appraisals) and 48 mini-HCAs were carried out
     in the target communities. The object of the appraisals was to assist both the communities
     and CCB staff to understand the communities’ unique histories, their strengths and
     challenges, and to establish a relationship of trust and partnership between FH and the
     communities.
   ♦ CCB staff assisted communities to select CDC members after providing training on CDC
     member criteria. In 48 communities 570 CDC members were selected, of which more
     than 30% are women. Each community has 10 to 12 CDC members.



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   ♦ A curriculum was developed in order to facilitate empowerment of CDC members to
     address community needs. Trainings included topics on internal governance, the role of
     CDCs, community holistic development, and conflict resolution.

In the MYAP, FH is addressing the key causes of food insecurity in Cabo Delgado: 1) infertile,
sandy soils leading to low agricultural productivity, 2) a lack of crop diversity, which creates
significant vulnerability to shocks related to pest infestations and drought, 3) poor post-harvest
crop storage leading to food loss, and 4) low household purchasing power due to poor market
access. In the area of poor food utilization, FH will address these key causes: 1) child and
maternal calorie and micronutrient deficiencies, 2) poor neonatal care, 3) acute respiratory
infections in children, 4) diarrhea in children, 5) fevers related to malaria in children, and 6) the
high incidence of HIV/AIDS.

The strategic objectives of the program are to:
   1) Protect and enhance livelihood capacities of vulnerable farming households via
        agricultural production and marketing,
   2) Protect and enhance human capabilities through improved health and nutritional status of
        pregnant women, preschool children and HIV+ individuals, and
   3) Increase community capacity to influence factors that affect food security and resiliency
        to shocks. A cross-cutting theme that will be addressed in all three objectives is gender
        balance.

SO 1 - Protect and enhance livelihood capacities of vulnerable farming households via
agricultural production and marketing

To address the critical areas of vulnerability related to food availability cited above, FH will
continue to address a set of interventions that will enhance household agricultural productivity
and production. To successfully accomplish the above objective, FH will focus its efforts on
increasing access to and the use of improved agricultural technologies in the target area via the
following interventions: 1) training of farmer leaders and group members through FFLGs 2)
promoting adoption of natural resource management practices, 3) application of integrated pest
management (IPM) techniques, and 4) training on key soil conservation measures, including
reduction of uncontrolled fires and the promotion of mulching.

The impact of these activities will be determined by one internal annual agricultural survey
scheduled to take place in the second year and the final evaluation to be conducted near the end
of the funding period in July 2011. The current hunger period during which communities have
limited access to adequate food supplies was established to be approximately 2.5 months. It is
planned to reduce this to 1.5 months by the end of the project.

SO 2 - Protect and enhance human capabilities through improved health and nutritional
status of pregnant women, preschool children and HIV+ individuals

Recognizing that chronic, rather than acute malnutrition is a primary risk in Cabo Delgado, FH
will continue to address long-term behavioral factors that affect utilization, access and
availability of food. The health and nutrition program will target women who are pregnant,
lactating, or have children under age two with nutrition education and activities proven to
improve Essential Nutrition Actions. Pregnant and lactating women will be educated through


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Care Groups and home visits from mother leaders who promote key behaviors and health
services relevant to pregnancy and the post-partum period. Through targeted nutrition and health
education, as well as community mobilization around nutrition/health issues, the program
intensely focuses activities and resources on the prevention of malnutrition in pregnant women
and children 0-23.9m of age. Almost all of the activities are prevention-focused, however the
program does support and strengthen the Ministry of Health’s (MOH) approach to identifying
and treating moderate and severe acute malnutrition, as a life-saving intervention. The largest
programmatic effort will be towards the prevention of malnutrition though education and
activities, with the next emphasis on prevention of growth faltering for those children under 23m
identified through growth monitoring and promotion activities.

SO 3 - Increase community capacity to influence factors that affect food security and
resiliency to shocks.

