Docstoc
EXCLUSIVE OFFER FOR DOCSTOC USERS
Try the all-new QuickBooks Online for FREE.  No credit card required.

THE TERMITICIDAL POTENTIAL OF Chromolaena odorata (L.) R.M. KING & H. ROBINSON (HAGONOY)

Document Sample
THE TERMITICIDAL POTENTIAL OF Chromolaena odorata (L.) R.M. KING & H. ROBINSON (HAGONOY) Powered By Docstoc
					    THE TERMITICIDAL POTENTIAL OF Chromolaena odorata (L.) 
            R.M. KING & H. ROBINSON (HAGONOY)  
                               
 
                                   
                                   
                     RALPH STEPHEN E. CACAPIT 
                    IZAVELO RAPHAEL J. LLOREN 
                     CALEB MARK D. QUIAMBAO 
                      DENNIS BRYAN A. VALDEZ 
                                   
                                   
                                   
 
            Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University 
                      South La Union Campus 
                        College of Education 
                      Laboratory High School 
                           Agoo, La Union 
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                        Elective II (Research) 
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                                     
                            March 2009 
                                     
THE TERMITICIDAL POTENTIAL OF Chromolaena odorata (L.) 
        R.M. KING & H. ROBINSON (HAGONOY)  
                               
                               
                               
                               
                 RALPH STEPHEN E. CACAPIT 
                IZAVELO RAPHAEL J. LLOREN 
                 CALEB MARK D. QUIAMBAO 
                  DENNIS BRYAN A. VALDEZ 
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                           Submitted to  
                    Tessie Q. Peralta, Ph. D.  
        Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University 
                    South La Union Campus 
                      College of Education 
                    Laboratory High School 
                         Agoo, La Union 
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
          In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements 
                    in Elective II (Research) 
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                                  
                            March 2009 
                                      APPROVAL SHEET 
                                                    
                                                    
       This  is  to  certify  that  this  study,  entitled:  “THE  TERMITICIDAL  POTENTIAL  OF 
Chromolaena  odorata  (L.)  R.M.  KING  &  H.  ROBINSON  (HAGONOY)”  presented  and 
submitted by Ralph Stephen E. Cacapit, Izavelo Raphael J. Lloren, Caleb Mark D. Quiambao, 
and Dennis Bryan A. Valdez, to fulfill part of the requirements in Elective II (Research), was 
examined and passed on March 4, 2009 by the Research Committee composed of:  
 
 
            TESSIE Q. PERALTA(Sgd)                       FLORDILIZA B. DALUMAY(Sgd) 
                   Adviser                                            Critic 
 
                                                 
                                   LILIA L. MADRIAGA(Sgd) 
                                           Chairman 
                                                 
           MARICON C. VIDUYA(Sgd)                                      
                  Member 
 
        
       Accepted  and  approved  in  partial  fulfillment  of  the  requirements  in  Elective  II 
(Research) on March 4, 2009. 
 
    MERCEDITA A. MABUTAS(Sgd)                    PURIFICACION B. VERCELES(Sgd) 
          OIC – Principal                                    Chairman 
      Laboratory High School                Bachelor of Secondary Education Department 

                                                
                                                
                                   MANUEL T. LIBAO(Sgd) 
                                            Dean 
                                    College of Education 




                                               ii
                                      ACKNOWLEDGMENT  

                                                  

       The researchers would like to extend their thanks to the people who helped in the 

realization and success of this study: 

       Dr. Tessie Q. Peralta,  their subject teacher for her encouragement and motivation 

throughout the development of this manuscript; 

       Prof.  Mercedita  A.  Mabutas,  the  principal  of  the  DMMMSU  –  SLUC,  College  of 

Education,  Laboratory  High  School,  Agoo,  La  Union,  for  her  encouragement  toward  a 

deeper pursuit of knowledge; 

       Ms. Flordiliza B. Dalumay, their critic, and Prof. Lilia L. Madriaga, the Chairman of 

the  panel,  for  sharing  their  ideas,  professional  expertise,  constructive  criticisms,  and 

invaluable assistance towards the refinement of this study; 

       Ms.  Maricon  C.  Viduya,  the  member  of  the  panel,  for  sharing  her  expertise  in 

English grammars, and checking and editing this manuscript;  

       Dr. Raquel D. Quiambao, for sharing her expertise in the statistical part of the study; 

       Mr.  Tristan  B.  Villanueva,  the  Laboratory  Custodian  of  the  DMMMSU  –  SLUC, 

College  of  Sciences,  for  making  the  laboratory  equipment  and  materials  available  to  the 

researchers; 

       Dr.  Wilfredo  F.  Vendivil,  the  Senior  Researcher  of  the  National  Museum,  Botany 

Division, for sharing his precious moments in determining and verifying the plant material 

used in the study; 
       Ms. Adoracion A. Ceniza, the Chief, Baguio Pesticide Analytical Laboratory Satellite, 

Bureau of Plant Industry, Baguio National Crop Research and Development Center, for the 

bulk extraction of the hagonoy methanol leaf extract;                         

       Their  parents,  for  their  love,  guidance,  encouragement,  cooperation,  inspiration, 

and financial support; 

       Their  brothers,  sisters,  friends,  and  relatives,  for  their  unstinted  support  and 

cooperation; 

       Their classmates, for the encouragement, moral support, help, and assistance; and 

       Above all, the Almighty God, for the spiritual enlightenment, guidance and support; 

and for the strength and wisdom that enabled the researchers to achieve this undertaking.  


 

                                                                             The Researchers



 

 




                                               iv
                                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS 
                                                                   
                                                                                                                                            Page 

Title Page  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       i 

Approval Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .           ii 

Acknowledgment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                 iii 

Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .            v 

List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       vii 

List of Figures  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      viii 

List of Experimental Plates  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                 ix 

List of Appendices  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .            x 

Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     xi 

Chapter I    Introduction                                                                                                                      

                    Background of the Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                  1 

                    Objectives of the Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .              2 

                    Null Hypotheses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .            3 

                    Significance of the Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                6 

                    Scope and Limitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .               6 

                    Time and Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .              7 

                    Definition of Terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .            7 

                    Conceptual Framework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                   8 

Chapter II   Review of Literature                                                                                                              

                     Termites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      12 
                     Chromolaena odorata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                16 

                     Solignum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .     22 

Chapter III  Methodology                                                                                                                      

                     Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    25 

                     Research Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .          25 

                     Collection and Preparation of Plant Material . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                             26 

                     Preparation of Decoction from C. odorata Leaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                                  26 

                     Preparation of Expressed Juice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                   26 

                     Preparation of the Methanol Leaf Extract  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                            27 

                     Test Organism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .        27 

                     Application of the Test Substances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                     27 

                     Data Gathered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .          28 

                     Data Analysis  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .       28 

Chapter IV  Results and Discussion  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                       30 

Chapter V   Summary, Conclusion, and Recommendation                                                                                           

                     Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      34 

                     Conclusion . . . . .  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      36 

                     Recommendation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .             37 

References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .        39 

Experimental Plates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .             42 

Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .        51 




                                                                         vi
                                   LIST OF TABLES 
                                            
                                            
Table                                      Title                             Page 

  1      Length of time in minutes for the termites to die due to various     30 
         treatments 
  2      One‐Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) Summary Table                   32 
                                            
  3      Pairwise Comparison of the Mean Time using Scheffé's Test            33 
                                            
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          
                                          


                                         vii
                                     LIST OF FIGURES 
                                              
                                              
Figure                                        Title                           Page 

  1       Problem Tree (Termites)                                               4 

  2       Problem Tree (Dependence on Insecticides)                             5 

  3       The Conceptual Framework                                              9 

  4       Research Flowchart                                                   29 

  5       Length of time in minutes for the termites to die due to various     31 
          treatments 
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              
                                              


                                           viii
                           LIST OF EXPERIMENTAL PLATES 
                                          
                                          
Plates                                   Title                                       Page 

  1       Chromolaena odorata in its natural environment                              42 

  2       Fresh leaves of Chromolaena odorata                                         42 

  3       The experimental set‐up                                                     43 

  4       The separation of test organism from the soil                               43 

  5       The test organisms placed on the dish                                       44 

  6       Decoction of Chromolaena odorata leaves                                     44 

  7       Pounding of fresh Chromolaena odorata leaves                                45 

  8       Air dried Chromolaena odorata leaves                                        45 

  9       Preparation of Extract                                                      46 

 10       Laboratory personnel of the Bureau of Plant Industry –                      46 

          National Pesticide Analytical Laboratory performing the Rotavation 

 11       The test organisms administered by  positive control (Solignum)             47 

 12       The test organisms administered by leaf decoction from hagonoy              47 

 13       The test organism administered by expressed juice from hagonoy              48 

 14       The test organism administered by 30% leaf extract solution                 48 

 15       The test organisms administered by 60% leaf extract solution                49 

 16       The test organisms as affected by the various treatments                    49 

 17       The researchers introducing the various test substances to the termites     50 

 18       Researcher of the National Museum, Botany Division determining the          50 
          plant material used in the study 

                                            
                                            
                                            


                                          ix
                                   LIST OF APPENDICES 
                                              
                                              
Appendix                                     Title                           Page 

   A        Sample Computation for Methanol Leaf Extract Solutions           51 

   B        Statistical Formula                                              52 

   C        Sample Computation of ANOVA and Scheffé’s Test                   54 

   D        Tables                                                           58 

   E        Figures                                                          60 

   F        Letter to the Senior Museum Researcher of the National Museum    65 
             
   G        Certification of Plant Material                                  66 

   H        Letter to the Chief, Baguio PAL Satellite‐BNCRDC                 67 
             
   I        Certificate of Appearance                                        68 
            (issued by the  Chief, Baguio PAL Satellite‐BNCRDC) 
             
                                                                              

                                                                              

                                                                              

                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               


                                             x
                     THE TERMITICIDAL POTENTIAL OF Chromolaena odorata (L.) 
                                   R.M. KING & H. ROBINSON (HAGONOY) 
 
 

Researchers:        Ralph Stephen E. Cacapit 

                                Izavelo Raphael J. Lloren 

                                Caleb Mark D. Quiambao 

                                Dennis Bryan A. Valdez 

Adviser:                 Tessie Q. Peralta, Ph. D. 

                                                              

                                                   A B S T R A C T 

          This  study  aimed  to  analyze  and  determine  the  termiticidal  potential  of 

Chromolaena odorata (L.) RM King & H Robinson (Hagonoy). 

          This study utilized the experimental method of  research which focused on the use 

standard laboratory diagnostic procedures implicated in termiticidal potential of hagonoy in 

terms  of  the  length  of  time  for  the  termites  to  die  upon  application  of  the  various 

treatments.   

          The  methods  used  were  collection  and  preparation  of  plant  material,  the 

preparations  on  decoction  from  hagonoy  leaves,  expressed  juice,  methanol  extract, 

Solignum, and the application of the various substances to the termites. 

