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Cosmetic Powder Compositions Having Improved Skin Coverage - Patent 5658579

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Cosmetic Powder Compositions Having Improved Skin Coverage - Patent 5658579 Powered By Docstoc
					


United States Patent: 5658579


































 
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	United States Patent 
	5,658,579



 LaFleur
,   et al.

 
August 19, 1997




 Cosmetic powder compositions having improved skin coverage



Abstract

The present invention is for powder compositions having high levels of talc
     and low levels of titanium dioxide wherein said compositions have improved
     skin coverage and uniformity. Said compositions comprise talc wherein said
     talc comprises a first talc having a particle size distribution wherein no
     more than about 45% of the particles are 10 microns or less; no more than
     about 70% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no more than about
     75% of the particles are 20 microns or less and a second talc having a
     particle size distribution wherein no less than about 75% of the particles
     are 10 microns or less, no less than about 90% of the particles are 15
     microns or less and no less than about 95% of the particles are 20 microns
     or less. The ratio of said first talc to said second talc is from about
     1:1 to about 6:1. The invention can be used in formulating numerous
     cosmetic powder compositions such as eye shadow, foundation, loose powder
     and the like.


 
Inventors: 
 LaFleur; Patricia Alison (Shrewsbury Township, PA), Vadaketh; Leena (Newark, DE), Leppla; Jeffrey Keith (Baltimore, MD) 
 Assignee:


The Procter & Gamble Company
 (Cincinnati, 
OH)





Appl. No.:
                    
 08/509,488
  
Filed:
                      
  July 31, 1995





  
Current U.S. Class:
  424/401  ; 424/63
  
Current International Class: 
  A61K 8/73&nbsp(20060101); A61K 8/72&nbsp(20060101); A61K 8/891&nbsp(20060101); A61K 8/81&nbsp(20060101); A61Q 1/12&nbsp(20060101); A61K 8/88&nbsp(20060101); A61K 8/19&nbsp(20060101); A61K 8/25&nbsp(20060101); A61K 007/00&nbsp()
  
Field of Search: 
  
  



 424/401,63,486,489
  

References Cited  [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
 
 
 
4820518
April 1989
Murphy et al.

4882225
November 1989
Fukui et al.

5023075
June 1991
Macchio et al.

5073364
December 1991
Giezendanner et al.

5283062
February 1994
Elliott et al.

5518728
May 1996
Burdzy



 Foreign Patent Documents
 
 
 
0191292
Aug., 1986
EP

0587415
Sep., 1993
EP

0587415A1
Mar., 1994
EP

62-016410
Jan., 1987
JP

62-181210
Aug., 1987
JP

9103103B
May., 1991
KR

9103076B
May., 1991
KR



   Primary Examiner:  Page; Thurman K.


  Assistant Examiner:  Howard; Sharon


  Attorney, Agent or Firm: Howell; John M.
Suter; David L.
Rasser; Jacobus C.



Claims  

We claim:

1.  A powder cosmetic composition comprising talc wherein said talc comprises:


a. a first talc having a particle size distribution wherein no more than about 45% of the particles are 10 microns or less, no more than about 70% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no more than 85% of the particles are 20 microns or
less;  and


b. a second talc having a particle size distribution wherein no less than about 55% of the particles are 10 microns or less, no less than about 80% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no less than about 90% of the particles are 20 microns
or less;


wherein the ratio of said first talc to said second talc is from about 1:1 to about 6:1.


2.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 1 wherein the first and second talc have packed densities from about 0.1 g/cm3 to about 1.5 g/cm wherein the packed density of said first talc is greater than the packed density of said second
talc.


3.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 1 comprising from about 50% to about 90% talc.


4.  A powder cosmetic composition comprising talc wherein said talc comprises:


a. a first talc having a particle size distribution wherein no more than about 40% of the particles are 10 microns or less;  no more than about 65% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no more than 80% of the particles are 20 microns or
less;  and


b. a second talc having a particle size distribution wherein no less than about 60% of the particles are 10 microns or less, no less than about 85% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no less than about 95% of the particles are 20 microns
or less;


wherein the ratio of said first talc to said second talc is from about from about 2:1 to 4:1.