The key activities related to this objective include strengthening community capacity through
training Community Development Committees (CDCs) in governance, project planning, and
conflict resolution, plus involving them in program planning, implementation, and monitoring
and evaluation. Community capacity will also be strengthened by assisting CDCs to design and
implement their own small infrastructure projects. Communities will also be assisted in the
formation of community-based early warning systems which will mitigate the impact of shocks
and increase resiliency in vulnerable populations.

A cross-cutting theme that will be addressed in all three objectives is gender balance.

Detailed Implementation Plans for Year 3

The ongoing activities under the SO1 as summarized in three main result areas outlined below
will continue into year 3.

SO1: Protect and enhance livelihood capacities of vulnerable farming households via
agricultural production and marketing.
       IR 1.1: Agricultural productivity and production diversified and increased.
       IR 1.2: Natural resource base protected and enhanced.
       IR 1.3: Market-led income sources increased and diversified.

YEAR 3 FY11

IR 1.1: Agricultural productivity and production diversified and increased

Coordination - The project will continue to initiate planning meetings with partners, particularly
the Ministry of Agriculture, to share upcoming quarterly activities and review previous quarter
activity progress. As provided for in the DIP (Attachment Eiib), these will take place during the
months of October 2010 and January, April and July 2011.

Acquisition of On-Farm Trials germplasm (seed) – As in Year 1 and 2 planting materials will
be sourced from IIAM and other credible sources in Nampula and the region. During the first
year FH has established a good working relationship with IIAM and improved germplasm will
continue to be sourced from this institution. This activity will be conducted in

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October/November 2010 so that the material is ready for planting before the main rains start in
December 2010/January 2011.

Trial Plots - The FFLGs will continue with the on-farm trials and multiplication plots in Year 3.
From May through July, the FFLGs will harvest the crops from the 104 on-farm trial sites and
evaluate the results which will be shared within the groups and partners before the closure of the
funding period. This will be a final activity leading to final handing over of the program to the
community and the MOA where applicable.

Seed Multiplication - The FFLGs will have attained sufficient experience in seed multiplication
during the second year. It is planned that 1663 ha will be put under seed multiplication, up from
the 62 ha target (152 ha was actually achieved in Year 1) at the beginning of the project. The
active period for this activity will stretch from planting in November 2010-January 2011 to
harvest in May-July 2011. The final aim is that the seed harvested from these plots will be the
key base for sustainability of the process. The FFLGs will be encouraged to sell some of the seed
from the multiplication plots to other farmers that will require the input. It is hoped that by the
final year of the project, participating communities will have been well exposed to the
availability of good seed produced by their fellow farmers. Since the seed types promoted are
open-pollinated, it will be possible to reuse the same seed more than once as long as the farmers
select healthy seed stock from each harvest. The final seed multiplication/production plots will
be established with the following specific activities:
    • FFLGs establish multiplication plots
    • FFLGs establish trial plots
    • Multiplication sites harvested
    • Trial plots harvested, evaluated and results shared.
    • Seed stored and redistributed/sold to group members and other members of the
        community for the following season.
    • Continue training and monitoring progress of FFLGs until the end of the project.

Training and Monitoring of FFLGs – FFLGs will continue to be strengthened and their role
re-emphasized. The groups are expected to be the main entity that will ensure sustainability of
the established activities when the project terminates later in the year. The groups will continue
to receive training and monitoring throughout the entirety of year three. The training will focus
on sustainability and preparing the groups to start operating independently. The program is
designed to equip the groups with knowledge, experience, and skills that will continue to be
utilized and shared within the communities beyond the life of the MYAP.

IR 1.2: Natural resource base protected and enhanced

This component will continue to be critical as soil fertility directly affects overall productivity. In
an effort to prevent slash and burn practices, farmers will be encouraged to re-use the same plot
every season. If proper soil protection practices are not followed this may lead to depletion of
soil nutrients and in order to reduce this risk the project will continue promoting soil
conservation technologies. The key conservation techniques will be implemented in the FFLGs
and facilitated by the trained farmer leaders.