          Specifically,  this  study  tested  if  there  were  significant  differences  in  the  length  of 

time the termites were killed between pair of treatments and after the application of the 

various treatments which were T1 – positive control, commercial pesticide (Solignum), T2 ‐ 
leaf  decoction  from  C.  odorata,  T3  ‐  expressed  leaf  juice  from  C.  odorata,      T4  ‐  30%  C. 

odorata leaf extract solution, and T5 ‐ 60% C. odorata leaf extract solution. 

        The  data  gathered  were  tabulated  and  computed  using  One‐Way  Analysis  of 

Variance (ANOVA) to determine whether significant differences exist in the length of time 

the termites were killed after the exposure to the five treatments. Scheffé's Test was used 

to  find  out  where  the  difference  lies  among  the  five  treatments  and  which  among  the 

treatments had the greatest termiticidal potential.   

        The study revealed that there were significant differences in the length of time the 

termites were killed among the various treatments and between the pair of treatments. The 

data gathered showed that sample termites in 60% C. odorata leaf extract solution has the 

least length of time with a mean of 1.29 minutes.  This was followed by T1 (positive control, 

Solignum) with a mean 1.45 minutes, 30% C. odorata leaf extract solution with a mean of 

1.47,  and  leaf  decoction  from  C.  odorata  with  a  mean  of  1.77.  The  treatment  with  the 

longest time for the sample to die was the expressed leaf juice from C. odorata with a mean 

of 2.15 minutes. 

        The F‐test showed that there were significant differences among the means of the 

five treatments at 0.05 significance level. The Scheffé's Test implies that the positive control 

and  30%  C.  odorata  methanol  leaf  extract  solution  were  equally  efficient.  Furthermore, 

since all comparisons with 60% C. odorata leaf extract solution which has the shortest mean 

time are significantly different, then it could be concluded that 60% hagonoy methanol leaf 

extract solution is the best among the five treatments.   

                                                      



                                                   xii
                                               Chapter I

                                         INTRODUCTION  

Background of the Study                                              

           Plants are considered as one of the most significant endeavors to study. All life on 

Earth depends directly or indirectly on the plants for food and for other purposes. Some of 

these contain thousands of medicinal compounds (Quisumbing, 1978) while the others have 

potential as insecticide (http://encarta.msn.com).   

           Chromolaena  odorata,  locally  known  as  Hagonoy  or  Hagonoi,  is  a  shrub  that  is 

widely  distributed  to  many  parts  of  the  tropics.  However,  many  farmers  do  not  seem  to 

mind  its  benefits  because  these  are  problems  in  agricultural  land  and  commercial 

plantations. Chromolaena odorata (hagonoy) is a pest abundant in our country (Padilla, et. 

Al., 2006) 

           It is proven that hagonoy causes diarrhea when ingested or even fetal deaths among 

animals.  It  also  reduces  the  carrying  capacity  of  the  field  to  grow  more  beneficial  weeds. 

(CPD Technoguide No. 8, 2003). 

           People  even  regard  this  as  unusable.  Because  of  this  perception,  the  researchers 

decided  to  make  something  out  of  Chromolaena  odorata  (Hagonoy).  The  plant  could  be 

used as a termiticide. 

           Termites  are  some  of  the  loathed  and  hated  pests  in  the  Philippines  because  they 

feed on woods and weaken its structure and they are considered pest by local people. For 

this reason, the researchers developed termiticide out of Chromolaena odorata (hagonoy) 

plant.  
                                                                                                       2

        According  to  Padilla,  et  al.,  the  use  of  pesticide  is  really  prevalent  to  industrial 

countries  like  the  Philippines.  They  are  used  in  comforts  of  their  business  establishments 

and even at home to eliminate the huge number of pests. And one of the pests, considered 

as problem of Filipinos today are the destructive termites. 

        With these concerns, the researchers were motivated to investigate the termiticidal 

potential of Chromolaena odorata (hagonoy). 

 

Objectives of the Study 

        The  main  purpose  of  this  study  is  to  formulate  a  potential  solution  to  the  focal 

problems  presented  in  Figures  1  and  2,  which  are  the  destructive  termites  and  the 

dependence on insecticides by developing a termiticide out of C. odorata. 

        The study purported to evaluate the termiticidal potential of Chromolaena odorata 

(L.) R.M. King & H. Robinson (Hagonoy).  

        In the study reported herein, it sought to: 

        1. Test termiticidal potential of Chromolaena odorata in terms of the length of time 

            the termites are killed after the application of the five treatments. 

        2. Determine the significant differences in the length of time the termites are killed 

            when exposed to the five treatments. 

        3. Analyze  the  significant  differences  in  the  length  of  time  the  termites  are  killed 

            between pairs of treatments. 
                                                                                                3

        In  this  regard,  the  researchers  were  encouraged  to  investigate  the  termiticidal 

potential of Chromolaena odorata (hagonoy) and to develop ways of putting C. odorata to 

beneficial uses as an effective alternative termiticide. 

        

Null Hypotheses 

       The following null hypotheses were tested in the study: 

       1. There are no significant differences in the length of time the termites are killed 

           after application of the five treatments. 

       2. There are no significant differences in the length of time the termites are killed 

           between pairs of treatments. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                                 4




                          PROBLEM TREE
                 Structural Damage and
                 Additional Expenses to
                    Repair Damaged
                       Properties               Use of Expensive
                                              Chemical Termiticide




                                        TERMITES




                                               Lack of Knowledge of
                          Destructive
                                                Plant Alternative as
                                                    Termiticide




Figure 1. Problem Tree 
 
 
                                                                        5



                      PROBLEM TREE


                       Risk to Human
                     and Animal Health
                                                            Expensive

              Pesticide           Toxicity to Natural Enemies
             Resistance             and Other Non-target
                                           Organisms




                                   DEPENDENCE
                                             ON
                                  INSECTICIDES



                  Highly                   Easy to Use
                 Effective


                                Readily             Lack of Knowledge on
                               Available             its Impacts to Health
                                                       and Environment

Figure 2. Problem Tree 
 
                                                                                                       6

Significance of the Study   
 
        Results of this study may be beneficial to the following: 

        a.  People  and  industry.    This  study  may  serve  as  a  benchmark  on  termite 

eradication. This study may also serve as a springboard towards the discovery of potentially 

new natural foundations of pesticides from plants. After several years of research efforts, 

the problems on C. odorata remained unsolved. In this unfolding scenario, it is necessary to 

develop ways of putting C. odorata to beneficial uses (Bamikole, 2004). It can be used as a 

source  alternative  foundations  as  termiticide  which  is  health  and  environment  friendly. 

People living in far‐flung areas and places that cannot be reached by modern products may 

also benefited by this study. 

        b. Future researchers.  The results of this study would provide baseline information 

that  may  serve  as  a  frame  of  reference  to  the  future  researchers  who  become  ardently 

absorbed in this study; and  

        c.  The  Researchers.    It  is  hoped  that  this  study  will  contribute  to  the  pool  of 

knowledge about the termiticidal properties of plants like Chromolaena odorata. 

        Ultimately, the results of this study will serve as the potential solution to the focal 

problems on the destructive termites and the people’s dependence on insecticides. 

 

Scope and Limitation 

        The  concern  and  focus  of  this  study  was  limited  to  the  termiticidal  potential  of  C. 

odorata  making  use  of  5  (five)  treatments  which  can  be  found  in  Figure  3.  Effects  of  the 
                                                                                                     7

positive  control,  hagonoy  leaf  decoction,  expressed  juice,  and  methanol  extracts  were 

determined based on the length of time the termites are killed upon the application. 

        The extracting solvent  used was a technical grade methanol. Thus, the component 

that can only be extracted using methanol was considered. Distilled water was used as the 

solvent  for  the  treatments  that  used  expressed  juice and  decoction  (Biagtan,  De  Guzman, 

Mangay‐ayam, 2007). 

 

Time and Location 

        This study was conducted at Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University‐South 

La Union Campus, Laboratory High School, Agoo, La Union from December 2008 to February 

2009.  Crude  extraction  of  the  termiticidal  components  was  done  at  the  Bureau  of  Plant 

Industry  (BPI)  –  Baguio  Pesticide  Analytical  Laboratory  (BPAL),  Baguio  City.  Verification  of 

the plant material was done at the Botany Division of the National Museum, Manila. 

 

Definition of Terms 

        For  better  understanding  of  the  study,  the  following  terms  were  operationally 

defined and used . 

        Commercial Pesticide.  e.g. Solignum; This refers to the positive control used in the 

study, which is a synthetic chemical mostly used as termite killer and wood preservative.  

        Decoction.   This refers to the preparation made by boiling the leaves in water. 

        Eradication.      This  refers  to  the  elimination  or  destruction  of  a  population  of 

termites as part of pest control. 
                                                                                                     8

        Expressed Juice.   The preparation made by pounding C. odorata leaves using mortar 

and pestle afterwich, fresh leaf juice was obtained. 

        Hagonoy.   A local term of Chromolaena odorata; plant used in the study. 

        Insecticide. A type of pesticide used to eliminate insects. 

        Leaf Extract.   A concentrated preparation of C. odorata (Hagonoy) leaf obtained by 

separating the active constituent of the plant through extraction using methanol.    

        Methanol.      A  colorless  organic  substance  used  as  a  solvent  also  known  as  methyl 

alcohol, carbinol, wood alcohol, wood naphtha or wood spirits. It is a chemical compound 

with chemical formula CH3OH (often abbreviated MeOH) and boils at 64.7 °C (337.8 K). 

        Methanol Extract .   It is a concentrated preparation of C. odorata obtained by using 

methanol as the extracting solvent. 

        Termites. Social insects that are destructive to properties, and used as test organism 

in this study. 

        Termiticide. It is a specific type of insecticide used to kill termites. 

        Pesticide.    The agent known to eliminate different types pests like termites, fungi, 

mollusks.  

         

Conceptual Framework 

        This research study focused on the termiticidal potential of C. odorata.   

        Proper  and  careful  laboratory  method  and  techniques  such  as  collection  and 

shredding  of  leaves,  extraction,  preparation  of  solutions  and  test  for  the  efficacy  of  the 

termiticide were done.  
                                                                                                   9

          There  were  five  treatments  namely:    T1  ‐  positive  control,  commercial  pesticide 

  (Solignum), T2 ‐ leaf decoction from C. odorata, T3  ‐ expressed leaf juice from C. odorata, T4 

  ‐ 30% C. odorata leaf extract solution, and T5 ‐ 60% C. odorata leaf extract solution. 

          The paradigm, which explains the conceptual framework of this study, is presented 

  in Figure 3. 