5.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 4 wherein the first talc has a packed density is from about 0.3 g/cm3 to about 1.2 g/cm3 and the second talc has a packed density from about 0.1 g/cm3 to about 0.7 g/cm3 wherein the packed
density of said first talc is greater than the packed density of said second talc.


6.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 4 comprising from about 60% to about 85% talc.


7.  A powder cosmetic composition comprising talc wherein said talc comprises:


a. a first talc having a particle size distribution wherein no more than about 35% of the particles are 10 microns or less, no more than about 60% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no more than 75% of the particles are 20 microns or
less;  and


b. a second talc having a particle size distribution wherein no less than about 65% of the particles are 10 microns or less, no less than about 90% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no less than about 100% of the particles are 20
microns or less;


wherein the ratio of said first talc to said second talc is from about from about 3:1.


8.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 7 wherein the first talc has a packed density is from about 0.5/cm3 to about 0.9 g/cm3 and the second talc has a packed density from about 0.2 g/cm3 to about 0.4 g/cm3 wherein the packed
density of said first talc is greater than the packed density of said second talc.


9.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 8 wherein said composition comprises from about 70% to about 80% talc.


10.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 9 wherein the composition comprises at least about 50% talc treated with hydrophobic materials.


11.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 10 wherein the hydrophobic material is selected from the group consisting of silicone, fatty acid esters, lecithin, polyfluorocarbons, rutile titanium dioxide and mixtures thereof.


12.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 11 wherein the hydrophobic material is silicone.


13.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 12 wherein the silicone is a poly(organosiloxane) fluids conforming to the formula: ##STR3## wherein the end groups R.sub.1 and R.sub.6 are independently selected from the group consisting of
hydroxyl groups, lower alkyl groups having carbon chain lengths from about C.sub.1 to about C.sub.6 and mixtures thereof and the non-end groups R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are independently selected from methyl groups, fluoroalkyl groups,
phenyl groups and mixtures thereof.


14.  A powder cosmetic composition according to claim 13 wherein the end groups R.sub.1 and R.sub.6 are methyl groups.


15.  A pressed powder composition according to claim 7 further comprising:


a. from about 0.5% to about 12% pigment;


b. from about 1% to about 10% filler material;


c. from about 1% to about 20% liquid material;  and


d. from about 0.1% to about 2% preservative.


16.  A pressed powder composition according to claim 15 wherein the filler material is selected from the group consisting of treated and untreated mica, nylon, polyethylene, silica, polymethacrylate, kaolin, teflon, starch, oil absorbers and
mixtures thereof.


17.  A pressed powder composition according to claim 15 wherein the cosmetic preservatives are selected from the group consisting of methylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, ethylparaben, potassium sorbate, trisodium EDTA, phenoxyethanol,
ethyl alcohol, diazolidinyl urea, imidazolidinyl urea, quaternium-15 and mixtures thereof.


18.  A pressed powder composition according to claim 15 wherein the liquid material is selected from the group consisting of silicone oils;  long chained fatty acid esters;  glycerides;  water;  fragrances;  skin conditioning and protective
materials including, but not limited to panthenol, allantoin, aloe, aloe vera gel, PABA, tocopheryl;  and mixtures thereof.  Description  

TECHNICAL FIELD


The present invention is for powder compositions with improved skin coverage and uniformity than previously formulated compositions comprising high levels of selected talc and little or no titanium dioxide as a filler or extender.  Said
compositions can be formulated to form a variety of color cosmetic compositions including eye shadows, foundations and the like.


BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION


Color powder compositions for application to the skin, particularly the face and around the eyes are well known in the art.  These compositions take a number of different forms ranging from loose powders in canisters to those that are molded or
compressed into cakes and inserted into mirrored compact cases, typically supplied with an applicator, usually a pad, a puff or other implement.


These compositions comprise, in a major part, fillers and extenders, most of which are of the mineral variety.  Examples of such mineral fillers and extenders include talc, kaolin, mica, silicon dioxide, silicon dioxide-coated mica and talc,
titanium dioxide, titanium dioxide-coated mica and talc, fluroite, apatite, perlite, boron nitride and the like.  To a lesser degree, such cosmetic powders include organic materials such as nylon and polyethylene.  All these materials are blended
together in various levels in order to impart desired benefits such as spreadibility and adherence while being smooth, lustrous and of high covering power.