Conservation Agriculture Training - Similar to year two, conservation agriculture training for
the farmer groups will be conducted from November 2010 to April of 2011. This will include
topics on minimum tillage, use of green manure/cover cropping, on farm planting of

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multipurpose agro-forestry trees, and selected soil conservation measures such as the reduction
of uncontrolled fires. The method of burning fields for agricultural use will also be discouraged
through the trainings as it depletes nutrients from the soil and leaves it susceptible to wind and
water erosion. The green manure/cover crops include, beans, cow peas, and pigeon peas. The
agro-forestry trees include, Neem tree (Margosa), Glyricidia spp, Leucena Leucocephala,
Moringa Oleirifica, and Sesbania Sesban, all of which help improve soil fertility and reduce soil
erosion.

IR1.3: Market links & household economic opportunities established

Graduate savings groups to independent status - Throughout the entirety of year three,
Savings Groups (SG) will continue to be graduated as they mature and maintain sufficient
savings to enable them to continue lending to each other. Training and monitoring will be
ongoing activities in these groups. It is expected that by the end of the project 176 groups will
have graduated to independent status.
.
Link producers to buyers (local/export) – Production of cash crops, mainly ground nuts,
sesame and cashew nuts, will be at the maximum for the project. Market linkages will be
facilitated in Year 2 and will continue into the Year 3 to ensure that all the producers will have
been linked to steady buyers both for local and/or export markets by the end of the project.

Fruit and cashew maintenance – During the year, there will be limited new fruit trees planted
from seedlings provided by the project. Farmers will however continue to be encouraged to
source seedlings on their own should they need to expand production. Community fruit and
cashew orchards will continue to be maintained as key training grounds and a source of grafting
material for future expansion and replacements.

Summary of planned targets for Yr 3:

The table below summarizes Year 1 achievements and targets for Year 2 and 3:

Target description                                         Year 1            Year 2       Year 3
Number of communities                                      40                40           40**
# of Group leaders                                         77                104          104
# of groups                                                182               400          400
Total number of direct beneficiaries                       3276              8,000        8,000
Hectares put under crop by beneficiaries of seed           152.7             600          1663
Savings group reached                                      24                88           176
Total savings group members                                440               1320         2,640
**Total for all 3 years

SO2: Protect and enhance human capabilities through improved health and nutritional
status of pregnant women, preschool children and HIV+ individuals.
       IR 2.1: Improved use of Essential Nutrition Actions (ENA) by pregnant women and
               mothers of young children
       IR 2.2: Improved mothers’ ability to prevent, diagnose and manage diseases that
               exacerbate malnutrition, including dietary management of illness.
       IR 2.3: Improved access to clean water, sanitation facilities and Essential Hygiene
               Behaviors (EHB).

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.

YEAR THREE: FY 2011

IR 2.1 Improved use of Essential Nutrition Actions (ENA)


Monitoring and evaluation: A key activity for the community facilitators will be consistent
visits with care groups in order to monitor and evaluate behavior change related practices related
to ENA and EHA. Analysis will take place to determine successes and challenges and context
related recommendations will then influence programmatic activities.

Growth monitoring and promotion: Two Leader Mothers per Care Group will be trained to
conduct growth and monitoring exercises of children 0-23.9m every 8 weeks. The monitoring
will be used to identify at risk children who will then be referred to the local health post.
Additionally, pregnant women will be screened every eight weeks by trained Leader Mothers,
using MUAC for malnutrition, a useful indicator for identifying pregnant women with increased
risk of Low Birth Weight and fetal/infant mortality. Results of GMP will be pictorially depicted
on growth monitoring boards so that the CDC and entire community can monitor the impact the
program is having on the nutritional status of its children and pregnant women. Children between
24-59.9 months will be screened for malnutrition using MUAC every three to six months during
MOH outreach campaigns for vaccination, vitamin A, de-worming and other activities.