    

       INDEPENDENT VARIBLE                                            DEPENDENT VARIABLE 
                                                
                                                         
    
Treatment:                                              Length of time the termites are 
                                                        killed after the exposure to: 
     
  a. T1 ‐ positive control,  (Solignum)                  
                                                            a. leaf decoction from hagonoy 
            
     T2‐ leaf decoction from                  
  b.                                                     
       C. odorata                                           b. expressed leaf juice from 
                                                                hagonoy 
  c. T3‐ expressed leaf juice from                       
     C. odorata                                             c. methanol leaf extract 
                                                                solutions 
     T4‐ 30% C. odorata leaf extract 
  d.                                                     
     solution 
   
    
  e. T5‐ 60% C. odorata leaf extract 
     solution 
    
    
    
    
    
   Figure 3. Conceptual Paradigm showing the Independent and Dependent Variables  
                   of the study. 
    
                                           Chapter II

                                REVIEW OF LITERATURE 

        Plants  are  used  as  insecticides  since  before  the  time  of  Ancient  Romans.  People 

applied  the  crude  mixture  from  natural  products  in  insecticidal  activities  nowadays 

(Franzios, 1997). 

        Many  plants  such  as  vetiver  grass  oil  (Zhu,  2001);  seeds  (Vanucci,  1992);  wood 

leaves,  such  as  leaves  of  tarbush  (Flourensia  cernua)  (Tellez,  2001);  mature  leaves  of  7 

species of Eucalyptus (Lin, 1998); leaves of Azadirachta excelsa (Jack) Jacobs (Sajap, 2000); 

and  heartwood  from  trees  have  been  investigated  for  termiticidal  preservatives.  Many 

species  of  wood  have  been  extracted,  and  the  efficacy  for  termite  resistance  has  been 

tested.  These  woods  include  Taxodium  distichum  (L.),  (Scheffrahn,  1988);  Sawara  wood 

(Chamaecyparis  pisifera  D.  Don)  (Saeki,  1973);  Port‐Orford‐cedar  [Chamaecyparis 

lawsoniana  (A.  Murr.)  Parl.]  (McDniel,  1989),  bogwood  of  yakusugi  (Yatagai,  1991); 

Diospyros  virginiana  L.  (common  persimmon)  (Carter,  1978),  Mansonia  altissima  and 

Piptadeniastrum  africanum  (Bultman,  1979);  Juniperus  procera  (African  pencil  cedar) 

(Kinyanjui,  2000);  Taiwania  (T.  cryptomerioides)  (Chang,  2001);    Melaleuca  (Melaleuca 

quinquenervia)  heartwood  blocks  (Carter,  1982);  Lophopetalum  wightianum, 

Microcerotermes  beesoni  Snyder,  Neotermes  bosei  (Snyder)  and  Heterotermes  indicola 

(Wasm.) (Sen‐Sarma, 1979); Brazil wood (Prosopis juliflora), Anadenanthera macrocarpa; 

Astronium  urundeuva;  Schinopsis  brasiliensis,  Senna  siamea,  Tabebuia  aurea,  Amburana 

cearensis, Tabebuia impetiginosa and Aspidosperma pyrifolium (Paes, 2001). Wang (1989) 

compared  the  effects  of  eight  species  which  included  (a)  Chamaecyparis  obtusa,               
                                                                                                 11

(b) Cunninghamia lanceolata, (c) Taiwania cryptomerioides, (d) Cryptomeria japonica, (e) 

Acacia  confusa,  (f)  Castanopsis  carlesii,  (g)  red  oak  (Quercus  sp.)  and  (h)  Gonystylus 

bancanus.  

         These  materials  were  extracted  with  organic  solvents  or  hot  water  to  get  crude 

mixture  to  test  against  termites.  Most  of  them  were  tested  in  a  mixture,  and  effective 

compositions  were  isolated  and  identified  by  some  of  the  researchers.  The  extracted 

chemicals may act as feeding deterrent, ovipositor deterrents, repellent and toxicant, and 

trail‐following  compounds.  Many  kinds  of  chemicals  are  found  to  be  termiticidal  due  to 

different  resources  used.  These  chemicals  include  ferruginol  and  manool  (Scheffrahn, 

1988),  nootkatone  (Zhu,  2001;  Maistrello,  2001),  chamaecynone  and  isochamaecynone 

(Saeki,  1973),  2‐phenoxyethanol  (Laine,  1998),  eugenol  (Cornerlius,  1997),  Terpene 

(Sharma,  1994),  α‐terpineol  and  three  sesquiterpene  alcohols  T‐cadinol,  torreyol  (δ‐

cadinol),  and  α‐cadinol  (McDaniel,  1989),  7‐methyljuglone,  isodiospyrin  (Carter,  1978), 

cedrol  and  alpha‐cadinol  (Chang,  2001),  alpha–pinene,  p‐cymene  and  1,8‐  cineole  (Lin, 

1998), and aphthalene (Henderson, 1998).  

         These  compositions  may  have  different  effects  on  different  species  of  termites. 

Most of the experiments were carried out with the FST (Chen, 1996; Valles, 2002). Other 

species  such  as  Reticulitermes  flavipes  (Green,  2000),  viz.  Microcerotermes  beesoni, 

Neotermes [Kalotermes] bosei and Heterotermes indicola (Sen‐Sarma, 1979; Gupta, 1978; 

Jain, 1990), and white termite (O. obesus) (Singh, 2001) collected from sugarcane fields in 

India     were      also     employed.       (http://etd.lsu.edu/docs/available/etd‐01172004‐

25708/unrestricted/Liu_thesis.pdf) 
                                                                                                    12

Termites 


        Termites are light‐colored social insects that form large colonies. Many species live 

in warm or tropical regions, feed on wood, and are highly destructive to trees and wooden 

structures (www.thefreedictionary.com).  


        The termites are a group of social insects usually classified at the taxonomic rank of 

order Isoptera. As truly social animals, they are termed eusocial along with the ants and 

some bees and wasps which are all placed in the separate order Hymenoptera. Termites 

mostly  feed  on  dead  plant  material,  generally  in  the  form  of  wood,  leaf  litter,  soil,  or 

animal  dung,  and  about  10%  of  the  estimated  4,000  species  (about  2,600  taxonomically 

known) are economically significant as pests that can cause serious structural damage to 

buildings,  crops  or  plantation  forests.  Termites  are  major  detrivores,  particularly  in  the 

subtropical and tropical regions, and their recycling of wood and other plant matter is of 

considerable ecological importance. 


        As eusocial insects, termites live in colonies that, at maturity, number from several 

hundred  to  several  million  individuals.  They  are  a  prime  example  of  decentralized,  self‐

organized  systems  using  swarm  intelligence  and  use  this  cooperation  to  exploit  food 

sources and environments that could not be available to any single insect acting alone. A 

typical colony contains nymphs (semi‐mature young), workers, soldiers, and reproductive 

individuals  of  both  genders,  sometimes  containing  several  egg‐laying  queens 

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Termite). 
                                                                                                   13

        A  colony  may  number  from  100  to  more  than  1  million  termites.  Excluding  the 

immature  forms,  called  nymphs,  a  colony  consists  of  several  structurally  differentiated 

forms  living  together  as  castes  with  different  functions  in  community  life.  In  socially 

advanced  species,  three  principal  castes  exist:  the  reproductives,  the  soldiers,  and  the 

workers.  Both  the  reproductives  and  the  soldiers  occur  in  two  or  three  distinguishable 

forms, each specialized for a role in the division of labor in the colony. All forms comprise 

individuals  of  both  sexes,  but  only  in  the  reproductives  do  the  sexual  organs  undergo 

complete development.  


        Among the reproductives are dark‐colored males and females with fully developed 

wings and compound eyes. At maturity, they leave the parental nest in swarms. After the 

flight,  they  shed  their  wings  and  mate.  A  new  colony  is  then  established  by  a  male  and 

female  who  become  primary  reproductives,  that  is,  the  king  and  queen,  whose  sole 

occupation is the production of eggs. Termite kings and queens are longer‐lived than other 

termites, and the queens are larger than other members of their colony. In certain tropical 

species, the king and queen live for ten years, and the queen grows to an enormous size, 

sometimes  as  much  as  20,000  times  the  size  of  the  worker.  The  abdomen  becomes  so 

distended  with  eggs  that  the  queen  is  unable  to  move  about.  The  eggs  are  laid  at  a 

prodigious rate that totals about 30,000 a day in some species. Most termite colonies have 

only one royal pair.  


        Apart from the reproductives, all castes are sterile and wingless and have whitish 

bodies. Typically, the workers constitute the most numerous castes and are the smallest of 
                                                                                                 14

the adult forms. Workers build and provision the nest, tend the eggs, and feed and groom 

all  the  other  inmates  of  the  community.  In  some  species,  no  true  worker  caste  exists; 

undifferentiated  nymphs  do  the  work  in  the  colonies  of  such  species.  All  species  have 

soldiers  with  greatly  enlarged  heads.  The  soldiers  of  certain  species  are  equipped  with 

huge jaws for defense of the colony; in some species, the soldiers have long snouts, from 

which  they  can  eject  a  sticky,  poisonous  substance  to  envelop  an  enemy  and  render  it 

helpless.  


        Termites  feed  mainly  on  wood  or  other  materials  containing  cellulose.  The 

cellulose is partially digested by a protozoan ciliate living symbiotically in the intestines of 

the  worker.  Enzymes  produced  by  the  protozoan  break  down  the  cellulose  into 

components that can be assimilated by the termites. Digested cellulose is distributed by 

the  workers  to  members  lacking  the  protozoan.  Some  species  feed  on  vegetable  molds 

that  they  cultivate.  Other  species  obtain  a  special  fluid  secreted  by  beetles,  known  as 

termitophiles, which live as guests within the termite community.  


        Termite nests, called termitaries, vary widely. The nests of certain tropical species 

are huge mound‐like structures, often 6 m (20 ft) in height. These mounds have extremely 

hard walls, constructed from bits of soil cemented with saliva and baked by the sun. Inside 

the walls are numerous chambers and galleries, interconnected by a complex network of 

passageways. Ventilation and drainage are provided, and heat required for hatching the 

eggs is obtained from the fermentation of organic matter, which is stored in the chambers 

serving as nurseries (www.encarta.msn.com).
                                                                                                   15

        Of  the  more  than  55  species  common  in  the  United  States,  majority  build  their 

nests  underground.  The  subterranean  termites  are  extremely  destructive,  because  they 

tunnel  their  way  to  wooden  structures,  into  which  they  burrow  to  obtain  food.  Given 

enough  time,  they  will  feed  on  the  wood  until  nothing  is  left  but  a  shell.  

        Termites  are  classified  under    Phylum:  Arthropoda,  Class:  Insecta,  Subclass: 

Pterygota,  Infraclass:  Neoptera,  Superorder:  Dictyoptera,  Order:  Isoptera.  Subterranean 

termites came from family Termitidae. In the Philippines: Nasutitermes luzonicus Oshima, 

Macrotermes  gilvus  Hagen,  and  Microcerotermes  losbanosensis  Oshima.  Are  the  most 

common (http://insectscience.org/7.26).    


