Free Template of How to Write a Spiritual Resume - Excel by obn18755

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									Course # User               SLO
ACCT 103 Gilbert F. Noble   1. A student will be able to analyze a fact situation, determine
                            what is pertinent, and create a balance sheet. 2. A student will be
                            able to analyze a fact situation, determine what is pertinent, and
                            create an income statement.
ACCT 105 Sherry L. Gordon   1 A student will be able to analyze a fact situation relating to a
                            single person, determine what information is needed, and do a
                            tax return that reflects the appropriate treatment of the situation.
                            2 A student will be able to analyze a fact situation relating to a
                            married couple, determine what information is needed, and do a
                            tax return that reflects the appropriate treatment of the situation.

ACCT 106 Sherry L. Gordon   1 A student will be able to analyze a fact situation related to a
                            single individual, determine what details are appropriate to the
                            situation, and prepare a proper tax return based on the facts. 2 A
                            student will be able to analyze a fact situation related to a
                            married couple, determine what details are appropriate to the
                            situation, and prepare a proper tax return based on the facts.

ACCT 107 Sherry L. Gordon   A student will be able to analyze a fact situation for a
                            corporation, determine a strategy to prepare a tax return and then
                            prepare a tax return appropriate to the situation. A students will
                            be able to analyze a fact situation for a partnership, determine a
                            strategy to prepare a tax return, and then prepare a tax return
                            appropriate for the situation. A students will be able to analyze a
                            fact situation for an S corporation, determine a strategy to
                            prepare a tax return, and then prepare atax retrun appropriate for
                            the situation.
ACCT 110 Leah J. Martin-    1. Integrate accounting theory, concepts and practice with
         Klement            accounting software. 2. Master the accounting software package
                            for daily, weekly, monthly, yearly accounting practices. 3. Apply
                            the use of accounting software in the private sector or for home
                            bookkeeping and accounting use.




ACCT 115 Sherry L. Gordon   A student will be able to analyze a fact situation dealing with
                            payroll, determine a strategy for preparing payroll tax returns,
                            and then prepare the returns appropriate to the situation. A
                            student will be able to analyze a fact situation dealing with sales
                            taxes, determine a strategy for preparing sales tax returns , and
                            then prepare a sales tax return appropriate to the situation.
ACS 50    Steve White         1. Students will produce a written analysis that creates, defines,
                              and communicates their desired academic, athletic, and career
                              goals on a short and long term basis. These goals will include
                              justification and plans of implementation. 2. Students will apply
                              appropriate study skills and learning strategies that maximize
                              universal understanding of course material.




AIS 100   Steven J.           1.A student will be able to label the location of the 10 North
          Crouthamel          American culture geographic regions and distinguish the
                              ecosystems present within these regions that traditional
                              American Indian cultures integrated for adaptation. 2.A student
                              will be able to analyze information and demonstrate knowledge
                              of an American Indian culture in case study format. 3.A student
                              will be able to demonstrate their awareness of the significance of
                              American Indian diversity in a global setting through classroom
                              participation. 4.A student will be able to identify examples of
                              American Indian traditional knowledge applied to current socio-
                              geopolitical issues. 5.A student will be able to design and
                              construct papers and/or presentations reflecting multidisciplinary
                              sources and orientation.


AIS 104   Patricia A. Dixon   Students will recognize basic differences in American Indian
                              music. Students will acquire a positive perspective of American
                              Indian cultures through music.
AIS 105   Alan Lechusza       1. Students will gain a positive image of Native American art. 2.
          Aquallo             Students will acquire a basic knowledge base of the different
                              styles of Native American art in the U.S. 3. Students will gather
                              the understanding of the differences which Native American
                              tribes have with respect to their art and culture. 4. Students will
                              realize the various influences of Native American art and culture
                              upon the larger U.S. culture. 5. Students will gain an
                              understanding of the different Native American art styles and
                              their respect to gender roles. 6. Students will realize that there is
                              a strong Native American identity present in the contemporary
                              era.
AIS 107A   Patricia A. Dixon   1). Students will understand the relationships of the Luiseño
                               language to other Uto-Aztecan languages and to indigenous
                               languages in other languages. 2). Students will demonstrate a
                               basic familiarity with Luiseño language phonology, morphology,
                               syntax and grammar. 3). Students will demonstrate a beginning
                               knowledge of Luiseño culture and will accurately use culturally
                               relevant terminology.




AIS 107B   Patricia A. Dixon   1) Students will increase their knowledge of the phonology,
                               morphology, syntax and grammar of the Luiseño language,
                               emphasizing culturally relevant terminology. 2) Students will
                               demonstrate increased proficiency in expressing basic concepts
                               both orally and in writing.




AIS 108A   Patricia A. Dixon   1) Students will increase their knowledge of the phonology,
                               morphology, syntax and grammar of the Luiseño language,
                               emphasizing culturally relevant terminology. 2) Students will
                               demonstrate increased proficiency in expressing basic concepts
                               both orally and in writing.




AIS 108B   Patricia A. Dixon   1) Students will increase their knowledge of the phonology,
                               morphology, syntax and grammar of the Luiseño language,
                               emphasizing culturally relevant terminology. 2) Students will
                               demonstrate increased proficiency in expressing basic concepts
                               both orally and in writing.
AIS 110   Steven J.           1. Students will be able identify the principle scholars of the
          Crouthamel          American West and their theoretical foundation and emphasis,
                              especially pertinent to Plains Culture. The student will also be
                              able to recognize the overall contributions of exemplary scholars
                              to understanding the role of Plains culture in the Western frontier
                              to today. 2.Students will be able to compare and contrast cultural
                              traits in different contexts of Plains Indian and non-Indian culture
                              in common environments. 3.Students will be able to analyze the
                              source of cultural change and the adaptive success or failure for
                              the survival of that particular group. 4. Students will develop the
                              ability to scrutinize ethnographic and historical data collecting
                              methods and analyze inherent bias and its context. 5. Students
                              will be able to recognize the relativism of culture traits in terms
                              of adaptive strategies in the cultural setting of the Plains.


AIS 120   Steven J.         1. Students will be able to identify specific biological and
          Crouthamel        cultural adaptive modes such as Inuit physique and technologies
                            in the Arctic circle or the 'desert gene', irrigation techniques of
                            the Pimans of the Southwestern deserts, or high altitude
                            phyisological traits and farming in the Andes. 2. Students will be
                            able to trace cultural changes from ancient times to the survival
                            of a Native American group in the Americas today. Students will
                            be able to evaluate the negative and positive effects of specific
                            strategies for change. 3. Students will be able to compare and
                            contrast diverse strategies for change in common environments
                            and analyze the relative merits of a particular approach. 4.
                            Students will evaluate the results of multiple academic
                            disciplines to understanding Native American and non Native
                            American cultures in America. 5. Students will identify Native
                            American contributions to the world (referred to as the
                            Columbian Exchange. Students will analyze the impact of
                            innovations over time to the present. 6. Students will demonstrate
                            an awareness of Native American diversity and persistence of
                            traditional cultures today. Students will be able to recognize and
AIS 125   Linda R. Locklear 1. Describe the historical experiences and contemporary issues in
                            North America from the perspective of American Indian peoples.
                            2. Differentiate the roles of history, culture, and politics in the
                            development of tribal worldviews that relate to modern life and
                            contemporary issues of concern for Native American peoples. 3.
                            Exam the historical, cultural, and political diversity and
                            significance in Native oral traditions and written literatures. 4.
                            Compare the stereotypes about Native American peoples and
                            explain how these stereotypes were created and why they are
                            sustained in modern society. 5. Distinguish the role of media in
                            the presentation tribal governments and organization in Indian
                            Country.
AIS 130   Steven J.    1. Students will be able to identify exemplary cultural
          Crouthamel   traditions/periods, sites, and artifacts in the North American
                       geographic/archaeology regions. 2. Students will be able to
                       provide examples of the results of armchair speculation versus
                       scientific method relative to changing theories of American
                       Indian origins and ancient lifestyles. 3. Students will be able to
                       identify adaptive strategies and their relative success or failure in
                       short and long term scenarios. 4.Students will be able to analyze
                       common and divergent viewpoints held by Native Americans and
                       archaeologists relative to human cultural knowledge. 5.Students
                       will be able to identify current environmnetal law as it applies to
                       CRM and recognize solutions beneficial to Native American
                       communities and science.

AIS 135   Steven J.    1. Students will be able to identify specific traditional California
          Crouthamel   Indian regions by media and style. 2. Students will be able
                       differentiate environmental impact in various attributes of the
                       traditional California arts interconnected with function, spiritual
                       concerns or power and aesthetics, based on primordial factors
                       and imagery. 3. Students will be able to elicit technique and
                       media manipulation to achieve design conventions driven by
                       cultural context in traditional California Indian art. 4. Students
                       will be able to demonstrate or reproduce the processes involved
                       in material collection, preparation and the production of
                       traditional art forms. 5. Students will be able to analyze historical
                       data to demonstrate the effect of colonization and subsequent
                       attempts to decolonize traditional Calfornia Indian art forms. 6.
                       Students will be able to identify contemporary California Indian
                       art and to evaluate the relative traditional influences in contrast
                       to the modern influences.
AIS 140    Steven J.           1. Students will be able to analyze the relationship between
           Crouthamel          environment and culture with the sub regions and diverse
                               California traditional cultures. 2. Students will use Heizer's
                               subsistence model as foundation for environmnetal strategies
                               (above)and be able to recognize the various food resources found
                               in aboriginal California. 3.Students will be able to recognize the
                               value of a relativistic approach to evaluating human cultures
                               based on comparing diverse California Indian cultures and
                               European stereotypes designed to justify removal or subjugation.
                               4. Students will be able to compare and contast the demographic
                               documentation of the treatment of California Indians at the hands
                               of various Europeans with many misconceptions in other sources.
                               5. Students will be able identify the evolution of theory
                               developed by various scholars on California Indian culture and
                               European contact and history. 6. Students will be able to identify
                               and analyze contemporary strategies employed by California
                               Indians and success or failure based on sovereignty and revival of
                               cultural traditions.

AIS 165    Patricia A. Dixon   1. Understand and appreciate the roles of American Indian
                               Women in history, culture, and politics and in the development
                               of tribal world views that relate to modern life and contemporary
                               issues of concern for American Indian Women. 2. Understand
                               historical experiences and contemporary issues in North America
                               from the perspective of American Indian Womens in regard to
                               birth, puberty, marriage, death and other life practice. 3.
                               Understand the development of modern roles of American Indian
                               women as they relate to Non Native women contemporary
                               society. 4. Identify historical, cultural, political and significance
                               Famous American Indan Women in the past and in present.

AIS 207A   Patricia A. Dixon   1) Students will increase their knowledge of the phonology,
                               morphology, syntax and grammar of the Luiseño language,
                               emphasizing culturally relevant terminology. 2) Students will
                               demonstrate increased proficiency in expressing basic concepts
                               both orally and in writing.
AIS 207B   Patricia A. Dixon   1) Students will increase their knowledge of the phonology,
                               morphology, syntax and grammar of the Luiseño language,
                               emphasizing culturally relevant terminology. 2) Students will
                               demonstrate increased proficiency in expressing basic concepts
                               both orally and in writing.




AJ 101     Morgan A.           1. The student will be able to use the rules of evidnece to conduct
           Peterson            an investigation. 2. The student will we able to Evaluate the
                               various types of evidence. 3. The student will be able to list all of
                               the constitutional amendments that are applicable to due process.
                               4. The student will identify legally admissible evidence in a
                               criminal violation.
AJ 102     Larry L. Roberts    The student will be able to discuss the three major components of
                               the criminal justice system. The student will be able to trace the
                               flow of the criminal process from crime to completion of
                               punishment. The student will be able to describe the steps taken
                               in a criminal trial---from jury selection to verdict. The student
                               will be able to discuss the legal requirement for each type of
                               punishment The student will be able to draw a flow chart of both
                               a misdemeanor and felony case---from crime to completion of
                               punishment. the student will become familiar with the publishing
                               industries addressing methods for appealed cases, be able to find
                               various cases, and write a case brief on assigned cases.

AJ 104     Larry L. Roberts    The student will be able to trace the development of Criminal
                               laws over the last 4,000 years.
                               The student will be able to discuss key criminal law terms and
                               concepts.
                               The student will be able to list the elements to thirty common
                               felonies and indicate which type of criminal intent is involved.
                               The student will be able to describe 15 common criminal
                               defenses used under California law. The student will understand
                               the publishing companies addressing system to appealant court
                               cases and given a set of cases be able to find the case, evaluate
                               the case, and write a case brief.
AJ 197     Larry L. Roberts    The specific learning outcomes for this course will vary
                               depending on the topic presented. Nevertheless, in general,
                               students completing this course would be expected to show
                               learning outcomes such as: the ability to express themselves
                               clearly in written reports on the topics covered in the course, the
                               ability to discuss questions related to the specific material
                               presented in the the course, and display both knowledge of
                               factual material and the ability to think critically about the course
                               topic.
AJ 212    Morgan A.          1. The student will be able to operate a 35mmSLR camera with a
          Peterson           manual override 2. The student will be able to discuss the rules
                             of evidence as they pertain to crime scene photography 3. The
                             student will be able to perform macro and macro photography


AJ 97     Larry L. Roberts   The specific learning outcomes for this course will vary
                             depending on the topic presented. Nevertheless, in general,
                             students completing this course would be expected to show
                             learning outcomes such as: the ability to express themselves
                             clearly in written reports on the topics covered in the course, the
                             ability to discuss questions related to the specific material
                             presented in the course, and display both knowledge of factual
                             material and the ability to think critically about the course topic.

AMS 100   Steven J.          1. Students will be able to recognize the multidisciplinary
          Crouthamel         contributions to understanding the totality of American culture
                             with an emphasis of the arts as reflective and effective
                             phenomena. 2. Students will be able to recognize the factors that
                             contribute to individual identity and be able to apply that
                             recognition to articulating their own individual identity. 3.
                             Students will be able to recognize and analyze the subjective and
                             objective imagery in art that expresses symbols and metaphors
                             that reveal deeper values and ideas in American culture. 4.
                             Students will be able to elicit culture changes through
                             identification of changes in artistic styles and forms in American
                             culture. 5. Students will be able to identify the benefits of
                             cultural diversity, especially the factors that keep the society
                             together in tenuous or crisis times. 6. Students will be able to
                             analyze various levels of identity (national, state, etc) and how
                             they interrelate to building a shared culture. In turn the student
                             will able to apply this analysis to formulating his/her own
                             identity and culture. 7. Students will become aware of the global
                             context of American culture's impact, positive and negative; as
ANTH 100 Philip L. De        The student should be able to: 1. explain the basic assumptions
         Barros              of science and how the scientific method works, including its
                             focus on the study of natural causes and effects and the
                             importance of peer review. 2. explain Darwin's theory of natural
                             selection results in evolution, adaptation and design, and how
                             evolution affects our everyday lives. 3. understand the basic
                             principles of genetic inheritance and how this relates to our
                             everyday lives. 4. understand the nature of human biological
                             diversity, including how it relates to popular misconceptions
                             about race. 5. explain the basic patterns of hominid evolution
                             over the last seven million years, including the origins of Homo
                             sapiens in Africa.




ANTH      James D. Eighmey Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
100L                       to: (1) describe and apply the scientific method to
                           biological/physical anthropological research,(2) describe the
                           principles and importance of micro and macro
                           evolution,(3)describe and demonstrate a working knowledge of
                           the principles of inheritance and population genetics as they
                           relate to human evolution,(4) describe and evaluate human and
                           nonhuman primate skeletal material, (5) explain human
                           biological variation and the history of the concept and study of
                           race, (6) identify and evaluate the anatomical and evolutionary
                           significance of various hominin species, and (7) apply the lecture
                           material to laboratory practicum analysis/reports as well as
                           outside the classroom.
ANTH 101 James D. Eighmey Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
                          to: (1) describe and apply the scientific method to
                          biological/physical anthropological research,(2) describe and
                          demonstrate the principles of micro and macro
                          evolution,(3)describe and demonstrate the principles of
                          inheritance and population genetics as they relate to human
                          evolution,(4) describe and assess human and nonhuman primate
                          skeletal material, (5) understand human biological variation and
                          the history of the concept and study of race, (6) identify and
                          evaluate the anatomical and evolutionary significance of various
                          hominin species, and (7) apply the lecture material to laboratory
                          practicum analysis/reports as well as outside the classroom.
ANTH 105 Philip L. De   Students should be able to: 1. Understand the nature of culture:
         Barros         that it is adaptive, learned, differentially shared, transmitted
                        through language, a system of interdependent parts, and gives
                        meaning to reality. 2. explain how anthropologists study the
                        native point of view (emic) but also construct an analytical view
                        (etic) of other cultures. 3. Critically evaluate their own culture
                        using the tools of cultural relativism and holism and their
                        knowledge of the concept of culture. 4. Have more meaningful
                        and insightful interactions with people of other cultures,
                        including American subcultures. 5. Understand the broad
                        correlations between a culture's subsistence practices and and
                        other aspects of culture, including economic, social, political
                        organization; status and gender relations; level of conflict; and
                        belief systems. 6. Understand the impact of the Western world on
                        the indigenous cultures of the Americas, Africa, and Asia.




ANTH 107 Anne-Marie     Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
         Mobilia        to: (1) Explain the current role of medical anthropology and
                        demonstrate an understanding of the theories and methodologies
                        used by medical anthropologists, (2) compare and contrast the
                        modern Western medical system with those of other cultures and
                        times, (3) describe standard health, illness and disease from a
                        cultural, biological ane ecological perspective from various
                        cultural groups, (4) recognize cross-cultural causation and
                        classification of illness and disease from various cultural groups,
                        (5) examine the cross-cultural roles and types of healers from
                        various cultural groups, (6) examine cultural factors in the
                        prevalence, spread, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of
                        disease, (7) assess the impact of social variable such as age,
                        gender, ethnicity and social class on an individual's experience of
                        health, illness and healing from various cultural groups, and (8)
                        examine the relationship between medical anthropology,
                        epidemiology and public policy.
ANTH 107 Anne-Marie     Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
         Mobilia        to: (1) think holistically; looking at all the parts of a system and
                        how those parts are interrelated, (2) apply cultural relativism in
                        their academic studies as well as outside of the academic arena,
                        (4) explain the biological basis for speech, and examine the
                        origins and development of languages through time, (4) identify
                        and describe the components of language: phonology,
                        morphology, syntax, grammar and semantics, (5) develop an
                        informed appreciation of other languages and cultures,
                        and(5)recognize the professional spectrum of the field of study
                        and understand how the field is applied to contemporary issues.




ANTH 110 Philip L. De   1. Through direct assesment and research papers students will
         Barros         demonstrate their ability to differentiate valid archaeological
                        models and data. These skills will allow students to be critical
                        consumers of popular media regarding archaeology and
                        prehistory. 2. The knowledge of world culture chronologies
                        presented in this course, and addressed through direct assesment,
                        provides students with a clear understanding of the antecedants
                        of their own cultural traditions and those of their contemporaries.
                        3. Through discussion, films, and lectures students will be able to
                        place the present world ecological crisis in a deep historical
                        context through an appreciation of the documented extent of
                        human impacts on the environment in prehistory. 4. The
                        framework of Anthropological Archaeology used throughout this
                        course strongly encourages students to empathize with the
                        members of past societies quite different from their own and
                        illustrates how that that approach can be extended to
                        contemporary culture issues.
ANTH 120 Philip L. De   1. Students will have the skills to perform entry-level processing
         Barros         of archaeological collections. They will be able to identify, clean,
                        and catalog the majority of prehistoric artifacts they are likely to
                        encounter in Southern California. 2. Students will understand the
                        requirements of archaeological field recording methods and the
                        relationship between field and laboratory data. This will allow
                        them to work effectively as part of an archaeolgical excavation
                        team. 3. Students will be able to conduct basic analyses of typical
                        prehistoric artifacts from Southern California.




ANTH 121 Philip L. De   1. Explain what factors determine whether a CRM project comes
         Barros         under Federal (Section 106) vs. State (CEQA)jurisdiction, citing
                        the basic laws and regulations involved. 2. Outline and explain
                        the basic elements of the four phases of Cultural Resource
                        Management (CRM)studies -- inventory, evaluation, mitigation,
                        and monitoring. 3. Explain the basic factors important in the
                        preparation of a CRM project budget. 4. Outline and explain the
                        key elements of a CRM evaluation report. 5. Outline and explain
                        the basic ethical standards under which CRM archaeology is
                        conducted.

ANTH 125 Philip L. De   1. Explain the basic assumptions of science and outline the basic
         Barros         concepts and/or elements of the scientific method. 2.
                        Demonstrate an understanding of basic informal logical fallacies.
                        3. Explain the basic functions of religion in human society. 4.
                        Explain the difference between knowledge and belief. 5. Explain
                        the basic concepts and processes of evolution, including mutation
                        and genetic variation, environmental stress, natural selection,
                        inheritance, microevolution, speciation, adaptation, and design.
                        6. Explain the explicit threat to science that the Intelligent Design
                        movement poses in America.
ANTH 126 Philip L. De   1. Demonstrate a basic understanding of the geographic and
         Barros         cultural diversity of sub-Saharan Africa that avoids viewing it
                        monolithically and stereotypically. 2. Outline some of the basic
                        evolutionary and cultural miletones of African history and
                        culture, including the evolution of Homo sapiens, ancient
                        ironworking, and the rise of major kingdoms and empires,
                        especially in West Africa. 3. Explain how the legacy of
                        colonialism has led to political instability in some parts of Africa.
                        4. Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental aspects of
                        traditional African cultures: polygyny and the extended family,
                        corporate descent groups, gerontocracy, and the relationship
                        between the living and dead ancestors. 5. Explain some key
                        differences in world view and/or core values between traditional
                        African cultures and American culture.

ANTH 135 Anne-Marie     Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
         Mobilia        to: (1) evaluate the nature of non-Western supernatural belief
                        systems, (2) describe and identify the significance of specific
                        customs, rites, values, and attitudes of non-Western peoples, (3)
                        compare and contrast the differences and similarities between
                        magic, witchcraft and religion, and (4) compare our world view
                        with that of non-Western cultures in order to ascertain common
                        principles used in human problem solving.
ANTH 137 Anne-Marie     Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
         Mobilia        to: (1) explain the current role of medical anthropology and
                        demonstrate an understanding of the theories and methodologies
                        used by medical anthropologists, (2) compare and contrast the
                        modern Western medical system with those of other cultures and
                        times, (3) describe standard health, illness and disease from a
                        cultural, biological and ecological perspective from various
                        cultural groups, (4) recognize cross-cultural causation and
                        classification of illness and disease from various cultural groups,
                        (5) examine the cross-cultural roles and types of healers from
                        various cultural groups, (6) examine cultural factors in the
                        prevalence, spread, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of
                        disease, (7) assess the impact of social variable such as age,
                        gender, ethnicity and social class on an individual's experience of
                        health, illness and healing from various cultural groups, and (8)
                        examine the relationship between medical anthropology,
                        epidemiology and public policy.




ANTH 205 Philip L. De   Demonstrate an improved ability to 1. apply basic archaeological
         Barros         excavation techniques. 2. identify basic artifact, ecofact, and
                        feature types, including the less common ones. 3. conscientiously
                        and accurately record excavation data in the field. 4. interpret the
                        contextual meaning of excavated data. 5. understand and
                        appreciate the connection between archaeological sites and
                        present-day communities, especially Indian nations. 6. be
                        prepared for entrance level employment as a para-professional in
                        the field of cultural resource management.
ANTH 210 Philip L. De          Students should be able to: 1. Conduct and/or participate in an
         Barros                archaeological survey using standard techniques to locate and
                               record archaeological sites in the field. 2. Utilize California State
                               Archaeological Information Centers to adequately prepare for an
                               archaeological survey and to prepare and submit archaeological
                               site records and reports according to State guidelines. 3.
                               Recognize that Native American communities place a high value
                               on archaeological sites and other vestiges of their traditional
                               cultural landscapes and that they can make important
                               contributions to a successful archaeological survey.




ANTH 215 James D. Eighmey 1. Students will have the skills to perform entry-level processing
                          of archaeological collections. They will be able to identify, clean,
                          and catalog the majority of prehistoric artifacts they are likely to
                          encounter in Southern California. 2. Students will understand the
                          requirements of archaeological field recording methods and the
                          relationship between field and laboratory data. This will allow
                          them to work effectively as part of an archaeolgical excavation
                          team. 3. Students will be able to conduct basic analyses of typical
                          prehistoric artifacts from Southern California.
ANTH 220 Philip L. De   The student shall be able to: 1. Collect field data with a GPS
         Barros         datalogger, differentially correct the data, and produce site and/or
                        feature maps using the corrected data. 2. Set up and use a total
                        station to produce an archaeological site map in AutoCad or
                        ArcGIS based on topographic, excavation, feature, and artifact
                        data points recorded with the total station and/or GPS datalogger.




ANTH 225 Philip L. De   1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic goals and
         Barros         theoretical orientations of historic archaeology. 2. The ability to
                        know the importance of and use a variety of written and oral
                        resources in historical archival research. 3. The ability to
                        determine the manufacturer, mode of manufacture, function
                        and/or contents, and temporal range of various historic ceramic,
                        glass and metal artifacts. 4. Understand the basic trends and
                        themes of the history of San Diego City and County.
AP C 201   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Students will observe precautions and employ all safety
                             procedures during class and shop activities. 1-2.) Given a set of
                             unsafe construction scenarios, students will descrobe the OSHA
                             standard safety violation(s) and list the proper hazard prevention
                             measures. 1-3.) Presented with an instruction sheets, students
                             will complete basic skill projects to specifications. 1-4.) Using
                             the route provided, students will successfully complete the
                             gradall operator test course. 1-5.) Using the tool provided,
                             students will successfully drive fasteners to complete the powder
                             actuated tools certification test.




AP C 202   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Students will observe precautions and employ all safety
                             procedures during class and shop activities. 1-2.) Given a set of
                             health emergencies, students will practice appropriate first aid
                             and CPR techniques. 1-3.) Presented with prints, students will
                             complete two scaffold building projects to meet scaffold
                             qualification requirements. 1-4.) Using the route provided,
                             students will successfully complete the aerial lift operator test
                             course.




AP C 203   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Students will explain how the principles of Orthographic
                             Projection are applied to selected isometric drawings to create
                             multiple object views from a single perspective view. 1-2.) Given
                             an ANSI standard print, students will demonstrate recognition of
                             the standard parts and basic information contained on prints. 1-
                             3.) Presented with a list of questions, students will state the title,
                             date and scale of a drawing, and locate features and aspects of
                             objects in multiple views.
AP C 204   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Students will apply the orthographic projection drawing
                             method to create three, two dimensional views of a three
                             dimensional object selected by the instructor. 1-2.) Presented
                             with a list of questions regarding symbols, materials and
                             architectural features, students will calculate dimensions and
                             create a material cut list. 1-3.) Given a building design, the
                             student will accurately layout out exterior and interior walls
                             according to print specifications.