Recipe competitions: One children’s recipe competition and one pregnant and lactating
women’s recipe competition will be held during the year. In these festival type events, a strong
emphasis will be placed on promoting local foods high in iron and other micronutrients, fat, and
protein. Pregnant and lactating women’s food taboos will be addressed and testimonials of
women who have successfully eaten “taboo foods” and had healthy babies will be shared.
Pregnant and lactating women’s calorie and water intake will be discussed. Recipe contest
winners will be invited to visit nearby communities and share their recipes and the new
information they have learned in addition to earning prizes.

IR 2.2 Improved mother’s ability to prevent, diagnose and manage diseases.

Curriculum Development and Training in Modules 4,5,6: At the beginning of Year 3
development of curriculum modules 4-6 will be complete and pretesting will take place.
Flipcharts will be produced and disseminated to the facilitators to use in the 139 Care Groups.
The modules will disseminate information relating to diseases that exacerbate malnutrition,
including: malaria, parasites, HIV/AIDS (including preventing mother to child transmission),
and acute respiratory infections. In addition to the new modules the Care Groups will continue to
review the first three modules concerning essential nutrition actions and essential hygiene
actions. MOH staff will attend the staff trainings in order to ensure the same messages shared at
the community level are known and reinforced at the health facility.

Coordination of activities with NGOs and MOH: Coordination will take place with the
Malaria Consortium in order to ensure insecticide treated mosquito nets are provided to all
pregnant and lactating women who are in the Care Groups. Coordination will also take place
with PSI in order to facilitate the availability of certeza (for sale) in the 49 target communities.

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FH will continue to coordinate with the MOH in ensuring that children identified as growth
faltering will be referred to MOH services for evaluation. FH will also coordinate with the MOH
to facilitate compliance with MOH strategies concerning outpatient and/or inpatient nutritional
rehabilitation practices. Coordination will also take place with Elizabeth Glacier Pediatric AIDS
Foundation (EGPAF) and AMODEFA to support HIV/AIDS education and counseling to
mothers, helping reduce vertical transmission.

Monitoring HIV testing/counseling for Pregnant Women: Throughout the year mother
leaders and community facilitators will encourage testing/counseling for pregnant women in
their communities. Data will be collected in order to monitor testing/counseling trends.

Care groups develop songs and theater: Every three months the care groups will create songs
and short theaters (linked to the modules) concerning practices that help prevent, diagnose and
manage diseases. The songs and dramas will be shared within the communities and with other
care groups.

Outreach campaigns: FH will continue partnering with the MOH to implement campaigns to
provide vaccinations, de-worming, vitamin supplementation, and malnutrition screening. Direct
support to the campaigns will take place by assisting with educational activities, transport and
fuel in the 3 target districts.


IR 2.3 Improved access to clean water, sanitation facilities and essential hygiene behaviors
(EHB).

Wat/San committees: Continuing from Year 2, in Year 3 wat/san committees will be formed by
the CDCs in conjunction with FH and JAM. The committees will be responsible for maintaining
the water points and will receive trainings with a focus on the health and economic benefits of
using protected water sources.

Water Points: FH will continue to work with JAM in Year 3 in completing the program’s water
point development. 17 boreholes will be drilled and 13 hand-dug wells will be constructed by the
end of the third quarter.

Latrines: JAM will also continue constructing 45 public latrines at points that have been
identified by the CDCs through participatory mapping exercises.

Point of Use Water Treatment: Coordination with PSI will take place in order facilitate the
availability of Certeza, a water treatment product, for sale in the 49 target communities of the
project.

Anti-Cholera Campaigns: FH will support the MOH anti-cholera campaigns by providing
educational activities, transport and fuel.


SO3: Increased community capacity to influence factors that affect food security and
    resiliency to shocks.
    IR 3.1: Increased leadership capacity of existing formal and informal community
            leaders to address factors that affect food security

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     IR 3.2: Increased community level economic infrastructure/assets
     IR 3.3: Increased ability to predict and mitigate shocks



YEAR THREE: FY 2011

IR 3.1 Increased leadership capacity of existing formal and informal community leaders to
address factors that affect food security
CDC Training: CDC leadership training will continue for the 570 leaders throughout Year 3.
Trainings will include topics on problem identification, applying problem-solving techniques,
and project implementation. Exchange visits with other CDC members will take place during the
first quarter. The visits will allow members to share experiences and lessons learned in addition
to assisting with evaluation and encouragement of fellow CDCs. All 48 CDCs will also be
actively be involved in participatory monitoring and evaluation meetings which will take place
on a quarterly basis in conjunction with FH staff.
Sustainable Development Plans: Each CDC will also be responsible for developing a
sustainable development plan for their community in the second half of the year.