        "Higher  termites"  (Family  Termitidae)  comprise  three  quarters  of  all  described 

termite  species.  They  differ  from  "lower  termites"  (all  families  except  Termitidae)  by 

having  bacteria  rather  than  protozoa  in  their  guts.  Many  in  the  deserts  of  the  American 

Southwest are important foragers of plant litter, grass and dung. Most are harmless, not 

known to cause serious structural damage, even though species of Amitermes feed mostly 

on wood ( http://www.utoronto.ca). 


        Termitidae rely on symbiotic bacteria rather than protozoa (as in all other termite 

families, the ‘lower’ termites) for the digestion of cellulose. Most  Termitidae inhabit soil 

nests.  The  complex  architecture  of  the  large  mounds  of  the  Macrotermitinae  ensures 

ventilation  and  regulation  of  the  microclimate  of  the  nest.  There  are  five  families,  with 

about  1500  species,  occurring  world‐wide  but  mainly  in  the  tropics.(A  Dictionary  of 

Zoology, 1999).
                                                                                                   16

Chromolaena odorata 

        Chromolaena  odorata  (L.)  R.M.  King  &  H.  Robinson,  is  a  weed  belonging  to  the 

Asteraceae  family  which  has  now  become  so  common  in  the  Philippines  since  its 

introduction from South America through the country's southern backdoor in the 1960's. 

(CPD Technoguide No. 8, 2003) 


        C. odorata  is a native of South and Central America but thoroughly naturalized in 

parts  of  Africa,  India,  Ceylon,  Indochina,  Malaysia  and  Indonesia.  It  migrated  into  the 

Philippines some 20 years ago. It might have found its way into the country either through 

some  air  packing  materials  during  the  World  War  11  or  through  traders  from  South 

Borneo  where  it  is  growing  abundantly  in  borders  of  abaca  plantations 

(http://www.ehs.cdu.edu.au). 


        Hagonoy  is  classified  under  Kingdom:  Plantae;  Division:  Magnoliophyta;              

Class  :  Magnoliopsida;  Order:  Asterales;  Family:  Asteraceae;  Tribe:  Eupatorieae;  Genus: 

Chromolaena. 


        Locally  in  the  Philippines,  the  plant  is  known  as  Agonoi  (Tagalog,  Iloko,  Bisaya); 

Hagonoi  (Tagalog,  Monobo);  Haluhagonoi  (Tagalog);  Haluka  (Tagalog);  Salonai  (Iloko);  

Malasili  (Iloko);  Larogon  (Bagobo);  Anoioi  (Ivatan);  Palunag  (Pampangan);  Palunai 

(Pampangan); Lahunai (Sulu); and Hagonoy or Hagonio in many parts of the country. The 

common names in English are devil weed, bitter bush, Chromolaena, jack in the bush, siam 

weed,  and  triffid  weed.  The  other  names  are  verba  de  Maluco  (Spanish);  herbe  de  Laos 
                                                                                                17

(French);  kasengisil,  masigsig  (Guam);  ngengesil  (Palau);  Utuot  (Chuuk);  rumput  pirtih 

(Indonesian); and siam kraut (German). 


        It  is  an  economically  significant  weed  because  it  grows  rapidly  under  any 

agricultural  situations,  in  cattle  ranches,  and  under  plantations;  it  is  avoided  by  all 

livestock;  it  causes  diarrhea  when  ingested  or  even  fetal  deaths  among  cows;  and  it 

reduces  the  carrying  capacity  of  the  field  to  grow  more  beneficial  weeds.  (CPD 

Technoguide No. 8, 2003). 


        C.  odorata  was  first  noted  in  Zamboanga  and  then  shortly  thereafter  in  Palawan 

and Mindoro. From there, it spread very rapidly northward to Luzon, covering thousands 

of acres of range and crop lands per year. Recent survey of the weed showed that it has 

spread extensively in Mindanao island (except the northeastern region), in most islands in 

the  Visayas,  Palawan  and  in  areas  surrounding  Manila. In  Mindanao,  the  spread  of  the 

weed appears to be originating from important port areas of Davao and Zamboanga, and 

progressing toward the northeastern region (http://www.ehs.cdu.edu.au). 


        C. odorata is an herbaceous perennial that forms dense tangled bushes 1.5‐2.0m in 

height. It occasionally reaches its maximum height of 6m (as a climber on other plants). Its 

stems branch freely, with lateral branches developing in pairs from the axillary buds. The 

older  stems  are  brown  and  woody  near  the  base;  tips  and  young  shoots  are  green  and 

succulent.  The  root  system  is  fibrous  and  does  not  penetrate  beyond  20‐30  cm  in  most 

soils. The flowerheads are borne in terminal corymbs of 20 to 60 heads on all stems and 

branches. The flowers are white or pale bluish‐lilac, and form masses covering the whole 
                                                                                                 18

surface of the bush (Cruttwell and McFadyen, 1989). C. odorata is a big bushy herb with 

long  rambling  (but  not  twining)  branches;  stems  terete,  pubescent;  leaves  opposite, 

flaccid‐membranous,  velvety‐pubescent,  deltoid‐ovate,  acute,  3‐nerved,  very  coarsely 

toothed,  each  margin  with  1‐5  teeth,  or  entire  in  youngest  leaves;  base  obtuse  or 

subtruncate  but  shortly  decurrent;  petiole  slender,  1‐1.5cm  long;  blade  mostly  5‐12cm 

long,  3‐6cm  wide,  capitula  in  sub‐corymbose  axillary  and  terminal  clusters;  peduncles  1‐

3cm long, bracteate; bracts slender, 10‐12mm long; involucre of about 4‐5 series of bracts, 

pale with green nerves, acute, the lowest ones about 2mm long, upper ones 8‐9mm long, 

all acute, distally ciliate, flat, appressed except the extreme divergent tip; florets all alike 

(disc‐florets),  pale  purple  to  dull  off‐white,  the  styles  extending  about  4mm  beyond  the 

apex of the involucre, spreading radiately; receptacle very narrow; florets about 20‐30 or a 

few  more,  10‐12mm  long;  ovarian  portion  4mm  long;  corolla  slender  trumpet  form; 

pappus  of  dull  white  hairs  5mm  long;  achenes  glabrous  or  nearly  so  (Stone  1970).  The 

seeds of Siam weed are small (3‐5mm long, ~1mm wide, and weigh about 2.5mg seed‐1 

(Vanderwoude et al., 2005).  

        Moreover,  the  proximate,  amino  acid  and  phytochemical  composition  of 

Chromolaena  odorata  was  investigated.  A  high  total  carbohydrate  (20.58%  WW  and 

50.82%  DW),  crude  fibre  (10.76%  WW  and  26.57%  DW)  and  protein  (6.56%  WW  and 

16.20% DW) content was observed. The protein is rich in the essential amino acids (with 

histidine  and  phenylalanine  being  very  high)  and  has  a  protein  score  of  88.24%  with 

methionine  as  the  limiting  amino  acid.  The  phytochemical  screening  revealed  the 

presence  of  alkaloids,  cyanogenic  glycosides,  flavonoids  (aurone,  chalcone,  flavone  and 
                                                                                                       19

flavonol),  phytates  saponins  and  tannins.  The  anti‐nutrients  composition  includes 

cyanogenic glycosides (0.05% WW and 0.13% DW), phytates (0.22% WW and 0.54% DW), 

saponins (0.80% WW and 1.98% DW) and tannins (0.15% WW and 0.37% DW). Our result 

suggests that C. odorata is a source of high quality protein which could serve as a potential 

source of protein supplement (Ngozi, et Al., 2009).   

        The PCA‐Davao Research Center, after having been granted a permit, imported the 

stem‐galling fly, Procecidochares connexa Macquart (Diptera : Tephritidae) from Indonesia 

ACIAR project CS2 96/91 "Biological Control of Chromolaena odorata in Indonesia, Papua 

New Guinea and the Philippines". A series of host specificity tests on ‘hagonoy’ and several 

other  weed  and  tree  species  were  conducted  under  the  supervision  of  the  National 

Biosafety  Committee  of  the  Philippines  (NCBP)  of  the  Department  of  Science  and 

Technology (DOST). A year of testing showed  that the gall fly was highly host specific to 

‘hagonoy’. In a parallel project in Indonesia which imported the flies in 1994 and released 

in 1995 the flies are now widely spread among Chromolaena in several islands. 

        The gall fly lays its eggs on practically all of the growing tips of ‘hagonoy’. As much 

as  50  eggs  are  laid  by  a  single  female  throughout  its  short  lifetime  of  1  to  2  weeks.  In 

about 12 to 15 days the tips begin to swell as manifestation of the activity of the maggots 

inside. The gall attains a maximum of 9 by 13 mm in size and each contains from 2 to 10 

pupae.  Two  months  after  egg  laying  the  flies  start  to  emerge.  Egg  –laying  starts  almost 

immediately  after  mating.  Death  to  ‘hagonoy’  is  often  as  a  result  of  extreme  pressure 

exerted by the fly where almost all shoots develop galls. The final dried‐up ‘hagonoy’ show 

galls in every axil and in chains at tips (CPD Technoguide No. 8 Series of 2003). 
                                                                                                 20

        The  shrub  is  reported  to  be  highly  allelopathic  to  nearby  vegetation  (Muniappan 

1994), a fact that has been demonstrated in controlled studies (Sahid and Sugau 1993). It 

reduces the diameter growth of teak in infested plantations (Daryono and Hamzah 1979). 

It  was  thought  to  be  useful  in  the  control  of  Imperata  grass  and  for  this  reason  was 

deliberately introduced into the Ivory Coast, but the results were disappointing (Binggeli 

1999). Because of the abundance of dead leaves and dry shoots, C. odorata stands are a 

fire  hazard  (Muniappan  1994).  Cattle  do  not  eat  C.  odorata;  however,  it  is  browsed  by 

white‐tailed deer (Meyer and others 1984). In herbal medicine, leaf extracts with salt are 

used as a gargle for sore throats and colds. It is also used to scent aromatic baths (Liogier 

1990). Extracts of C. odorata have been shown to inhibit or kill Neisseria gonorrhea (the 

organism  that  causes  gonorrhoea)  in  vitro  (Caceres  and  others  1995)  and  to  accelerate 

blood  clotting  (Triratana  and  others  1991).  A  satisfactory  medium‐density  particleboard 

was  prepared  from  Christmas  bush  stems  (Kaleta  and  others  1999).  During  fallows 

between cultivation, Christmas bush adds copious amounts of organic matter to the soil 

and may reduce the populations of nematodes (M’Boob, 1991). It is also useful as mulch 

for row crops (Swennen and Wilson 1984).  