AP C 205   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials for cut lists used in the foundation and flatwork
                             construction processes. 2.) Communicate and work cooperatively
                             with others to organize tasks and execute edge form; inverted
                             “T”; screed form construction procedures. 3.) Employ the safe
                             and proper use of tools and building techniques to meet area
                             specific code requirements, and quality and productivity rates
                             consistent with industry standards as detailed on project prints.




AP C 207   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a print containing symbols, materials and
                             architectural features; students will calculate dimensions,
                             requirements for concrete placement, and create a material cut
                             list. 1-2.) Given a tilt up panel design, the students will
                             accurately layout out exterior wall lines and interior wall features
                             according to print specifications. 1-3.) Students will construct
                             typical exterior tilt up wall panels to project print specifications
                             and troubleshoot a design flaw presented by the instructor. 1-4.)
                             Students will observe precautions and employ all safety
                             procedures during class and shop activities.
AP C 208   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a print containing symbols, materials, and
                             formwork features; students will calculate dimensions, determine
                             requirements for concrete placement, and create a material cut
                             list. 1-2.) Given a wall form design, the students will accurately
                             layout out exterior wall lines and features according to print
                             specifications. 1-3.) Students will construct typical exterior wall
                             form panels to project specifications and troubleshoot design
                             flaws presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.




AP C 209   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials for cut lists used in the gang form and column
                             construction process. 2.) Efficiently apply the 3-4-5 layout
                             method to produce reference lines and column templates. 3.)
                             Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                             tasks and execute gang panel and column assembly and
                             installation procedures using product manufacturers’ guidelines.
                             4.) Employ the safe and proper use of tools and building
                             techniques to meet area specific code requirements, and quality
                             and productivity rates consistent with industry standards as
                             detailed on project prints.
AP C 214   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and framed features; students will calculate
                             dimensions, determine requirements for walls, and create a
                             material cut list. 1-2.) Given a set of prints, the students will
                             accurately layout out exterior, interior wall lines and features
                             according to print specifications. 1-3.) Students will construct
                             exterior and interior wall to meet project print commercial
                             specifications and troubleshoot design flaws presented by the
                             instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe precautions and employ all
                             safety procedures during class and shop activities.
AP C 215   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and framed wall features; students will calculate
                             dimensions, determine requirements for rake walls, and create a
                             material cut list. 1-2.) Given a set of prints, the students will
                             accurately layout out exterior, interior wall lines and features
                             according to print specifications. 1-3.) Students will construct
                             exterior and interior walls, including rake walls, to meet project
                             print commercial specifications and troubleshoot design flaws
                             presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.




AP C 216   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and framed floor features; students will calculate
                             dimensions and create a material cut list. 1-2.) Given a floor plan,
                             the students will accurately layout out building lines and features
                             according to print specifications. 1-3.) Students will complete
                             commercial floor framing construction to meet project print
                             specifications and troubleshoot design flaws presented by the
                             instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe precautions and employ all
                             safety procedures during class and shop activities.




AP C 217   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and stair framing features; students will calculate
                             dimensions, and create a material cut list. 1-2.) Given a basic
                             stair design, the students will accurately layout out the floor plan,
                             stringers and stair features according to print specifications. 1-3.)
                             Students will complete single level straight stair framing
                             construction to meet project print specifications and troubleshoot
                             design flaws presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Students will
                             observe precautions and employ all safety procedures during
                             class and shop activities.
AP C 218   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and stair framing features; students will calculate
                             dimensions, requirements for concrete placement, and create a
                             material cut list. 1-2.)Given an advanced stair frame design, the
                             students will accurately layout out floor plan, stringers and stair
                             features according to print specifications. 1-3.) Students will
                             complete multi-level “L” design stair construction to meet
                             project print specifications and troubleshoot design flaws
                             presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.




AP C 219   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and exterior finish detail features; students will
                             calculate dimensions and create a material cut list. 1-2.) Given an
                             exterior finish design, the students will accurately layout out
                             exterior wall lines and features according to print specifications.
                             1-3.) Students will complete exterior wall framing and finish
                             detail construction to meet project print specifications, and
                             troubleshoot design flaws presented by the instructor. 1-4.)
                             Students will observe precautions and employ all safety
                             procedures during class and shop activities.




AP C 221   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and roof framing features; students will calculate
                             dimensions and create a material cut list. 1-2.) Given a gable roof
                             frame design, the students will accurately layout out roof lines
                             and features according to print specifications. 1-3.) Students will
                             complete gable roof framing construction to meet project print
                             specifications, and troubleshoot design flaws presented by the
                             instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe precautions and employ all
                             safety procedures during class and shop activities.
AP C 223   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and metal framing features; students will calculate
                             dimensions and create a material cut list. 1-2.) Given a metal
                             framing design, the students will be able to accurately layout out
                             floor plan and exterior wall lines and features according to print
                             specifications. 1-3.) Students will construct exterior and interior
                             metal framed walls to meet project print specifications, and
                             troubleshoot design flaws presented by the instructor. 1-4.)
                             Students will observe precautions and employ all safety
                             procedures during class and shop activities.




AP C 225   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding optical
                             principles and leveling instruments, students will label
                             instruments and list proper set procedures. 1-2.) Given a leveling
                             instrument, the students will set up and properly adjust level as
                             indicated by the instructor. 1-3.) Students will complete building
                             line and formwork layouts to project print specifications using
                             various leveling instruments. 1-4.) Students will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.




AP C 226   Mollie R. Smith   1. Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials for cut lists used in the concrete bridge construction
                             process. 2. Communicate and work cooperatively with others to
                             organize tasks and execute gang panel construction and
                             installation procedures. 3. Employ the safe and proper use of
                             tools and building techniques to meet area specific code
                             requirements, and quality and productivity rates consistent with
                             industry standards as detailed in project prints.
AP C 227   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and formwork features; students will calculate
                             dimensions, requirements for concrete placement, and create a
                             material cut list. 1-2.) Given a stair and ramp form design, the
                             students will accurately layout out stair/ramp building lines and
                             features according to print specifications. 1-3.) Students will
                             complete straight stair and connecting ramp construction to meet
                             project print specifications and troubleshoot design flaws
                             presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.




AP C 228   Mollie R. Smith   1.1) Presented with a list of questions regarding stairs and trim;
                             students will describe materials and applications. 1.2) Given a
                             print, students will calculate materials. 1.3) Provided with a stair
                             design, students will install trim to meet project specifications.
                             1.4) Students will observe precautions and employ all safety
                             procedures during class and shop activities.




AP C 229   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials, cabinetry details, and features; students will calculate
                             dimensions and create a material cut list. 1-2.) Given a cabinet
                             design, the student will accurately layout out component
                             dimensions and details according to print specifications. 1-3.)
                             Student will complete one door/drawer style cabinet constructed
                             to meet project print specifications, and troubleshoot design
                             flaws presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Student will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.
AP C 230   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials, cabinetry details, and features; students will calculate
                             dimensions and create a material cut list. 1-2.) Given a cabinet
                             design, the students will accurately layout out location and
                             elevation for installing components according to print
                             specifications. 1-3.) Students will complete cabinetry installation
                             according to project print specifications, and troubleshoot design
                             flaws presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Student will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.




AP C 235   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and finish features; students will calculate dimensions,
                             requirements for moldings and trims, and create a material cut
                             list. 1-2.) Given a wall elevation view, the students will be able to
                             accurately layout out wall and wall features according to print
                             specifications. 1-3.) Students will complete interior molding and
                             trim installation to meet project print specifications, and
                             troubleshoot design flaws presented by the instructor. 1-4.)
                             Students will observe precautions and employ all safety
                             procedures during class and shop activities.




AP C 236   Mollie R. Smith   1.1) Presented with a list of questions regarding plastic
                             laminates; students will describe materials and installation
                             criteria. 1.2) Given a cabinet layout, students will determine
                             countertop dimensions. 1.3) Provided with a print, students will
                             shape and laminate a countertop design to specifications. 1.4)
                             Students will observe precautions and employ all safety
                             procedures during class and shop activities.
AP C 237   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and door frame features; students will calculate
                             dimensions and create a material cut list. 1-2.) Given a door
                             project design, the students will be able to accurately layout out
                             walls for door framing according to print specifications. 1-3.)
                             Students will complete framing and door frame installation to
                             meet project print specifications, and troubleshoot design flaws
                             presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.




AP C 239   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             materials and door frame features; students will calculate
                             dimensions and create a material list. 1-2.) Given a door project
                             design, the students will be able to accurately layout door frame
                             for hardware according to print specifications. 1-3.) Students will
                             complete hinge, door closure, and exit device hardware
                             installation to meet project print specifications, and troubleshoot
                             design flaws presented by the instructor. 1-4.) Students will
                             observe precautions and employ all safety procedures during
                             class and shop activities.




AP C 245   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials used in the commercial store fixture installation
                             process. 2.) Communicate and work cooperatively with others to
                             organize tasks and execute panel and valance fixture assembly
                             procedures. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of tools and
                             installation techniques to meet area specific code requirements;
                             quality, and productivity rates consistent with industry standards
                             as detailed in project instructions.
AP C 246   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials used in the store fixture installation process. 2.)
                             Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                             tasks and execute component preparation, staging and fixture
                             assembly procedures. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of tools
                             and installation techniques to meet area specific code
                             requirements; quality, and productivity rates consistent with
                             industry standards as detailed in project instructions.




AP C 256   Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                             hazardous materials and chemicals; students will identify the
                             necessary levels of personal protective equipment based on the
                             four routes of entry. 1-2.) Given a hazard scenario, the students
                             will accurately identify the proper permit required based on
                             OSHA 1910.146 standard. 1-3.) Students will complete work
                             process in a simulated confined space and demonstrate proper
                             use of two types of respirators. 1-4.) Students will observe
                             precautions and employ all safety procedures during class and
                             shop activities.




AP C 261   Mollie R. Smith   1. Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials for cut lists used in basic wall framing procedures. 2.
                             Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                             tasks and execute wall layout, assemble and installation
                             procedures. 3. Assess shear panel requirements and produce the
                             proper fastening pattern. 4. Employ the safe and proper use of
                             tools and building techniques to meet area specific code
                             requirements, and quality and productivity rates consistent with
                             commercial industry standards.


AP C 262   Mollie R. Smith   1. Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials for cut lists used in the stair construction process. 2.
                             Effectively plan, communicate, and work cooperatively with
                             others to execute stair layout and assembly tasks to print
                             specifications. 3. Employ the safe and proper use of tools and
                             building techniques to meet area specific code requirements, and
                             quality and productivity rates consistent with industry standards.
AP C 263   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials for cut lists used in the hip roof framing process. 2.)
                             Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                             tasks and execute ceiling joist, rafter and bracing construction
                             procedures. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of tools and
                             building techniques to meet area specific code requirements, and
                             quality and productivity rates consistent with industry standards.




AP C 264   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials for cut lists used in the concrete abutment construction
                             process. 2.) Communicate and work cooperatively with others to
                             organize tasks and execute keyway, wing and head wall
                             construction procedures. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of
                             tools and building techniques to meet area specific code
                             requirements, and quality and productivity rates consistent with
                             industry standards as detailed on project prints.




AP C 265   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze loads and determine the correct center of gravity, and
                             calculate safe working load for various hardware types. 2.)
                             Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                             tasks for lifting and moving single and multiple leg (hitch
                             configuration) loads. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of
                             hardware attachments and rigging procedures to meet safety
                             requirements as detailed in project instructions.




AP C 266   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials used in the solid surface installation process. 2.)
                             Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                             tasks and execute surface preparation, shaping and assembly
                             procedures. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of tools and
                             installation techniques to meet manufacturers’ requirements;
                             quality, and productivity rates consistent with industry standards
                             as detailed in project instructions.
AP C 267   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials for cut lists used in both the post and beam and
                             panelized roof framing processes. 2.) Use the job planning
                             exercises to communicate and work cooperatively with others to
                             execute post and beam, and panelized roof construction
                             procedures. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of tools and
                             building techniques to meet area specific code requirements, and
                             quality and productivity rates consistent with industry standards.




AP C 268   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials used in the fitting room installation process. 2.)
                             Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                             tasks and execute partition layout and assembly procedures. 3.)
                             Employ the safe and proper use of tools and installation
                             techniques to meet area specific code requirements; quality, and
                             productivity rates consistent with industry standards as detailed
                             in project instructions.




AP C 269   Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine and calculate the appropriate
                             materials used in the security exits device installation process. 2.)
                             Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                             tasks and execute door frame modifications and exit device
                             assembly procedures. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of tools
                             and installation techniques to meet area specific code
                             requirements; quality, and productivity rates consistent with
                             industry standards as detailed in project instructions.




AP DL 205 Mollie R. Smith    1.) Analyze prints to determine the appropriate materials for
                             basic lathing applications. 2.) Communicate and work
                             cooperatively with others to organize tasks and effectively apply
                             the 3-4-5 layout method for basic lathing project. 3.) Employ the
                             safe and proper use of tools and product application techniques
                             to meet quality and productivity rates consistent with industry
                             standards.
AP DL 210 Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols and
                            welding procedures, students will identify the proper welding
                            processes and applications. 1-2.) Given a welding scenario, the
                            students will accurately apply the proper welding process and
                            techniques applicable to the interior systems industry. 1-3.)
                            Students will perform required weld types in three positions to
                            complete AWS D1.3 light gage certification. 1-4.) Students will
                            observe precautions and employ all safety procedures during
                            class and shop activities.




AP DL 212 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Assess surfaces to determine the appropriate type and
                            quantity of materials for hand finishing applications. 2.)
                            Differentiate between levels of finish and utilize the proper
                            coating sequences. 3.) Communicate and work cooperatively
                            with others to organize jobs and accomplish basic hand finishing
                            tasks. 4.) Employ proper use of hand tool and material
                            application techniques to attain project finish level that meets
                            industry standards for quality and productivity.




AP DL 215 Mollie R. Smith   1-1.) Presented with a list of questions regarding symbols,
                            materials, and architectural design features; students will
                            calculate dimensions, requirements for foam placement, and
                            create a material list. 1-2.) Given a project design, the students
                            will be able to accurately layout out building lines according to
                            print specifications. 1-3.) Students will complete wall
                            construction and exterior insulation installation to meet project
                            print specifications, and troubleshoot design flaws presented by
                            the instructor. 1-4.) Students will observe precautions and
                            employ all safety procedures during class and shop activities.
AP DL 223 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine the appropriate materials for both
                            interior and exterior advanced lathing applications. 2.)
                            Communicate and work cooperatively with others to organize
                            tasks and accomplish lathing procedures. 3.) Employ the safe and
                            proper use of tools and product application techniques to meet
                            quality and productivity rates consistent with industry standards.




AP DL 224 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Assess architectural details to determine the appropriate type
                            and quantity of materials for various ceiling and soffit designs.
                            2.) Differentiate between levels of finish and utilize the proper
                            coating sequences. 3.) Communicate and work cooperatively
                            with others to organize jobs and accomplish joint finishing tasks.
                            4.) Employ the correct combination of hand and automatic taping
                            tools techniques to achieve industry production rates for
                            measuring, cutting and splicing joints, and coating ceilings and
                            soffits to selected finish level.


AP DL 225 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Assess surfaces to select the appropriate mediums as primers
                            and top coats to produce a wet wall, level five finish. 2.) Analyze
                            wall surfaces between levels of finish and utilize the proper
                            coating sequences. 3.) Communicate and work cooperatively
                            with others to organize jobs and accomplish wet wall finishing
                            tasks. 4.) Employ the correct use of rollers, sprayers and
                            application techniques to execute a uniformly coated wet wall
                            surface that meets industry quality and productivity standards for
                            level five finishes.


AP DL 226 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Analyze prints to determine the appropriate materials for fiber
                            reinforced substrate applications. 2.) Communicate and work
                            cooperatively with others to organize jobs and accomplish
                            substrate installation tasks. 3.) Employ the safe and proper use of
                            tools and product application techniques to meet quality and
                            productivity rates consistent with industry standards.
AP DL 227 Mollie R. Smith    1.) Assess surfaces to determine the appropriate type and
                             quantity of materials for decorative trim and texture applications.
                             2.) Differentiate between levels of finish and utilize the proper
                             coating sequences. 3.) Communicate and work cooperatively
                             with others to organize jobs and accomplish trim and texturing
                             tasks. 4.) Employ the correct use of automatic taping tool
                             techniques to achieve the textured surface finish for a specified
                             design that meets industry standards for quality and productivity.




AP E 101   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. The student will be able to deduce valid conclusions
                             employing formulas and arithmetic skills in solving problems
                             related to conduit bending and circuit calculations. 1.2. Presented
                             with a circuit, the student will demonstrate proficiency
                             measuring values of voltage, current, and resistance using a
                             digital multi meter. 1.3. The student will be able to demonstrate
                             proficiency in basic 1st Aid and CPR in given situations that
                             might occur in a construction environment.




AP E 102   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. The student will be able to interpret electrical drawings and
                             apply the basic skills required for conduit bending and wiring
                             basic electrical circuits. The student will demonstrate, by hands-
                             on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to
                             fabricate instructor-assigned conduit bends and to install and test
                             electrical circuits. 1.2. Given a set of direct current (DC) series
                             and parallel circuits, the student will perform the necessary
                             mathematical calculations required to solve for an instructor-
                             designated variable (voltage, current, or resistance). 1.3.
                             Presented with a list of question regarding electrical raceway fill,
                             the student will reference the NFPA 70A to determine the
                             number of wires that can occupy an electrical raceway based on
                             ambient temperature, type of raceway, and type of wire
                             insulation.
AP E 103   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. Presented with the material on Drug Awareness students will
                             be able identify particular drugs and the effects they have on the
                             metabolism, as well as the degree to which someone would be
                             impaired while trying to perform a job task. 2.2. Given a set of
                             alternating current (AC) series and parallel circuits, the student
                             will perform the necessary mathematical calculations required to
                             solve for an instructor-designed variable (voltage, current, or
                             impedance). 3.3. Presented with a list of electrical code questions
                             regarding cable tray and instructor-selected electrical conductors,
                             the student will reference the NFPS 70A to determine the
                             appropriate wire type, fill capabilities, and other requirements for
                             cable tray installations.
AP E 104   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. Presented with a list of electrical code questions based on
                             transformers, the student will reference the National Electrical
                             Code (NFPA 70A) to determine the over-current protection
                             required for a transformer, based on transformer size (VA),
                             voltage, temperature rise, and available source current. 2.2.
                             Presented with a set of commercial blueprints, the student will
                             recognize and identify common electrical symbology. 3.3.
                             Presented with a list of electrical code questions regarding cable
                             tray and instructor-selected electrical conductors, the student will
                             reference the NFPA 70A to determine the appropriate wire type,
                             fill capabilities, and other requirements for cable tray
                             installations.
AP E 105   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. The student will be able to design and interpret electronic
                             circuit diagrams. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests
                             and by written assignments, the skills required to fabricate, test,
                             and operate electronic circuits assigned by his/her instructor. 2.2.
                             The student will be asked to demonstrate knowledge of DC
                             Theory (OHMS Law) to solve real world circuit problems. 3.3.
                             Given a list of electrical utilization equipment, the student will
                             perform the necessary mathematical calculations required to
                             complete a code-compliant installation. The student will
                             demonstrate, through research and by written assignments, the
                             skills needed to correctly calculate circuit requirements for
                             instructor-provided requirement, based on the Nation Electrical
                             Cade (NFPA 70A).

AP E 106   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. Presented with a list electrical code questions based on
                             electrical grounding and bonding for a service entrance facility,
                             the student will reference the National Electrical Code (NFPA
                             70A) to determine the correct conductor sizing needed to meet
                             the specified electrical requirements. 2.2. Presented with an
                             industrial set of blueprints the student will reference the NFPA
                             70A to determine the service feeder sizes needed for a given
                             industrial application. 3.3. The student will be able to identify 3
                             phase wye and delta transformer configurations to determine the
                             applications for each system.
AP E 107   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. The student will evaluate a motor control sequence of
                             operation and be able to design and build a circuit to create that
                             sequence. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on-tests and by
                             written assignments, the skills required to install, test and
                             troubleshoot motor control circuits that are assigned by his/her
                             instructor. 1.2. The student will be able to design and build a
                             circuit to control a three-phase motor using a latching relay. The
                             student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written
                             assignments, the skills required to install, test and troubleshoot a
                             latching relay circuit as assigned by his/her instructor. 1.3. . SLO:
                             Presented with a nameplate data from several three-phase
                             electrical motors: the student will reference the National
                             Electrical Code (NFPA 70A) to determine the correct
                             branch/feeder conductors for each motor and over-current
                             protection required for each of them.
AP E 108   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. Given design parameters for an analog electronic circuit, the
                             student will complete the necessary mathematical calculations
                             required to select the proper components to perform a desired
                             function. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by
                             written assignments, the skills necessary to select the appropriate
                             components and properly install them. 1.2. The student will
                             interpret digital electronic diagrams and apply the basic skills
                             required to test and troubleshoot solid-state digital devices. The
                             student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written
                             assignments, the skills required to analyze, test and troubleshoot
                             solid-state digital devices. 1.3.Presented with a list of electrical
                             code questions regarding arc flash; the student will reference the
                             National Electrical Code (NFPA 70E) to determine the
                             appropriate personal protective equipment required to work on
                             energized electrical circuits.

AP E 109   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. The student will be able to design and interpret fire alarm
                             drawings and utilize the drawings to install a code-compliant fire
                             alarm system. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests
                             and by written assignments, the skills required to layout, install,
                             test, troubleshoot, and operate fire alarm systems. 1.2. Given
                             design parameters for an intrusion detection system, the student
                             will design an alarm circuit to perform the intended operation.
                             The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written
                             assignments, the skills required to design, install, test, and
                             troubleshoot a commercial intrusion detection circuit based on a
                             given sequence of operation. 1.3. Presented with a list of
                             electrical code questions regarding fire alarm systems, the
                             student will reference the National Electrical Code (NFPA70A)
                             and The National Fire Alarm Code (NFPA 72) to determine the
                             smoke and heat detector selection, detector, horn, strobe, and pull
                             station placement, and adequate battery capacity to meet code
                             requirements.
AP E 110   Mollie R. Smith   1.1. The student will interpret the requirements of a given PLC
                             installation. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and
                             by written assignments, the skills required to program, test, and
                             troubleshoot a programmable logic control circuits. 1.2. Given
                             design parameters for a PLC circuit, the student will perform the
                             necessary programming required to create a PLC ladder diagram
                             on a computer workstation, load the program into the PLC, and
                             run, test, and troubleshoot the program. The student will
                             demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written assignments, the
                             skills necessary to design a control circuit and program a PLC to
                             perform an instructor-assigned function. 3.3. Presented with a list
                             of electrical code questions regarding programmable logic
                             controller installations, the student will reference the National
                             Electrical Code (NFPA 70A) to ensure that the materials and
                             wiring design of a given PLC installation are code compliant.


AP IW 101 Mollie R. Smith    1.) The student will be able to interpret electrical drawings and
                             apply the basic skills required for conduit bending and wiring
                             basic electrical circuits. The student will demonstrate, by hands-
                             on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to
                             fabricate instructor-assigned conduit bends and to install and test
                             electrical circuits. 2.)Given a set of direct current (DC) series and
                             parallel circuits, the student will perform the necessary
                             mathematical calculations required to solve for an instructor-
                             designated variable (voltage, current, or resistance. 3.) Presented
                             with a list of questions regarding electrical raceway fill, the
                             student will reference the NFPA 70A to determine the number of
                             wires that can occupy an electrical raceway based on ambient
                             temperature, type of raceway, and type of wire insulation.

AP IW 102 Mollie R. Smith    1.) The student will be able to interpret electrical drawings and
                             apply the basic skills required for conduit bending and for wiring
                             basic electrical circuits. The student will demonstrate, by hands-
                             on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to
                             fabricate instructor-designated conduit bends and the skills
                             needed to install and test electrical circuits. 2.) Given a set of
                             alternating current (AC) series and parallel circuits, the student
                             will perform the necessary mathematical calculations required to
                             solve for an instructor-designated variable (voltage, current, or
                             impedance). 3.) Presented with a list of electrical code questions
                             based on transformers, the student will reference the National
                             Electrical Code (NFPA 70A) to determine the over-current
                             protection required for a transformer, based on transformer size
                             (VA), voltage, temperature rise, and available source current.
AP IW 103 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will be able to design and interpret electronic
                            circuit diagrams. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests
                            and by written assignments, the skills required to fabricate, test,
                            and operate electronic circuits assigned by his instructor. 2.)
                            Given a set of parameters for a Zener diode; a student will
                            perform the mathematical calculations needed to predict its effect
                            on a given circuit. 3.) Presented with a list electrical code
                            questions based on electrical grounding and bonding for a service
                            entrance facility, the student will reference the National
                            Electrical Code (NFPA 70A) to determine the correct conductor
                            sizing needed to meet the specified electrical requirements.




AP IW 104 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will evaluate a motor control sequence of
                            operation and be able to design and build a circuit to create that
                            sequence. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by
                            written assignments, the skills required to install, test, and
                            troubleshoot motor control circuits that are assigned by his
                            instructor. 2.) The student will be able to design and build a
                            circuit to control a three-phase motor using a latching relay. The
                            student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written
                            assignments, the skills required to install, test, and troubleshoot a
                            latching relay circuit as assigned by his instructor. 3.) Presented
                            with a nameplate data from several three-phase electrical motors:
                            the student will reference the National Electrical Code (NFPA
                            70A) to determine the correct branch/feeder conductors for each
                            motor and over-current protection required for each of them.

AP IW 105 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will be able to design and build programmable
                            logic control (PLC) circuits based on the description of their
                            intended sequence of operation. The student will demonstrate his
                            understanding through hands-on labs and written assignments. 2.)
                            Given design parameters for a traffic light system, the student
                            will design a PLC circuit to perform the intended sequence of
                            operation. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by
                            written assignments, the skills required to design, install, test,
                            and troubleshoot a PLC circuit based on a given sequence of
                            operation. 3.) Presented with a list of electrical code questions
                            regarding arc flash; the student will reference the National
                            Electrical Code (NFPA 70E) to determine the appropriate
                            personal protective equipment required to work on energized
                            electrical circuits.
AP IW 106 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will be able to design and interpret the NFPA72
                            code requirements for installation of a fire alarm system. The
                            student will demonstrate his ability to design, wire, connect, and
                            troubleshoot a fire alarm system through hands-on labs and
                            written assignments. 2.) Given design parameters for an intrusion
                            detection system, the student will design an alarm circuit to
                            perform the intended operation. The student will demonstrate, by
                            hands-on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to
                            design, install, test, and troubleshoot a commercial intrusion
                            detection circuit based on a given sequence of operation. 3.)
                            Presented with a list electrical code questions regarding
                            hazardous locations, the student will reference the National
                            Electrical Code (NFPA 70A) to determine the correct materials
                            and installation requirements for a given hazardous location.