IR 3.2. Increased community level economic infrastructure/assets

CDC Projects: From August 2010 to April 2011, 18 CDCs will identify, design, and mobilize
resources for their projects. Possible projects include: (1) access road and small bridge (spot
improvement) construction, (2) construct improved wells to protect against contamination at
source, (3) markets or warehouses, (4) first aid facility. FH will provide financial support of up
to $600 for each project, subject to the following conditions:
    1. A partnership will be formed to implement the project.
    2. The community will contribute a minimum 30% of the project cost.
    3. FH will only contribute materials, such as cement or tin roofing. All labor costs will be
        covered by the community.
48 CDC led projects are expected to be completed in years 2-3. Those completed in Year 3 will
be evaluated by the CDCs in February through May.


IR 3.3: Increased ability to predict and mitigate shocks

Early Warning and Response System –The Early Warning and Response Systems will have
been established in 48 communities during year 2. Throughout the year the CDCs will monitor
trigger indicators and report their findings in monthly records to the local government and FH.




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2. Monetization Proceeds and Program Income

A. Monetization proceeds
i. Monetization Budget
FH has an approved budget of $2,443,984 in monetization proceeds for Year 3. However, due to
expected shortfall in expected proceeds, FH is requesting $2,151,348 in monetization proceeds
for the implementation of activities in Year 3.

ii. Timing and Maximizing Monetization Proceeds
The Call Forwards will be scheduled near the end of the agricultural season so that global
commodity prices are at their highest in order to maximize monetization proceeds. Currency
flexibility in contracts are used to balance out currency fluctuations. Although most of the
contracts are denominated in US$, there are provisions for payments to be made in local
currency at the exchange rate prevailing on the date of payment.

The contracts are designed so that funds can either be paid in local currency or in US$. The
payments are scheduled over a four month period using a current exchange rate at the time of
payment.

iii. Monetization Expenditures

The requested $2,151,348 monetization proceeds and expected expenditures for Year 3 will stay
within the approved LOA monetization budget of $6,935,479. Monetization proceeds will be
applied to Salaries and Benefits, Travel and Transport, Training, Supplies and Materials, Sub-
contracts, Consultancies and Allocated Support Costs. FH will ensure that monetization
expenditures are prioritized over 202e funds.

B. Other Program Income
i. Section 202(e) Funds - FH has a TA approved budget of $350,000 in the 202(e) section for
Year 3 of the MYAP. FH’s 202(e) budget request remains $350,000. The 202(e) funds will be
applied to Salaries and Benefits, Travel and Transport, Training, Supplies and Materials, and
Allocated Support Costs.

ii. ITSH - FH has no ITSH in the budget.

In summary, a total of $2,501,348 in cash resources have been requested from federal funds for
Year 3 and that total is composed of two funding sources: monetization proceeds and Section
202(e).

3. Bellmon Analysis Supplemental Information

The most recent Usual Market Requirement (UMR) for Mozambique is 123,200 MTs of wheat.
The P.L. 480 Title II commodities expected to be monetized over the next few years is
approximately 45,000 MTs per year, well below the UMR.


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As the Bellmon Analysis indicates, wheat from US Food Aid traditionally amount to
approximately 20% of Mozambique’s wheat consumption. There is very little wheat production
in Mozambique. Almost all wheat for consumption is imported. Key import markets include
Argentina, Australia, Germany, France, Russia and the U.S.