        In addition, the allelopathic effects of Chromolaena odorata L. aqueous leaf extract 

and  residues  incorporated  in  the  soil  on  the  growth  and  water  status  of  Lycopersicon 

esculentum  Mill  were  studied.  Significant  growth  reductions  in  L.  esculentum  were 

observed from additions of C. odorata aqueous leaf extract at concentrations as low as 1g 

fresh weight in 40ml of water. Reduction in growth was accompanied by decreases in leaf 

water  potential.  Incorporation  of  C.  odorata  leaf  material  into  the  soil  in  which          
                                                                                                  21

Lesculentum  Mill  seedlings  were  germinated  and  grown  caused  significant  depression  in 

growth over the 2‐week test period with addition of 2g residue to 80g soil. Allelochemicals 

released from C. odorata plants and residues are suggested as a possible explanation for 

yield reductions in crops in fields where C. odorata plants are present. One mechanism of 

toxic    action     on     seedlings     involved     interference      with     water      balance. 

(http://bioline.utsc.utoronto.ca/archive/00001932/) 

         Furthermore, essential oil extracts of Chromolaena odorata, and Lantana camara 

from  their  leaves  were  tested  for  efficacy  on  the  morality  of  the  maize  grain  weevil, 

Sitophilus zeamais (Coleoptera, Curculionidae). Concentrations of the essential oils relative 

to the maize grains of 0.013, 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1% (v/w) were used for A. conyzoides and 

0.063, 0.125, 0.25 and 0.50% (v/w) for C. odorata and L. camara. Twenty 7‐day old adult 

weevils were fed on maize grains treated with the above concentrations of the essential 

oils  in  Petri  dishes.  Control  dishes  contained  insects  and  maize  grains  without  essential 

oils.  The  experiment  was  repeated  three  times.  Dishes  were  incubated  in  the  laboratory 

for 7 days at 26°C and 75‐‐85% relative humidity. Insect mortality was recorded every 24 

h. Graphs of percentage mortality versus the duration of exposure were constructed and 

the LD50 was computed for each oil. Significant insect mortality was obtained with all the 

essential  oils  used.  The  mortality  of  S.  zeamais  increased  with  the  concentration  of  the 

essential  oils  of  the  three  plants  and  the  duration  of  exposure  of  the  weevils  on  the 

treated  substrates.  The  essential  oil  extract  of  Ageratum  conyzoides  was  the  most 

effective insecticide (LD50 = 0.09% in 24 h), followed by that of L. camara (LD50 = 0.16%) 

and C. odorata (LD50 = 6.78%). These results show that the essential oils of the leaves of 
                                                                                                     22

some  of  these  weed  species  may  be  exploited  for  insect  control  in  stored  products 

(http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=855900). 

        Furthermore,  studies  on  Chromolaena  odorata  oils  from  the  flowers  and  leaves 

showed toxicity to mosquitoes, although the extent of toxicity varied from each oil. Lt50 

determined for the C. odorata flower and leaf oils used on the larvae gave 10.6 minutes 

and 12.0 minutes respectively. Adult treatments also gave the LD50 of 2.5 and 4.0 minutes 

for the flower and leaf oils respectively. The C. odorata oils were effective against both the 

larvae  and  adults  of  the  mosquitoes  and  their  effects  found  to  be  persistent.  The  oil 

extracts  therefore  have  good  prospects  of  being  developed  as  insecticides  for  mosquito 

control (http://esa.confex.com/esa/2004/techprogram /paper_14489.htm). 

Solignum

        Solignum,  the  No.  1  wood  preservative  that  provides  sure  protection  against 

termites (anay), woodborers (bukbok) and fungi (amag). Solignum has been tried, tested 

and trusted in the Philippines for over 50 years now and is registered under Fertilizer and 

Pesticide  Authority  (FPA).  Solignum  is  available  in  two  variants:  Solignum  Colorless  and 

Solignum Brown (http://www.jardinedistribution.com/construction.php ?cid=10). 


        According  to  Fertilizer  and  Pesticide  Authority  (FPA),  the  major  termiticidal 

component  of  Solignum  is  permethrin.  (http://fpa.da.gov.ph/List%20of%20Registered%2 

0Agricultural%20Pesticide%20Products.pdf)  Permethrin  is  a  common  synthetic  chemical, 

widely  used  as  an  insecticide  and  acaricide  and  as  an  insect  repellent.  It  belongs  to  the 

family  of  synthetic  chemicals  called  pyrethroids  and  functions  as  a  neurotoxin,  affecting 

neuron  membranes  by  prolonging  sodium  channel  activation.  It  is  not  known  to  harm 
                                                                                                 23

most mammals or birds. It generally has a low mammalian toxicity and is poorly absorbed 

by  skin.  In  agriculture,  permethrin  is  mainly  used  on  cotton,  wheat,  maize,  and  alfalfa 

crops, and is also used to kill parasites on chickens and other poultry. It is also extensively 

used in Europe as a timber treatment against wood boring beetle (woodworm). Its use is 

controversial since, as a broad‐spectrum chemical, it kills indiscriminately; as well as the 

intended pests, it can harm beneficial insects including honey bees, aquatic life, and small 

mammals such as mice. Permethrin is toxic to cats and many cats die each year after being 

given flea treatments intended for dogs, or by contact with dogs that have recently been 

treated with permethrin. 


        Permethrin is also used in healthcare, to eradicate parasites such as head lice and 

mites responsible for scabies, and in industrial and domestic settings to control pests such 

as ants and termites. 


        Permethrin  kills  ticks  on  contact  with  treated  clothing.  According  to  the 

Connecticut  Department  of  Public  Health,  it  "has  low  mammalian  toxicity,  is  poorly 

absorbed through the skin and is rapidly inactivated by the body. Skin reactions have been 

uncommon.”  


        Permethrin  is  used  in  tropical  areas  to  prevent  mosquito‐borne  disease  such  as 

dengue  fever  and  malaria.  Mosquito  nets  used  to  cover  beds  may  be  treated  with  a 

solution of permethrin. This increases the effectiveness of the bed net by killing parasitic 

insects before they are able to find gaps or holes in the net. Malaria kills 1‐3 million people 

per year, and permethrin is believed to have very low if any toxicity in humans. Military 
                                                                                               24

personnel training in malaria‐endemic areas may be instructed to treat their uniforms with 

permethrin as well. An application should last several washes. 


       Recently,  in  South  Africa,  residues  of  permethrin  were  found  in  breast  milk, 

together with DDT, in an area that experienced DDT treatment for malaria control, as well 

as the use of pyrethroids in small‐scale agriculture. 


       Permethrin  is  extremely  toxic  to  fish.  Extreme  care  must  be  taken  when  using 

products containing permethrin near water sources. Permethrin is also highly toxic to cats. 

Flea and tick repellent formulas intended (and labeled) for dogs may contain permethrin 

(like k‐9 Advantix and Advantage Multi for Dogs) and cause feline permethrin toxicosis in 

cats:  specific  flea  and  tick  control  formulas  intended  for  feline  use,  such  as  those 

containing fipronil, should therefore be used for cats instead. 


       Permethrin  is  classified  by  the  US  EPA  a  likely  human  carcinogen,  based  on 

reproducible  studies  in  which  mice  fed  permethrin  developed  liver  and  lung  tumors. 

Carcinogenic  action  in  nasal  mucosal  cells  for  inhalation  exposure  is  suspected  due  to 

observed genotoxicity in human tissue samples, and in rat livers the evidence of increased 

preneoplastic  lesions  lends  concern  over  oral  exposure  (http://en.wikipedia.org/ 

wiki/Permethrin). 
                                           Chapter III

                                     METHODOLOGY 

       This  chapter  deals  with  the  materials,  methods,  and  procedures  used  in  the 

preparation of the different test substances and its application to termites. It also includes 

the  data  gathered  and  the  statistical  analysis  of  the  data.  Research  flowchart  is  also 

presented in Figure 3.  

 

Materials 

       Plant material – Chromolaena odorata leaves collected from Aringay, La Union 

       Test organism – termites 

       Laboratory  apparatus  –  triple  beam  balance,  spatula,  stirring  rod,  beaker, 

Erlenmeyer flask, graduated cylindeccr, petri dish, scissor, timer, blender, rotary evaporator, 

desiccators,  sprayer, clean containers 

       Chemicals ‐ chemical termiticide (Solignum), technical grade methanol 

       Others – distilled water 

 

Research Design  

       The  study  did  not  use  any  design  for  the  reason  that  studies  such  as  this  one, 

concerned  treatment  of  the  experimental  animals  done by  batches  or  done  one  after  the 

other and not at the same time. 

       In  line  with  this,  this  study  utilized  the  experimental  method  of  research  using 

standard laboratory diagnostic procedures involved in termiticidal potential of hagonoy. 
                                                                                            26

        The study used five treatments, which are as follows: 

        a. T1 – positive control, commercial pesticide (Solignum) 

        b. T2 – leaf decoction from C. odorata 

        c. T3 – expressed leaf juice from C. odorata 

        d. T4 – 30% C. odorata leaf extract solution 

        e. T5 – 60% C. odorata leaf extract solution 

     

Collection and Preparation of Plant Material  

        Fresh  leaves  of  C.  odorata  were  removed  from  the  plant.  Only  leaves  without 

adhering dirt particles or associated with insect or insect bites were used. The leaves were 

washed by running water. 

 

Preparation of Decoction from C. odorata Leaves 

        About 100 grams of dried C. odorata leaves were boiled in 250 mL water. Boiling was 

done for about 15 minutes. Afterwards, the mixture is allowed to cool then placed in a clean 

container. Eventually, the mixture was filtered using filter paper. The filtrate collected was 

the decoction used in the treatment.  

 

Preparation of Expressed Juice  

        About 100 grams of fresh C. odorata leaves were pounded using mortar and pestle 

and squeezed using a clean cheese cloth. The obtained juice was filtered using filter paper. 

Finally, the expressed leaf juice was placed in a clean container.   
                                                                                                            27

Preparation of the Methanol Leaf Extract  

        Fresh C. odorata leaves were dried, cut into small pieces, and homogenized using a 

blender.  The  ground  leaves  were  soaked  in  technical  grade  methanol  for  two  days  with 

occasional  stirring.  The  volume  of  solvent  was  just  enough  to  immerse  the  material.  The 

methanol  extract  was  filtered  through  a  filter  paper.  After  filtration,  the  methanol  was 

removed  by  concentrating  at  400C  in  vacuo  using  a  rotary  evaporator,  and  kept  in  a 

dessicator at room temperature to remove the moisture of the specimen.  

 

Test Organism 

        A total of 225 subterranean termites in more or less uniform in sizes were collected 

from  Agoo,  La  Union.  The  researchers  dug  up  termitaries  and  collected  the  termites 

including the soil where they thrived on and placed in a box. After the collection, the test 

organisms  were  separated  from  the  soil  and  placed  them  in  a  petri  dish.  Each  petri  dish 

contained 15 termites. 

 

Application of the Test Substances 

        Five (5) treatments namely T1 – positive control, commercial pesticide (Solignum); T2 

‐  leaf  decoction  from  C.  odorata,  T3  ‐    expressed  leaf  juice  from  C.  odorata,      T4  ‐  30%  C. 

odorata leaf extract solution, and T5 ‐ 60% C. odorata leaf extract solution were utilized in 

the study. The test substances were sprayed once to the sample termites by using sprayer. 
                                                                                                     28

          These  doses  were  administered  once  for  each  treatment.  The  termiticidal  effects 

were  observed  as  to  the  length  of  time  the  termites  are  killed.    The  treatment  was 

replicated three (3) times.  