AP IW 107 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will interpret electronic diagrams and apply the
                            basic skills required to build, test, and troubleshoot electronic
                            analog circuits. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests
                            and by written assignments, the skills required to build, test, and
                            troubleshoot electronic analog circuits. 2.) The student will
                            interpret electronic diagrams and apply the basic skills required
                            to test and troubleshoot solid-state analog devices. The student
                            will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written assignments,
                            the skills required to analyze, test, and troubleshoot solid-state
                            analog devices. 3.) Given design parameters for an analog
                            electronic circuit, the student will complete the necessary
                            mathematical calculations required to select the proper
                            components to perform a desired function. The student will
                            demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written assignments, the
                            skills necessary to select the appropriate components and
                            properly install them.

AP IW 108 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will interpret electronic diagrams and apply the
                            basic skills required to build, test, and troubleshoot electronic
                            analog circuits. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests
                            and by written assignments, the skills required to build, test, and
                            troubleshoot electronic analog circuits. 2.) The student will
                            interpret electronic diagrams and apply the basic skills required
                            to test and troubleshoot solid-state analog devices. The student
                            will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written assignments,
                            the skills required to analyze, test, and troubleshoot solid-state
                            analog devices. 3.) Given design parameters for an analog
                            electronic circuit, the student will complete the necessary
                            mathematical calculations required to select the proper
                            components to perform a desired function. The student will
                            demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written assignments, the
                            skills necessary to select the appropriate components and
                            properly install them.
AP IW 109 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Given a description of a desired control operation, the student
                            will develop a formal sequence of operation and ladder diagram
                            for the operation. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests
                            and by written assignments, the skills required to develop, wire,
                            test, and troubleshoot advanced motor control circuits. 2.)
                            Presented with a list electrical code questions regarding electrical
                            motors, the student will reference the National Electrical Code
                            (NFPA 70A) to determine the correct materials and installation
                            requirements for a given motor and for its control circuit. 3.) The
                            student will design and connect circuits using pilot devices
                            (indicator lights, pushbuttons, proximity switches, etc.) selected
                            by his instructor. The student will describe the function of each
                            device in the circuit.

AP IW 110 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Given a CSI® Master Format specification, the student will
                            interpret electrical design requirements and design and create
                            electrical AutoCAD drawings. The student will demonstrate, by
                            hands-on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to
                            read, edit, and create new AutoCAD electrical drawings. 2.)
                            Given utilization requirements for electrical switchgear, the
                            student will calculate bus ampacity and illustrate single-line
                            distribution of electrical power. The student will develop a
                            drawing of the electrical service equipment that shows power
                            distribution, overcurrent protection, and utility metering. 3.)
                            Given a set of electrical design criteria for a new building, the
                            student will reference the NFPA 70A to determine service
                            equipment requirements, electrical circuit distribution layout, and
                            light fixture placement. The student will create construction
                            drawings based on these determinations.

AP IW 111 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will be able to interpret the requirements of a
                            motor control circuit controlled by a Variable Frequency Drive
                            (VFD). The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by
                            written assignments, the skills required to program, test, and
                            troubleshoot an electric motor drive system. 2.) Given design
                            parameters for an electric motor drive circuit, the student will
                            perform the necessary mathematical calculations required to
                            select the proper motor size and type, the proper variable speed
                            controller, and the proper circuit conductors for the installation.
                            The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written
                            assignments, the skills necessary to select and install the
                            appropriate motor and VFD for a given application. 3.) Presented
                            with a list of electrical code questions regarding electrical motor
                            drives, the student will reference the National Electrical Code
                            (NFPA 70A) to ensure that the materials and installation
                            requirements of a given electric motor drive circuit are code
                            compliant.
AP IW 112 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will use Microsoft Word to open, create, edit, and
                            save documents to meet instructor-defined objectives. The
                            student will demonstrate the computer-based word-processing
                            skills needed to conduct routine electrical construction
                            correspondence. 2.) The student will use Microsoft Excel to
                            open, create, edit, and save spreadsheets to meet instructor-
                            defined objectives. The student will demonstrate the computer-
                            based data manipulation skills needed to track, total, and average
                            numerical information. 3.) The student will demonstrate, through
                            computer-based tests and by written assignments, an
                            understanding of basic computer operating systems (OS), his
                            ability to navigate and locate the computer’s file structure, his
                            ability to use email, and his ability to conduct research using the
                            internet.
AP IW 113 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will interview guest speakers who represent all
                            facets of the industry to facilitate his understanding of problems
                            and issues confronting an electrical supervisor. The student will
                            investigate each area of contract responsibility from business
                            owner to foreman to construction support vendors. The student
                            will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written assignments,
                            the skills required to manage an electrical construction project.
                            2.) Given a supervision problem, the student will be asked to
                            provide solutions to the problem. The student will demonstrate
                            by oral and written assignments his ability to solve a variety of
                            problems found on a typical construction project. 3.) Presented
                            with a list of Occupational Safety and Health Administration
                            (OSHA) requirements for construction jobsites, the student will
                            reference the Code of Federal Regulations (CRF) 1926 to
                            determine the correct procedures to maintain a safe work
                            environment on an electrical construction project.


AP IW 114 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will design and interpret the electrical
                            requirements of residential, commercial, and industrial buildings.
                            The student will demonstrate, through research and by written
                            assignments, the skills required to quickly and accurately locate
                            the electrical code requirements for assigned applications. 2.)
                            Given a list of electrical utilization equipment, the student will
                            perform the necessary mathematical calculations required to
                            complete a code-compliant installation. The student will
                            demonstrate, through research and by written assignments, the
                            skills needed to correctly calculate circuit requirements for
                            instructor-provided equipment, based on the National Electrical
                            Code (NFPA 70A). 3.) Presented with a list of electrical code
                            questions regarding cable tray and instructor-selected electrical
                            conductors, the student will reference the NFPA 70A to
                            determine the appropriate wire type, fill capabilities, and other
                            requirements for cable tray installations.
AP IW 115 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will interpret specifications of a Voice Data
                            Video (VDV) system for a commercial building and design a
                            strategy for its installation. The student will demonstrate, by
                            hands-on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to
                            design and install a structured cabling system. 2.) Given fiber
                            optic circuit design criteria, the student will perform the
                            necessary mathematical calculations required to verify code-
                            compliant cable installation. The student will demonstrate, by
                            hands-on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to
                            install, test, and document a fiber optic communications cable
                            system. 3.) Presented with a list electrical code questions
                            regarding low voltage systems, the student will reference the
                            National Electrical Code (NFPA 70A) to ensure that the
                            materials and installation requirements of a given low voltage
                            communications circuit are code-compliant.
AP IW 116 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will be able to interpret and design installations
                            of commercial, residential, and industrial solar photovoltaic (PV)
                            systems. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by
                            written assignments, the skills required to assess solar PV site
                            feasibility, design mounting systems, calculate array series-
                            parallel module configuration, install all equipment, test,
                            troubleshoot, and operate a residential, commercial or industrial
                            solar photovoltaic system. 2.) Given an inverter circuit for a
                            photovoltaic system; the student will be asked to perform the
                            necessary mathematical calculations required to show expected
                            inverter voltage/current curve during peak production. The
                            student will install, connect, test, troubleshoot, and operate the
                            inverter at its designed capacity. 3.) Presented with a list of
                            electrical code questions regarding photovoltaic systems, the
                            student will reference the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70A)
                            to meet code-compliant installation requirements for a
                            photovoltaic system.
AP IW 117 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will interpret electrical drawings and apply the
                            basic skills required to install commercial and industrial
                            electrical service equipment. The student will demonstrate, by
                            hands-on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to
                            install electrical service equipment. 2.) Given a drawing for a
                            commercial construction project, the student will perform the
                            necessary take-offs and mark-ups required to compile a material
                            list for construction. The student will demonstrate an
                            understanding of the CSI® Master Format specification used in
                            construction documents. The student will demonstrate, by hands-
                            on tests and by written assignments, the skills needed to develop
                            a material list and comply with specifications of a construction
                            project. 3.) Presented with a list of questions regarding electrical
                            service equipment, the student will reference the San Diego Gas
                            & Electric Service Guide to determine the correct materials and
                            installation requirements.

AP IW 118 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will interpret electrical drawings and utilize this
                            information to facilitate his testing of electrical distribution
                            equipment. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and
                            by written assignments, the skills required to safely operate a
                            variety of test instruments including megohmmeters, voltmeters,
                            ohmmeters, ammeters, oscilloscopes, ground rod testers, and
                            circuit tracers, among others. 2.)The student will observe
                            specialized test procedures used for high voltage cable testing,
                            cable fault location, and circuit breaker testing, among others. 3.)
                            Presented with a list of Occupational Safety and Health
                            Administration (OSHA) requirements for Lock-out/Tag-out of
                            energized circuits, the student will reference the Code of Federal
                            Regulations (CFR) 1926 to determine the correct procedures
                            required to maintain a safe work environment while testing
                            energized electrical equipment.

AP IW 119 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will set up and weld a variety of metal
                            connections using electrical resistance welding equipment. 2.)
                            The student will be able to set up and weld various joints using
                            gas welding equipment. The student will adjust and maintain the
                            oxygen/welding gas mixture for a given welding/brazing
                            operation. 3.) Presented with a list of questions regarding
                            electrical arc and gas welding, the student will select the correct
                            welding media and demonstrate proper procedures for welding a
                            variety of metal types and thicknesses.
AP IW 120 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will develop and present a lecture based on
                            instructor-designated subject matter at an appropriate level for
                            the audience. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and
                            by written assignments, the skills required to develop and deliver
                            a lecture on assigned material. 2.) Given an electrical circuit
                            problem, the student will be asked to perform the necessary
                            mathematical calculations required to illustrate and outline the
                            problem to his class. The student will demonstrate, by
                            presentation and by written assignments, the skills required to
                            develop and instruct a class session based on an assigned
                            problem. 3.) The student will generate and present an electrical
                            code question derived from instructor-assigned subject matter.
                            The student will reference the National Electrical Code (NFPA
                            70A) to determine code requirements used to formulate the
                            problem for presentation to the class.

AP IW 121 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will interpret the requirements of a given PLC
                            installation. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and
                            by written assignments, the skills required to program, test, and
                            troubleshoot a programmable logic control circuit. 2.) Given
                            design parameters for a PLC circuit, the student will perform the
                            necessary programming required to create a PLC ladder diagram
                            on a computer workstation, load the program into the PLC, and
                            run, test, and troubleshoot the program. The student will
                            demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written assignments, the
                            skills necessary to design a control circuit and program a PLC to
                            perform an instructor-assigned function. 3.) Presented with a list
                            of electrical code questions regarding programmable logic
                            controller installations, the student will reference the National
                            Electrical Code (NFPA 70A) to ensure that the materials and
                            wiring design of a given PLC installation are code compliant.
AP IW 122 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will be able to design and interpret fire alarm
                            drawings and utilize the drawings to install a code-compliant fire
                            alarm system. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests
                            and by written assignments, the skills required to layout, install,
                            test, troubleshoot, and operate a fire alarm system. 2.) The
                            student will design and install Class A, Class B, and network-
                            based fire alarm systems. The student will demonstrate, by hands-
                            on tests and by written assignments, the skills required to layout,
                            install, test, troubleshoot, and operate fire alarm systems
                            employing different design criteria. 3.) Presented with a list of
                            electrical code questions regarding fire alarm systems, the
                            student will reference the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70A)
                            and The National Fire Alarm Code (NFPA 72) to determine the
                            smoke and heat detector selection, detector, horn, strobe, and pull
                            station placement, and adequate battery capacity to meet code
                            requirements.

AP IW 123 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will interpret electrical drawings and piping and
                            instrumentation diagrams (P&ID) and apply the basic skills
                            required to install a measurement and control system. The
                            student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written
                            assignments, the skills required to design, install, test,
                            troubleshoot, and operate a measurement and control system. 2.)
                            Given a temperature measurement device, the student will assess
                            its design, select an appropriate signal conditioner, connect the
                            device, and calibrate its output. The student will demonstrate, by
                            hands-on tests and by written assignments, his ability to install
                            and calibrate a temperature measurement device. 3.) Given a
                            pressure measurement device, the student will assess its design,
                            select an appropriate signal conditioner, connect it, and calibrate
                            its output. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by
                            written assignments, his ability to install and calibrate a pressure
                            measurement device.
AP IW 124 Mollie R. Smith   1.) The student will develop and present a lecture based on
                            instructor-designated subject matter at an appropriate level for
                            the audience. The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and
                            by written assignments, the skills required to develop and deliver
                            a lecture on assigned material. 2.) Given an electrical circuit
                            problem, the student will be asked to perform the necessary
                            mathematical calculations required to illustrate and outline the
                            problem to his class. The student will demonstrate, by
                            presentation and by written assignments, the skills required to
                            develop and instruct a class session based on an assigned
                            problem. 3.) The student will generate and present an electrical
                            code question derived from instructor-assigned subject matter.
                            The student will reference the National Electrical Code (NFPA
                            70A) to determine code requirements used to formulate the
                            problem for presentation to the class.

AP IW 125 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Describe the operating principles of building services system
                            which are important energy saving and security applications. 2.)
                            Accurately locate and explain the operation and function of
                            HAVAC components during a building walk-through. 3.) Design
                            a LonWorks based building automation system. 4.) Install and
                            troubleshoot lighting control systems to include: line voltage, low
                            voltage, and digital systems.




AP IW 126 Mollie R. Smith   1.) Using the SDG&E Service Guide, determine the electrical
                            service requirements for both commercial and industrial
                            facilities. 2.) Locate take-off information from construction
                            drawings. 3.) Design and perform a successful and safe rigging
                            operation to move an object. 4.) Layout and place large electrical
                            equipment inside a building.
AP SC 108 Mollie R. Smith   1.1. The student will interpret building drawings and apply the
                            derived information to the installation, design, and maintenance
                            of voice, data, video (VDV), and other low voltage systems. The
                            student will demonstrate the basic skills required to install
                            cabling and equipment for voice (telephone) systems, data (local
                            area network) systems, and video (CATV and CCTV) systems.
                            The student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written
                            assignments, the skills required to design, install, test,
                            troubleshoot, and operate these VDV systems. 1.2. Given a
                            structured cable installation, the student will assess its design,
                            select appropriate active and passive system components,
                            connect all equipment, and verify their proper operation. The
                            student will demonstrate, by hands-on tests and by written
                            assignments, his ability to install code- and industry-compliant
                            systems. The student will utilize the National Electrical Code
                            (NFPA 70A) and guidelines published by BICSI, the American
                            National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the National Electrical
                            Manufacturers Association (NEMA). 1.3. Given a voice, data, or
                            video system installation, the student will provide a complete list
ARAB      Martha K. Evans   1) Apply the basic structures of Arabic grammar to communicate
101A                        effectively. 2) Formulate declarative and interrogative sentences
                            at an elementary level. 3) Construct a descriptive paragraph
                            about personal life, family, education, interests using basic
                            sentences in the present tense. 4) Speak Arabic at an elementary
                            level with effective pronunciation and intonation. Demonstrate
                            signs of spontaneity in speech. 5) Understand basic written
                            language and summarize its meaning. 6) Deduce meaning from
                            simple spoken language and authentic written materials. 7)
                            Recognize the diversity among Arabic-speaking cultures.
                            Compare these cultures to one’s own culture.




ARAB      Martha K. Evans   1. Speak Arabic at an elementary level with effective
101B                        pronunciation and intonation. Demonstrate signs of spontaneity
                            in speech. 2. Understand basic written Arabic and summarize its
                            meaning. 3. Deduce meaning from simple spoken language and
                            authentic written materials. 4. Recognize the diversity among
                            Arabic-speaking cultures. Compare these cultures to one's own
                            culture.
ART 106   Michael F         1. Student will be able to paint a human likeness in black and
          Steirnagle        white paint from a live model. 2. Student will be able to paint a
                            human likeness in color from a photograph. 3. Student will be
                            able to utilize photographic techniques in portrait lighting and
                            produce photos suitable to use as reference for painting a likness
                            of the model.
ART 135   Sasha Jonestein   1. Students will be able to use the pinching, coiling, slab-building
                            and throwing techniques to create works that are technically
                            sound - without cracks or warping. 2. Students will be able to
                            consider the composition of a three dimensional form in order to
                            create works that are visually interesting from all angles. 3. In
                            writing, critiques and conversation, students will be able to
                            identify, understand and utilize ceramic terminology to discuss
                            the ceramic process and its results. 4. Refer to both modern and
                            historical approaches to ceramics when viewing or creating
                            ceramic works of art. 5. Students will be able to use glaze and the
                            firing process to achieve the most appropriate and visually
                            interesting surface for their finished piece.
ART 136   Sasha Jonestein   -Students will be able to complete ceramic forms which are
                            technically proficient in each of the assigned building techniques
                            - coiling, slab-building, pinching and throwing. -Students will be
                            able to demonstrate the understanding of surface and how it
                            relates to the form and concept of the overall piece. This includes
                            a basic understanding of the principals of how to mix glaze from
                            dry material and how to use it to achieve the desired result. -
                            Students will have a basic understanding of how to load and
                            unload both bisque and glaze kilns and the principals of the firing
                            process, including the difference between oxidation and
                            reduction. -Students will be able to use ceramic vocabulary when
                            discussing examples of ceramic artwork or processes. They will
                            need this skill frequently when critiquing each other's finished
                            works. -Students will create original works that include
                            thoughtful consideration of form, detail, concept, and overall
                            presentation. Each aspect of the piece will be intentional and
                            finished with a high level of craftmanship.
ART 137   Sasha Jonestein     Students will have refined their wheel throwing techniques so
                              that they are able to create repeatable forms efficiently and
                              skillfully, creating light-weight, functional objects. Students will
                              be able to integrate form and function to create objects that are
                              both aesthetically pleasing and user friendly. Students will be
                              able to present and display work in manner to positively effect
                              buyer perception and sales. Students will have a greater
                              understanding of how to price work based on the cost involved in
                              generating each object and market value. Each student will
                              integrate their personal style into their functional works, creating
                              a line of pottery that is both unique and technically strong.
                              Students will be able to mix glazes from dry materials while
                              understanding the properties that make a glaze food safe. They
                              will also understand multiple methods of applying glaze to their
                              ceramic forms in order to achieve a visually appealing form.




ART 165   Mark J. Hudelson Students will be able to identify works of art created in various
                           periods, from prehistoric through Gothic. Students will
                           understand and use appropriate terminology while discussing and
                           writing about art and art history. Students will be able to
                           recognize and discuss symbolism and iconography used
                           throughout the various periods covered.
ART 165   Mark J. Hudelson Students will be able to identify works of art created in various
                           periods, from prehistoric through Gothic. Students will
                           understand and use appropriate terminology while discussing and
                           writing about art and art history. Students will be able to
                           recognize and discuss symbolism and iconography used
                           throughout the various periods covered.
ART 166   Mark J. Hudelson 1. Students will be able to identify works of art created in various
                           periods, from the early Renaissance through contemporary art. 2.
                           Students will understand and use appropriate terminology while
                           discussing and writing about art and art history. 3. Students will
                           be able to recognize and discuss symbolism and iconography
                           used throughout the various periods covered.
ART 167   Mark J. Hudelson Students will be able to identify works of art created in various
                           periods and styles, from Neoclassicism through Post-
                           Impressionism. Students will understand and use appropriate
                           terminology while discussing and writing about art and art
                           history. Students will be able to recognize and discuss symbolism
                           and iconography used throughout the various periods covered.

ART 168   Mark J. Hudelson Students will be able to identify works of art created in various
                           periods and styles, from Fauvism through Postmodernism.
                           Students will understand and use appropriate terminology while
                           discussing and writing about art and art history. Students will be
                           able to recognize and discuss symbolism and iconography used
                           throughout the various periods covered.

ART 200   Lily Glass         1. Students will be able to apply their understanding of light,
                             pigment and visual color to technical methods of additive and
                             subtractive color mixing. 2. Students are going to demonstrate
                             clear comprehension of the three variable qualities of color: hue,
                             lightness and saturation by generating succinct visual examples
                             using color systems and models. 3. Students will be able to
                             formulate academic analysis of the use and application of color
                             in various fields of Art.
ART 250   Sasha Jonestein    Students will be able to use handbuilding, throwing and molding
                             techniques to create ceramic works that are technically sound -
                             without cracks, crazing, dunting or warping. 2. Students will be
                             able to consider the composition of a three dimensional form in
                             order to create works that are visually interesting from all angles.
                             3. In writing, critiques and conversation, students will be able to
                             identify, understand and utilize ceramic terminology to discuss
                             the ceramic process and its results. 4. Students will be able to
                             refer to both modern and historical approaches to ceramics when
                             viewing and creating ceramic works of art. 5. Students will
                             understand the technique behind firing a kiln and making a glaze.
                             They will be able to identify ceramic materials for their unique
                             quality that they bring to a glaze or clay body. 6. Students will be
                             able to use glaze and the firing process to achieve the most
                             appropriate and visually interesting surface for their finished
                             piece.
ARTD 220 Lily Glass            Students will demonstrate a basic theoretical and historical
                               understanding of animation, multimedia, film and video. They
                               will be able to practically apply spatial design and composition to
                               temporal design, using typography, visual texture, video and
                               literal imagery. They will be able to sync animation to sound,
                               apply effects, work with transparency and masks and
                               choreograph cohesive motion design.




ARTI 200   Michael F           Students will be able to create works of art in wet and dry
           Steirnagle          medium which reflect a thorough knowledge in creating the
                               illusion of three-dimensional form through the use of color,
                               value, lighting, surface treatments, drawing and perspective.
                               Works of art will be completed with respect to each of the
                               mentioned categories and a final work of art will be submitted to
                               reflect all of the areas of study mentioned.




ASL 100    Kevin F. McLellan 1. The student will be able to express basic conversational
                             information, (introductions, discuss family, etc.) at a beginning
                             sign language level.




ASL 205    Kevin R Struxness 1. Demonstrate vocabulary correctly introduced in previous
                             classes and in this class. 2. Demonstrate the correct usage of non-
                             manual markers in expressive presentations. 3. Contrast and
                             compare ASL grammar and English grammar.

ASL 206    Kevin R Struxness 1. Demonstrate vocabulary correctly introduced in previous
                             classes and in this class. 2. Demonstrate the correct usage of non-
                             manual markers in expressive presentations. 3. Contrast and
                             compare ASL grammar and English grammar.

ASL 220    Melissa B. Smith    1.Identify in writing the principles of interpreting for each of the
                               areas addressed in this course, where applicable, to: ?Role
                               clarification ?Language assessment ?Pre-assignment
                               considerations/work ?Consumer relations ?Positioning ?Dress
                               and grooming ?Ethical considerations ?Applications of the
                               interpreting process 2.Demonstrate, in writing, knowledge of
                               special procedures, protocol and decision-making processes used
                               for each setting.
ASTR 100 Mark R Lane           A. Phases of the Moon – Given any two of three variables (time
                               of day, phase of Moon, position of the Moon in the sky) predict
                               the missing variable. This will demonstrate knowledge of the
                               concept of why the Moon shows phases and how its phase is
                               related to where the Moon is in its orbit and where the observer
                               is on Earth. [Critical thinking skills, conceptual visualization
                               skills] B. Seasons – Explain why the Earth experiences seasons.
                               [Conceptual visualization skills] C. The Hertzsprung-Russell
                               Diagram – Interpret the measurable physical characteristics of a
                               star (temperature, radius, luminosity, absolute magnitude, etc.)
                               based on its position on the H-R diagram. [Critical thinking
                               skills, conceptual relationships]

ASTR        Mark R Lane        A. Use Newton’s Version of Kepler’s Third Law to determine
105L                           the mass of a body being orbited - Many of the concepts covered
                               in the lab class (Mass of Jupiter, Black Holes, Mass of the Milky
                               Way Galaxy) use this concept. It is one where the concept of
                               gravity, orbiting bodies, mass and time are all integrated together
                               into one very commonly used “tool” in astronomy. [Critical
                               thinking skills, laboratory data processing skills, conceptual
                               visualization skills] B. Determine the Age of the Universe –
                               Using a Hubble Diagram, students will demonstrate the proper
                               skills to interpret a data set and create a graph to find the Hubble
                               constant. Then using the appropriate methodology they will use
                               the Hubble constant to determine the age of the Universe.
                               [Critical thinking skills, laboratory data processing skills,
                               conceptual visualization skills]

ASTR 120 James P. Pesavento A. given any of two of three given variables, predict by previous
                            observations, deductive reasoning and cognitive processes one of
                            the following: the position of the Moon in the sky, phase of the
                            Moon or local time. B. Identify crater surface features and
                            relative surface age on any object in the Solar System that has a
                            solid crust. These features includes simple and complex craters,
                            ejecta blanket regions, rays and the type of crater erosion.
ASTR 210 Mark R Lane         A. Describe why the Earth is a favorable harbor for life in our
                             Solar System. B. Describe the variables that are used in the
                             Drake Equation in predicting the likelihood of intelligent life
                             occurring elsewhere in the Universe.




AT 100   Steven L. Bertram 1. The student will be able to explain the proper service needs of
                           a vehicle so they can properly communicate with repair
                           professionals regarding vehicle service. 2. The student will be
                           able to apply safety practices in a shop environment. 3. The
                           student will be able to perform basic maintenance to
                           automobiles. 4. The student will be able to perform basic
                           automotive operations using a variety of automotive tools.
AT 105   Steven L. Bertram 1. Students will develop a safe attitude towards mechanical
                           operations.
                            2. Students will be able to perform various electrical tests on
                           automotive systems.
                           3. Students will be able to evaluate electrical systems using a
                           digital volt-ohm meter (DVOM).
                           4. Students will be able to diagnose and repair electrical system
                           faults.
AT 105   Steven L. Bertram 1. Students will develop a safe attitude towards mechanical
                           operations. 2. Students will be able to perform various electrical
                           tests on automotive systems. 3. Students will be able to evaluate
                           electrical systems using a digital volt-ohm meter (DVOM). 4.
                           Students will be able to diagnose and repair electrical system
                           faults.
AT 110   Steven L. Bertram 1.Students will develop a safe attitude towards mechanical
                           operations. 2.Students will be able to retrieve vehicle data using
                           various diagnostic machines. 3.Students will be able to analyze
                           vehicle data and determine the proper repair procedure required.
                           4.Students will be able to perform proper repair procedures
                           engine performance systems.
AT 110   Steven L. Bertram 1.Students will develop a safe attitude towards mechanical
                           operations. 2.Students will be able to retrieve vehicle data using
                           various diagnostic machines. 3.Students will be able to analyze
                           vehicle data and determine the proper repair procedure required.
                           4.Students will be able to perform proper repair procedures
                           engine performance systems.
AT 115      Steven L. Bertram 1.Students will develop a safe attitude towards automotive fuel
                              systems. 2.Students will be able to retrieve vehicle fuel system
                              data using various diagnostic machines. 3.Students will be able to
                              analyze vehicle fuel system data and determine the proper repair
                              procedure required. 4.Students will be able to perform proper
                              repair procedures on engine fuel systems.