As has been done in past P.L. 480 Title II programs and USDA programs and is recommended in
the latest Bellmon Analysis, the ideal commodity for monetization includes Hard Red Winter
(HRW). This commodity was originally selected for its market potential and their role in
strengthening the overall food security of the country. The wheat is used to produce wheat flour
products, commonly used as a hunger food to supplement the diet during those months when
local agricultural production is being exhausted. Mozambique’s wheat production totals only a
few thousand metric tons, far less than what is required, therefore there is no risk of disrupting
the local market with the monetization of wheat.

4. Food Aid Commodity Justification

The quantity of commodities in the AER is greater than the approved LOA quantities for FY10
due to a significant decrease in the global market price. The quantities need to be increased to
offset the drop in price and maintain the levels of funding to implement the MYAP as proposed.

As in past Call Forwards, HRW continues to be the most appropriate commodity as estimated
proceeds are 1.7% ($244 per metric ton) higher than NS. In order to maximize proceeds HRW is
the only commodity type being requested.


5. Food Aid Rations

Due to government regulations there is no food for distribution in the MYAP or this PREP.

6. Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

FH’s monitoring and evaluation plan remains the same as in the original proposal. The focus for
the M&E approach is to enhance multi-stakeholder accountability and program improvement.
The M&E system follows an integrated and participatory approach to synergize program
components and involve stakeholders: FH staff, partners, relevant GOM ministries, and the
communities served. Involvement starts with the design of the questions and data to be
investigated, and continues through information collection, analysis, and interpretation leading to
the formulation of lessons learned and action steps.

       A. Indicator Performance Tracking Table Narrative
          The majority of the IPTT remains the same as the latest version submitted to FFP in
          July 2009. See Attachment E.ii.a. for the full table. Several indicators were altered
          based on Year 1 achievements and they include:
              • Targets for indicators 6-9 (productivity kg/ha) were increased based on the
                 achievements of Year 1.
              • Targets for indicators 40 and 41 were slightly decreased due to updated
                 beneficiary targeting plan for Care Groups.

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               •   Targets for Year 2 and 3 for output indicator #56 were increased as additional
                   communities have been added and more CDC leaders are participating than
                   the original targets.
               •   Year 2 target was increased for indicator #57 as more than 30% women
                   membership occurred in Year 1.
               •   Indicator #59 targets were increased for Year 2 and reduced for Year 3. The
                   total LOA target has been increased based on the addition of 3 communities
                   and the small scale projects they will implement. Indicator #57 targets were
                   also increased as the additional projects will result in communities
                   contributing more.
               •   Indicator #61 targets were increased for Year 2 and reduced for Year 3. The
                   total LOA target has been increased based on the addition of 3 communities
                   which will have improved infrastructure to mitigate against shocks.

       B. Detailed Implementation Plan Narrative- Although some minor changes have been
          made in the Year 3 DIP, the overall LOA DIP generally remains the same. The Year
          3 DIP is Attachment E.ii.b.

7. Program Graduation and Exit Strategies

The program graduation and exit strategies remain unaltered from the original proposal. All
MYAP related activities will be implemented with an emphasis on community ownership and
capacity building to ensure sustainability and smooth transition during the exit process. Key
components of the graduation and exit strategy include:

IR 1.1: Agricultural productivity and production diversified and increased- Key
behaviors/institutions to be sustained include 1) seed saving, diversify farming systems,
increasing production 2) FFLGs used to innovate, experiment and transfer knowledge and
technology 3) experimentation and adoption through trials and multiplication sites. In order to
ensure sustainability the following mechanisms/strategies will be used: 1) self pollinated seeds
can be saved so that appropriate local and newly introduced crops will continue to be used to
address key household needs (nutrition, income) 2) the use of volunteers means capacity created
remains in the field after exit 3) volunteers will be linked to public extension service and
agricultural research systems (IIAM). The graduation/exit criteria used to measure sustainability
include 1) when at least 70% FFLGs adopt 3 improved agriculture technologies 2) once variety
or new crop has been validated as suitable for the local environment and accepted 3) the ability
of FFLGs to persist following exit of the program. The timeframe for sustainability and the
initiation of the withdrawal process is May 2011.