 

Data Gathered 

          The following data was collected during the course of the study: 

          The  length  of  time  the  termites  were  killed.  The  data  on  the  length  of  time  the 

termites were killed after the application of the test substances was determined using timer 

in minutes. This was done for every replication. 

 

Data Analysis 

          The  data  gathered  were  tabulated  and  computed  using  the  following  statistical 

tools: 

 

          1. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) to determine whether significant differences exist 

              in the length of time the termites are killed among the five treatments; and 

           

          2.  Scheffé's Test to find out where the difference lies and determine which among 

              the five treatments has the greatest termiticidal potential. 

 

 

 
                                                                                          29

 

 

 
     Preparation and collection of                     Preparation of various test 
     resources used in the study:                      substances: 
        a. plant material                                a. Positive control 
        b. test organisms                                b. leaf decoction from 
        c. laboratory apparatuses                           hagonoy 
            and equipment                                c. expressed leaf juice from 
        d. chemicals, etc.                                  hagonoy 
                                                         d. methanol extracts 




     Gathering of data: 
      a. length of time for the test                   Application of the various test 
          organisms to die as                          substances to the test 
          affected by various test                     organisms (termites) 
          substances 




                                Analyzing the data gathered 
                                using the following statistical 
                                tools: 
                                    a. Analysis of Variance 
                                    b. Scheffé's Test 




Figure 4. The Research Flowchart depicting chronologically the methods and procedures 
               used in the study. 
                                                       Chapter IV

                                              RESULTS AND DISCUSSION  


              This  chapter  presents  the  analysis,  discussion,  and  interpretation  of  the  data 

gathered  from  the  test  organisms  that  were  treated  with  the  Chromolaena  odorata  leaf 

decoction, expressed juice, and various concentration levels. It also discusses the findings in 

relation to the problems in Chapter I. 

 

Table 1. Length of time in minutes for the termites to die due to various treatments 

                                                          Replication                   Treatment 

              Treatment                         1                2        3               Mean 

                     T1                        1.43             1.48     1.45              1.45 
       (positive control,  Solignum)
                     T2                        1.73             1.83     1.75              1.77 
    (leaf decoction from C. odorata)
                     T3                        2.05             2.25     2.15              2.15 
    (expressed leaf juice  from C. odorata)
                     T4                        1.33             1.58     1.50              1.47 
     (30% C. odorata leaf extract solution)
                     T5                        1.18             1.42     1.28              1.29 
    (60% C. odorata leaf extract solution)

          GRAND MEAN                                                                      1.626 

                                                             
               
              Table 1 presents the data on the length of time in minutes for the sample termites 

to  die  upon  application  of  the  various  treatments.    The  results  reveal  that  the  sample 

termites  in T5  (60%  Chromolaena  odorata leaf extract  solution)  has  the  shortest  length  of 

time with a mean of 1.29 minutes.  This is followed by T1 (positive control, Solignum) with a 
                                                                                                  31

mean  1.45  minutes,  T4  (30%  Chromolaena  odorata  leaf  extract  solution)  with  a  mean  of 

1.47, and T2 (leaf decoction from Chromolaena odorata) with a mean of 1.77. The treatment 

with the longest time for the termites to die is T3 (expressed leaf juice from Chromolaena 

odorata) with a mean of 2.15 minutes.  The shorter the number of mean time, the higher its 

termiticidal  potential,  so  this  implies  that  the  T5  (60%  Chromolaena  odorata  leaf  extract 

solution)  which  has  the  lowest  mean  is  the  most  effective  and  it  has  the  greatest 

termiticidal potential among the various treatments.  

 

 

                       2.5
 
                        2
 

                       1.5
  Length of time in                                                                      R1
      minutes
                        1                                                                R2
                                                                                         R3
                       0.5

                        0
                             1         2           3           4           5
 
                                               Treatment
 

Figure 5. Length of time in minutes for the termites to die due to various treatments 

 

 
                                                                                                       32

 

Table 2. One‐Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) Summary Table 

     Source of          Degrees of            Sum of Squares      Mean Square               F‐ratio 
     Variation           Freedom 
                                                                                               
      Within                 4                     1.39                0.35                38.89* 
    Treatments 
                                                                                                
     Between                 10                    0.09                0.009 
    Treatments 
                                                                                                
      TOTAL                  14                    1.48 
Legend: *significant at ∞ = .05                                    CV = 5.83 % 

        The  One‐Way  Analysis  of  Variance  is  used  to  compare  the  means  of  the  five 

treatments is presented in Table 2.   The F‐test shows that there are significant differences 

among the means of the five treatments at 0.05 significance level.  This implies that there 

are treatments that are more efficient than the others in terms of the length of time for the 

sample  termites  to  die  upon  application  of  such  treatment.  Since  the  Coefficient  of 

Variation  (CV)  is  5.83  %,  the  study  is  highly  reliable.  Hence,  to  determine  where  the 

difference lies, was further tested using Scheffé's Test.   

        Furthermore, Table 3, on the next page, depicts that all pairwise comparisons exhibit 

significant differences with the exception of T1, the positive control and T4,  30% C. odorata 

leaf  extract  solution.  This  implies  that  T1  and  T4  have  comparable  effect  in  terms  of  the 

length  of  time  it  takes  the  sample  termites  to  die.  Thus,  the  application  of  the  positive 

control,  Solignum  (T1)  and  the  application  of  30%  C.  odorata  leaf  extract  solution  (T4)  are 

equally efficient in killing termites. Furthermore, since all comparisons with T5 which has the 
                                                                                                        33

lowest mean time, are significantly different, then it can be derived that T5  (60% C. odorata 

leaf extract solution)  is the best among the five treatments.   

 

Table 3. Pairwise Comparison of the Mean Time using Scheffé's Test 

Between Treatments                    F’                    F(.05)(k‐1)                 ∞ = .05 

       T1 vs. T2                  1 896.30                    13.44                    significant 

       T1 vs. T3                  9 074.10                    13.44                    significant 

       T1 vs. T4                    7.41                      13.44                  not significant 

       T1 vs. T5                     474                      13.44                    significant 

       T2 vs. T3                    2 674                     13.44                    significant 

       T2 vs. T4                  1 666.7                     13.44                    significant 

       T2 vs. T5                  4 266.7                     13.44                    significant 

       T3 vs. T4                    8 563                     13.44                    significant 

        T3 vs. T5                 13 696.3                    13.44                    significant 

       T4 vs. T5                     600                      13.44                    significant 




        Conclusively, the null hypotheses, indicating that there are no significant differences 

on  the  length  of  time  the  termites  are  killed  upon  the  application  of  the  five  treatments, 

and  between  the  pairs  of  treatments,  are  rejected.  This  is  because  each  treatment  is 

significantly  different  from  one  another.  This  strongly  indicates  that  60%  C.  odorata 

methanol leaf extract solution is the best among the five treatments however; the positive 

control and 30% C. odorata methanol leaf extract solution are equally efficient. 
                                             Chapter V

           SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS, AND RECOMENDATIONS  

        This chapter presents a summary of the experimental study, the drawn conclusions, 

and the offered recommendations.  

Summary 

        This  study  aimed  to  analyze  and  determine  the  termiticidal  potential  of 

Chromolaena odorata (L.) King & Robinson (Hagonoy). 

        It  study  utilized  the  experimental  method  of  research  which  focused  on  the  use 

standard laboratory diagnostic procedures implicated in termiticidal potential of Hagonoy in 

terms  of  the  length  of  time  for  the  termites  to  die  upon  application  of  the  various 

treatments.   

        The  study  was  conducted  at  DMMMSU  ‐  South  La  Union  Campus,  Agoo,  La  Union 

from  December  2008  to  February  2009.  Crude  extraction  of  the  termiticidal  components 

was  done  at  the  Bureau  of  Plant  Industry  (BPI)  –  Baguio  Pesticide  Analytical  Laboratory 

(BPAL), Baguio City. Verification of the plant material was done at the Botany Division of the 

National Museum, Manila. 

        The  methods  used  were  collection  and  preparation  of  plant  material,  the 

preparations  on  decoction  from  Chromolaena  odorata  leaves,  expressed  juice,  methanol 

extract, and the application of the various substances to the termites. 

        Specifically,  this  study  tested  if  there  were  significant  differences  in  the  length  of 

time  the  termites  were  killed  among  and  between  the  five  treatments  which  were  T1  – 

positive control, commercial pesticide (Solignum), T2 ‐ leaf decoction from C. odorata, T3  ‐ 
                                                                                                         35

expressed leaf juice from C. odorata,   T4 ‐ 30% C. odorata leaf extract solution, and T5 ‐ 60% 

C. odorata leaf extract solution. The extracting solvent used was technical grade methanol. 

Thus, the components that could only be extracted with methanol were considered. For the 

treatments that used expressed juice and decoction, distilled water was used as the solvent. 

        The data gathered were tabulated and compute using One‐Way Analysis of Variance 

to  determine  whether  significant  differences  exist  in  the  length  of  time  the  termites  are 

killed after the exposure to the five treatments. Scheffé's Test was used to find out where 

the difference lies among the five treatments had the greatest termiticidal potential.                

        The study revealed that there were significant differences in the length of time the 

termites  were  killed  after  exposure  to  the  various  treatments  and  between  the  pair  of 

treatments.  The  data  gathered  showed  that  sample  termites  in  T5  (60%  Chromolaena 

odorata  leaf  extract  solution)  had  the  least  length  of  time  with  a  mean  of  1.29  minutes.  

This  was  followed  by  T1  (positive  control,  Solignum)  with  a  mean  1.45  minutes,  T4  (30% 

Chromolaena odorata leaf extract solution) with a mean of 1.47, and T2 (leaf decoction from 

Chromolaena  odorata)  with  a  mean  of  1.77.  The  treatment  with  the  longest  time  for  the 

sample to die was T3 (expressed leaf juice from Chromolaena odorata) with a mean of 2.15 

minutes. 

        The result of the One‐Way Analysis of Variance was used to compare the means of 

the  five  treatments.  The  F‐test  showed  that  there  are  significant  differences  among  the 

means  of  the  five  treatments  at  0.05  significance  level.    This  implied  that  there  were 

treatments  that  are  more  efficient  than  the  others  in  terms  of  the  length  of  time  for  the 

sample termites to die upon application of such treatment.  The Scheffé's Test implies that 
                                                                                                   36

T1 and T4 had comparable effects in terms of the length of time it took the sample termites 

to die. Furthermore, since all comparisons with T5  (60% Chromolaena odorata leaf extract 

solution) which had the lowest mean time are significantly different, it was concluded that 

T5  was  the  best  among  and  the  most  effective  the  five  treatments.  Besides,  T5  (60%  C. 

odorata leaf extract solution was the best substitute for Solignum, the positive control, for 

the reason that C. odorata is environment and health friendly in contrast with Solignum. 