Titanium dioxide, or TiO.sub.2 is well known for use in the art as a filler or extender.  Japanese Patent Application 62-16410, published Jan.  24, 1987, Pola Kasei Kogyo KK, discloses a combination of plate-like powders and globular TiO.sub.2
having an average diameter 1-50 microns compounded in a solid cosmetic composition at a level from about 1% to 85%.  Said cosmetic compositions are reputed to have excellent adherence to and smoothly spread on the skin.  Japanese Patent Application
62-181210, published Aug.  8, 1987, Pola Kasei Kogyo KK, discloses solid cosmetic compositions comprising 10 to 85% of a base agent comprising plate shaped powders such as mica and talc with TiO.sub.2 having average grain size of 1-50 microns in a ratio
of powder to TiO.sub.2 of 1:9 to about 9.5:0.5.  The cosmetic compositions disclosed therein are reputed to have good adhesion and removal, good spread ability and good skin feel.  Korean Patent Application 91-03133, published May 18, 1991, Lucky
Company, discloses make-up compositions containing powders obtained by adsorbing 10-40% by weight of TiO.sub.2 onto mica.  Said treated mica is combined with 0.5-20% focus powders to form a emulsified foundation composition.  Said composition is reputed
to have a good soft focus effect and an ultraviolet ray intercepting effect.  European Patent Application 0 191 292, published Aug.  20, 1986, Sumitomo Chemical, discloses makeup compositions comprising flaky titanium oxide having a mean thickness from
0.01 to below 0.1 microns and a mean thickness of 0.1 to 3 microns and a mean size of 0.8 to 70 microns.  Said compositions disclosed therein include powder foundations wherein the titanium dioxide is used as an extender (as opposed to a pigment) at
levels from about 20 to 90% by weight of the composition.  Such foundations, containing about 50% titanium oxide, are reputed to be superior in terms of adherence and smooth feel to foundations containing comparable amounts of talc.


In the present invention, good coverage and uniformity on the skin is achieved utilizing selected talcs as opposed to titanium dioxide as the filler.  Minimizing or eliminating titanium dioxide as a filler is advantageous since its presence
generally is responsible for whitened or ashy look it leaves on the skin.  This result is surprising based on comparison with compositions, such as pressed powders, containing high levels of non-specific talc that do not provide adequate coverage.


SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION


The present invention are for powder cosmetic composition comprising talc wherein said talc comprises:


a. a first talc having a particle size distribution wherein no more than about 45% of the particles are 10 microns or less; no more than about 70% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no more than 85% of the particles are 20 microns or
less; and


b. a second talc having a particle size distribution wherein no less than about 55% of the particles are 10 microns or less, no less than about 80% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no less than about 90% of the particles are 20 microns
or less;


wherein the ratio of said first talc to said second talc is from about 1:1 to about 6:1.


One object of the present invention is to provide powder compositions which deliver significantly improved coverage and uniformity when applied to the skin.  It is also an object of the present invention that the present invention provides
compositions having a natural look to the skin, i.e. not whitened or ashy.  Lastly an object of the present invention is to provide a convenient product form which delivers the benefits described above.


DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION


Definitions


As used here "powder cosmetic composition" refer to any cosmetic composition that has less than about 20% liquid content in its packaged form.


As used herein "pressed powder compositions" refer to any cosmetic composition whose packaged form is made by compressing the materials comprising a sufficient binder by physical means whereby a cake is formed having sufficient hardness to
sustain its shape and resist crumbling.  Said compositions are often formed in small shallow metal pans or godets to facilitate storage and placement into cosmetic cases.


As used herein "loose powder" refers to powder cosmetic composition absent the binder mentioned above, packaged in a loose form in cosmetic canisters.  The canisters typically have a fine mesh screen over the loose-powder wherein an applicator is
applied to the screen to pick up the powder composition.


As used herein "powder foundations" refer to a cosmetic composition used for full face coverage similar to a cosmetic liquid foundation.  The foundation provides an adherent base for other cosmetics such as blusher, rouge and powder.


As used herein "concealer" refers to a cosmetic composition used to conceal or hide imperfections on the face.