AT 120      Mark Coppedge     Upon completion of this course the student will demonstrate the
                              following skills: 1) The ability to perform a pressure test on an
                              automatic transmission/transaxle. 2) Perform an endplay check
                              on the final drive of the 3T40 transaxle. 3) Remove and install
                              piston and seal inside of a clutch drum.
AT 125      Steven L. Bertram 1. Students will be able to apply proper safety procedures in
                              automotive applications.
                              2. Students will be proficient in using precice measuring tools on
                              engine parts.
                              3. Students will demonstrate their ability to perform various
                              automotive engine machining operations.
AT 175      Steven L. Bertram 1. Students will achieve skills empowering them to attain
                              certification in at least 2 automotive areas. 2. Students will be
                              able to evaluate automotive electrical and engine performance
                              systems, and troubleshoot their most common faults. 3. Students
                              will become proficient in identifying specific vehicle details
                              using computer refrence programs.

AT 225   Steven L. Bertram 1. The student will Demonstrate proficiency using precise
                           measuring tools. 2. The student will be able to identify the
                           internal parts of a modern automobile engine. 3. The student will
                           be able to explain the intricate operation of a modern automobile
                           engine 4. The student will be able to explain and perform the
                           proper rebuilding techniques for a modern automobile engine. 5.
                           The student will be able to diagnose mechanical failures of a
                           modern automobile engine.
AVIA 100 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to 1) describe how major events in the history of
                           aviation influenced the development of aviation as we know it
                           today, 2) describe the governmental agencies that control
                           aviation today and explain the basic duties of each, 3) describe
                           the major industry organizations that influence aviation today,
                           and 4) describe the state of the aviation industry as it exists today.
AVIA 105 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of this course, students will
                           be able to 1) apply his/her learned knowledge in a manner so as
                           to be able to achieve a passing score on the Federal Aviation
                           Administration's private pilot knowledge exam and 2) explain
                           his/her learned knowledge during the verbal portion of the
                           practical test (administered by a Federal Aviation Administration
                           designated pilot examiner) for the private pilot certificate.




AVIA 106 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of this course, students will
                           be able to 1) apply his/her learned knowledge in a manner so as
                           to be able to achieve a passing score on the Federal Aviation
                           Administration's commercial pilot knowledge exam and 2)
                           explain his/her learned knowledge during the verbal portion of
                           the practical test (administered by a Federal Aviation
                           Administration designated pilot examiner) for the commercial
                           pilot certificate.




AVIA 107 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of this course, students will
                           be able to 1) apply his/her learned knowledge in a manner so as
                           to be able to achieve a passing score on the Federal Aviation
                           Administration's instrument rating (airplane) knowledge exam
                           and 2) explain his/her learned knowledge during the verbal
                           portion of the practical test (administered by a Federal Aviation
                           Administration designated pilot examiner) for the instrument
                           rating in an airplane.
AVIA 108 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of this course, students will
                           be able to 1) apply his/her learned knowledge in a manner so as
                           to be able to achieve a passing score on the Federal Aviation
                           Administration's fundamentals of instructing and flight instructor-
                           airplane knowledge exams and 2) explain his/her learned
                           knowledge and ability to prepare satisfactory lesson plans during
                           the verbal portion of the practical test (administered by a Federal
                           Aviation Administration designated pilot examiner) for the flight
                           instructor-airplane certificate.




AVIA 108 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of this course, students will
                           be able to 1) apply his/her learned knowledge in a manner so as
                           to be able to achieve a passing score on the Federal Aviation
                           Administration's fundamentals of instructing and flight instructor-
                           airplane knowledge exams and 2) explain his/her learned
                           knowledge and ability to prepare satisfactory lesson plans during
                           the verbal portion of the practical test (administered by a Federal
                           Aviation Administration designated pilot examiner) for the flight
                           instructor-airplane certificate.
AVIA 110 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to describe the different types of controlled airspace
                           and formulate a plan for a visual flight rules flight through these
                           different types of airspace within the United States to include 1)
                           the identification of the air traffic control facilities with whom
                           one must communicate while flying through the airspace as well
                           as a demonstration of the of the ability to select the appropriate
                           radio frequency and 2) the use of the navigation computer and
                           plotter to prepare a detailed plan of a flight through the airspace
                           to include courses, altitudes, and radio navigation.




AVIA 115 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to 1) describe how the air traffic control facilities in
                           the United States provide services to an aircraft travelling
                           between two cities on a visual flight rules flight plan, 2) describe
                           how the air traffic control facilities in the United States provide
                           services to an aircraft travelling between two cities on an
                           instrument flight rules flight plan, and 3) demonstrate how the
                           pilot of an aircraft would access and utilize these services during
                           the flights.




AVIA 120 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to 1) interpret and evaluate weather reports and
                           forecasts, 2) recognize areas that should be avoided due to
                           hazardous weather conditions, and 3) apply this knowledge to
                           selecting a satisfactory route and altitude for flights under both
                           visual and instrument flight conditions.
AVIA 125 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to apply knowledge learned to 1) demonstrate a
                           flight between two airports under simulated instrument flight
                           rules conditions, 2) demonstrate the appropriate instrument
                           approach at the destination airport, and 3) formulate appropriate
                           actions when faced with simulated emergencies or abnormal
                           situations during the flight. These student learning outcomes are
                           to be demonstrated in a flight simulator (ground trainer).




AVIA 140 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to 1) solve mathematical problems dealing with both
                           aircraft performance and navigation that are encountered during
                           both visual and instrument flight rules flights and 2) describe the
                           theory of operation as well as the operational considerations of
                           all of the types of navigation systems that are currently in use in
                           general aviation and airline aircraft.




AVIA 140 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to 1) solve mathematical problems dealing with both
                           aircraft performance and navigation that are encountered during
                           both visual and instrument flight rules flights and 2) describe the
                           theory of operation as well as the operational considerations of
                           all of the types of navigation systems that are currently in use in
                           general aviation and airline aircraft.
AVIA 145 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to apply knowledge learned to 1) demonstrate the
                           complete operation of the Garmin G1000 glass cockpit system to
                           include normal and emergency situations and 2) demonstrate the
                           complete operation of the Garmin 430/530 global positioning
                           navigation system.




AVIA 197 Jerry L. Houser   The learning outcomes for this course will depend on the specific
                           topic covered. A set of student learning outcomes will be
                           developed for each topics class and included in the outline
                           developed by the instructor.

AVIA 205 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to 1) describe, in detail, the aerodynamic forces that
                           act on an airplane during both subsonic and supersonic flight, 2)
                           explain aircraft stability and controllability, and 3) explain the
                           principles of operation of aircraft engines.




AVIA 210 Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                           will be able to 1) describe the basic methods of accident
                           investigation and how the determination of the probable cause
                           leads to the prevention of similar accidents in the future, 2)
                           describe the role that the pilots physical and psychological
                           factors play in the chain of events that may lead to an accident,
                           and 3) describe techniques and procedures that a pilot may use to
                           prevent an accident as well as to help him/her survive an accident.
AVIA 215 Jerry L. Houser    As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                            will be able to 1) describe all of the mechanical and electrical
                            systems found in the Citation I (small corporate jet) series
                            aircraft, 2) describe the normal operation of all of the just
                            mentioned systems, and 3) describe the abnormal/emergency
                            operation of the just mentioned systems.




AVIA 220 Jerry L. Houser    As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                            will be able to 1) describe all of the mechanical and electrical
                            systems found in the CRJ (Canadair Regional Jet), 2) describe
                            the normal operation of all of the just mentioned systems, 3)
                            describe the abnormal/emergency operation of the just mentioned
                            systems, 4) describe the modern navigation system on this
                            aircraft, and 5) solve performance problems for this aircraft.




AVIA 295 Jerry L. Houser    The learning outcomes for this course will depend on the specific
                            project or research selected by the student, approved by the
                            instructor, and detailed in a written contract. A set of student
                            learning outcomes will be developed for each student project and
                            listed on an attachment to the written contract.


AVIA 75   Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                            will be able to 1.) demonstrate the planning of a flight (using
                            visual flight rules) to include the preflight preparation of an
                            aircraft, 2) explain and demonstrate flight maneuvers required by
                            the Federal Aviation Administration, 3)apply his/her knowledge
                            and planning to demonstrate a successful flight (at the private
                            pilot level) to a Federal Aviation Administration designated pilot
                            examiner.
AVIA 80   Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                            will be able to 1.) demonstrate the planning of a flight (using
                            instrument flight rules) to include the preflight preparation of an
                            aircraft and the filing of an instrument flight plan, 2) explain and
                            demonstrate flight maneuvers required by the Federal Aviation
                            Administration including instrument navigation and approaches,
                            3)apply his/her knowledge and planning to demonstrate a
                            successful flight under instrument flight rules to a Federal
                            Aviation Administration designated pilot examiner.

AVIA 85   Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                            will be able to 1.) demonstrate the planning of a flight (using
                            visual flight rules) to include the preflight preparation of an
                            aircraft, 2) explain and demonstrate flight maneuvers required by
                            the Federal Aviation Administration, 3)apply his/her knowledge
                            and planning to demonstrate a successful flight (at the
                            commercial pilot level) to a Federal Aviation Administration
                            designated pilot examiner.

AVIA 90   Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                            will be able to 1.) demonstrate the preflight preparation of a
                            multi-engine aircraft, 2) demonstrate flight maneuvers while
                            flying on a single engine as well as both engines as required by
                            the Federal Aviation Administration, 3)apply his/her knowledge
                            and planning to demonstrate a successful flight in a multi-engine
                            aircraft to a Federal Aviation Administration designated pilot
                            examiner.

AVIA 90   Jerry L. Houser   As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                            will be able to 1.) demonstrate the preflight preparation of a
                            multi-engine aircraft, 2) demonstrate flight maneuvers while
                            flying on a single engine as well as both engines as required by
                            the Federal Aviation Administration, 3)apply his/her knowledge
                            and planning to demonstrate a successful flight in a multi-engine
                            aircraft to a Federal Aviation Administration designated pilot
                            examiner.
BIOL 102   Kimberly M.   1) Understand and apply the Scientific Method in both lecture
           Marshall      and lab, and apply these principles to analysis of experimental
                         results. 2) Understand the properties of chemical elements,
                         compounds, and molecules that are critical to understanding
                         biology. 3) Understand basic cell structure, organelle function,
                         and cell division. 4) Understand the principles of energy transfer,
                         photosynthesis, and cellular respiration. 5) Understand the basic
                         principles of inheritance, DNA replication, RNA transcription,
                         and protein translation. 6) Demonstrate basic laboratory skills
                         and techniques which are required for more advanced courses in
                         biology.




BIOL 105   Kimberly M.   1) Understand the Scientific Method and apply these principles
           Marshall      to analysis of experimental results. 2)Understand the basic
                         physiology of human systems.




BIOL 106   Kimberly M.   1) Understand the basic physiology of human systems.
           Marshall




BIOL 106L Kimberly M.    1)Understand the Scientific Method and apply these principles to
          Marshall       the analysis of experimental results.
BIOL 110   James L. Gilardi   The key student learning outcomes for this course are to: 1.
                              Understand the principles of inheritance, including gene
                              transmission, molecular genetics and population genetics. 2.
                              Understand the causes and the outcomes of chromosome
                              abnormalities and gene mutations. Understand the most common
                              human genetic problems related to chromosome and gene
                              abnormalities. 3. Understand the more common diagnostic
                              techniques, current treatments and promising future treatments
                              (e.g. gene therapies) for the most common human genetic
                              problems.




BIOL 110   James L. Gilardi   The key student learning outcomes for this course are to: 1.
                              Understand the principles of inheritance, including gene
                              transmission, molecular genetics and population genetics. 2.
                              Understand the causes and the outcomes of chromosome
                              abnormalities and gene mutations. Understand the most common
                              human genetic problems related to chromosome and gene
                              abnormalities. 3. Understand the more common diagnostic
                              techniques, current treatments and promising future treatments
                              (e.g. gene therapies) for the most common human genetic
                              problems.




BIOL 114   Daniel B. Sourbeer Key student learning outcomes for this course are to: 1.
                              Understand the scientific process (method). 2. Understand
                              natural selection 3. Understand energy flow in ecosystems.
BIOL 118    Kimberly M.        1) Understand the scientific method and apply these principles to
            Marshall           analysis of scientific information. 2) Understand the basic
                               principles of evolution, population ecology, community ecology,
                               and ecosystem ecology.
BIOL 160    James L. Gilardi   The specific learning outcomes for this course fall into two major
                               categories: 1. Mastery of laboratory skills and techniques
                               essential to advanced biotechnology courses. In addition to
                               laboratory skills, students must also demonstrate an
                               understanding of, and an appreciation of established laboratory
                               safety procedures. 2. Mastery of the basic knowledge of math,
                               chemistry, biology, and microbiology for additional
                               biotechnology coursework.




BIOL 160    Ralph E. Ferges    The specific learning outcomes for this course fall into two major
                               categories: 1. Mastery of laboratory skills and techniques
                               essential to advanced biotechnology courses. In addition to
                               laboratory skills, students must also demonstrate an
                               understanding of, and an appreciation of established laboratory
                               safety procedures. 2. Mastery of the basic knowledge of math,
                               chemistry, biology, and microbiology for additional
                               biotechnology coursework.




BIOL 195B Daniel B. Sourbeer Students completing this course will be able to demonstrate
                             enhanced observational skills and be able to assess situations
                             observed in natural ecosystems.




BIOL 197    Richard           The specific learning outcomes for this course will vary
            Albistegui-DuBois depending on the specific topic covered in the term in which the
                              course is presented. Nevertheless, in general, students completing
                              a course such as this would be expected to show learning
                              outcomes such as: The ability to express themselves clearly in
                              written reports on the topics covered in the course The ability to
                              discuss questions and controversies related to the specific topics
                              of the course in a well-reasoned manner, displaying both good
                              knowledge of factual material and the ability to think critically
                              about evidence and reasoning.
BIOL 215   James L. Gilardi   Students completing this course will be able to: 1. Design
                              biological experiments, taking into account the types of questions
                              asked, the number and types of biological variables involved, the
                              type of data to be collected, significant sample size and sampling
                              techniques and the appropriate data analysis. 2. Test hypotheses
                              and analyze data involving one or more biological variables. 3.
                              Identify the limitations of parametric tests such as t-tests, F-tests,
                              and linear correlation in the analysis of biological data, and
                              appropriately use non-parametric tests to analyze discrete
                              biological variables. 4. Graph biological data in the form of
                              histograms, line graphs, stem plots, scatter plots, and box plots.


BIOL 47    Richard           The specific learning outcomes will vary depending on the
           Albistegui-DuBois specific topics covered in the term in which the course is
                             presented. However, in general, students will be expected to:
                             Demonstrate the ability to absorb and evaluate new information
                             on the specific topic Evaluate the validity of statements or
                             positions relevant to the topic based on evidence Originate
                             creative ideas regarding the specific topic.

BMGT 125 Carol Bruton         1. The student will be able to differentiate and evaluate relevant
                              laws pertaining to labor relations and evaluate and assess the
                              union structure and the methods used to organize employees 2.
                              The student will be able to examine and descirbe the process of
                              the negotiated agreement 3. The student will be able to evaluate
                              the arbitration process 4. The student will be able to appraise the
                              role of unions in the public and private sector 5. The student will
                              be able to analyze a mock negotiation and examine a contract

BUS 136    Sherry L. Gordon   1 A student will be able to analyze a fact situation and then apply
                              the appropriate money management principles to the situation
                              described. 2 A student will be able to evaluate a particular
                              financial situation and demonstrate the ability to make decisions
                              requiring critical evalautions.
BUS 145    Nancy J. Galli     Retailing SLO: 1. Describe the nature and scope of retailing. 2.
                              Analyze Retailing as an economic force in the United States and
                              globally. 3. Explain the operations methods for of a retail firm. 4.
                              Explain how retailers manage their sales, promotion, and
                              publicity through identifying target markets, SWOT,
                              demographics and psychographics. 5. Organize the basic
                              components of the retailer’s merchandise mix and promotional
                              mix.
BUS 150    Mary Cassoni       1. Students will be able to analyze and critique current
                              advertisements for their use of strategic messaging elements. 2.
                              Both independently and as a team (simulating an Advertising
                              Agency) students will be able to research a current advertising
                              problem and develop a creative approach to solving it.
BUS 158   Mary Cassoni   1) Student will be able to understand a clients needs and develop
                         a marketing/promotional program to address needs.
BUS 205   Mary Cassoni   1) Students will be able to apply business communication
                         principles in different types of business letters or reports.
CE 100    Bruce A        Students will: 1. Identify organizational objectives. 2. Achieve
          McDonough      organizational objectives through the utilization of a business
                         model. 3. Formulate a written agreement between their
                         supervisor and the employee. 4. Complete specific workplace
                         projects that involve problem-solving for their particular
                         organization. 5. Apply academic theory, skills, and knowledge
                         acquired in their coursework.
CE 110    Bruce A        Students will: 1. Identify organizational objectives. 2. Achieve
          McDonough      organizational objectives through the utilization of a business
                         model. 3. Formulate a written agreement between their
                         supervisor and the employee. 4. Complete specific workplace
                         projects that involve problem-solving for their particular
                         organization. 5. Apply academic theory, skills, and knowledge
                         acquired in their coursework.
CE 150    Bruce A        Students will: 1. Identify organizational objectives. 2. Achieve
          McDonough      organizational objectives through the utilization of a business
                         model. 3. Formulate a written agreement between their
                         supervisor and the employee. 4. Complete specific workplace
                         projects that involve problem-solving for their particular
                         organization. 5. Apply academic theory, skills, and knowledge
                         acquired in their coursework.
CFT 122   Jon K. Stone   1.Identify construction details needed to complete project.
                         2.Analyze construction details which need further research to
                         complete. 3.Create a plan of procedure to achieve completion of
                         project. 4.Perform test pieces of critical and new processes. 5.
                         Analyze test pieces and adjust processes if necessary. 6.
                         Complete construction and finishing of project

CFT 124   Jon K. Stone   Through the construction of product/project students will
                         demonstrate competencies in analysis, planing, accuracy, and
                         construction by completing the following; 1.Identify construction
                         details needed to complete project. 2.Analyze construction
                         details which need further research to complete. 3.Create a plan
                         of procedure to achieve completion of project. 4.Perform test
                         pieces of critical and new processes. 5. Analyze test pieces and
                         adjust processes if necessary.

CFT 128   Jon K. Stone   1. Identify construction details needed to complete project.
                         2.Analyze construction details which need further research to
                         complete.
                         3.Create a plan of procedure to achieve completion of project
                         4.Perform test pieces of critical and new processes.
                         5. Analyze test pieces and adjust processes if necessary
                         6. Complete construction and finishing of project.
CFT 130   Jon K. Stone   1.Identify construction details needed to complete project.
                         2.Analyze construction details which need further research to
                         complete. 3.Create a plan of procedure to achieve completion of
                         project. 4.Perform test pieces of critical and new processes. 5.
                         Analyze test pieces and adjust processes if necessary. 6.
                         Complete construction and finishing of project.

CFT 131   Jon K. Stone   1. Apply quality control principles to individual and production
                         work 2. Demonstrate competency in the process of steam
                         bending with various methods. 3. Demonstrate competency in the
                         process of shaping with various methods. 4. Demonstrate
                         competency in time management and goal setting. 5.
                         Demonstrate competency in finishing and finish preparation. 6.
                         Demonstrate competency in guitar set
CFT 142   Jon K. Stone   Describe, recognize, demonstrate, practice, and apply appropriate
                         safety standards and practices. Describe and discuss the various
                         types and functions of handplanes. Demonstrate appropriate
                         strategies in tuning, using and maintaining metal and wooden
                         handplanes. Sketch, explain and discuss correct layout, geometry
                         and design for a traditional wooden handplane. List, describe,
                         and demonstrate effective usage of traditional and modern
                         planemaking tools. Describe and demonstrate all steps in the
                         cutting, shaping, tempering and sharpening of a blade for a
                         handplane. Describe and demonstrate all steps necessary in the
                         making of a laminated handplane. Describe and demonstrate all
                         steps necessary in the making of a traditional handplane.


CFT 145   Jon K. Stone   Through the manufacturing of specific products, production
                         techniques of fabrication will be demonstrated. 1.Identify
                         construction/production details needed to complete project.
                         2.Analyze construction/production details which need further
                         research to complete. 3.Create a plan of procedure to achieve
                         completion of project. 4.Perform test pieces of critical and new
                         processes. 5. Analyze test pieces and adjust processes if
                         necessary. 6. Complete construction and finishing of project.

CFT 148   Jon K. Stone   1. Students will complete construction on a project, which was
                         designed by student. 2. Students will understand and apply the
                         process of cutting two veneers at once on a bevel to fabricate
                         marquetry. 3. Students will be able to design and apply process
                         of hot sand shading.
CFT 173    Jon K. Stone       1. A bamboo culm will be split, straightened, heat treated and
                              planed into six 60 degree angle strips that are glued, turned on a
                              lath. 2. Installation of the tips, ferrels, cork handle and reel seat.
                              3. Fabrication of chromemoly wire guides and silk wrapped to
                              the bamboo blank and it is 4. Applied diped finished with varnish
                              or a hand rubbed oil finish.

CFT 176    Jon K. Stone       1. Students will be able to identify and select the best lathe and
                              lathe accessories for their turning style and competancies. 2.
                              Students will demonstrate their understanding of sharpening the
                              three basic tools ; the skew, the gouge,and the parting tool by
                              grinding the proper straight or curved, hollow grind or flat grind
                              on the appropriate tool. 3. Students will design and fabricate tool
                              handles. as a way of demonstrating the safe and effective use of
                              three basic tools; the skew, the gouge, and the parting tool.

CHDV 100 Robert A. Sasse  1.) Analyze major developmental milestones for children from
                          conception through adolescence in areas of physical,
                          psychosocial, and cognitive development using standard research
                          methodologies.
CHEM 10 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to analyze a chemistry problem
                          and set up a reasonable approach to calculating the correct
                          answer. This will involve dimensional analysis as well as
                          significant figure calculations.




CHEM 10 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to analyze a chemistry problem
                          and set up a reasonable approach to calculating the correct
                          answer. This will involve dimensional analysis as well as
                          significant figure calculations.




CHEM 100 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Apply the scientific
                           method by stating a question, performing experiments and/or
                           analyzing a data presentation. 2. Name general inorganic
                           compounds. 3. Set up and execute general and intermediate
                           chemical reactions in the lab using a chemical technique.
CHEM 100 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Apply the scientific
                           method by stating a question, performing experiments and/or
                           analyzing a data presentation. 2. Name general inorganic
                           compounds. 3. Set up and execute general and intermediate
                           chemical reactions in the lab using a chemical technique.




CHEM 102 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to explain how the basic
                           principles of chemistry relate to their daily lives and their
                           surrounding environment. They will be able to apply scientific
                           methods and principles in solving problems, both real and
                           theoretical, while using chemical language in the appropriate
                           context. Successful students will also be able to analyze and
                           evaluate the validity of scientific articles and make reasoned
                           judgments on social issues that are founded on general chemical
                           processes.
CHEM 102 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to explain how the basic
                           principles of chemistry relate to their daily lives and their
                           surrounding environment. They will be able to apply scientific
                           methods and principles in solving problems, both real and
                           theoretical, while using chemical language in the appropriate
                           context. Successful students will also be able to analyze and
                           evaluate the validity of scientific articles and make reasoned
                           judgments on social issues that are founded on general chemical
                           processes.
CHEM 104 David A. Boyajian Successful students will: 1. Have a general understanding of the
                           Periodic Table Of Elements and be cognizant of the simple
                           periodicity of the chemical elements. 2. Be able to understand the
                           basic principles of organic chemistry relating to simple structure
                           and reactivity of hydrocarbons. 3. Be able to understand the basic
                           energy cycles of life on the molecular level.

CHEM 105 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Classify and evaluate basic
                           organic chemical mechanisms and reactions. 2. Plan simple
                           organic synthetic reactions and demonstrate these techniques in
                           the laboratory.
CHEM 110 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Apply the scientific
                           method by stating a question, performing experiments and/or
                           analyzing a data presentation. 2. Name general inorganic
                           compounds.




CHEM        David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Apply the scientific
110L                          method by stating a question, performing experiments and/or
                              analyzing a data presentation. 2. Set up and execute general and
                              intermediate chemical reactions in the lab using a chemical
                              technique.




CHEM 115 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Apply the scientific
                           method by stating a question, performing experiments and/or
                           analyzing a data presentation. 2. Explain the general differences
                           that exist between weak acids and bases versus strong acids and
                           bases.


CHEM        David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Apply the scientific
115L                          method by stating a question, performing experiments and/or
                              analyzing a data presentation. 2. Set up and execute general and
                              intermediate chemical reactions in the lab using a chemical
                              technique.




CHEM 210 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Apply the scientific
                           method by stating a question, performing experiments and/or
                           analyzing a data presentation. 2. Set up and execute general and
                           intermediate chemical measurements in the lab using an
                           analytical technique.
CHEM 220 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to plan the synthesis,
                           purification, and characterization of many common aliphatic and
                           aromatic compounds from a theoretical perspective and then
                           carry out the actual techniques in the laboratory.


CHEM 220 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Apply the scientific
                           method by stating a question, performing experiments and/or
                           analyzing a data presentation. 2. Set up and execute general and
                           intermediate organic chemical reactions in the lab using an
                           organic chemical technique. 3. Successfully complete Organic
                           Chemistry 221 lecture/laboratory.




CHEM 221 David A. Boyajian Succesful students will be able to plan the synthesis, purification,
                           and characterization of many common aliphatic and aromatic
                           compounds from a theoretical perspective and then carry out the
                           actual techniques in the laboratory.


CHEM 221 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to: 1. Successfully plan the
                           synthesis, purification, and characterization of many common
                           aliphatic and aromatic compounds from a theoretical perspective
                           and then carry out the actual techniques in the laboratory.




CHEM 295 David A. Boyajian Successful students will be able to perform the journal research
                           needed in order to eventually perform some kind of lab synthesis
                           or to provide instruction in lab synthesis. This will be done with
                           periodic guidance from and/or meetings with the professor.
CHIN 101 Martha K. Evans    1)Speak Chinese at an elementary level with appropriate
                            pronunciation and tones . 2)Understand and interpret slow to
                            slow-normal speed Chinese at an elementary level. 3)Apply the
                            basic Chinese functional expressing to the basic social situation
                            effectively. 4)Formulate declarative and interrogative sentences
                            at an elementary level 5)Practice summarizing the meaning from
                            a dialogue and transferring to a narrative in a short paragraph
                            with the sentence structures of Chinese grammar effectively.
                            6)Recognize the difference of the Chinese customs, the way of
                            speaking and the culture with their own.