Conclusions 

        Within the limits of the study, the following conclusions were drawn: 

    1. Based on the results of the study in terms of the length of time for the termites to 

        die, 60% Chromolaena odorata leaf extract solution is effective in killing the sample 

        termites with the shortest length of time. The shorter the number of mean time, the 

        higher  its  termiticidal  potential.  However,  the  positive  control  (Solignum)  and  30% 

        Chromolaena  odorata  leaf  extract  solution  have  comparable  effect  in  terms  of  the 

        length of time it takes for the sample termites to die. This indicates that the T1 and 

        T4  are  not  significantly  different  from  each  other  which  implies  that  Solignum  and 

        30% C. odorata leaf extract solution have the same effect (same length of time) for 

        the termites to die. 

    2. In  terms  to  the  length  of  time  for  the  termites  to  die,  there  are  significant 

        differences between the pairwise comparisons of T1 (positive control, Solignum) vs. 

        T2 (leaf decoction from C. odorata)  , T1 (positive control, Solignum) vs. T3  (expressed 

        leaf juice from C. odorata),  T1 (positive control, Solignum) vs. T5  (60% C. odorata leaf 

        extract solution), T2 (leaf decoction from C. odorata)  vs. T3 (expressed leaf juice from 
                                                                                                       37

        C.  odorata),  T2  (leaf  decoction  from  C.  odorata)  vs.  T4  (30%  C.  odorata  leaf  extract 

        solution)  ,  T2  (leaf  decoction  from  C.  odorata)  vs.  T5  (60%  C.  odorata  leaf  extract 

        solution), T3 (expressed leaf juice from C. odorata) vs. T4 (30% C. odorata leaf extract 

        solution), T3 (expressed leaf juice from C. odorata) vs. T5 (60% C. odorata leaf extract 

        solution),  and  T4  (30%  C.  odorata  leaf  extract  solution)  vs.  T5  (60%  C.  odorata  leaf 

        extract solution). However, the positive control (Solignum) and 30% C. odorata leaf 

        extract  solution  are  comparable  with  each  other.  Based  from  the  results,  leaf 

        decoction, expressed leaf juice, and the different extract solutions from C.  odorata 

        are efficient in terms of their termiticidal potential. 

    3. The  positive  control  and  the  30%  C.  odorata  methanol  leaf  extract  solution  have 

        comparable effect in terms of the length of time it takes for the sample termites to 

        die.  Thus,  the  application  of  the  positive  control,  Solignum  and  the  application  of 

        30%  C.  odorata  leaf  extract  solution  are  equally  efficient  in  killing  termites. 

        Furthermore,  since  all  comparisons  with  T5  which  has  the  lowest  mean  time  are 

        significantly  different,  then  it  can  be  derived  that  T5  is  the  best  and  the  most 

        effective in eradicating termites among the five treatments.   

Recommendations 

        According to results of the study, the following recommendations were offered: 

    1. In  view  of  the  fact  that  there  was  a  great  termiticidal  potential  of  Chromolaena 

        odorata, which has a comparable effects to the commercial chemical termiticides, it 

        is recommended that this plant be used as the best alternative termiticide for it is 

        health and environment friendly. 
                                                                                                   38

    2. While leaf decoction, expressed leaf juice, and the different concentration levels of 

        Chromolaena odorata have almost the same efficacy, decoction is better to use for 

        practical reasons. And it is more economical to use and is easy to be obtained by the 

        people especially those living in far‐flung areas and places that cannot be reached by 

        modern products. 

    3. Additional studies should utilize the same preparations of Chromolaena odorata to 

        investigate its effects on other type of pest as well as plants. 

    4. Further  studies  should  be  conducted  by  oil  extraction  and  fractionation  of  the 

        various  chemical  constituents  of  Chromolaena  odorata  to  analyze  which  of  these 

        substances have the potential to cause such termiticidal effect.  

    5. Other researchers may employ the similar arrangement and set‐up of treatments of 

        the  study  using  variety  of  plants  in  analyzing  and  determining  their  potential  not 

        only as termiticide but also another type of pesticide. 

    6. Ultimately, a great termiticidal potential of Chromolaena odorata was found out. For 

        this reason, the researchers recommend the patenting of termiticidal product out of 

        Chromolaena  odorata  which  is  efficient,  cheap,  economical,  organic,  and 

        environment and health friendly.  

     

 

 

 
                                                                                         39

                                       REFERENCES 
                                             

A  Dictionary  of  Zoology  1999,    Oxford  University  Press  1999.    ISBN:  0192800760 
       http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1O8‐Termitidae.html

Acda, M. 2007 Toxicity of Thiamethoxam Against Philippine Subterranean Termites. 6pp. 
       Journal of Insect Science 7:26, available online:  insectscience.org/7.26  

Ahiati, JT. 2004. A Study of the Insecticidal Effects of Chromolaena odorata Oil Extracts 
       on the Larvae and Adults of Mosquitoes (Family Culicidae) 

       http://esa.confex.com/esa/2004/techprogram /paper_14489.htm


Aterrado E.D.,Sanico R.L, Status of Chromolaena Odorata Research in the Philippines. 
       Davao Research Center, Davao City, Philippines  & Visayas State College of 
       Agriculture, Baybay, Leyte 6521‐A,   Philippines. http://www.ehs.cdu.edu.au/ 
       chromolaena/proceedings/first/Status%20of%20Chromolaena% 
       20odorata%20research%20in%20the%20Philippines.htm 
 
Bamikole, M.A et. Al. 2004.  Converting Bush to Meat: A Case of Chromolaena odorata 
       Feeding to Rabbits. Department of Animal Science, University of Benin, Nigeria 
 
Bouda, H. (et al). Effect of Essential Oils from Leaves of Ageratum conyzoides, Lantana 
       camara and Chromolaena odorata on the Mortality of Sitophilus zeamais 
       (Coleoptera, curculionidae). 
       http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=855900
 
Broto, Antonio S. 2006. Statistics Made Simple. Second Edition. National Bookstore, 
       Quezon City, Philippines. 
                                                                                                 40

Chromolaena odorata. http://www.ehs.cdu.edu.au/ chromolaena/proceedings/first/ 
       Status%20of%20Chromolena%20odorata%20research%20in%20the%20Philippin
       es.htm

Chromolaena odorata.www.fs.fed.us/global/iitf/pdf/shrubs/ 
       Chromolaena%20odoratum.pdf
 
Chromolaena odorata. http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecology.asp?fr=1&si =47 
 
Eleyinmi, Afolabi. 2007. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of Gongronema 
       latifolium .Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Sciences, University 
       of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2P5, Canada 
 
Enyi, J., 2001. Allelopathic Effects of Chromolaena Odorata L. (R. M. King and Robinson – 
       (Awolowo Plant’ Toxin on Tomatoes (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill) 
       http://biblioteca.universia.net/html_bura/ficha/params/id/3920514.html  
 
Guidebook to Grassland Plants (A Resource Material for Biology Teachers). 2003 
       Foundation for the Advancement of Science Education,Inc., Science 
       Education Center, University of the Philippines Press, Diliman, Quezon City. 

List of Registered Agricultural Pesticide Products as of 31 Dec 2007. 2008  PRSD. 
       Fertilizer  and  Pesticide  Authority,  FPA  Bldg.  B.A.I.  Compound  Visayas  Ave.  Diliman, 
       QuezonCity.http://fpa.da.gov.ph/List%20of%20Registered%20Agricultural% 

       20Pesticide%20Products.pdf 


Ngozi,  Igboh,  Jude,  Ikewuchi  and  Catherine,  Ikewuchi.  2009.    Chemical  Profile  of 
       Chromolaena  odorata  L.  (King  and  Robinson)  Leaves.  Pakistan  Journal  of 
       Nutrition,  University  of  Port  Harcourt,  Department  of  Biochemistry,  Port 
       Harcourt, Nigeria 
                                                                                              41

 
Plants. http://encarta.msn.com
 
Padilla, et. Al., Chromolaena odorata as Termite Eradicator. 2006, Agoo Kiddie Special 
        School, Agoo, La Union 
 
Primer on Biological Control of Hagonoy (Chromolaena odorata).CPD Technoguide No.8, 
        2003.  Crop  Protection  Division,  Davao  Research  Center,Agricultural  Research  & 
        Development Branch, Philippine Coconut Authority,Bago‐Oshiro, Davao City. 
 
Quisumbing,  E.  1978.    Medicinal  Plants  of  the  Philippines,  Katha  Publishing  Co.,  Inc. 
        Quezon City, Philippines.  


Termite. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Termite

Termites. www.encarta.msn.com


Termites. www.thefreedictionary.com

Permethrin. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permethrin.   
 
Protect  Your  Wood,  Preserve  Your  Home.  http:  /www.  jardinedistribution.com/ 
        construction.php ?cid=10. 
 
Yaojian,  L.    2004.  Study  on  the  Termiticidal  Components  of  Juniperus  virginiana, 
        Chamaecyparis         nootkatensis      and           Chamaecyparis         lawsoniana. 
        http://etd.lsu.edu/docs/available/etd‐01172004‐
        225708/unrestricted/Liu_thesis.pdf  
 
                           
 
                                                                     42 


                    EXPERIMENTAL PLATES 
                              




                                                              
     Plate 1. Chromolaena odorata in its natural environment 
(from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chromolaena_odorata.jpg)  
                                 




                                                                 
                                   
          Plate 2. Fresh leaves of Chromolaena odorata  
                                   
                                                                  43 




                                                               
                           
          Plate 3. The experimental set‐up 
                           
                           




                                                           
                            
Plate 4. The separation of test organism from the soil 
                            
                                                            44 




                                                         
  Plate 5. The test organisms placed on the dish 
                           
                           
                           




                                                     
Plate 6. Decoction of Chromolaena odorata leaves 
                                                                 45 




                                                              
Plate 7. Pounding of fresh Chromolaena odorata leaves 
                             




                                                          
    Plate 8. Air dried Chromolaena odorata leaves 
                             
                             
                                                                                       46 




                                                                                  
                          Plate 9. Preparation of Extract 
                                          
                                          




                                                                                   
Plate 10. Laboratory personnel of the Bureau of Plant Industry – National Pesticide 
                 Analytical Laboratory performing the Rotavation 
                                                                                 47 


                                     




                                                                              
Plate 11. The test organisms administered by positive control (Solignum)  
                                     
                                     
                                     




                                                                          
Plate 12. The test organisms administered by leaf decoction from hagonoy 
                                                                                 48 


                                     
                                     




                                                                          
Plate 13. The test organism administered by expressed juice from hagonoy 
                                      




                                                                              
                                     
  Plate 14. The test organism administered by 30% leaf extract solution 
                                                                               49 


                                    
                                    