As used herein "packed density" refers to the density of the a material as measured by a Hosokawa Powder Characteristics Tester from Hosokawa Micron Corporation, Summit N.J., using the packed or packed method disclosed in The Annual Book of ASTM
Standards, 1986, Section 5; incorporated herein by reference.


Talc


It has now been found that an improved coverage powder cosmetic composition can be achieved with high levels of talc selected based on its particle size distribution or PSD.  These compositions provide coverage benefits previously not thought
possible absent sufficient levels of other components such as titanium dioxide.


Talc is generally known to those skilled in the art as natural, powdered hydrous magnesium silicate.  Talc can be ground into various particle sizes and acts as an anti caking agent that has a very smooth feel on the skin.  Talc is available from
a number of commercial suppliers such as Whittaker, Clark and Daniels Inc., South Plainfield N.J.; Cyprus Industrial Minerals Company, Englewood, Colo.; Presperse Inc., South Plainfiled N.J.; and L. A. Salamon, Inc., Nontville, N.J.; U.S.  Cosmetics,
Dayville, Conn.; Miki America, Inc., Dayville, Conn.; Ultra Chemical, Inc., Red Band, N.J.; Color Technologies, South Plainfield, N.J.; Kobo Products, Inc., South Plainfield, N.J.; Charles B. Chrystal Co., Inc., New York, N.Y.  and Ecco Resources, So. 
Plainfield, N.J.  Compositions of the present invention comprise from about 50% to about 90%, preferably from about 60% to about 85% and most preferably from about 70% to about 80% talc.


The talc of the present invention comprises a first talc and a second talc having a ratio of said first talc to said second talc from about 1:1 to about 6:1, preferably from about 2:1 to 4:1, most preferably about 3:1.


While not wishing to be bound by theory, it is believed that using a combination of specifically sized particles promotes the coverage benefits found in the present invention.  For example, large or course particle talc contributes towards
providing uniformity and spreadability on the skin, however, they do not provide sufficient coverage.  On the other hand, smaller or fine particle talc provide good coverage while not providing satisfactory uniformity.  Therefore, the key is to combine
talcs having particle size distributions or PSD's to form a poly-modal talcs which pack efficiently wherein the fine particles fit within the interstices formed between the larger particles.


As used herein particle size distribution or "PSD" refers to the particle size distribution data obtained by laser diffraction methodology using a Hariba LA-900 particle size analyzer (volume-weighted analysis of distribution).  The distribution
data are based on the cumulative percent of the particles which are less than a designated micron sizes.  In the present invention the first talc being coarse has a PSD wherein no more than about 45%, preferably no more than about 40% and most preferably
no more than about 35% of the particles are 10 microns or less; no more than about 70%, preferably no more than about 65% and most preferably no more than about 60% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no more than about 85%, preferably no more
than about 80% and most preferably no more than 75% of the particles are 20 microns or less.  The second talc of the present invention being fine has a PSD wherein no less than about 55%, preferably no less than about 60% and most preferably no less than
about 65% of the particles are 10 microns or less; no less than about 80%, preferably no less than about 85% and most preferably no less than about 90% of the particles are 15 microns or less and no less than about 90%, preferably no less than about 95%
and most preferably 100% of the particles are 20 microns or less.


It is also preferred that the talcs have packed densities from about 0.1 g/cc.sup.3 to about 1.5 g/cc.sup.3, wherein the packed density of said first talc is greater than the packed density of said second talc.  It is more preferred that the
packed density of the first talc is from about 0.3 g/cc.sup.3 to about 1.2 g/cc.sup.3, preferably from about 0.5 g/cc.sup.3 to about 0.9 g/cc.sup.3 and the packed density of the second talc is from about 0.1 g/cc.sup.3 to about 0.7 g/cc.sup.3, preferably
from about 0.2 g/cc.sup.3 to about 0.4 g/cc.sup.3.


It has also been discovered that the talc used in the present invention is preferably talc that has been treated with hydrophobic material.  Said hydrophobic materials are applied to the surface of talc in order to impart hydrophobicity to said
talc.  Improvements to the composition in terms of skin adhesion and improved binding characteristics are attributable to such treatment.  It is preferred that the compositions of the present invention comprises at least about 50% talc treated with
hydrophobic materials.  The hydrophobic materials used to treat talcs of the present invention include silicones, fatty acids esters, surfactants such as lecithin, polyfluorocarbons, rutile titanium dioxide and other such hydrophobic material are known
in the art.