CHIN 197 Martha K. Evans    SLO's will be determined each time new content is developed for
                            this topics course.




CHIN 201 Martha K. Evans    1. Reading competency in Chinese at an intermediate level. 2. An
                            understanding of spoken Chinese and show the ability to
                            communicate in sentence-length utterances that consist of
                            recombination of learned words, phrases, and grammatical
                            structure in functional areas. 3. Ability to write paragraphs in
                            Chinese employing correct Chinese grammar and structure. 4.
                            Understand better and deeper the Chinese history, culture and
                            society in more aspects.




CI 100    Mollie R. Smith   SLO 1: Students will be required to independently research
                            Chapters 1 through 12 of the International Building Code (IBC)
                            to establish code compliance. Students will be given a take home
                            examination requiring them to research the IBC to obtain the
                            technical knowledge to evaluate buildings for compliance with
                            the code relative to allowed occupancies, fire rated components,
                            maximum allowable area, type of construction, fire sprinklers
                            and flame spread of interior finishes. SLO 2: Students will
                            prepare a correction notice, log inspections, read construction
                            drawings and study the techniques used by inspectors to
                            communicate effectively with the public and other government
                            agencies.
CI 101   Mollie R. Smith   SLO 1: Students will be required to independently research
                           Chapters 16 through 35 of the International Building Code (IBC)
                           to establish code compliance. Students will be given a take home
                           examination requiring them to research the IBC to obtain the
                           technical knowledge to analyze minimum live and dead loads,
                           allowable strength design, minimum construction standards for
                           wood, concrete and masonry buildings, and the standards for
                           exiting systems. SLO 2: Students will evaluate the framing
                           requirements of wood and concrete buildings and prepare a table
                           listing the required inspections.

CI 105   Mollie R. Smith   SLO 1: The student will research and interpret the general
                           requirements (first half) of the National Electrical Code. The
                           student will be able to comprehend and explain the NEC
                           vocabulary, assess proper electrical design, and summarize Code
                           requirements. SLO 2: Build a Code complying electrical system
                           from a blank floorplan for a single family residence or a small
                           commercial building (student choice). The student will be
                           required to calculate the proper electrical service size (load
                           calculations), design the receptacle outlet floorplan, equipment
                           layouts, and develop a branch circuiting layout. SLO 3: Design
                           an electrical circuit complete from the building service to the
                           furthest outlet. The project will require determining circuit
                           design parameters based upon physical attributes, selection of
                           proper conductors, overcurrent devices, and wiring methods.
                           SLO 4: Given a blank site plan and completed single line
                           diagram with the exception of the grounding design, the student
                           will design a grounding system for a multiple building site layout
                           that is supplied by a single electrical service. Integration of
                           grounding theories and use of specific Code requirements found
CI 106   Mollie R. Smith   SLO 1: The student will research and interpret the special
                           occupancies, equipment, and conditions (second half) of the
                           National Electrical Code. The student will be able to comprehend
                           and explain the NEC vocabulary, assess proper electrical design,
                           and summarize Code requirements. SLO 2: Given a site plan, a
                           single line diagram, and technical equipment sheets, the student
                           will perform a complete analysis of a designed residential solar
                           photovoltaic system. The analysis will include both proper design
                           verification as well as critiquing incorrect design. A proper
                           redesign of non-complying items will be required. SLO 3:
                           Students will be required to design a completed electrical
                           distribution system that includes the use of transformers. The
                           final design will result in a typical multiple voltage electrical
                           distribution system that begins at the electrical service and ends
                           at the utility equipment. This outcome will require computing
                           equipment sizing, selecting correct conductor and conduit sizing,
                           and designing the systems physical layout. SLO 4: Given a form
                           duplicating actual City building department correction notices,
                           along with a site layout and written description of the wiring
CI 115     Mollie R. Smith   SLO 1: Students will independently research Chapters 1 through
                             7 of the IBC to evaluate the plan checking services required by
                             government agencies that issue building permits to private
                             developers. Students will be given a take home examination to
                             apply their knowledge of the techniques used by plan examiners,
                             to evaluate site plans, floor plans, and exterior elevations for
                             compliance with the code. SLO 2: Students will use standard
                             plan checking lists that are used by municipal plan checkers in
                             the review of construction drawings. The plan check lists will
                             include such subjects as access for the disabled, energy
                             conservation and storm water pollution prevention.

CI 120     Mollie R. Smith   SLO 1: Students will be required to independently research
                             Chapters 16, 19, 21, and 23 of the IBC to establish code
                             compliance. Students will be given a take home examination
                             requiring them to research the IBC to analyze the loading
                             conditions of simple structures and apply general engineering
                             principles and the code minimum standards to obtain the
                             allowable stress limits of wood, concrete and masonry buildings.
                             SLO 2: Students will use standard structural plan checklists to
                             evaluate the construction details and supporting engineering
                             calculations that are required to obtain a building permit for
                             wood, concrete and masonry buildings.
CI 125     Mollie R. Smith   SLO 1: Given a set of building plans, students will demonstrate
                             knowledge of the use of lines and symbols and their application
                             in a set of building plans. SLO 2: Given a set of building plans,
                             students will demonstrate the ability to identify the more
                             complex structural elements in the plans.

CINE 120   Lisa Cecere       Identify a wide-ranging number of aesthetic criteria with which
                             to review and evaluate films. Demonstrate a thorough
                             understanding of the language of film and the foundations for
                             writing about this art form through analyzing and evaluating
                             selected motion pictures. Compare and contrast the value systems
                             inherent in selected films. Identify and define how film
                             influences contemporary society.
CS 102     John E. Valdez      STUDENTS WILL COMPILE AND EVALUATE DATA
                               OUTLINING RELEVANT HISTORICAL AND POLITICAL
                               SYSTEMS IMPORTNAT TO THE STUDY OF KEY
                               POLITICAL SCIENCE CONCEPTS VITAL TO THE
                               UNDERSTANDING OF CHICANO POLITICS AND ISSUES
                               INVOLVING THE ANERICAN CREED AND EQUALITY.




CS 110     John E. Valdez      Students will know how to apply their knowledge of universal
                               literary traditions on Mexican literature. Through critical essays,
                               students will demonstrate analytical skills using theories applied
                               to the assigned texts. In addition students will demonstrate their
                               understanding of how genres in Mexican literature expresss in
                               unique forms the social and cultural contexts that inform the
                               texts.


CS 125     John E. Valdez      Students will critically review and synthesize information on the
                               fundamentals of social and economic development Mexican
                               society. They will be able to identify, define and assess historical
                               conditions through written assays ,discussions and power point
                               prsentations, and exams.
CSCI 108   Walter R. Pistone   1)Understand the basics of the von Neumann architecture and
                               how it influences the design of high-level programming language
                               constructs. 2 Describe a variety of data representation systems,
                               be able to manipulate numbers in these representations, and
                               relate these representations to the storage of numbers and other
                               data. 3)Explain the role of the principal functional components of
                               a computer. 4) Understand the basics of machine-level
                               addressing and programming. 5) Discuss the role of abstraction
                               and virtual machines in understanding computer architectures. 6)
                               Comprehend the technology and software that supports the
                               Internet and Local Area Networks.
CSCI 110   Anthony W. Smith 1. Describe the software development life cycle, through the
                            stages of analysis, design, code, test, live, maintenance. 2.
                            Discuss good software engineering practices such as incremental
                            development, encapsulation, data hiding, and adherence to style
                            guidelines. 3. Describe the 3 standard flows of control of
                            sequence, selection, iteration. 4. Write effective algorithms and
                            translate to appropriate control structures in an implementation
                            language. 5. Compare alternative implementations of algorithms
                            with respect to simplicity, clarity and maintainability. 6. Write
                            programs that use the following: classes, objects, instance
                            variables, data types, constructors, methods, parameters, return
                            types, sequence, selection, iteration control structures, arrays, the
                            String library class, files. 7. Implement simple object-oriented
                            programs in a high-level language. 8. Compare and contrast the
                            costs and benefits of dynamic and static implementations of a
                            simple data structure. 9. Apply software development tools
                            including the libraries, compiler, editor and debugger.

CSCI 210   Richard L.          1. Discuss the representation and use of primitive data types and
           Stegman             built-in data structures. 2. Describe how the data structures are
                               allocated and used in memory. 3. Describe common applications
                               for each data structure. 4. Implement the user-defined data
                               structures in a high-level language. 5. Compare alternative
                               implementations of data structures with respect to performance.
                               6. Write programs that use each of the following data structures:
                               arrays, records, strings, linked lists, stacks, queues, and hash
                               tables. 7. Compare and contrast the costs and benefits of dynamic
                               and static data structure implementations. 8. Choose the
                               appropriate data structure for modeling a given problem.

CSCI 212   Walter R. Pistone   1) Understand the fundamental concepts underlying assembly
                               language programming for 80x86 architecture. 2) The student
                               will create, execute, and test assembly language programs using
                               calculations, decision statements,loops,arrays,procedures and the
                               stack. 3)Summarize how instructions are represented at both the
                               machine level and in the context of a symbolic assembler. 4)
                               Explain different instruction formats, such as addresses per
                               instruction and variable length vs. fixed length formats, direct
                               and indirect addressing. 5)Explain the machine level
                               representation of data. In particular: the pros and cons of using
                               different formats to represent numerical data; convert numerical
                               data from one format to another; Discuss the effects of fixed-
                               length number representations on accuracy and precision;
                               describe the internal representation of characters, strings,
                               records, and arrays.
CSCI 220   Anthony W. Smith 1. Describe the software development life cycle, through the
                            stages of analysis, design, code, test, live, maintenance. 2.
                            Discuss good software engineering practices such as incremental
                            development, encapsulation, data hiding, and adherence to style
                            guidelines. 3. Describe the 3 standard flows of control of
                            sequence, selection, iteration. 4. Write effective algorithms and
                            translate to appropriate control structures in an implementation
                            language. 5. Compare alternative implementations of algorithms
                            with respect to simplicity, clarity and maintainability. 6. Write
                            programs that use the following: variables, data types, functions,
                            parameters, return types, sequence, selection, iteration control
                            structures, arrays, C-style strings, files. 7. Implement simple
                            procedural programs in a high-level language. 8. Compare and
                            contrast the costs and benefits of dynamic and static
                            implementations of a simple data structure. 9. Apply software
                            development tools including the libraries, compiler, editor and
                            debugger.

CSCI 222   Richard L.         1. Justify the philosophy of object-oriented design and the
           Stegman            concepts of encapsulation, abstraction, inheritance, and
                              polymorphism. 2. Design, implement, test, and debug simple
                              programs in an object-oriented programming language. 3.
                              Describe how the class mechanism supports encapsulation and
                              information hiding. 4. Design, implement, and test the
                              implementation of “is-a” relationships among objects using a
                              class hierarchy and inheritance. 5. Compare and contrast the
                              notions of overloading and overriding methods in an object-
                              oriented language. 6. Explain the relationship between the static
                              structure of the class and the dynamic structure of the instances
                              of the class.
DA 50      Denise E Rudy      1.Upon completion of the course, students will be able to assess
                              and evaluate job opportunities for careers in the dental field.
                              2.Upon course completion, students will be able to communicate,
                              using basic dental terminology and professional language.




DA 50      Denise E Rudy      1.Upon completion of the course, students will be able to assess
                              and evaluate job opportunities for careers in the dental field.
                              2.Upon course completion, students will be able to communicate,
                              using basic dental terminology and professional language.
DA 57   Denise E Rudy   1.To identify and describe the main histological characteristics of
                        the different dental structures and how these relate to the
                        selection and application of dental materials. 2.To identify and
                        describe different oral lesions and conditions, as well as
                        differentiate normal from abnormal tissues.




DA 60   Denise E Rudy   1.Upon course completion students will be able to select
                        appropriate dental materials for a set of "case based" scenarios
                        that would occur in a dental office. 2. Upon course completion
                        students will be able to identify and describe applications for
                        dental materials used in the laboratory portion of this class.




DA 65   Denise E Rudy   1.Students will be able to function as an administrative assistant
                        in the externship office (while enrolled in DA 90)using standard
                        dental business practices.2. 2. 2. Students will be able to generate
                        patient records, appointment schedules, recall systems, accounts
                        payable and accounts recievable data using dental software.
DA 65   Denise E Rudy   1.Students will be able to function as an administrative assistant
                        in the externship office (while enrolled in DA 90)using standard
                        dental business practices.2. 2. 2. Students will be able to generate
                        patient records, appointment schedules, recall systems, accounts
                        payable and accounts receivable data using dental software.




DA 70   Denise E Rudy   1. After gaining skills learned throughout this course, students
                        will be able to demonstrate the ability to expose one full dental
                        radiographic survey on a "human patient" at a "clinically
                        acceptable" level. 2. After gaining skills learned throughout this
                        course, students will be able to identify anatomical landmarks on
                        several randomly selected human radiographic surveys.
DA 71   Denise E Rudy   1.After gaining skills learned throughout this course, students
                        will be able to demonstrate the ability to expose a full dental
                        radiographic survey in three patients at a “clinically acceptable”
                        level. This will result in students receiving a license in dental
                        radiography. 2.After gaining skills learned throughout this
                        course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to
                        process,read and mount three radiographic dental surveys on
                        patients at a “clinically acceptable" level.




DA 75   Denise E Rudy   1.Students who complete this course will be able to identify and
                        use appropriate dental specialty armamentarium and materials.
                        2.After gaining skills learned throughout this course, students
                        will be able to produce a temporary restoration on a typodont that
                        is "clinically acceptable".
DA 82   Denise E Rudy   1.After gaining skills learned throughout this course, students
                        will be able to perform coronal polishing on two “live patients”
                        at a clinically acceptable level. 2.After gaining skills learned
                        throughout this course, students will be able to place pit and
                        fissure sealants on typodont teeth at a clinically acceptable level.




DA 83   Denise E Rudy   1.After gaining skills learned throughout this course, students
                        will be able to demonstrate the ability to perform coronal
                        polishing on one live patient at a “clinically acceptable” level.
                        This will result in students receiving a license in coronal
                        polishing. 2.After gaining skills learned throughout this course,
                        students will be able to demonstrate the ability to place pit and
                        fissure sealants on four live patients at a “clinically acceptable"
                        level. This will result in students receiving a license in pit and
                        fissure sealants.
DA 85    Denise E Rudy      1.After gaining skills learned throughout this course, students
                            will be able to produce impressions that are clinically acceptable.
                            2.After gaining skills learned throughout this course, students
                            will be able to produce a provisional crown #8, and a sedative
                            filling #19 that are clinically acceptable in a timed "mock board".




DA 90    Denise E Rudy      Upon completetion of this course students will be able to:
                            1. have attained the experience and skills necessary to gain
                            employment as a dental health care professional
                            2. apply dental assisting theory into practice.




DMT 50   Sergio Hernandez 1. I.D. different engines. 2. Read and apply technical manuals. 3.
                          Perform basic engine troubleshooting. 4. Use various scan tools
                          and software. 5. Write a basic service report.
DMT 54   Sergio Hernandez Students should be able to: 1. Work and know safety requirments
                          for heavy duty electrical systems. 2. Read and apply technical
                          manuals. 3. Perform electrical troubleshooting. 4. Use various
                          types of test equipment scan tools . 5. Write a basic service report.




DMT 55   Sergio Hernandez Students should be able to: 1. I.D. different engines. 2. Read and
                          apply technical manuals. 3. Perform basic engine
                          troubleshooting. 4. Use various scan tools and software. 5.
                          Perform tune up on any of the of the four major engine
                          manufactures engines.


DMT 56   Sergio Hernandez Students should be able to: 1. I.D. and safely handle different
                          fuels 2. Read and apply technical manuals. 3. I.D. different
                          engines and fuels. 4. Use various service tools. 5. I.D. electronic
                          systems




DMT 61   Sergio Hernandez Students should be able to: 1. Work safely around engines in the
                          shop 2. Read and apply technical manuals. 3. Perform failure
                          analysis 4. Use various pression tools. 5. Disassemble diesel
                          engines. 6. Take and log component measurements.




DMT 62   Sergio Hernandez Students should be able to: 1. I.D. engine failures. 2. Read and
                          apply technical manuals. 3. Perform basic engine
                          troubleshooting. 4. Use various scan tools and software. 5. Write
                          engine specs. and results after engine is run.




DMT 65   Sergio Hernandez 1. I.D. brake system components. 2. Read and apply technical
                          manuals. 3. Perform brake system troubleshooting. 4. Use
                          various scan tools and software. 5. Disassemble and assamble
                          brake components.




DMT 66   Sergio Hernandez 1. I.D. different transmissions and drivelines. 2. Apply safe
                          priceples of repair 3. Perform transmission and driveline
                          troubleshooting. 4. Read and apply technical manuals. 5. I.D. part
                          failures.
DMT 70   Sergio Hernandez 1. Apply safe work principle's. 2. I.D. testing equipment. 3.
                          Perform basic engine troubleshooting. 4. Use various scan tools
                          and software. 5. Read and apply technical manuals.




DMT 81   Sergio Hernandez 1. Know how to work safely and hydraulics. 2. Read and apply
                          technical manuals. 3. Perform basic maintainance and
                          troubleshooting. 4. Repair hydraulic components. 5. Read
                          hydraulic schematics.




DMT 96   Sergio Hernandez   pending
DMT 97   Sergio Hernandez   pending
DNCE     Margaret M.        1. The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197B     Faulkner           observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                            deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                            have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                            performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                            techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                            insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                            their ability to work as an ensemble member.




DNCE     Margaret M.        1. The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197B     Faulkner           observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                            deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                            have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                            performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                            techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                            insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                            their ability to work as an ensemble member.
DNCE   Margaret M.   . The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197C   Faulkner      observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                     deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                     have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                     performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                     techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                     insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                     their ability to work as an ensemble member.




DNCE   Margaret M.   . The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197C   Faulkner      observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                     deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                     have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                     performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                     techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                     insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                     their ability to work as an ensemble member.




DNCE   Margaret M.   1. The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197E   Faulkner      observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                     deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                     have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                     performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                     techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                     insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                     their ability to work as an ensemble member.
DNCE   Margaret M.         1. The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197E   Faulkner            observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                           deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                           have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                           performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                           techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                           insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                           their ability to work as an ensemble member.




DNCE   Margaret M.         1. The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197F   Faulkner            observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                           deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                           have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                           performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                           techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                           insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                           their ability to work as an ensemble member.




DNCE   Patriceann J. Mead 1. The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197F                      observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                          deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                          have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                          performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                          techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                          insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                          their ability to work as an ensemble member.
DNCE     Margaret M.      The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197J     Faulkner         observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                          deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                          have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                          performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                          techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                          insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                          their ability to work as an ensemble member.




DNCE     Margaret M.      The student will be able to perform in front of an audience,
197J     Faulkner         observing the standard concert protocols for appearance,
                          deportment and execution of choreography. 2. The student will
                          have a general knowledge of the principles of preparation for
                          performance, including, but not limited to, appropriate dance
                          techniques, performance quality/artistry, learning methods to
                          insure a secure performance. 3.The student will have improved
                          their ability to work as an ensemble member.




DT 100   Dennis C. Lutz   Analyze and evaluate basic mechanical drafting designs,
                          including proper scaling, presentations and documentation of
                          elementary mechanical components. Students will be able to
                          interpret, describe and produce correct 2 dimensional drawings to
                          describe 3 dimensional objects.
DT 105   Sandra Andre     The student is expected to produce a completed portfolio of
                          drafting work that shows a mastery of basic skills drawing using
                          tools and content. Analysis and synthesis of techniques include
                          roofline resolutions based on framing outline.
DT 105   Sandra Andre     The student is expected to produce a completed portfolio of
                          drafting work that shows a mastery of basic skills drawing using
                          tools and content. Analysis and synthesis of techniques include
                          roofline resolutions based on framing outline.
DT 110   Dennis C. Lutz   Analyze and evaluate basic (complex) mechanical drafting
                          designs, including proper scaling, presentations and
                          documentation of elementary (complex) mechanical components.
DT 111   Dennis C. Lutz     Analyze and evaluate basic (complex) mechanical drafting
                            designs, including proper scaling, presentations and
                            documentation of elementary (complex) mechanical components.

DT 120   Kenneth E. Swift   Upon completion of this course successful students will be able
                            to: 1. identify and discuss the primary building cultures in the
                            development of Western architecture, and their general social
                            character and political history 2. contrast and compare the design
                            characteristics and structural systems of the primary building
                            cultures of Western architectural development 3. identify and
                            describe the key architects and architectural movements in the
                            development of modern Western architecture 4. research and
                            discuss in a term paper the career and built work of a well-known
                            modern architect selected from an instructor-prepared list. The
                            paper must include a bibliography and plans and photos of key
                            structures

DT 121   Kenneth E. Swift   Upon completion of this course the successful student will be
                            able to: 1. identify and discuss the key cultural groups in
                            Precolumbian America, Islam, and the Far East and understand
                            their basic history and development 2. compare and contrast
                            construction materials and structural systems of building cultures
                            in Precolumbian America, traditional Islam, and the Far East 3.
                            analyze and discuss in a term paper the similarities and
                            differences of a particular building type (i.e. residence, religious
                            structure, etc.) in a Precolumbian culture in the Americas
                            compared to an Islamic or Far Eastern culture

DT 125   Dennis C. Lutz     Student will be able to use AutoCAD to produce industrial
                            drawings for the manufacturing industry.
DT 126   Dennis C. Lutz     Analyze and evaluate basic to complex mechanical drafting
                            designs, including proper scaling, presentations and
                            documentation of the mechanical components. Students will be
                            able to interpret, describe and produce correct 2 dimensional
                            drawings to describe 3 dimensional objects. Demonstration of
                            mechanical drafting skills and correct documentation using
                            AutoCAD is more appropriate
DT 127   Dennis C. Lutz     Students will be able to interpret, the software “Off the shelf”
                            layout and make changes and additions to the core of AutoCAD.
                            Students will be able to analyze and evaluate the best way to
                            customize the AutoCAD software to best suite individual needs
                            of their applications. Demonstrations of customizing the many
                            areas of AutoCAD is more appropriate.
DT 128   Dennis C. Lutz     Analyze and evaluate basic 3D mechanical models, including
                            proper building, scaling, presentations and documentation of the
                            elementary mechanical models. Students will be able to interpret,
                            describe and produce correct 2 dimensional drawings to describe
                            the 3D models. Demonstration of modeling skills and correct
                            documentation using SolidWORKS is more appropriate

DT 130   Dennis C. Lutz     Analyze and evaluate simple to complex mechanical 3D models
                            to interface with the CAM (MasterCAM) software. Students will
                            be able to interpret “Feeds and speeds” with regards to tool
                            paths, as they relate to the computer manufacturing of the
                            models. Demonstration of software skills and correct
                            documentation using MasterCAM is more appropriate.

DT 131   Dennis C. Lutz     Analyze and evaluate complex mechanical 3D models, including
                            proper scaling, presentations and documentation of the complex
                            mechanical models. Students will be able to interpret, describe
                            and produce correct 2 dimensional drawings to describe complex
                            3D models. Demonstration of mechanical drafting skills and
                            correct documentation using SolidWORKS is more appropriate

DT 135   Kenneth E. Swift   Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be
                            able to: 1. identify and describe key construction materials and
                            building systems employed in current commercial construction 2.
                            research and create a materials notebook in which the student has
                            selected a specific construction porduct and written a detailed
                            report on its manufacture, installation, recyclability,
                            environmental impact, and lifespan. The notebook will also
                            contain student drawings, photos, and product brochures.

DT 160   Sandra Andre       1. Students will apply sustainability practices in contemporary
                            construction projects in order to minimize the impact of the
                            construction process on the environment. 2. A student's portfolio
                            will demonstrate proficiency in green planning and managing
                            with knowledge in custodial documentation of materials
                            according to LEED guidelines. 3. Students will have portfolio
                            evidence of personal research and analysis of building strategies
                            to reduce costs and waste by selection of alternative materials. 4.
                            Implemention and interpretation of siting, waste management,
                            evaluation of material shipping methods,choosing controls,
                            lighting and renewable energy power sources for light
                            construction are part of the portfolio.
DT 200      Kenneth E. Swift   Upon completion of the course successful students will be able
                               to: 1. convert design floor plans and elevations for a two-story
                               residence into a complete set of dimensioned and noted
                               construction documents 2. analyze a building's structural
                               requirements, calculate joist and rafter sizes, and create structural
                               drawings in the form of framing plans and building sections.

DT 202      Dennis C. Lutz     Student will be able to understand and build a 3D architectural
                               model using Revit software. Student will be able to understand
                               and apply the BIM (Building information model) data and
                               generate architectural construction drawings
ECON 100 Jose L. Esteban       The student will draw demand and supply curves, label them
                               correctly and use the graphs to explain fluctuating prices of a
                               commodity - for example gasoline. The student will explain how
                               inflation is measured.




ECON 100 Teresa L. Laughlin The student will draw demand and supply curves, label them
                            correctly and use the graphs to explain fluctuating prices of a
                            commodity - for example gasoline. The student will explain how
                            inflation is measured.




ECON 101 Teresa L. Laughlin The student will: • identify and describe the characteristics of
                            theoretical capitalism • compare the European form of capitalism
                            and will compare it to American capitalism. • summarize three
                            distinct characteristics of the Japanese economy. • analyze the
                            economic performance in each country studied


ECON 102 Teresa L. Laughlin 1. Identify the types of markets and illustrate how differences in
                            the markets affect their production and consumption patterns. 2.
                            Organize and analyze data in graphs and exhibit understanding of
                            the relationships of variables in writing. 3. Compare and contrast
                            a variety of economic systems. 4. Use theories of Comparative
                            Advantage to evaluate global trade.
ECON 110 Jose L. Esteban   The student will: • identify and describe the characteristics of
                           theoretical capitalism • compare the European form of capitalism
                           and will compare it to American capitalism. • summarize three
                           distinct characteristics of the Japanese economy. • analyze the
                           economic performance in each country studied


ELTR 101 Mollie R. Smith   1. Apply the principles and methods for solving mathematical
                           problems related to the electrical trade. 2. Use logic and
                           reasoning to perform assigned tasks related to the electrical
                           industry in a safe and efficient manner. 3. Demonstrate the ability
                           to identify and explain the function of commonly used electrical
                           construction materials and tools.




ELTR 102 Mollie R. Smith   1. Demonstrate the ability to fabricate electrical conduit
                           raceways by applying right triangle and algebraic calculations. 2.
                           Apply the basic principles of DC electrical theory. 3.
                           Demonstrate the ability to locate and interpret the general rules
                           of the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70) as it applies to the
                           electrical industry.