IR 1.2: Natural resource base protected and enhanced- Key behaviors to be sustained include
the implementation and continuity of conservation techniques through the FFLGs. Sustainability
will be ensured through the adoption of crops that are nitrogen fixing and nutrient recycling in
addition to knowledge and best practices that will be passed to the groups. Exit criteria will be
based on when 30% of households adopt at least one NRM technology, which is targeted for
May 2011.



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IR 1.3: Market-led income sources increased and diversified- Key behaviors/institutions to be
sustained include 1) obtaining extra household income from cash crop sales 2) use of savings
groups to safely store wealth and obtain credit for productive ventures. Sustainability will be
promoted by1) linking producers with buyers and training FFLGs in negotiation and market
identification 2) increasing trust and cooperation through use of transparent methods and simple
accounting procedures. The exit criteria are based on when 1) 40% of households are producing
at least 1 cash crop 2) 40% of savings groups reach “independent” status. The exit process will
begin in May 2011.

IR 2.1: Improved use of Essential Nutrition Actions- Key behaviors to be sustained include 1)
nutrition education through Care Groups 2) growth Monitoring and Promotion (GMP).
Sustainability will be promoted by 1) Care Group outreach will influence social norms about
infant and pregnancy nutrition so that identification of malnutrition will take place and MOH
services will provide nutritional counseling according to protocols. 2) Care Groups will evolve to
have other functions such as savings groups, income generation, but will serve as leadership on
health and nutrition 3) CDCs will develop community plans that promote proper nutrition for
children and pregnant women. Exit criteria are based on 1) changes in social norms concerning
maternal and child health and nutrition which will be shown through meeting target indicators on
KPC 2) mothers graduate from the program when they adopt 75% of key measurable behaviors.

IR 2.2: Improved mother’s ability to prevent, diagnose and manage diseases that exacerbate
malnutrition, including dietary management of illness- Key behaviors/institutions to be sustained
include behavior change messages and activities through Care Groups which will promote
appropriate home prevention and home management of illnesses. Sustainability will be promoted
by 1) social norms about prevention and management of illness will be established 2) MOH
contacts will reinforce messages according to protocols 3) trained Mother Leaders will provide
leadership on health issues and act as a resource for new mothers 4) Malaria Consortium will
continue malaria education and provision of ITNs. Exit criteria will be based on the adoption of
social norms about prevention and management of illness which will be demonstrated by
meeting KPC target indicators and will take place in May 2011.

IR 2.3: Improved access to clean water, sanitation facilities and Essential Hygiene Behaviors
(EHB)- Key institutions/behaviors to be sustained include 1) borehole and well management 2)
maintenance and management of community VIP latrines. Sustainability will be promoted
through 1) WASH committees that will coordinate with CDCs to establish a schedule for regular
maintenance provided by the community which will be financed by charging a small monthly fee
to each family in order to maintain the borehole 2) Technical support will be provided by the
National Water Authority in coordination with the District Administrator’s office, which is
charged with this function. Exit criteria will be based on 1) an existing MOU for each district
between the WASH committees and District Administrator’s Office 2) each WASH committee
having a signed plan with CDC for fee charge.

IR 3.1: Increased leadership capacity of existing formal and informal community leaders to
address factors that affect food security- Key institutions/behaviors to be sustained include
community led (through the CDCs) identification and resolution of problem in addition to
identification of development priorities. Sustainability will be promoted through 1) fortnightly
trainings, which although initially be facilitated by the facilitators, will be encouraged to

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continue take place independently in order to address community leadership issues 2) copies of
materials will be left for literate CDC members 3) the CDC will be comprised of formal leaders
that have automatic links to the government 4) the potential for the CDCs to become ‘forums
locais’, part of the government decentralization consultative process 5) training which includes
information sharing on other potential partners in the district and province for small project
support. Exit criteria include 1) CDC able to apply problem solving techniques to address
community development and food security issues 2) CDC meeting minimum once per month
without the facilitation of the facilitators 3) well established relationships established between
CDC and district government representatives. 4) community’s own contribution towards
development project grows by 100%/year from 2010. Phase down will happen in the last 6
month period, as the facilitators take more of a consultative role for CDCs and the district
administration, rather than facilitation.