Preferable hydrophobic materials used to treat talcs of the present invention are silicones having a viscosity from about 0.5 to about 20,000 centistokes (csts), preferably from about 1 to about 500 csts, most preferably from about 10 to about
100 csts.  Although the silicone material of the present invention may be either volatile or non-volatile, non-volatile materials are preferred.  By "non-volatile" it is meant that the vapor pressure of said fluid is less than about 10 mm Hg, preferably
less than about 1 mm Hg, and most preferably less than about 0.5 mm Hg at 30.degree.  C. as measured using analytical means known to those skilled in the art.


Said silicone material of the present invention include poly(organosiloxane) fluids conforming to the formula: ##STR1## wherein the end groups R.sub.1 and R.sub.6 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydroxyl groups, lower
alkyl groups having carbon chain lengths from about C.sub.1 to about C.sub.6 and mixtures thereof, preferably methyl groups and the non-end groups R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are independently selected from methyl groups, fluoroalkyl groups,
phenyl groups and mixtures thereof.


The poly(organosiloxane) fluids with non-end groups (R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5) comprising methyl groups are known in the art and provide the final product with a relatively non-lipohilic character.  Commercially available
non-volatile silicone fluids having such non-end groups include those available from Dow Corning as the 200 Fluids, and those available from General Electric as SF-96 Series.


Silicone fluids with non-end groups comprising fluoroalkyl groups are also useful herein.  It is preferable, however, that the fluorine atom is attached to alkyl groups having a C.sub.3 to C.sub.8 chain length wherein the fluorine atom is
attached to attached to said alkyl group at a point no closer than third carbon atoms from the silicone/carbon bond.  Commercially available non-volatile silicone fluids having such non-end groups include those available from Dow Corning as the 1265
Fluid series, and those available from General Electric as the SF-1153 Series, most preferred is the 1265 Fluid Series, most preferably those of having a viscosity from about 100 csts to about 350 csts.


Silicone fluids with the non-end groups comprising allyl groups are also useful in the present invention.  The allyl groups which are particularly useful in the present invention are phenyl groups.  Particularly useful allyl-substituted silicone
fluids commercially available are available as the 556 Series from Dow Corning.


Preferable poly(organosiloxane) fluids of the present invention are selected from the group consisting of perfluoropolyether fluids, poly(dimethylsiloxane) fluids, poly(phenylmethylsiloxane) fluids, poly(fluoroalkylmethylsiloxane) fluids, the
copolymers of said fluids and mixtures thereof.  More preferred fluids are selected from the group consisting of perfluoropolyether fluids, poly(dimethylsiloxane) fluids, their copolymers and mixtures thereof.  Most preferred are poly(dimethylsiloxane)
fluids and their copolymers.  Said fluids are selected from the group consisting of perfluoropolyether fluids, poly(dimethylsiloxane) fluids, poly(phenylmethylsiloxane) fluids, poly(fluoroalkylmethylsiloxane) fluids, the copolymers of said fluids and
mixtures thereof.  More preferred fluids are selected from the group consisting of perfluoropolyether fluids, poly(dimethylsiloxane) fluids, their copolymers and mixtures thereof.  Most preferred are poly(dimethylsiloxane) fluids and their copolymers,
preferably selected from the group consisting of dimethicone, phenyl dimethicone, phenyl trimethicone and mixtures thereof.


The polyfluorocarbon materials useful in the present invention includes perfluoropolyethers of general formula: ##STR2## wherein R.sup.1 though R.sup.5 are independent fluorine atoms, perfluoroalkyl groups, or oxyperfluoroalkyl groups; the value
of p, q, and r is at least zero; wherein the perfluoropolyether molecular weight is from about 500 to about 10,000, wherein P, Q and R may be equal, but, not zero.  A preferred perfluoropolyether is the commercially available product known as Fomblin
HC-04, HC-25, and HC-R available from Montefluosu of Milano, Italy.