ELTR 103 Mollie R. Smith   1. Demonstrate knowledge of the theories of operation of direct
                           current electrical circuits. 2. Explain the effects of voltage and
                           current changes direct current electrical circuits. 3. Demonstrate
                           the ability to design and install an electrical grounding circuit in
                           compliance with the National Electrical Code (NFPA 70.)




ELTR 104 Mollie R. Smith   1. Demonstrate knowledge of principles and methods of applying
                           Ohms law to Alternating Current electrical circuits. 2. Use logic
                           and reasoning to describe the application and operation of
                           semiconductor devices as they apply to electrical circuits. 3.
                           Demonstrate the ability to perform the required calculations and
                           manual skills to build metallic conduit raceways.
ELTR 105 Mollie R. Smith   1. Demonstrate knowledge of digital electronics to include logic
                           gates, truth tables, and Boolean algebra. 2. Select and describe
                           the electrical characteristics of commonly used electrical
                           conductors. 3. Demonstrate the ability to correctly install the
                           appropriate electrical connection device for common electrical
                           applications.




ELTR 106 Mollie R. Smith   1. Demonstrate knowledge of electrical distribution equipment to
                           include panelboards and switchgear. 2. Use logic and reasoning
                           to select the correct fuse or breaker for a particular application. 3.
                           Demonstrate the ability to read and understand construction
                           drawings and specifications.




ELTR 107 Mollie R. Smith   1. Apply the principles and requirements of electrical grounding
                           systems per the National Electrical Code Requirements (NPFA
                           70.) 2. Use logic and reasoning to determine the requirements of
                           electrical feeder and branch circuit raceways. 3. Demonstrate the
                           ability to install and wire an electrical motor.




ELTR 108 Mollie R. Smith   1. Apply the principles of motor control theory and associated
                           equipment. 2. Demonstrate the ability to use schematic symbols
                           for pilot devices used with motor control circuits. 3. Demonstrate
                           the ability to develop and install a simple program for a
                           Programmable Logic Controller.
ELTR 109 Mollie R. Smith     1. Demonstrate knowledge of the types and operation of 3-phase
                             electrical transformers. 2. Apply logic and reasoning to identify
                             the wiring requirements for electrical transformers. 3.
                             Demonstrate the ability to install and commission an intrusion
                             detection system.




ELTR 110 Mollie R. Smith     1. Demonstrate installation and operation of fire alarm systems
                             per the requirements of the NFPA 72. 2. Operate a Local Area
                             Networks (LAN.) 3. Demonstrate the ability to install and test
                             CATV and CCTV systems.




EME 100   Debi Workman       1. Student will be ready to enter the EMT program. 2. Student
                             will be able to demonstrate competency of first aid principles
                             listed in their book. 3. Students will be able to demonstrate
                             competency in CPR and the use of an AED.




EME 116   Michael J Finton   1. Students will verbalize understanding of the pathophsiology,
                             signs/symptoms of common medical illnesses and traumatic
                             conditions, and current treatment protocols per San Diego
                             County Department of Emergency Medical Services. 2. Students
                             will demonstrate the ability to conduct patient assessments,
                             obtain vital signs and provide patient care skills.




EME 125   Debi Workman       1.Document patient assessment findings on SD County approved
                             EMS form 2.Recognize and implement appropriate behavior
                             while on ride along time. 3. Perform EMT skills according to SD
                             County protocol and standards.

EME 175   Debi Workman       1. Recognize significance of the signs and symptoms as they
                             apply to specific disease pathologies. 2. The student will be able
                             to demonstrate effective writing skills as they relate to the
                             reporting of emergency calls.
EME 175L Debi Workman    1. Integrate knowledge of pathophysiology, disease process and
                         assessment findings to formulate a field impression and
                         implement an appropriate treatment plan. 2. Use effective verbal
                         communication as demonstrated by accurate radio reports. 3.
                         Demonstrate importance of safety considerations as well as team
                         work in all patient assessments and management decisions.

EME 200   Debi Workman   1. Recognize and initiate early management of peri-arrest
                         conditions that may result in cardiac arrest or complicate
                         resuscitation outcome. 2. Demonstrate proficiency in providing
                         BLS care, including prioritizing chest compressions and
                         integrating AED use. 3. Manage cardiac arrest until the return of
                         spontaneous circulation, transfer of care, or termination of
                         resuscitation. 4. Identify and treat ischemic chest pain and
                         expedite the care of patients with acute coronary syndromes. 5.
                         Recognize other life threatening clinical situations, such as
                         stroke, and provide effective initial care and transfer to reduce
                         disability and death. 6. Demonstrate effective communication as
                         a member or leader of a resuscitation team and recognize the
                         impact of team dynamics on overall team performance.
EME 201   Debi Workman   1. Identify and describe appropriate treatment of pediatric
                         cardiopulmonary arrest. 2. Perform pediatric CPR. 3. Insert
                         airway adjuncts and perform endotracheal intubations in the
                         pediatric patient. 4. Perform vascular access, intraosseous
                         injections, and fluid replacement in the pediatric patient. 5.
                         Recognize arrythmias and identify therapeutic modalities. 6.
                         Identify and incorporate appropriate medication administration
                         techniques for pediatric patients.




EME 213   Debi Workman   1. Recognize significance of patients signs and symptoms as they
                         relate to the pathophysiology of the disease and treatment. 2.
                         Appropriately treat patients according to current local protocol.

EME 55    Debi Workman   Student will be able to perform CPR according to current
                         American Heart Association Standards for Health Care
                         Personnel. Student will be able to properly identify the need for
                         and use of an AED
EMET 51   Mollie R. Smith     SLO 1: Students are given multiple quizzes, mid-term, and a final
                              examination containing representative questions from the Mail
                              Processing Equipment Examination (MPE) to prepare them for
                              the testing environment and the content of the exam. Questions
                              are objective multiple choice the same as on the MPE
                              Examination. SLO 2: Students are given multiple electrical
                              problems to utilize OHM’s Law to solve for unknown electrical
                              quantities. SLO 3: Students are given multiple mechanical
                              equipment scenarios requiring them to employ basic mechanical
                              principles and mathematical formulas to determine mechanical
                              advantage.
ENG 10    Susan B. Zolliker   1) Identify main grammatical elements and punctuation marks of
                              standard written English; 2)Edit writing for errors in grammar
                              and punctuation; 3) Write a paragraph based on a topic sentence;
                              4)Write a short multi-paragraph essay.
ENG 100   Pamela M.           1) Analyze written arguments. 2) Write coherent, well-developed
          McDonough           analytical essays. 3) Incorporate source material into at least
                              research-based essay and apply MLA guidelines for
                              documentation. 4) Write clear, effective sentences demonstrating
                              sensitivity to language.
ENG 150   Susan B. Zolliker   1.Students will be able to analyze English words and sentences in
                              terms of their meaningful parts (morphemes), distinctive sounds
                              (phonemes), and phrase structure (syntax). 2.Students will
                              demonstrate understanding of language change and variation in
                              terms of morphology, phonology, and syntax. 3.Students will
                              demonstrate a basic understanding of how the human brain
                              processes and acquires natural language.

ENG 202   Brent D Gowen     1. Demonstrate an ability to write analytical essays based on
                            comprehension and interpretation of primary and secondary
                            texts. 2. Analyze and synthesize information and arguments from
                            a variety of texts, including scholarly sources, to develop
                            research-based essays in MLA form.
ENG 203   Barbara N. Kelber 1. Demonstrate an ability to write advanced analytical essays
                            based on comprehension and interpretation of primary and
                            secondary texts. 2. Analyze and synthesize information and
                            arguments from a variety of texts, including scholarly sources, to
                            develop research-based essays in MLA form.

ENG 215   Abbie Cory          See Course Objectives
ENG 215   Abbie Cory          1) Recognize significant authors, works, and passages in the
                              British novel from the 18th century to the current day. 2) Analyze
                              and evaluate novels using a variety of methods including formal,
                              cultural, and historical analysis. 3) Articulate clear and
                              thoughtful responses to novels in both class discussions, and
                              formal and informal writing assignments. 4) Appreciate the
                              diverse styles and movements of the history of the British novel.
ENG 226   Richard Hishmeh     1) Recognition of significant authors, works, and passages in post
                              1865-American literature. 2) Ability to analyze and evaluate
                              literary texts using a variety of methods including: formal and
                              aesthetic; historical; or those that engage issues of race, class,
                              gender, and sexuality. 3) Ability to articulate clear and thoughtful
                              responses to literature in both class discussions, and formal and
                              informal writing assignments. 4) An appreciation of the diverse
                              styles and movements of post-1865 American literature.

ENG 50    Barbara N. Kelber 1. Exhibit skills in paraphrasing, summarizing, and the
                            incorporation of quotations in writing; 2. Organize and develop
                            five or more paragraphs into an essay that sufficiently supports a
                            thesis.


ENG 97    Fergal C.           The student learning objectives will depend on the specific topic
          O'Doherty           covered. A set of outcomes will be developed for each topic class
                              and included in an outline developed by the instructor.

ENGR 100 Arthur Gerwig        Students will gain insight into the coursework required to obtain
                              a degree in Engineering. Students gain insight into the types of
                              work and projects the different branches of Engineering are
                              involved with, thereby aiding them in deciding which branch of
                              Engineering they want to pursue.
ENGR 130 Daniel F.    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to 1. Solve
         Finkenthal   basic electronic problems involving current, voltage resistance,
                      and power (Ohm's Law); 2. Compare and contrast the
                      relationship between electricity and magnetism; 3. Use a
                      schematic diagram to construct DC and AC circuits with
                      components such as resistors, relays, switches, lamps, batteries,
                      inductors, capacitors, transformers, and diodes; 4. Demonstrate
                      the safe, effective operation of measuring and testing equipment;
                      Analyze the phase relationship for resistive, capacitive,
                      inductive, and resonant tuned circuits; 5. Construct DC and AC
                      circuits with components such as resistors, relays, switches,
                      lamps, batteries, power supplies, capacitors, inductors, and
                      diodes following traditional lab station procedures, using
                      standard equipment, as well as through computer simulated
                      construction, design, and analysis; 6. Demonstrate basic safety
                      procedures designed to protect the students, components, and
                      equipment; Apply developed troubleshooting techniques and
                      computer simulated programs.

ENGR 131 Daniel F.    Successful students will be able to: 1. Compare and contrast the
         Finkenthal   electrical characteristics of materials that are classified as
                      semiconductors. 2. Explain how the most important
                      semiconductor devices are constructed and operated. 3.
                      Manipulate semiconductor components properly without
                      exceeding their maximum ratings or damaging them with
                      improper handling procedures. 4. Identify the most commonly
                      used semiconductor packages and schematic symbols. 5. Test
                      various semiconductor devices and circuits to determine if they
                      are functioning properly. 6. Predict the conductivity of junction
                      diodes under the conditions of forward and reverse bias. 7.
                      Identify common power supply rectifier and regulator filter
                      configurations and list their characteristics. 8. Explain the
                      difference between the different types of amplifiers. 9. Analyze
                      and design simple inverting and noninverting amplifiers. 10.
                      Construct basic electronic circuits like amplifiers using resistors,
                      capacitors, inductors, transformers, diodes, transistors, power
                      supplies, and generators following traditional lab station
                      procedures using standard equipment, as well as through
ENGR 135 Daniel F.       1. Analyze the different frequency effects on amplifier circuits. 2.
         Finkenthal      Manipulate integrated circuits properly without exceeding their
                         maximum ratings or damaging them with improper handling
                         procedures. 3. Test various integrated circuit devices and circuits
                         to determine if they are functioning properly. 4. Analyze and
                         design simple inverting and noninverting amplifiers that use
                         operational amplifiers. 5. Construct basic electronic circuits like
                         amplifiers using resistors, capacitors, inductors, transformers,
                         diodes, transistors, integrated circuits power supplies, and
                         generators following traditional lab station procedures using
                         standard equipment, as well as through computer simulated
                         construction, design, and analysis. 6. Apply developed
                         troubleshooting techniques to solve electronic circuit problems
                         utilizing electronic test equipment and computer simulated
                         programs. 7. Demonstrate basic soldering techniques in the
                         construction of an electronic project.

ENGR 203 Daniel F.       1. Draw the logic symbols, write the output function equation,
         Finkenthal      construct a truth table, and draw the timing diagram for the basic
                         digital logic gates (AND, OR, NOT, NAND, and NOR). 2. Apply
                         Boolean Laws, DeMorgan¿s Theorem, and Karnaugh maps to
                         describe and simplify the characteristics. 3. Analyze and draw the
                         logic circuits for R-S, T, D, and J-K flip-flops. 4. Translate
                         numbers from one radix (base) to another. 5. Prepare logic
                         diagrams and explain the operation of the following counters: a.
                         Binary ripple-up counter b. Binary ripple-down counter c. Binary
                         ripple up/down counter d. Synchronous up-counter e.
                         Synchronous down-counter f. Decimal counters 6. Perform
                         mathematical operation using 1 and 2's complement notation. 7.
                         Program Complex Programmable Logic Devices (CPLDs) using
                         VHDL.

ENGR 235 Arthur Gerwig   Successful students will be able to understand force systems and
                         equilibrium conditions. Engineering problems covering
                         structures, machines, distributed forces, and friction. Graphical
                         and algebraic solutions, and vectorial analysis. Students will have
                         the ability to transfer to a four year university to successfully
                         pursue a degree in Engineering.
ENGR 236 Arthur Gerwig       Successful students will be able to understand linear motion,
                             work, different types of energy, momentum,and rotational
                             motion. Students will have the ability to transfer to a four year
                             university to successfully pursue a degree in Engineering.




ENGR 245 Arthur Gerwig       Students will be able to understand and apply the principles
                             underlying the physical behavior of materials - particularly those
                             used in engineering. Students will gain the foundations as
                             preparation to complete the upper division Materials courses
                             while successfully pursuing a degree in Engineering at any four
                             year university.




ES 100    Patricia A. Deen   1. Describe the dynamic processes involved in tectonic plate
                             motions, including the characteristic processes and landforms
                             associated with tectonic plate boundaries. 2. Describe the fontal
                             components, weather patterns, and general motions of a mid-
                             latitude cyclone.
ESL 10    Tracy Fung         Upon completing this course, students will be able to apply rules
                             for standard American English speech production to syllables,
                             words, phrases, and sentences in a conscious way, to produce
                             utterances that closely resemble spoken American English.




ESL 101   Colleen S. Weldele 1) Students should be able to write a five-paragraph, unified,
                             coherent expository essay with sentence variety and appropriate
                             grammar. 2) Demonstrate an understanding of coordination,
                             subordination, punctuation, agreement, and verb tense.

ESL 102   Colleen S. Weldele SLO 1 Students should be able to write a five-paragraph, unified,
                             coherent expository essay with sentence variety and appropriate
                             grammar, supported by outside sources in response to selected
                             readings SLO 2 Edit their own writing for grammatical
                             correctness at the sentence level.
ESL 103   Colleen S. Weldele SLO 1 Students should be able to write a five-paragraph, unified,
                             coherent expository essay with sentence variety and appropriate
                             grammar, supported by multiple outside sources in response to
                             selected readings SLO 2 Provide detailed support through use of
                             summary, paraphrase, quotation, and example in an essay format.
                             SLO 3 Employ correct punctuation and grammatical structures in
                             verb tense, conditionals, verbals, and run-on sentences and
                             fragment at the sentence level. SLO 4 Analyze and synthesize
                             information from written material for incorporation in their
                             essays.
ESL 9      Tracy Fung    Students will be able to apply the rules of syllable, phrase, and
                         sentence stress of standard American English pronunciation.




ESL 98.1   Marty Furch   1. Identify and initiate preliminary plans and goals for study
                         within a specific vocational area. 2. Demonstrate reading of
                         technical material related to a specific vocational area at a
                         minimum 9th grade level. 3. Describe orally and in writing 2 or
                         more career paths within a specific vocational area. 4. Apply
                         reading and critical thinking skills to complete a variety of
                         simple computer-based activities.


ESL 98.1   Marty Furch   1. Identify and initiate preliminary plans and goals for study
                         within a specific vocational area. 2. Demonstrate reading of
                         technical material related to a specific vocational area at a
                         minimum 9th grade level. 3. Describe orally and in writing 2 or
                         more career paths within a specific vocational area. 4. Apply
                         reading and critical thinking skills to complete a variety of
                         simple computer-based activities.


ESL 98.2   Marty Furch   1. Demonstrate reading of technical material related to a specific
                         vocational area at a minimum 11th grade level. 2. Identify 3 or
                         more specific subject areas required in a specific vocational
                         program of study. 3. Utilize effective grammar and vocabulary at
                         an intermediate ESL level within a specific vocational area. 4.
                         Apply reading and critical thinking skills to complete a variety of
                         intermediate computer-based activities.
ESL 98.2   Marty Furch    1. Demonstrate reading of technical material related to a specific
                          vocational area at a minimum 11th grade level. 2. Identify 3 or
                          more specific subject areas required in a specific vocational
                          program of study. 3. Utilize effective grammar and vocabulary at
                          an intermediate ESL level within a specific vocational area. 4.
                          Apply reading and critical thinking skills to complete a variety of
                          intermediate computer-based activities.


ESL 98.3   Marty Furch    1. Demonstrate reading of technical material within a specific
                          vocational area at minimum 12th grade level. 2. Explain orally
                          and in writing the current career paths available within a specific
                          vocational area. 3. Effectively utilize listening and speaking
                          skills to discuss a variety of subject areas within a particular
                          vocational area. 4. Write reports of 300 or more words related to
                          career, vocational, and technical material within a specific
                          vocational area. 5. Apply reading and critical thinking skills to
                          complete a variety of complex computer-based activities.

FASH 100 Nancy J. Galli   1. Identify the career opportunities available in the fashion
                          industry.
                          2.Choose a career in fashion that is compatible with your
                          qualifications and personality type and develop a plan of action
                          to reach that goal.
                          3.Reconstruct the process of fashion creation from trend research
                          to product.


FASH 105 Nancy J. Galli   1.Analyze the cultural, psychological, sociological, and economic
                          aspects of clothing as they relate to the individual. 2.Apply the
                          art elements and principles of design to selection of a wardrobe
                          by assessing the principles of color, line, form, fabric, texture and
                          apply this information to self and others. 3.Evaluate figure types
                          and chose appropriate clothing styles for that body type.

FASH 115 Nancy J. Galli   1. Design and build quality, effective exterior windows and
                          interior displays. 2. Design a retail store floor plan to scale with
                          placement of fixtures, displays, wrap desk and identify the traffic
                          pattern. 3. Recognize good design techniques as it applies to the
                          principles of design though balance, emphasis proportion, rhythm
                          and harmony. 4. Prepare a color presentation for the interior of a
                          retail location. 5. Differentiate between the traditional human
                          form mannequin and the stylized mannequin.

FASH 116 Nancy J. Galli   1. Lead, organize and direct a group of VMI students through the
                          set up of a display. 2. Organize and set up displays for special
                          events. 3. Design and set up a retail space.
FASH 120 Nancy J. Galli   1. Demonstrate an overall understanding of the principles of
                          planning, organizing and managing a retail store, from a retail
                          buyer’s point of view. 2. Understand and assess how each
                          component of the Operating Statement (Profit and Loss Report)
                          affects gross margin and ultimately the pre-tax profit of a retail
                          business. 3. Demonstrate how to properly select merchandise
                          based on demographics, target customer profile and desired
                          image of store.
FASH 125 Nancy J. Galli   Retailing SLO: 1. Describe the nature and scope of retailing. 2.
                          Analyze Retailing as an economic force in the United States and
                          globally. 3. Explain the operations methods for of a retail firm. 4.
                          Explain how retailers manage their sales, promotion, and
                          publicity through identifying target markets, SWOT,
                          demographics and psychographics. 5. Organize the basic
                          components of the retailer’s merchandise mix and promotional
                          mix.
FASH 126 Nancy J. Galli   1.Coordinate and implement a fashion show. 2.Develop
                          operational skills to orchestrate special events. 3.Develop
                          promotional skills to orchestrate special events.




FASH 135 Nancy J. Galli   1. Demonstrate skill for basic "open" pattern assembly in
                          construction and pressing of vest, blouse/shirt, and pants/skirt
                          and 1 original design. 2. Differentiate between proper and
                          improper pressing techniques on a variety of fabrics. 3. Set up a
                          sewing machine for properfunctioning. 4. Choose appropriate
                          sewing supplies for a given task. 5. Define basic sewing
                          terminology as related to construction.
FASH 136 Nancy J. Galli   1.Demonstrate the achievement of a high level of skill
                          development by completing samplers of increasing difficulty and
                          complexity. 2.Apply acquired high level of skill to the
                          completion of required garments. 3.Analyze a garment to
                          determine the correct adjustments necessary to achieve proper fit.
                          4.Demonstrate appropriate pressing techniques to enhance the
                          finished appearance of constructed garments. 5.Assess machine
                          malfunction and perform adjustments necessary to restore proper
                          operation. 6. Evaluate the appropriateness of particular textiles
                          and trims for use in the construction of a specified garment.
FASH 137 Nancy J. Galli   1.Create a portfolio of samplers of tailoring techniques including
                          special seams, hems, bound buttonholes, pockets, hand finishings
                          2.Construct a jacket or coat using specialty fabrics incorporating
                          tailoring techniques of construction. 3.Evaluate the advantages of
                          using tailoring techniques over garments made of like fabrics
                          which have not been tailored. 4.Construct a muslin and perform
                          the necessary fitting adjustments necessary prior to cutting the
                          garment in final fabric. 5.Apply appropriate quick tailor
                          techniques to a garment in the process of construction based on
                          its style and fabric specifications. 6.Differentiate between the
                          qaulity of fabrication,construction and finishing of two garments
                          from two separate price points.

FASH 139 Nancy J. Galli   1. construct basic pattern using flat pattern methods 2. transform
                          basic pattern using pattern manipulation techniques 3.
                          comprehend line development components, group and style,
                          using design elements such as proportion, silhouette and style
                          lines. 4. identify all pattern markings and terminoligy used in
                          pattern making and pattern cards.
FASH 141 Nancy J. Galli   1. construct basic pattern using the draping method 2.Identify
                          design tools and proceedures of garment manufacturing 3. choose
                          appropriate fabric choices for designs in terms of drapability and
                          style. 4. Solve problems in pattern construction, fit and design
                          interpretation.
FASH 146 Nancy J. Galli   1. Develop and demonstrate industry quality patterns using a
                          CAD computer graphics system. 2. Analyze and adjust created
                          patterns for custom fit and fit measurements. 3. Create muslim
                          samples to evaluate pattern-making skills.
FASH 147 Nancy J. Galli   1. Analyze and solve problems related to industrial pattern-
                          making. 2. Apply industry standard grading techniques to
                          production patterns. 3. Create markers using industry standard
                          principles and techniques.
FASH 148 Nancy J. Galli   1. Demonstrate achievement high level of skill development of
                          Adobe Illustrator/Photoshop interface by successful completion
                          of exercises. 2. Apply acquired high level skills to the completion
                          of the final project which includes logo creation and a series of
                          story boards.
FASH 149 Nancy J. Galli   1.Create a portfolio of samplers of tailoring techniques including
                          special seams, hems, bound buttonholes, pockets, hand finishings
                          2.Construct a jacket or coat using specialty fabrics incorporating
                          tailoring techniques of construction. 3.Evaluate the advantages of
                          using tailoring techniques over garments made of like fabrics
                          which have not been tailored. 4.Construct a muslin and perform
                          the necessary fitting adjustments necessary prior to cutting the
                          garment in final fabric. 5.Apply appropriate quick tailor
                          techniques to a garment in process of construction based on its
                          style and fabric specifications. 6.Differentiate between the
                          quality of fabrication, construction and finishing of two garments
                          from two separate price points.

FASH 165 Nancy J. Galli   1.create a garment using patternmaking, draping and sewing
                          skills.
                          2.Use technical equipment in the construction of a garment.
                          3.Evaluate and alter the fit of a garment to enhance its
                          appearance.
                          4.Use time effectively to complete assigned projects
                           5.Evaluate their improvement of personal garment making skills.
                           6.Complete the required number of hours to receive class credit.




FASH 166 Nancy J. Galli   1.Use technical equipment in the construction of a tailored
                          garment. 2.Evaluate and alter the fit of a garment to enhance its
                          appearance. 3.Use time effectively to complete assigned projects
                          4.Evaluate their improvement of personal garment making skills.
                          5.Complete the required number of hours to receive class credit.

FASH 175 Nancy J. Galli   Summarize todays apparel industry locally and globally and the
                          use of government regulations. Demonstrate effective
                          communication with manufacturer's, buyers, consumers and co-
                          workers by using appropriate terminology for manufacturing,
                          styling, buying and selling. Distinguish various quality levels of
                          ready-to-wear garments in relationship to design development,
                          shape sillouette, style, fabric features and performance, findings
                          and trims, stitches, seams and edge treatments.
FASH 176 Nancy J. Galli    1. Demonstrate the ability to solve problems dealing with
                           fractions, decimals and percents.
                           2. Memorize, recall and demonstrate an ability to properly utilize
                           appropriate mathematical formulas in order to solve given retail
                           situational problems
                           3. Analyze and evaluate appropriate methods of inventory
                           valuation in order to maximize optimum profitability.
                           4. Understand and assess how each component of pricing, cost of
                           goods sold and expenses affects gross margin and pre-tax profit
                           in a retail environment.
FASH 178 Nancy J. Galli    1. Compose a fashion career portfolio including all student and
                           professional work that pertains to the apparel industry.
FASH      Nancy J. Galli   1. identify new garment industry information that relates to
197C                       apparel design and construction 2. apply new techniques based
                           on information relating to apparel design and construction

FASH 90   Nancy J. Galli   1. Illustrate a design group including production flat sketches. 2.
                           prepare a time management chart to implement project 3. Create
                           3 dimensional designs from the group using pattern making and
                           sewing techniques.
FASH 93   Nancy J. Galli   The key student learning outcomes are: 1. Ability to sketch
                           and/or draw revisions. 2. Communicate construction details and
                           corrections. 3. Communicate points of measure. 4. Communicate
                           color block or areas of logo placement including hang tag
                           placement. 5. Format and optimize drawings in order to digitally
                           transfer documents to appropropriate manufacturers.

FCS 101   Nancy J. Galli   Students will identify their short term, intermediate and long
                           term and goals. The student will develop a money management
                           plan and resume consistent with their stated goals. The students
                           will meet with a counselor to prepare an academic program plan
                           consistent with their goals.