IR 3.2: Increased community level economic infrastructure/assets- Key institutions/behaviors to
be sustained will be the maintenance of infrastructure development projects. Sustainability will
be promoted by 1) teaching on importance of long term sustainability development planning and
action 2) clear delineation of responsibilities for maintenance (e.g. WATSAN committees,
annual road maintenance schedules) 3) wherever possible, formal linkages to government
departments (eg. DDE, MOH, Conselhos Consultivos) will take place to provide ongoing
avenues for accountability. Exit criteria will be based on when 50% of CDCs implement at least
one autonomously conceived project.

IR 3.3: Increased ability to predict and mitigate shocks- Key institutions/behaviors to be
sustained include 1) one representative per CDC/EWS committee will take responsibility to alert
community and local authorities to the prospect of food shortages in order to initiate response
and mitigation measures 2) each community will become more proactive in early warning and
prevention. Sustainability will be promoted through the establishment of trigger indicators and a
monitoring mechanism in each district which will encourage people to be proactive rather than
fatalistic to the reality of vulnerability and weather cycles. Exit criteria will be based on
autonomous updating of trigger indicators to make them more relevant in addition to clear
channels of communication established between CDCs and district authorities when trigger
indicator thresholds are reached. The timeframe for exit initiation will by May 2011.




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ATTACHMENTS:

       A. Budgets
             i. Comprehensive Budget: The Comprehensive Budget has been included in
                  Attachment Ai. The Year 3 requested monetization proceeds have been
                  reduced from the original $2,443,985 to $2,118,550 due to a reduction in
                  monetization proceeds. With the estimated opening balance the total will be
                  $2,339,984
             ii. Detailed Budget: See attachment A.ii.
             iii. Budget Narrative: The Budget Narrative (Attachment A.iii) explains any
                     changes in the Year 3 budget compared to those in the LOA budget.

       B. Monetization Tables
          i. Life of Activity Analysis for Monetization Proceeds: See Attachment B.i.
          ii. Anticipated Monetization Proceeds and Cost Recovery: See Attachment B.i.
          iii. Anticipated Monetization Results: The Call Forwards will be scheduled near the
                  end of the agricultural season so that global commodity prices are at their
                  highest in order to maximize monetization proceeds. The Call Forward is
                  expected to take place in January, with arrivals expected in April 2010.
                  Commodity sales in April are expected to be $244 per MT for HRW.

       C. Annual Estimate of Requirements (AER) and Commodity Pipeline:
          The AER has been included in Attachment C and is based on the anticipated cost
          recovery table and current commodity prices.

       D. Tracking Table for Beneficiaries and Resources: The tracking table has been based on
          the approved MYAP budget for Year 3 and the attached AER for Year 3. The
          commodities to be monetized for year 2 were called forward in FY09, therefore Year
          3 commodities will be called forward in FY10.

       E. Monitoring and Evaluation Materials:
          i. Monitoring and Evaluation Assessments Table
          ii. Monitoring and Evaluation Plan: The monitoring and evaluation plan has not
                been altered since the approval of the MYAP. There are several small target
                adjustments in the IPTT (Attachment E.ii.a) although the majority of the
                document remains the same as the revised version submitted to FFP in
                Washington DC in July 2009. The DIP highlights planned activities for Year 3
                and is Attachment E.ii.b.

       F. Environmental Status Report Guidance and Compliance Information: The
          Environmental Status Report is found in Attachment F. It is based on the IEE
          submitted to USAID in February 2009.

       G. Affirmation of Certification: See the signed certification in Attachment G




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       H. Negotiated Indirect Cost Rate Agreement: A copy of FH’s latest approved negotiated
          indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA) may be found in Attachment H. This rate
          14.01% was used in computing the NICRA amount stated in the budget.

       I. Close-Out Schedule: See details in attachment I.




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