Treated talcs of the present invention are available from a number of commercial sources.  Said treated talcs include PF-5 Talc, SI Talc, JA-13R and JA-46R, all available from Kobo, South Plainfield N.J.; DF-10240 available from Color Techniques,
South Plainfield, N.J.; Sim 2043 available from Ecco Resources, South Plainfield, N.J.; Miki T-Uft-20 and Miki-13-ST available from Miki America, Inc., Dayville, Conn.; and J-68-ST-PEG/MOD available from U.S.  Cosmetics Corporation, Dayville, Conn.


Optional Ingredients


Compositions of the present invention can include numerous cosmetically acceptable ingredients selected for various desirable effects.  These ingredients can be either in dry or liquid form, however, at levels that do not detract from the primary
objects of the present invention.


Pigments are used in the present invention.  Pigments are selected from the group consisting of inorganic pigments, organic pigments, and pearlescent pigments.  When employed, the pigments are present in proportions depending on the color and the
intensity of the color which it is intended to produce.  Pigments can be used in the present invention at levels from about 0.1% to about 20%, preferably from about 0.5% to about 12%.  Pigments are selected from the group consisting of inorganic
pigments, organic lake pigments, pearlesent pigments, and mixtures thereof.  Said pigments may optionally be surface-treated within the scope of the present invention but are not limited to treatments such as silicones, perfluorinated compounds,
lecithin, and amino acids.


Inorganic pigments useful in the present invention include those selected from the group consisting of rutile or anatase titanium dioxide, coded in the Color Index under the reference CI 77,891; black, yellow, red and brown iron oxides, coded
under references CI 77,499, 77, 492 and, 77,491; manganese violet (CI 77,742); ultramarine blue (CI 77,007); chromium oxide (CI 77,288); chromium hydrate (CI 77,289); and ferric blue (CI 77,510) and mixtures thereof.


The organic pigments and lakes useful in the present invention include those selected from the group consisting of D&C Red No. 19 (CI 45,170), D&C Red No. 9 (CI 15,585), D&C Red NO. 21 (CI 45,380), D&C Orange No. 4 (CI 15,510), D&C Orange No. 5
(CI 45,370), D&C Red No. 27 (CI 45,410), D&C Red No. 13 (CI 15,630), D&C Red No. 7 (CI 15,850), D&C Red No. 6 (CI 15,850), D&C Yellow No. 5 (CI 19,140), D&C Red No. 36 (CI 12,085), D&C Orange No. 10 (CI 45,425), D&C Yellow No. 6 (CI 15,985), D&C Red No.
30 (CI 73,360), D&C Red No. 3 (CI 45,430) and the dye or lakes based on Cochineal Carmine (CI 75,570) and mixtures thereof.


The pearlescent pigments useful in the present invention include those selected from the group consisting of the white pearlescent pigments such as mica coated with titanium oxide, bismuth oxychloride, colored pearlescent pigments such as
titanium mica with iron oxides, titanium mica with ferric blue, chromium oxide and the like, titanium mica with an organic pigment of the above-mentioned type as well as those based on bismuth oxychloride and mixtures thereof.


Any optional ingredients known to those skilled in the art may also be used in the invention.  Examples of optional ingredients are disclosed in CTFA Cosmetic Ingredient Handbook, Second Edition, 1992, pages 621-622, 623-626 and 637-639;
incorporated herein by reference.  Some of the more frequently used components include from about 1% to about 10% fillers and powders other than talc, including but not limited to the group consisting of treated and untreated mica, nylon, polyethylene,
silica, polymethacrylate, kaolin, teflon, starch, oil absorbers and mixtures thereof.  From about 1 to about 20% liquid ingredients including, but not limited to the group consisting of silicone oils; long chained fatty acid esters; glycerides; water;
fragrances; skin conditioning and protective materials including, but not limited to panthenol, allantoin, aloe, aloe vera gel, PABA, tocopheryl; and mixtures thereof.  From about 0.1% to about 2% cosmetic preservatives including, but not limited to the
group consisting of methylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, ethylparaben, potassium sorbate, trisodium EDTA, phenoxyethanol, ethyl alcohol, diazolidinyl urea, imidazolidinyl urea, quaternium-15 and mixtures thereof.