FCS 110   Nancy J. Galli   1) Compare the similarities and differences among the five major
                           groups of microorganisms 2) Examine the differences among the
                           types of cell division 3) Assess the effects of microorganisms on
                           teh human body 4) Differentiate among the major food-borne
                           pathogens including functions (i.e. microbial vs. toxin producing)
                           and clinical symptoms 5) Identify other potential food
                           contaminants and high risk situations 6) Apply methods of
                           control for microbiological growth and reproduction 7) Interpret
                           public health statistics 8) Develop methodsof monitoring
                           procedures to reduce risk of microbiological proliferation
FCS 150    Nancy J. Galli   As a result of successful completion of this course,
                            1)Students will demonstrate knowlege of various cultural factors
                            that influence food choices and how those factors relate to meal
                            patterns and subsequent health status.
                            2)Students will demonstrate improved skills at cross-cultural
                            communication and sensitivity to others.
                            3)Students' organization, writing, and presentation abilities will
                            be enhanced.
                            4)Students will demonstrate an expanded awareness and an
                            attitude of openness and respect about food as a common bond
                            among all people.
FCS 165    Nancy J. Galli   1) Evaluate the students' personal diets in light of the National
                            Health Objectives 2) Reconstruct the body systems' functions
                            related to nutrient absorption and transport 3) Assess nutrient
                            adequacies, deficiencies and toxicities using a current diet
                            analysis computer program. 4) Create a personal diet plan. 4)
                            Interpret the relationship between diet and health. 5)
                            Differentiate among various nutrient intake requirements for all
                            stages of the life cycle.
FCS 170    Nancy J. Galli   Upon successful completion of this course, students will
                            demonstrate-- 1) Knowledge of energy balance and how energy
                            balance is measured and reflected (positive or negative) in body
                            weight status and body composition. 2) Skills in evaluating
                            current resources and treatment approaches that are available for
                            weight management and eating disorders. 3) Attitudes of
                            awareness and acceptance for the complexities and
                            interrelationships of weight management and healthy self-
                            concepts.
FCS 185    Nancy J. Galli   1) Apply basic anatomy, biology and chemistry concepts to the
                            digestion, absorption and metabolism of the macronutrients and
                            micronutrients in the human body. 2)Apply energy balance
                            concepts to dietary beliefs, habits and patterns. 3) Differentiate
                            among nutrient intake requirements for all stages of the life
                            cycle. 4) Interpret the relationship between nutrient intake and
                            disease processes.

FIRE 105   Carl Lofthouse   1. Calculate water pressure using formulas with given hose,
                            nozzles and appliances.
FIRE 115   Carl Lofthouse   1) The student will be able to define basic HazMat terms at the
                            First Responder Level. 2) The student will be able to define
                            safety, isolation, notification and evacuation procedures. 3) The
                            student will be able to identify HazMat situations and recognize
                            effective action planning. 4) The student will be able to describe
                            the Incident Command System. 5) The student will be able to
                            recognize decontamination and disposal procedures.




FIRE 151   Carl Lofthouse   1) The student will be able to define and demonstrate knowledge
                            of fire department organization and culture, and the expectations
                            of entry-level fire department personnel. 2) The student will
                            demonstrate knowledge of fire department equipment through the
                            selection and application of equipment for given firefighting
                            tasks. 3) The student will be able to analyze and assess firefighter
                            hazards inherent to the profession. 4) The student sill be able to
                            demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively through
                            multiple methods of communication including: written,
                            electronic, face-to-face, and radio transmitted messages. 5) The
                            student will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of strategies,
                            tactics and incident command through the selection and
                            implementation of firefighting methods, and the application of
                            the Incident Command and Emergency Management Systems. 6)
                            The student will demonstrate safe practices by using minimum
                            standard safety procedures.

FIRE 152   Carl Lofthouse   1) The student will be able to analyze features and performance
                            of modern fire apparatus. 2) The student will be able to identify
                            and apply driving laws and safe driving practices. 3) The student
                            will be able to perform maintenance and pump service tests. 4)
                            The student will be able to apply mathematical and hydraulic
                            formulas to develop effective fire streams.




FIRE 160   Carl Lofthouse   1) The student will be able to define and describe wildland
                            firefighting. 2) The student will be able to identify wildland fire
                            behavior includin fuel, weather and topography. 3) The student
                            will be able to define and describe tactics and strategies of
                            wildland firefighting. 4) The student will be able to define and
                            describe all firefighter safety standards for survival in wildland
                            firefighting.
FIRE 165   Carl Lofthouse   1) The student will be able to define basic terms and concepts
                            related to fire behavior and combustion. 2) The student will be
                            able to describe chemical processes associated with combustion.
                            3) The student will be able to analyze physical conditions which
                            determine the influence of fire behavior. 4) The student will be
                            able to describe fire suppression agents and their properties. 5)
                            The student will be able to differentiate methods and techniques
                            of fire extinguishment.

FIRE 168   Carl Lofthouse   1) The student will be able to identify Fire Department functions
                            and duties of fire service personnel. 2) The student will be able to
                            define fire behavior and apply appropriate extinguishing
                            methods. 3) The student will be able to perform search and
                            rescue. 4) The student will be able to perform safe fire ground
                            activities including hose evolutions, ladder operations, salvage
                            and overhaul. 5) The student will be able to define and perform
                            wildland firefighting. 6) The student will be able to define and
                            perform all firefighter safety standards and rules.

FIRE 197A Carl Lofthouse    1) The student will be able to analyze and write policy statements
                            that guide fire service organizations. 2) The student will be able
                            to write a sample mission statement for a fire service
                            organization. 3) The student will be able to define the roles and
                            functions of personnel within the organization. 4) The student
                            will be able to demonstrate knowledge of diversity and
                            contemporary issues, and managing diversity in the workplace. 5)
                            The student will be able to create a model human resources
                            program. 6) The Student will be able to analyze complex
                            personnel conflicts and identify possible solutions.

FIRE 197B Carl Lofthouse    1) The student will be able to define the components of the
                            Incident Command System. 2) The student will be able to
                            describe the organizational structure used within large scale fires
                            and natural disasters, including basic duties and responsibilities
                            of chief, director, leader, and specialist functions. 3) The student
                            will be able to identify communication tools (verbal and written)
                            used to convey a report on conditions, safety messages and
                            incident action plans. 4) The student will be able to write an
                            action plan (based upon simulation), and how to utilize that
                            information while in command of a large incident. 5) The student
                            will be able to analyze strategies, tactics and methods necessary
                            to effectively manage given large scale emergency scenarios. 6)
                            The student will be able to describe the components of a safety
                            plan and identify circumstances that would necessitate the filling
                            of a safety officer position at a major incident.
FIRE 197C Carl Lofthouse    1) The student will be able to differentiate Fire Technology
                            educational requirements. 2) The student will be able to describe
                            fire behavior, combustion and tactics and strategy. 3) The student
                            will be able to define and describe the purpose, scope and
                            organization of the Fire Service. 4) The student will be able to
                            identify various types of equipment and apparatus. 5) The student
                            will be able to describe the Fire Prevention Bureau and
                            regulations. 6) The student will be able to perform manipulative
                            skills required of a firefighter.

FIRE 51   Carl Lofthouse    1) The student will be able to prepare for the physical ability
                            testing process. 2) The student will be able to perform specific
                            fitness training requirements for the Fire Service. 3) The student
                            will be able to discuss and apply proper nutrition, hydration and
                            diet. 4) The student will be able to prepare for the hiring process.

FIRE 98   Carl Lofthouse    1) The student will be able to differentiate certificate and two-
                            year degree programs. 2) The student will be able to describe fire
                            behavior, combustion and tactics and strategy. 3) The student
                            will be able to define and describe the purpose, scope and
                            organization of the Fire Service. 4) The student will be able to
                            identify various types of equipment and apparatus. 5) The student
                            will be able to describe the Fire Prevention Bureau and
                            regulations. 6) The student will be able to perform manipulative
                            skills required of a firefighter.

FREN 101 Chantal R. Maher   1) Apply the basic structures of French grammar to communicate
                            effectively. 2) Formulate declarative and interrogative sentences
                            at an elementary level. 3) Construct a narrative in paragraph form
                            about personal events using the present and near future tenses. 4)
                            Speak French at an elementary level with effective pronunciation
                            and intonation. Demonstrate signs of spontaneity in speech. 5)
                            Understand basic written language and summarize its meaning.
                            6) Deduce meaning from complex spoken language and authentic
                            written materials. 7) Recognize the diversity among Francophone
                            cultures. Compare these cultures to one’s own culture.
GC 100     Lillian S. Payn   1. Explore historical events related to mass communication,
                             visual communication and graphic design. 2. Understand the
                             design process 3. Explore perception principles seeing and
                             believing 4. Analyze appropriate delivery mediums to deploy
                             visual message 5. Discuss advertising and preconceived ideas in
                             relation to audience perception 6. Utilize type to communicate
                             visual message 7. Identify and compare layout designs 8.
                             Recognize purpose of illustration and photography in design 9.
                             Identify color models and usage 10. Understand the proper
                             production tools in the design process




GCIP 103   Kenneth Dodson    1. Students will be able to properly identify PDF files for high
                             quality pre-press applications. 2. Will be able to apply PDF
                             creation techniques. 3.The student will be able to use pre-flight
                             and editing software. 4. Will be able to identify and incorporate
                             quality concepts and practices associated with the
                             implementation of PDf workflows.


GCIP 140   Lillian S. Payn   At completion of the course students will be able to : retouch and
                             colorize photographs, understand resolution, use multiple layers,
                             and color mode usage.
GCIP 152   Lillian S. Payn   At the completion of the course students will be able to: draw
                             with the pen tool, use multiple layers, select appropriate
                             typefaces and make color selection.
GCIP 255   Lillian S. Payn   1. Upon completion the successful student will have designed
                             and developed a five different packages for their portfolio. 2.
                             Upon completion the successful student will have developed a
                             creative brief for marketing their product packaging.

GCIP 291   Lillian S. Payn   Explain the rules of common law pertaining to the graphics
                             communications industry by evaluating and explaining how legal
                             policies determine business practices through research, essays
                             and oral arguments.
GCMW   Lillian S. Payn   1. Identify types of multimedia, examples of multimedia, and the
100                      use of technology to produce new media. 2. Contribute to a wiki
                         to track the development of new media from its historical roots
                         on a global scale in order to place our current media in a
                         historical and international perspective. 3. Contribute to a blog
                         that compares, contrasts, and integrates multimedia
                         conceptualizations using various methods: Developments,
                         Paradigms, Rhizomes, Interactivity, Graphical User Interfaces,
                         and Hypertext/Hypermedia. 4. Participate in multimedia
                         immersion experiences: gaming, simulations, virtual reality, and
                         training; and reflect and report to the class about it. 5. Produce a
                         narrative using new media. 6. Describe and predict the
                         implications for transformation in the future using new media.


GCMW   Lillian S. Payn   1. The student will be able to work with still images and animate
165                      them. 2. The student will be able to use and apply video
                         transitions. 3. The student will be able to identify and create
                         alpha channels. 4. The student will be able to set up a green
                         screen and use a color key to composite it. 5. The student will be
                         able to shoot and capture video from a tape or hard drive. 6. The
                         student will be able to create video for podcasting, internet
                         broadcast, broadcast and DVD production.

GCMW   Lillian S. Payn   !. Design a funcitonal form. 2. Design a functional database
216                      connected to the form. 3. Retrieve the data collected from an
                         online form.
GCMW   Lillian S. Payn   Learners will: 1. design and manage a remote database on a
226                      remote database server using popular database management
                         tools. 2. setup their own accounts on remote Web servers and
                         remote database servers. 3. display data from the remote database
                         server on their Web pages. 4. create Web pages that can add
                         records, modify records and delete records.
GEOG 100 Douglas B. Key      Describe the development of mid-latitude cyclones and explain
                             their role in bringing precipitation to the earth's mid-latitudes.
                             Explain the basic concept of a biome and the geographic controls
                             that determine their location on earth.
                             Describe the role of plate tectonics in explaining the occurrence
                             and distribution of such phenomena as mountain ranges, faulting
                             and earthquakes, volcanoes, and ocean basins.




GEOG      Catherine M. Jain Analyze and reach valid conclusions from the analysis of graphs,
100L                        geographic diagrams, and maps. Construct educated opinions and
                            responses to a variety of environmental issues.
GEOG      Catherine M. Jain Read and interpret basic information from a topographic map
100L                        such as elevation, relative steepness of slopes, hills, valleys,
                            ridges, and depressions.
                            Read and interpret basic weather information from a surface
                            analysis chart.
                            Read and interpret landforms using geologic maps and aerial
                            photography.
                            Ability to evaluate geographic phenomena observed in the world
                            outside of class as a result of field trip experiences.
GEOG 103 Wing H. Cheung       1. Locate the world's major geographic regions on a map. 2.
                              Associate distinct world regions with their climatic and geologic
                              characteristics. 3. Describe key historical events and
                              contemporary political challenges confronted by each region. 4.
                              Recognize and explain the demographic patterns in each world
                              region. 5. Discuss and understand the social indicator measures
                              (e.g. UN HDI) for each world region.




GEOG 105 Wing H. Cheung       1. Identify the world's major linguistic, political, religion,
                              agricultural, ethnic, and demographic culture regions. 2.
                              Associate culturally motivated actions with their ecological
                              impacts. 3. Explain the interactions between different cultural
                              traits. 4. Justify differences in landscapes based on the cultural
                              values of their inhabitants. 5. Visualize geographic patterns, and
                              explain their absence or presence in geographic space.




GEOG 110 Catherine M. Jain Interpret and use meteorological maps and charts. Identify the
                           physical processes that shape weather patterns.
GEOG 110 Catherine M. Jain Explain the weather conditions that result from high and low
                           pressure systems.
                           Explain the basic process of cloud formation.
                           Understand the solstices and the equinoxes and how they affect
                           the distribution of incoming solar radiation.




GEOG 115 Douglas B. Key       1. Describe the role of plate tectonics in the formation of
                              volcanoes and faults zones. 2. Use maps and images to interpret
                              the flooding potential of streams. 3. Understand how to mitigate
                              hazard/disaster potential through planning and changing
                              behavioral responses to hazards/disasters.
GEOG 120 Wing H. Cheung    1. Explain different components that make up a Geographic
                           Information System. 2. Distinguish between shapefiles, feature
                           classes, and raster datasets. 3. Collect and prepare geospatial
                           information needed for GIS analysis. 4. Evaluate study designs
                           and data used in other GIS studies. 5. Demonstrate the proper use
                           of various cartographic elements. 6. Perform basic spatial queries
                           and analysis.




GEOG 125 Steven G. Spear   Successful students will be able to generally describe the weather
                           patterns that seasonally affect the state, the climatic regions to be
                           found in the state, the biomes and their state-wide distribution,
                           the general geology and geomorphology of each of California's
                           eleven geologic provinces and the general geologic history of the
                           state for the past 2 billion years.

GEOG 132 Wing H. Cheung    1. Explain basic geodatabase management concepts. 2. Operate
                           ArcPad and mobile GPS devices in the field environment. 3.
                           Demonstrate prudent judgment when choosing between batch
                           and interactive vectorization using ArcScan. 4. Understand the
                           basic structure of common geospatial data portals, such as the US
                           census data server, SANDAG, and USGS. 5. Apply geodatabase
                           and feature class behaviors and configurations (e.g. domains,
                           subtypes) as appropriate. 6. Integrate and import CAD data into
                           the GIS environment.
GEOG 134 Wing H. Cheung   1. Explain the mechanism of a successful GIS data distribution
                          system. 2. Manipulate and analyze GIS data by building queries
                          within database software. 3. Customize and modify GIS software
                          according to their organization's needs. 4. Expand the power of
                          the GIS software by writing custom applications and tools. 5.
                          Evaluate their workflows and assess a project's GIS needs.




GEOG 136 Wing H. Cheung   1. Analyze and represent complex geographic trends. 2. Discuss
                          scale and precision limitations inherent in raster analysis. 3.
                          Explain the fundamental mechanism behind network and spatial
                          analyses. 4. Integrate survey and engineering data into GIS
                          projects. 5. Evaluate and perform site suitability studies. 6.
                          Understand the roles of external models in various GIS projects.
GEOG 138 Wing H. Cheung   1. Operate geographic information systems in a variety of
                          settings. 2. Judge the appropriateness of different GIS data
                          models and applications. 3. Design and organize GIS projects to
                          analyze a real world problem. 4. Demonstrate the ability to
                          utilize or learn a variety of GIS-related technological tools.




GEOG 140 Wing H. Cheung   1. Explain the mechanism of insolation and reflectance. 2.
                          Discuss existing and potential applications of new satellite
                          sensors. 3. Perform basic analytical functions using appropriate
                          software and data sources. 4. Recognize the limitations of
                          existing remote sensing systems and related research.
GEOG 141 Wing H. Cheung   1. Identify and define components of an effective transportation
                          system. 2. Evaluate existing transportation systems and
                          distribution networks using GIS 3. Comprehend and critique
                          previous transportation systems research. 4. Plan and conduct
                          transportation studies using GIS 5. Demonstrate the ability to
                          troubleshoot technical problems by turning to online resources
                          and existing literature.




GEOG 142 Wing H. Cheung   1. Understand basic terminologies commonly used in
                          environmental studies. 2. Identify portals which disseminate
                          credible data on physical geographic features and socioeconomic
                          information. 3. Preprocess (convert, refine, correct) and verify
                          field data that may contain topological errors. 4. Successfully
                          plan and implement a GIS project, from data collection to output
                          presentation. 5. Critically analyze existing environmental
                          applications of GIS, 6. Demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot
                          technical problems by turning to online resources and existing
                          literature.
GEOG 143 Wing H. Cheung    1. Identify elements of an effective map. 2. Critically evaluate
                           map layouts by considering spatial data limitations and human
                           psychology theories. 3. Create, modify, and save map templates
                           that fulfill industry-specific standards. 4. Plan and adjust map
                           scale and label placement settings in order to improve map
                           clarity. 5. Analyze the appropriateness of different projections
                           and datum for the given study area. 6. Determine the appropriate
                           symbologies for various industry-specific maps.




GEOG 195 Douglas B. Key    1. From interpreting real-life environments in the field, come to
                           the realization that nature is much more complex and less well
                           defined than is necessarily taught in the classroom. 2. From
                           observing the elements that make up physical landscapes,
                           become keenly aware of how the elements interact and impact
                           one another. 3. The ability to independently analyze physical
                           landscapes will develop student self confidence that will lead to
                           learning beyond what is achieved in the class itself.

GEOG 295 Douglas B. Key    1. The student will be able to demonstrate skills in organization
                           and presentation. 2. The student will be able to apply the
                           principles of the scientific method in observing a problem,
                           developing a hypothesis, and testing the hypothesis.
GEOL 100 Steven G. Spear   After completion of Geology 100, the successful student should
                           be able to: 1.Explain the different origins of igneous,
                           sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. 2.Describe the common
                           types of volcanoes and plutons. 3.Explain several different types
                           of geologic structures and the general forces that caused them.
                           4.Explain what is happening in an earthquake in terms of earth
                           motion and causes of damage. 5.Explain the origin of the
                           different types of mountains, volcanoes and faults in terms of
                           plate tectonics. 6.Describe the surficial geomorphic processes
                           that operate on earth and the kinds of landforms they produce.
GEOL      Steven G. Spear   Upon completion of the course, the successful student, with the
100L                        aid of standard reference volumes: 1. Should be able to identify
                            some common rock- and ore-forming minerals. 2. Should be able
                            to identify common igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic
                            rocks. 3. Should be able to identify a fault or fold in the field. 4.
                            Should be able to identify which geomorphic agents shaped the
                            landscape he/she is visiting/looking at.




GEOL 110 Steven G. Spear    Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be
                            able to explain the geologic processes that have shaped the
                            landscape in any national park in the western USA. Secondly,
                            using the national parks and monuments as examples, the student
                            should be able to explain the basic principles of physical and
                            historical geology particularly as they relate to the origin of rocks
                            and tectonic features.
GEOL 150 Steven G. Spear    At the end of the course, the successfull student will be able to:
                            A. Describe the stratigraphic, structural tectonic,and
                            paleontologic development of the American Southwest. B.
                            Describe the phylogeny of the major groups of dinosaurs.




GEOL 150 Steven G. Spear    At the end of the course, the successfull student will be able to:
                            A. Describe the stratigraphic, structural tectonic,and
                            paleontologic development of the American Southwest. B.
                            Describe the phylogeny of the major groups of dinosaurs.




GEOL      Steven G. Spear   By the end of the course, the successfull stuent will be able to: A.
150L                        With the aid of standard geologic references, be able to identify
                            any sedimenatry rock, the phylum of the fossils contained therein
                            and be able to determine a logical environment of depositon. B.
                            When presented with a geologic map including a standard map
                            legend, the student will be able to interpret the map in terms of
                            generalized environmnetal and tectonic history.
GEOL 195 Steven G. Spear      At the conclusion of the field course, the successful student will
                              be able to: A) Describe the relative importance of the various
                              gemorphic processes that operate in the field area. B) Describe
                              the various tectonic processes that operate/operated in the field
                              area. C) Describe the mineral resources available in the field
                              area. D)Describe the various rock types found in the field area.

GERM 101 Martha K. Evans      1) Apply the basic structures of German grammar to
                              communicate effectively. 2) Formulate declarative, interrogative
                              and imperative sentences at an elementary level. 3) Construct a
                              narrative in paragraph form about personal events using the
                              present and near future tenses. 4) Speak German at an elementary
                              level with effective pronunciation and intonation. Demonstrate
                              signs of spontaneity in speech. 5) Understand basic written
                              language and summarize its meaning. 6) Deduce meaning from
                              complex spoken language and authentic written materials. 7)
                              Recognize the diversity among German speaking cultures.
                              Compare these cultures to one’s own culture.




HE 100    Hugh G. Gerhardt 1. Develop knowledge and an understanding of physical activity
                           and fitness and its role in personal development and lifelong
                           wellness.
                           2. Recognize their individual well being will be developed
                           through the study of the emotional, spiritual, intellectual, social
                           and physical qualities of health.
                           3. Apply principles of wellness, fitness, recreational and physical
                           activity in making proper choices as it applies to life skills and
                           lifestyle.
HE 100L   Hugh G. Gerhardt 1. Recall the physical benefits of a total body conditioning
                           program. 2. Appraise their physical lifestyle by viewing their
                           fitness test results. 3. Plan their own future invidual activity and
                           exercise program. 4. Discover workpout techniques that work
                           best for their body and lifestyle. 5. Schedule their future time to
                           include an active lifestyle and planned exercise routine.
HIST 101   Christopher S.   Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in
           Johnson          American history through Reconstruction. Accurately interpret
                            American history through the use of primary and secondary
                            sources. Identify, use, and cite reliable primary and secondary
                            sources in American. Demonstrate college level writing in
                            assessing and interpreting American history. Identify the
                            historical and theoretical foundations of the U. S. Constitution,
                            the structure and function of the three Branches, the Checks and
                            Balances system, and the nature as well as the continuing impact
                            of the Bill of Rights.




HIST 102   Christopher S.   A student will: Demonstrate knowledge of the basic structures of
           Johnson          California politics and history; be able to read primary and
                            secondary historical sources and critically analyze the texts;
                            understand the interprative quality of history and be aware that
                            there is a historiography; interpret the fundamental tensions
                            involved in American Federalism; and critically analyze the
                            developments of American foreign and domestic policies.




HIST 105   Christopher S.   Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in the
           Johnson          history of modern Western Civilization. Evaluate and interpret
                            major patterns and trends in Western Civilization history through
                            the Reformation with a particular focus on causation,
                            continuities, and change. Accurately interpret Western
                            Civilization history through the use of primary and secondary
                            sources. Identify, use, and cite reliable primary and secondary
                            sources in Western Civilization history. Demonstrate college
                            level writing in assessing and interpreting Western Civilization.
HIST 106   Christopher S.   Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in the
           Johnson          history of modern Western Civilization. Evaluate and interpret
                            major patterns and trends in modern Western Civilization history
                            with a particular focus on causation, continuities, and change.
                            Accurately interpret modern Western Civilization history through
                            the use of primary and secondary sources. Identify, use, and cite
                            reliable primary and secondary sources in Western Civilization
                            history. Demonstrate college level writing in assessing and
                            interpreting modern Western Civilization.




HIST 107   Christopher S.   Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in the
           Johnson          history of World History to 1650. Evaluate and interpret major
                            patterns and trends in World history to 1650 with a particular
                            focus on causation, continuities, and change. Accurately interpret
                            World history to 1650 through the use of primary and secondary
                            sources. Identify, use, and cite reliable primary and secondary
                            sources in World history to 1650. Demonstrate college level
                            writing in assessing and interpreting World history to 1650.




HIST 108   Christopher S.   Accurately recall major events and figures in modern world
           Johnson          history, 1650-present. Evaluate and interpret major patterns and
                            trends in modern world history with a particular focus on
                            causation, continuities, and change. Identify and use reliable
                            primary and secondary sources in modern world history.
                            Demonstrate college level writing skills while analyzing
                            historical problems, events, or figures.




HIST 121   Christopher S.   Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in
           Johnson          California history. Accuratley interpret California history
                            through the use of primary and secondary sources. Identify, use,
                            and cite reliable primary and secondary sources in California
                            history. Demonstrate college level writing in assessing and
                            interpreting California history. Assess and interpet the roles and
                            interactions of various and diverse cultural elements in California
                            history.
HIST 130   Linda Dudik   Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in
                         Women's history. Accurately interpret Women's history through
                         the use of primary and secondary sources. Identify, use, and cite
                         reliable primary and secondary sources in Women's history.
                         Demonstrate college level writing in interpreting and assessing
                         Women's history.




HIST 140   Michael T.    1. Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in the
           Arguello      History of the Americas from pre-Columbian times to 1800. 2.
                         Accurately interpret the History of the Americas through the use
                         of primary and secondary sources. 3. Demonstrate college level
                         writing in interpreting and assessing themes from the period
                         under study.
HIST 141   Michael T.   1. Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in the
           Arguello     History of the Americas since 1800, particularly in relation to
                        global historical change in this period. 2. Accurately interpret the
                        History of the Americas in this period through the use of primary
                        and secondary sources. 3. Demonstrate college level writing in
                        interpreting and assessing significant themes from the period
                        under study. 4. Analyze important themes and the historical
                        causation of these events from the period under study, in
                        particular the effect of migration on the Americas since 1800.
HIST 150   Michael T.   1. Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in the
           Arguello     History of Latin America from pre-Columbian times to 1824. 2.
                        Accurately interpret the History of Latin America through the use
                        of primary and secondary sources. 3. Demonstrate college level
                        writing in interpreting and assessing themes from the period
                        under study.




HIST 151   Michael T.   1. Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in the
           Arguello     History of the Americas from 1824 and Independence to the
                        present. 2. Accurately interpret the History of the Americas
                        through the use of primary and secondary sources. 3.
                        Demonstrate college level writing in interpreting and assessing
                        themes from the period under study.
HIST 152   Linda Dudik         Accurately recall knowledge of major events and figures in WW
                               II history. Accurately interpret history through the use of primary
                               and secondary sources. Identify, use, and cite reliable primary
                               and secondary sources in WW II history. Demonstrate college
                               level writing in interpreting and assessing WW II history.