                                                                        
Plate 15. The test organisms administered by 60% leaf extract solution 
                                   




                                                                            
  Plate 16. The test organisms as affected by the various treatments 
                                                                                      50 


                                          




                                                                                   
                                          
 Plate 17. The researchers introducing the various test substances to the termites 
                                          




                                                                               
Plate 18. Researcher of the National Museum, Botany Division determining the plant 
                             material used in the study 
                                          APPENDICES 

                                                

Appendix A. Sample Computation for Methanol Leaf Extract Solutions 

I. 30% Methanol Leaf Extract Solution 

       100 mL hagonoy methanol leaf extract solution 

              = 100 mL  ×  30% 

              = 100 mL  ×  .30  

              = 30 mL pure hagonoy methanol leaf extract  

              = 100 mL – 30 mL  

              = 70 mL distilled water 

              = 70 mL distilled water + 30 mL pure hagonoy methanol leaf extract 

 

II. 60% Methanol Leaf Extract Solution 

       100 mL hagonoy methanol leaf extract solution 

              = 100 mL  ×  60% 

              = 100 mL  ×  .60  

              = 60 mL pure hagonoy methanol leaf extract  

              = 100 mL – 60 mL  

              = 40 mL distilled water 

              = 40mL distilled water + 60mL pure hagonoy methanol leaf extract 

 

 
                                                                        52

Appendix B. Statistical Formula 

I. Analysis of Variance



1.     Degrees of freedom (df)

       dfwithin = total number of treatments -1

       dfbetween = total df – dfwithin – replication df

       Total df = total number of observations – 1



2.     Sum of Squares (SS)

       Correlation Factor (CF)

                      ( grand total ) 2
       CF =
              total number of observatio ns

       Total Sum of Squares =       ∑X   2
                                             −CF


       Block Sum of Squares =         ∑ (treatment total )   2

                                                                 − CF
                                             replication

       Sum of Squares between = Total SS – Block SS – SSwithin



3.     Mean Square (MS)

                       SS within
       MSwithin =
                    Treatment − 1

                     SS between
       MSbetween =
                     t ( r − 1)
                                                            53



4.       Observed F – Value

                                                MSwithin
                   Observed F (within) =
                                                MSbetween


5.       Coefficient of Variation (CV)

                                    MS between
                    CV =                       × 100
                                  grand mean



II. Scheffé's Test

               (T1 − T2 ) 2
         F'=    SW 2 ( n1 +n2 )
                    n1n2



where:

         T1 = Mean of 1st sample

         T2 = Mean of 2nd sample

         SW= MSbetween

         n1= Total of 1st sample

         n2= Total of 2nd sample
                                                                      54

Appendix C. Sample Computation of ANOVA and Scheffé’s Test 


I. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)


A.    Degrees of Freedom (df)

      df between = 5-1 = 4

      df within = 10

      Total df= 15 – 1 = 14



B.    Sum of Squares (SS)

                      ( grand total ) 2       ( 24 .41) 2   595 .85
       CF =                                 =             =
              total number of observatio ns       15          15

      CF = 39.72333333



      Total SS =   ∑x   2
                            − CF

      Total SS = 1.48

      SSbetween=   ∑ (treatment total)   2
                                             − CF

      SSbetween= 0.09

      SSwithin= total SS – SSbetween

      SSwithin= 41.11 – 37.72 = 1.39
                                          55

C.   Mean Square (MS)

                  SS within    1.39
     MSwithin=              =
                   t −1       (5 − 1)

     MSwithin= 0.35

                    SS between   .09
     MSbetween=                =
                    t ( r − 1) 5(3 − 1)

     MSbetween= 0.009

                     MS within   0.35
     F – value =               =
                     MSbetween 0.009

     F – value = 38.89

                 MS between
     CV=                      × 100
           Grand Mean

            0.009
     CV=          × 100
           1.626

     CV= 5.83%
                                                        56

II. Scheffé's Test



               (T1 − T2 ) 2
         F'=    SW 2 ( n1 +n2 )
                    n1n2




1.     T1 vs. T2

             (1.45 − 1.77) 2    0.1024
        F '=          2
                             =          = 1,896 .30
               (.009) (6)      0.000054
                   9

2.     T1 vs. T3

               (1.45 − 2.15) 2      0.49
        F '=            2
                               =          = 9,074 .10
                 (.009 ) (6)     0.000054
                      9

3.     T1 vs. T4

               (1.45 − 1.47 ) 2    0.0004
        F'=             2
                                =          = 7.41
                 (.009) (6)       0.000054
                      9

4.     T1 vs. T5

            (1.45 − 1.29) 2    0.0256
        F'=          2
                            =          = 474 .00
              (.009) (6)      0.000054
                   9

5.     T2 vs. T3

               (1.77 − 2.15) 2    0.1444
        F'=             2
                               =          = 2,674
                 (.009 ) (6)     0.000054
                      9
                                                      57

6.    T2 vs. T4

          (1.77 − 1.47 ) 2      0.09
      F'=          2
                           =          = 1,666 .70
            (.009 ) (6)      0.000054
                9

7.    T2 vs. T5

             (1.77 − 1.29) 2    0.2304
      F '=            2      =          = 4,266.70
               (.009) (6)      0.000054
                   9

8.    T3 vs. T4

             (2.15 − 1.47) 2    0.4624
      F '=           2       =          = 8,563 .00
               (.009) (6)      0.000054
                   9

9.    T3 vs. T5

           (2.15 − 1.29) 2    0.7396
      F '=         2       =          = 13,696 .30
             (.009) (6)      0.000054
                 9

10.   T4 vs. T5

             (1.47 − 1.29) 2    0.0324
      F '=            2
                             =          = 600 .00
               (.009) (6)      0.000054
                   9
                                                                                                                    58

Appendix D. Tables 

 

Table 1. Length of time in minutes for the termites to die due to various treatments 

                                                                          
                                                                     Replication                        Treatment 

              Treatment                              1                        2               3           Mean 

                     T1                             1.43                     1.48            1.45         1.45 
       (positive control,  Solignum)
                     T2                             1.73                     1.83            1.75         1.77 
    (leaf decoction from C. odorata)
                     T3                             2.05                     2.25            2.15         2.15 
    (expressed leaf juice  from C. odorata)
                     T4                             1.33                     1.58            1.50         1.47 
     (30% C. odorata leaf extract solution)
                     T5                             1.18                     1.42            1.28         1.29 
    (60% C. odorata leaf extract solution)

          GRAND MEAN                                                                                      1.626 

 

 

Table 2. One‐Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) Summary Table 

       Source of                        Degrees of              Sum of Squares           Mean Square     F‐ratio 
       Variation                         Freedom 
                                                                                                             
        Within                               4                       1.39                   0.35         38.89* 
      Treatments 
                                                                                                             
       Between                                10                     0.09                   0.009 
      Treatments 
                                                                                                             
        TOTAL                                 14                     1.48 
Legend: *significant at ∞ = .05                                                          CV= 5.83% 

 
                                                                                         59

 

Table 3. Pairwise Comparison of the Mean Time using Scheffé's Test 

Between Treatments              F’                 F(.05)(k‐1)           ∞ = .05 

      T1 vs. T2              1 896.3                  13.44             significant 

      T1 vs. T3              9 074.1                  13.44             significant 

      T1 vs. T4                7.41                   13.44           not significant 

      T1 vs. T5                474                    13.44             significant 

      T2 vs. T3               2 674                   13.44             significant 

      T2 vs. T4              1 666.7                  13.44             significant 

      T2 vs. T5              4 266.7                  13.44             significant 

      T3 vs. T4               8 563                   13.44             significant 

       T3 vs. T5             13 696.3                 13.44             significant 

      T4 vs. T5                600                    13.44             significant 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                                60

 

Appendix E. Figures 



                        PROBLEM TREE

                 Structural Damage and
                 Additional Expenses to
                    Repair Damaged
                       Properties               Use of Expensive
                                              Chemical Termiticide




                                        TERMITES




                                               Lack of Knowledge of
                        Destructive
                                                Plant Alternative as
                                                    Termiticide




              Figure 1. Problem Tree 
                                                                        61



                      PROBLEM TREE



                       Risk to Human
                     and Animal Health
                                                            Expensive

              Pesticide           Toxicity to Natural Enemies
             Resistance             and Other Non-target
                                           Organisms




                                   DEPENDENCE
                                             ON
                                  INSECTICIDES



                  Highly                   Easy to Use
                 Effective


                                Readily             Lack of Knowledge on
                               Available             its Impacts to Health
                                                       and Environment

Figure 2. Problem Tree 
                                                                                             62

 
 

 

 

         INDEPENDENT VARIBLE                                 DEPENDENT VARIABLE 
                                                   
                                                           
   Treatment:                                             Length of time the termites are 
                                                          killed after the exposure to: 
     a. T1 ‐ positive control,                             
         (Solignum)                                           a. leaf decoction from 
                                                                  hagonoy 
    b. T2‐ leaf decoction from                             
         C. odorata                                           b. expressed leaf juice 
                                                                  from hagonoy 
  c. T3‐ expressed leaf juice                              
         from        C. odorata                               c. methanol leaf extract 
                                                                  solutions 
  d. T4‐ 30% C. odorata leaf                               
         extract solution 
   
  e. T5‐ 60% C. odorata leaf 
         extract solution 
 
 
 
Figure 3. Conceptual Paradigm  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                                          63

 
 
 
 

 

 
     Preparation and collection of                     Preparation of various test 
     resources used in the study:                      substances: 
        a. plant material                                a. Positive control 
        b. test organisms                                b. leaf decoction from 
        c. laboratory apparatuses                           hagonoy 
            and equipment                                c. expressed leaf juice from 
        d. chemicals, etc.                                  hagonoy 
                                                         d. methanol extract 




     Gathering of data: 
      a. length of time for the test                   Application of the various test 
          organisms to die as                          substances to the test 
          affected by various test                     organisms (termites) 
          substances 




                                Analyzing the data gathered 
                                using the following statistical 
                                tools: 
                                    a. Analysis of Variance 
                                    b. Scheffé's Test 




Figure 4. The Research Flowchart  
                                                                                         64

 

 

 

 

 

                       2.5
 
                        2
 

                       1.5
  Length of time in                                                                R1
      minutes
                        1                                                          R2
                                                                                   R3
                       0.5

                        0
                             1      2          3          4          5
 
                                           Treatment
 

Figure 5. Length of time in minutes for the termites to die due to various treatments 

 

 

 

 

 

 
                                                                             65

 
 
Appendix F. Letter to the Senior Museum Researcher of the National Museum 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                               66

 
 
Appendix G. Certification of Plant Material 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                67

Appendix F. Letter to the Chief, Baguio PAL Satellite‐BNCRDC 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                                       68

Appendix I. Certificate of Appearance (issued by the Chief, Baguio PAL Satellite‐BNCRDC) 
 
 
 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: THE TERMITICIDAL POTENTIAL OF Chromolaena odorata (L.)   R.M. KING & H. ROBINSON (HAGONOY)