Coverage Measurement


As stated above, the compositions of the present invention have improved coverage compared with conventional powder compositions known in the art.  The following test determines the extent of coverage of the powder composition:


Attach several 8".times.14" strips of 100% black cotton fabric to a flat vertical surface.  The fabric is model CC SLD 7018, Black, at 44 threads per inch, available from Beachwood Fabric Centers of America.  The fabric strips can be cut to 51/2
lengths once the test is complete, facilitating its display for evaluation.


A new applicator is to be used for each sample tested.  In the case of a compressed powder product, the entire surface of the product is first wiped with the applicator for 8-10 strokes until surface of cake is broken or ribbon/design mark has
been removed.  Twice rub in a circular motion in a circular motion across entire surface of the powder product one half of a cosmetic applicator such as a sponge or puff.  In the case of a loose powder, the entire puff is dabbed five times onto the
screen over the powder.


Wipe the applicator in a downward motion using even pressure on the applicator to distribute the powder over a six to seven inch length of the material disclosed above.  Continue to wipe the applicator over the same area of the material for about
nine more times, with no additional replenishment of product to the applicator.


The samples are evaluated for coverage and uniformity; often referred to as "payout" using a Spectraflash 500.TM.  Spectrophotometer made by Datacolor International, Lawrenceville, N.J.  The value V is the ratio of K to S wherein K is the value
of the light absorbed and S is the value for the light scattered, the light being that having a wavelength of the highest absorption value for the black fabric.  The Coverage Value or CV of the sample is determined by dividing value V for the sample by
the value V for the fabric.  The CV of the sample is compared to standard products known to have either desirable or non-desirable coverage and uniformity characteristics when applied to the skin. 

EXAMPLES


The following are non-limiting of powder products which embody the present invention.  Said samples contain a number of other routinely used cosmetic ingredients which is envisioned to be used in conjunction with the present invention.  Said
ingredients are employed to help for the specific product form, and/or to promote secondary skin benefits such as oil control and moisturization.


______________________________________ Amount (%  Component by weight)  ______________________________________ 1. Press Powder Foundation  Octyldodecyl Steroyl Stearate  6.00  Silicone Oil.sup.1 3.00  Trimethyl Trimellitate 1.00  Talc  Talc
One.sup.2 56.83  Talc Two.sup.3 19.25  Zinc Sterate 1.40  Calcium Silicate 1.80  Nylon-12 1.60  Boron Nitride 1.00  Pigments  Treated Yellow Iron Oxide  0.56  Treated Red Iron Oxide 0.52  Treated Black Iron Oxide 0.12  Treated Mica 3.00  Titanium Dioxide
3.00  Silica 0.50  Preservatives 0.42  .sup.1 available from Dow Corning as DC 200 Fluid  .sup.2 available from US Cosmetics as J-68-ST-PEG/MOD.  .sup.3 available from US Cosmetics as Miki-13-ST  2. Loose Powder  Octyldodecyl Steroyl Stearate  4.00 
Silicone Oil.sup.1 1.00  Trimethyl Trimellitate 1.00  Talc  Talc One.sup.2 60.30  Talc Two.sup.3 15.08  Zinc Sterate 2.50  Calcium Silicate 3.00  Nylon 4.00  Pigments  Yellow Iron Oxide 0.56  Red Iron Oxide 0.52  Black Iron Oxide 0.12  Treated Mica 4.00 
Silica 0.50  Titanium Dioxide 3.00  Preservatives 0.42  .sup.1 available from Dow Corning as DC 225 Fluid  .sup.2 available from Ultra Chemicals as Rhapsody.  .sup.3 available from US Cosmetics as Miki-13-SAT.  3. Press Powder Concealer  Octyldodecyl
Steroyl Stearate  7.00  Silicone Oil.sup.1 4.00  Trimethyl Trimellitate 1.00  Aloe Vera Oil 1.00  Talc  Talc One.sup.2 39.00  Talc Two.sup.3 37.20  Zinc Sterate 1.40  Calcium Silicate 1.80  Pigments  Yellow Iron Oxide 0.51  Red Iron Oxide 0.49  Black
Iron Oxide 0.12  Chromium Green 0.10  Titanium Dioxide 3.00  Treated Mica 2.50  Powdered polyethylene.sup.4  0.50  Vitamin E 0.05  Preservatives 0.42  .sup.1 available from Dow Corning as Q21403 Silicone  .sup.2 available from Color Technics as DF10240 
.sup.3 available from US Cosmetics as a combination of  Miki-13-SAT and Soft Talc in a ratio of about 2.5 to 1  .sup.4 available from Lipo Chemicals, Inc. as Nylon-12  4. Eye shadow  Dimethicone Dimethiconol.sup.1  4.50  Silicone Oil.sup.2 2.75 
Octyldodecyl Stearoyl Stearate  1.00  Talc  Talc One.sup.3 30.00  Talc Two.sup.4 22.85  Zinc Sterate 1.40  Calcium Silicate 1.80  Pigments  Black Iron Oxide 3.55  Violet Iron Oxide 10.40  Red Carmine 7.02  Red Iron Oxide 3.06  Russet C33-5138 7.00 
Mica.sup.5 2.50  Silica 0.50  Titanium Dioxide 3.00  Preservatives 0.42  .sup.1 available from G.E. as SF 96-5  .sup.2 available from Dow Corning as DC 593 Fluid  .sup.3 available from US Cosmetics as J-68-ST-PEG/MOD  .sup.4 available from US Cosmetics
as Miki-13-SAT  5 available from Kobo as SI Mica H-30  ______________________________________


Process Method


Mix all the powdery or dry materials in powder blender, such as a Lodige mixer until homogeneous.  Pulverize this mixture in a standard hammer mill, such as Micropul single hammer mill, equipped with a 0.010" herringbone screen.  Return the
mixture to the powder blender.  Mix at ambient temperature all the liquid ingredients in a vessel equipped with a mixer, such as a Lighting Mixer until homogeneous.  Spray the liquid mixture onto the powdery mixture in the powder blender and mix about 10
minutes.  Stop the powder blender, scrape side walls and mix for about 5 minutes.  Sift the resulting granulation through a 0.032" screen and place into storage bins.  In the case of pressed powders, compress the granulation into various shaped standard
makeup pans or godets using a ribbon punch press, such as a Hydraulic Kemwall Press, at a compression pressure wherein the pressed powder can sustain physical insult when exposed to routine quality testing such as a drop test which is routinely used in
the art.  Insert the pans in appropriate cosmetic cases.


In the case of loose powders, appropriate canisters are filled with the granulation from the storage bins using for example a volumetric filler such as Master or Allfill feeders.


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DOCUMENT INFO
Description: The present invention is for powder compositions with improved skin coverage and uniformity than previously formulated compositions comprising high levels of selected talc and little or no titanium dioxide as a filler or extender. Saidcompositions can be formulated to form a variety of color cosmetic compositions including eye shadows, foundations and the like.BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTIONColor powder compositions for application to the skin, particularly the face and around the eyes are well known in the art. These compositions take a number of different forms ranging from loose powders in canisters to those that are molded orcompressed into cakes and inserted into mirrored compact cases, typically supplied with an applicator, usually a pad, a puff or other implement.These compositions comprise, in a major part, fillers and extenders, most of which are of the mineral variety. Examples of such mineral fillers and extenders include talc, kaolin, mica, silicon dioxide, silicon dioxide-coated mica and talc,titanium dioxide, titanium dioxide-coated mica and talc, fluroite, apatite, perlite, boron nitride and the like. To a lesser degree, such cosmetic powders include organic materials such as nylon and polyethylene. All these materials are blendedtogether in various levels in order to impart desired benefits such as spreadibility and adherence while being smooth, lustrous and of high covering power.Titanium dioxide, or TiO.sub.2 is well known for use in the art as a filler or extender. Japanese Patent Application 62-16410, published Jan. 24, 1987, Pola Kasei Kogyo KK, discloses a combination of plate-like powders and globular TiO.sub.2having an average diameter 1-50 microns compounded in a solid cosmetic composition at a level from about 1% to 85%. Said cosmetic compositions are reputed to have excellent adherence to and smoothly spread on the skin. Japanese Patent Application62-181210, published Aug. 8, 1987, Pola Kasei Kogyo KK, discloses solid cosmetic compos