HUM 100    Susan B. Zolliker   1. demonstrate comprehension of objective information about the
                               history of Western people's spiritual, intellectual, and artistic
                               endeavors; 2. demonstrate that they can think critically about the
                               major issues of human life -truth, justice, beauty, value, meaning;
                               3. demonstrate understanding and respect for "high culture' so
                               that their interest in it will grow and prove personally satisfying
                               in years; 4. demonstrate understanding and respect of cultural
                               differences that have influenced and that still influence people's
                               responses to life's great questions.

HUM 100    Susan B. Zolliker   1. demonstrate comprehension of objective information about the
                               history of Western people's spiritual, intellectual, and artistic
                               endeavors; 2. demonstrate that they can think critically about the
                               major issues of human life -truth, justice, beauty, value, meaning;
                               3. demonstrate understanding and respect for "high culture' so
                               that their interest in it will grow and prove personally satisfying
                               in years; 4. demonstrate understanding and respect of cultural
                               differences that have influenced and that still influence people's
                               responses to life's great questions.

HUM 101    Susan B. Zolliker   1. demonstrate comprehension of objective information about the
                               history of Western people's spiritual, intellectual, and artistic
                               endeavors; 2. demonstrate that they can think critically about the
                               major issues of human life -truth, justice, beauty, value, meaning;
                               3. demonstrate understanding and respect for "high culture" so
                               that their interest in it will grow and prove personally satisfying
                               in years; 4. demonstrate understanding and respect of cultural
                               differences that have and that still influence people's responses to
                               life's great questions.
HUM 101   Susan B. Zolliker   1. demonstrate comprehension of objective information about the
                              history of Western people's spiritual, intellectual, and artistic
                              endeavors; 2. demonstrate that they can think critically about the
                              major issues of human life -truth, justice, beauty, value, meaning;
                              3. demonstrate understanding and respect for "high culture" so
                              that their interest in it will grow and prove personally satisfying
                              in years; 4. demonstrate understanding and respect of cultural
                              differences that have and that still influence people's responses to
                              life's great questions.

HUM 197   Susan B. Zolliker   The student learning outcomes will depend on the specific topic
                              covered. A set of learning outcomes will be developed for each
                              topic class and will be included in an outline created by the
                              instructor.
ID 100    Lori G. Graham      1.Students will identify symbols used on floor plans and working
                              drawings. 2.Students will analyze the effects of color and color
                              schemes in a space. 3.Students will identify design principle and
                              elements as they are used in an interior space. 4.Students will
                              illustrate the use of a functional furniture arrangement.




ID 135    Lori G. Graham      Design students will be able to evaluate a fabric's use in
                              residential and commercial applications. Design students will be
                              able to identify fabrics used in a historic setting. Design students
                              will be able to estimate the amount of fabric needed for
                              upholstery, drapery, and carpet for residential and commercial
                              applications. Design students will evaluate fabrics for use in
                              "Green" environments for residential and commercial
                              applications.
ID 150    Sandra Andre        Upon completion of this course students will be able to analyze a
                              documented ADA environmental design problem, determine a
                              strategy to correct the problem and draft and plot a drawing that
                              addresses a correction.




ID 150    Sandra Andre        Upon completion of this course students will be able to analyze a
                              documented ADA environmental design problem, determine a
                              strategy to correct the problem and draft and plot a drawing that
                              addresses a correction.
ID 151     Sandra Andre      The student will create a primary portfolio of original computer
                             generated drawings applying building codes, translating various
                             software applications, illustrating a synthesis of construction
                             technique and design concepts.




ID 170     Sandra Andre      Upon completion students will apply spacial reconfiguration and
                             relocation techniques, use current ADA and consumer law,
                             address project management analysis, evaluate ergonomics,
                             redress space and furniture analysis on a variety of commercial
                             and residential interior projects.




IT 108     Jay Miller        1. Students will be able to convert standard measurement values
                             to the metric values. 2. Students will be able to measure objects
                             and distance to the accuracy of the measuring tools provided.

ITAL 101   Martha K. Evans   1) Speak Italian at an elementary level, using effective
                             pronunciation and intonation, and demonstrating signs of
                             spontaneity in speech; 2) Formulate declarative and interrogative
                             sentences at an elementary level; 3) Apply the basic structure of
                             Italian grammar to effective communication; 4) Understand basic
                             written language and summarize its meaning; 5) Deduce meaning
                             from complex spoken language and authentic written materials;
                             6) Compose a narrative paragraph about personal events using
                             the present and near-future tenses; 7) Recognize the complexity
                             and diversity of the Italian culture, and compare it to one’s own
                             culture.
ITAL 102   Martha K. Evans   1.Interact (comprehension and production) in oral exchange at
                             the continuing elementary level and with the appropriate
                             pronunciation and intonation; specifically, the students will be
                             able to exchange greetings and salutations, identify themselves
                             and their family, describe their work, ask and give directions,
                             shop and travel, and collect and give information in real-life
                             settings, at the continuing elementary level. 2.Describe past
                             events and circumstances, as well as future plans, using the
                             present perfect, imperfect and future tenses; 3.Use the
                             conditional and present subjunctive in appropriate contexts.
                             4.Discriminate between grammatical and ungrammatical
                             constructions at the continuing elementary level. 5.Read and
                             write correct Italian sentences and texts at the continuing
                             elementary level. 6.Respond to and generate, orally and in
                             writing, informal and formal commands; 7.Continue to
                             demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the Italian culture,
                             and gain insights into how language and culture reflect values,
                             belief systems, and ways of confronting life.


ITAL 197   Martha K. Evans   Student learning outcomes will be determined each time new
                             content is developed for this topics course.




ITAL 201   Martha K. Evans   1.Formulate Italian sentences at the intermediate level;
                             2.Understand basic written and verbal communications involving
                             all tenses of the language; 3.Read and write correct sentences in
                             Italian at the intermediate level; 4.Place simple sentences in
                             coherent compositions in all tenses; 5.Apply the basic structure
                             of Italian grammar to effective communication at the
                             intermediate level. Specifically, students will be able to speak in
                             the present, the future, and the past with reasonable correctness,
                             using proper accentuation and intonation; 6.Continue to
                             demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the Italian culture.
JAPN 101 Martha K. Evans   1. Actively use about 300 acquired vocabulary words. 2.
                           Communicate effectively and completely on certain key topics:
                           identifying themselves and their family; describe their work or
                           studies; describe personal events; tell time; recognize and use
                           numbers; use dates (days, months and years); and describe
                           objects in terms of size, color and location. 3. Master basic
                           grammatical structures: identifying the dictionary forms and
                           formal forms of verbs and adjectives; forming affirmatives,
                           negatives and interrogatives; past forms; volitional forms;
                           transitive and existence verb constructions. Correctly use other
                           sentence elements, especially particles. 4. Master correct
                           Japanese pronunciation, and learn how to pronounce “borrowed
                           words” that originate in English in the correct Japanese rendition.
                           5. Understand and correctly use about 20 common idiomatic
                           expressions. 6. Collect and provide information about real-life
                           settings, including directions and shopping-related information,
                           at the elementary level. 7. Respond to classroom directions, and
                           express inability to comprehend without resorting to speaking
                           languages other than Japanese. 8. Communicate likes and
                           dislikes; express choices; participate in basic discussion of
                           hobbies and interests. 9. Memorize all hiragana and katakana
                           characters, and approximately 45 kanji characters.




JAPN 197 Martha K. Evans   Student Learning Outcomes will be determined each time new
                           content is developed for this topics class.




LT 120    Judy J. Cater    Students will be able to: 1. Evaluate reference questions in
                           written and verbal exercises. 2. Analyze reference sources for
                           content, accuracy, timeliness and usefulness. 3.Interpret
                           reference questions and find appropriate information source.


LT 130    Linda Morrow     Students will be able to: 1. Evaluate and select appropriate media
                           for an instructional setting. 2. Formulate and conduct student
                           learning activities that integrate the use of information media
                           tools. 3. Design and create library displays, bulletin boards,
                           exhibits and collections as marketing and informational tools.

LT 154    Katy French      1. Define a research question based on an information need. 2.
                           Use a variety of search tools such as library databases and
                           Internet search engines to find information on a topic. 3. Evaluate
                           the usefulness and reliability of websites and other information
                           sources.
LT 197    Judy J. Cater    Student learning outcomes will vary by the subject of the specific
                           topics course and will be included in the course syllabus by the
                           instructor.
MA 55     C Andrea Taupier Recognize specific word elements common to body systems to
                           facilitate reading of medical language as utilized in the patient
                           record and medical and allied health literature. To be able to
                           read, write and speak the language of medicine to communicate
                           more fully with the medical staff and to assist the patient with
                           basic understanding of issues related to health and disease.


MATH 10 Greg Larson          1. The student will be proficient in addition, subtraction,
                             multiplication and division of whole numbers, fractions, and
                             decimal numbers. 2. The student will be able to solve simple
                             everyday math problems by identifying the applicable operation
                             to be used, correctly carrying out that operation and interpreting
                             the result of that operation.




MATH 100 Jay R. Wiestling    Upon completion of the course the student will be able to: 1.
                             Apply mathematical principles and techniques to solve problems
                             in areas such as ancient systems of numeration, set theory, and
                             number theory. 2. Use critical thinking to arrive at conclusions
                             from Venn Diagrams, syllogistic forms, and truth tables. 3.
                             Relate a knowledge of the people, and uses of mathematics
                             throughout history of mathematics.




MATH 106 Robert N Jones      Students who have successfully completed this course will be
                             able to demonstrate the difference between inductive and
                             deductive reasoning, use counterexamples to disprove false
                             statements, and understand the importance of definitions.
MATH 110 Mark E. Walker   1.) Students will demonstrate the ability to use symbolic,
                          graphical, and numerical representations of mathematical
                          concepts. 2.) Students will demonstrate the algebra skills needed
                          to succeed in calculus.




MATH 115 Mathews T.       A successful student will be able to define the six trigonometric
         Chakkanakuzhi    functions of real numbers and interpret them graphically,
                          numerically and analytically; verify trigonometric identities;
                          solve equations involving trigonometric functions, and apply
                          trigonometric functions or identities to solve applications
                          problems.
MATH 120 Cynthia M.       Upon completion of the course the successful student will be able
         Torgison         to: 1. Construct and interpret graphs to display and classify data.
                          2. Compute appropriate descriptive statistics. 3. Compute
                          probabilities for discrete and continuous distributions. 4. Choose
                          and apply inferential analyses in order to draw conclusions about
                          a population.




MATH 130 Mark D. Clark    • Students will be able to solve real world applications using the
                          concepts of an average or instantaneous rate of change. •
                          Students will recognize, apply, and interpret multiple
                          representations (graphic, symbolic, numerical/data,
                          verbal/applied) of the derivative and its applications. • Students
                          will recognize, apply, and interpret multiple representations
                          (graphic, symbolic, numerical/data, verbal/applied) of integration
                          and its applications. • Students will develop skills and attitudes
                          for effectively solving problems at an applied calculus level.
MATH 135 Cynthia J.      Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
         Anfinson        to: 1. Solve equations involving algebraic and transcendental
                         functions, and systems of equations at the precalculus level. 2.
                         Solve real-world applications of the above. 3. Demonstrate
                         proficiency in the graphing of algebraic functions, transcendental
                         functions, and conic sections at the precalculus level. 4. Solve
                         introductory sequence and series problems.




MATH 140 Mathews T.      Upon completion of the course the student will be able to: 1.
         Chakkanakuzhi   Compute limits of elementary algebraic and transcendental
                         functions analytically, graphically, and numerically. 2.
                         Differentiate elementary algebraic and transcendental functions
                         of a single variable, solve application problems involving related
                         rates and optimization and apply the concepts of calculus to
                         determine the behavior of the graph of functions. 3. Integrate
                         selected elementary and transcendental functions of a single
                         variable, use the concept of Riemann sum to compute area
                         between curves, and solve selected differential equations. 4.
                         Apply critical thinking skills and tools from this course to
                         analyze problems arise in engineering, sciences and mathematics,
                         and formulate appropriate solutions.




MATH 141 Anne L. Voth    Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
                         to: 1. Demonstrate proficiency in evaluating integrals using
                         various techniques of integration at a level commensurate with
                         two semesters of calculus; 2. Demonstrate proficiency in
                         representing functions in the polar coordinate system at a level
                         commensurate with two semesters of calculus; 3. Demonstrate
                         proficiency in representing functions in parametric form at a
                         level commensurate with two semesters of calculus; 4. Solve real-
                         world applications of the previous three outcomes.
MATH 15 Greg Larson         Successful students will be 1) proficient in arithmetic with
                            integers, rational numbers, decimals and percents, 2) able to
                            perform operations with variable and unknown quantities, 3) able
                            to calculate perimeters, areas, and volumes of geometric figures,
                            and 4) able to solve application problems involving the above.




MATH 200 Chuong Nguyen      A successful student will be able to solve a linear system using
                            appropriate methods and interpret the results, to be able to
                            understand the theoretical foundations of linear algebra, and
                            apply the theorems and solution methods to solve problems in
                            math, science and/or engineering.

MATH 205 Jay R. Wiestling   Successful students will understand some mathematics in space,
                            with functions of several variables, and some of their
                            applications.


MATH 205 Jay R. Wiestling   Upon completion of the course the student will be able to: 1.
                            Perform calculus on vector valued functions. 2. Perform vector
                            operations using geometry in space. 3. Perform calculus on
                            multivariable functions. 4. Use vector calculus




MATH 206 Monika Brannick    Successful students will be able to compare first- and second-
                            order differential equations, solve these equations using
                            appropriate techniques including constructing solutions using
                            series and matrices, and apply them to problems in science and
                            engineering.

MATH 245 Monika Brannick    Successful students will be able to use discrete mathematics to
                            define and describe mathematical ideas such as logic and logical
                            proof techniques. They will be able to understand the basic
                            algebra of sets, graphs, functions, relations, and make
                            connections between the discrete mathematics and computer
                            science applications
MATH 50 Wendy R. Metzger Upon completion of this course the student will be able to: 1.Use
                         the properties of real numbers, order of operations, and
                         properties of integer exponents (including scientific notation) to
                         simplify and reorganize polynomial expressions. 2.Formulate
                         algebraic expressions and equations using variables to represent
                         relations from tables, graphs, problem situations, and geometric
                         diagrams. 3. Analyze and solve linear equations, inequalities, and
                         two variable systems of linear equations and interpret the
                         solutions. 4.Analyze the connections between the numeric,
                         algebraic, and graphic representations of linear relations and
                         simple quadratic relations. 5.Solve application problems
                         involving linear, quadratic, proportional, and rational
                         relationships and interpret the solutions.




MATH       Mona Ellis         Upon completion of the course the student will be able to: 1.
50A                           Analyze a variety of problems involving contemporary
                              applications of linear equations. Such applications may include,
                              but are not limited to: translating sentences into equations,
                              consecutive integer problems, geometry problems, markup and
                              discount problems, uniform motion problems and applications
                              involving inequalities. 2. Determine and implement an
                              appropriate method of solution for the problems discussed above.
                              3. Graph linear equations, and utilize the graph in problem
                              solving. 4. Students will develop skills and attitudes for
                              effectively solving problems at a beginning algebra level,
                              preparing them for the second half of beginning algebra (Math
                              50B).
MATH      Mona Ellis        Upon completion of the course the student will be able to: 1.
50B                         Analyze a variety of problems involving contemporary
                            applications of linear and quadratic equations. Such applications
                            may include, but are not limited to: investment problems
                            involving simple interest, value mixture problems, percent
                            mixture problems, and uniform motion problems. 2. Determine
                            and implement an appropriate method of solution for the
                            problems discussed above. 3. Graph linear and quadratic
                            equations, and utilize the graph in problem solving. 4. Students
                            will develop skills and attitudes for effectively solving problems
                            at a beginning algebra level, preparing them for intermediate
                            algebra.


MATH 56 Jay R. Wiestling    Upon completion of the course the student will be able to: 1.
                            Determine and implement an appropriate method of solution for
                            a variety of problems involving contemporary applications of
                            linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions.
                            Such applications include, but are not limited to bacterial growth,
                            radioactive decay, earthquakes, compound and simple interest,
                            and variation. 2. Graph linear, quadratic logarithmic, and
                            exponential functions, and utilize the graph in problem solving.




MICR 197 Gary D. Alderson   The learning outcomes for this course will depend on the specific
                            topic covered. A set of SLO's will be developed for each topic
                            class and included in an outline developed by the instructor.

MICR 200 Gary D. Alderson   1. Describe the form and function of intracellular structures and
                            molecules and explain how these structures govern microbial life.
                            2. Describe, in detail, the structural and metabolic diversity of
                            microbial life, including bacteria, protists, fungi and viruses. 3.
                            Relate the structure, genetics, metabolism, and ecology of
                            pathogenic microbes to their life histories. 4. Describe the
                            characteristics, route of infection, and process of disease for
                            pathogenic microbes encountered in the medical profession. 5.
                            Demonstrate working knowledge of techniques routinely used in
                            controlling, culturing, isolating, and characterizing microbes in
                            accordance with safe laboratory practices. 6. Critically analyze
                            laboratory results, and clearly convey your comprehension in
                            written format.
MICR 200 Gary D. Alderson    1. Describe the form and function of intracellular structures and
                             molecules and explain how these structures govern microbial life.
                             2. Describe, in detail, the structural and metabolic diversity of
                             microbial life, including bacteria, protists, fungi and viruses. 3.
                             Relate the structure, genetics, metabolism, and ecology of
                             pathogenic microbes to their life histories. 4. Describe the
                             characteristics, route of infection, and process of disease for
                             pathogenic microbes encountered in the medical profession. 5.
                             Demonstrate working knowledge of techniques routinely used in
                             controlling, culturing, isolating, and characterizing microbes in
                             accordance with safe laboratory practices. 6. Critically analyze
                             laboratory results, and clearly convey your comprehension in
                             written format.




MUS 105   Madelyn R Byrne 1. Write and identify major and minor scales, intervals, triads in
                          root position and in inversion, and transpose melodies. 2. Identify
                          simple and compound meters and cadence types including perfect
                          authentic, imperfect authentic, half, plagal, and deceptive. 3.
                          Harmonize a given melody using I, IV, V, V7, in four-part,
                          chorale style, using basic cadential formulas in phrases and
                          periods. 4. Conduct harmonic analysis of diatonic chord
                          progressions.
MUS 106   Madelyn R Byrne 1. Construct and visually identify all intevals up to P12. 2.
                          Harmonize a given melody using non-dominant 7th chords,
                          secondary/applied chords, diatonic and modulating sequences,
                          and modulation to closely related keys. Students should also
                          realize a figured base inclusive of the aforementioned chord
                          types. 3. Compose music, and conduct harmonic and formal
                          analysis of music, using the aforementioned chord types. 4.
                          Apply princples of first and second species counterpoint.

MUS 119   Peter F. Gach      Overarching student learning outcomes: 1. Play Major scales
                             beginning on white keys and their paralles minor scales, two
                             octaves hands together. 2. Play a 'standard' chord progress (I IV I
                             V7 I) for the scales in no. 1, above. 3. Sight read simple piano
                             pieces 4. Sight read simple score examples in two parts 5.
                             Harmonice a simple accompnaiment to a diatonic melody using
                             the I, IV, V and V7 chords. 6. Transpose simple harmonizations
                             (I, IV, V) into closely realted keys.
MUS 151   William A.      1. Play in time with section and ensemble as directed by the
          Hawkins         conductor, and play the correct pitches as indicated by his/her
                          part with accurate intonation. 2. Play with the articulation,
                          dynamics, phrasing, and expression as directed by his/her part
                          and/or the conductor's direction. 3. Play stylistically
                          appropriately to the period/style of the composition. 4.
                          Demonstrate an awareness of blend and balance within the
                          ensemble and/or the section. 5. Adhere to professional level
                          ensemble performance and rehearsal standards of conduct. 6.
                          Participate in all rehearsals and performances of the semester as
                          assigned.
MUS 220   Peter F. Gach   1. As a result of successful completion of the course, the student
                          will be able to perform in front of an audience, observing the
                          standard concert protocols for appearance, deportment and
                          presentation of music. 2. As a result of successful completion of
                          the course, the student will have a general knowledge of the
                          principles of preparation for performance, including, but not
                          limited to, techniques for stress management, relaxation methods,
                          learning methods to insure a secure performance. 3. As a result of
                          successful completion of the course, the student will demonstrate
                          the ability to chosse repertoire commensurate with his/her level
                          of technique and accomplishment, and will successfully
                          demonstrate the methods by which he/she begins the process of
                          learning the repertoire to its 'completion' in the form of a public
                          performance.
MUS 223   David A. Chase   1.Student will have performed at a high technical level in small
                           ensembles. 2.Student will have learned how to rehearse with
                           others in efficient and effective ways. 3.Student will have learned
                           how to organize and execute a program of music for the public.
                           4.Student will have practiced the art of speaking to an audience
                           in a concert setting.




MUS 225   Peter F. Gach    Overarching student learning outcomes: 1. Play al major and
                           minro scales each hand two octaves up and down. 2. Play chord
                           progressions in major and minor keys using all diatonic chords.
                           3. Play chord progresions modulating to closely related keys. 4.
                           Play technical exercies appropriate to their level of development.
                           5. Sight read piano pieces of moderate difficulty. 6. Play any two
                           voices in four-part choral scores of moderate difficulty. 7.
                           Harmonize melodies using primary and secondary triads,
                           including transpositions. 8. Accompany fellow students playing
                           simple solo listature for instruments or the voice.

MUS 227   Peter F. Gach    1. as a result of successful completion of the course the student
                           will have the knowledge to be able to successfully accompany a
                           solo instrumentalist in the performance of a scored piece of
                           music. 2. as a result of the successful completion of the course
                           the student will have the skills to adjust his/her accompanying to
                           the demands of the solist - that is make the adjustments in
                           dynamics, tempo, timbre and articulation demanded by the
                           composition being performed and by the individual interpretation
                           of the soloist. 3. as a result of the successful completion of the
                           course the student will be able to accompany a variety of solists
                           (both vocal and instrumental)

MUS 251   Peter F. Gach    1.The student will demonstrate the ability to successfully
                           perform a solo piano piece in front of other students. 2. The
                           student will demonstrate the ability to absorb observations and
                           suggestions for improvement from the instructor, and incorporate
                           them into further performances.
MUS 297   Peter F. Gach      1. Play or sing the musical score chosen with the correct rhythm.
                             2. Play or sing the correct pitches with accurate intonation. 3.
                             Play or sing with the articulation, dynamics, phrasing and
                             expression appropriate to the literature being studied, and if
                             singing, diction appropriate to the lyrics of the literature. 4. Play
                             or sing in a stylistically appropriate manner suitable to the genre,
                             period and style of the literature. 5. Perform improvised solos as
                             applicable. 6. Demonstrate an awareness of blend and balance
                             when performing with an accompanist, as appropriate. 7.
                             Memorize performance literature when appropriate to the
                             performance medium and artistic tradition. 8. Sightread music
                             appropriate to this level.




NURS 120 Judith G. Eckhart   Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1.
                             Explain how various medications impact the human body. 2. Use
                             critical thinking and the nursing process, to identify nursing
                             considerations and patient teaching for various medications.


NURS 121 Judith G. Eckhart   Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 1.
                             Explain how various medications impact the human body. 2. Use
                             critical thinking and the nursing process to identify nursing
                             considerations and patient teaching for various medications.


NURS 140 Judith G. Eckhart   Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate the
                             following learning outcomes: 1. Demonstrate the ability to
                             properly interview a patient and obtain accurate, appropriate
                             information. 2. Demonstrate the ability to perform a complete
                             head to toe assessment. 3. Utilize data obtained in an interview
                             and a physical assessment to formulate a nursing plan of care.
NURS 140 Judith G. Eckhart   Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate the
                             following learning outcomes: 1. Demonstrate the ability to
                             properly interview a patient and obtain accurate, appropriate
                             information. 2. Demonstrate the ability to perform a complete
                             head to toe assessment. 3. Utilize data obtained in an interview
                             and a physical assessment to formulate a nursing plan of care.




NURS 197 Judith G. Eckhart   The student will verbalize and demonstrate an ability to apply
                             and critically analyze the information they are studying for this
                             course. Since the specific course objectives vary depending upon
                             the topic, it is difficult to be more exact.

NURS 203 Judith G. Eckhart   Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate the
                             following learning outcomes: 1. Verbalize a comprehensive
                             understanding of how education impacts nurses and health care.
                             2. Utilize critical thinking to explain how health care and clinical
                             decision making require a holistic view of the patient. 3.
                             Analytically describe how managerial concepts impact health
                             care. 4. Become comfortable using various informatic formats.


NURS 295 Judith G. Eckhart   The student will verbalize and demonstrate an ability to apply
                             and critically analyze the information they are studying for this
                             course. Since the specific course objectives vary depending upon
                             the needs of the student, it is difficult to be more exact.


OCN 100   Lisa D Yon         1. Explain the concept of an Earth dominated by a global ocean
                             with several interconnected basins. 2. Describe the dynamic
                             processes involved in tectonic plate motions, including the
                             characteristic processes and landforms associated with tectonic
                             plate boundaries. 3. Discuss the role of the ocean as a major
                             influence on weather and climate. 4. Recognize the role of the
                             ocean in making the Earth habitable and describe the global
                             distribution of primary productivity. 5. Explain the ways in
                             which humans and the ocean are interconnected and asses the
                             ways in which humans may have negative or positive impacts on
                             the ocean environment and thus life itself.
OCN 100   Patricia A. Deen   1. Describe characteristic processes and landforms associated
                             with tectonic plate boundaries. 2. Compare and contrast the
                             oceanic and atmospheric characteristics between El Niño and La
                             Niña. 3. Describe the seasonal pattern of phytoplankton
                             productivity for tropical, midlatitude, and polar oceans. 4.
                             Describe ways in which humans and the oceans interact; provide
                             specific examples of ways in which humans have negative
                             impacts on the ocean environment.
OCN 100L Patricia A. Deen   1. Interpret bathymetry and navigation information from a
                            NOAA marine chart. 2. Read a published tide chart to interpret
                            current tidal conditions; explain how Earth-Moon-Sun
                            relationships influence the observed pattern. 3. Perform and
                            discuss a variety of measurement and sampling techniques used
                            to investigate physical and biologic aspects of the ocean
                            ecosystem.
OCN 101   Patricia A. Deen   1. Describe characteristic processes and landforms associated
                             with tectonic plate boundaries. 2. Compare and contrast the
                             oceanic and atmospheric characteristics between El Niño and La
                             Niña. 3. Describe the seasonal pattern of phytoplankton
                             productivity for tropical, midlatitude, and polar oceans. 4.
                             Interpret bathymetry and navigation information from a NOAA
                             marine chart. 5. Read a published tide chart to interpret current
                             tidal conditions; explain how Earth-Moon-Sun relationships
                             influence the observed pattern. 6. Perform and discuss a variety
                             of measurements and sampling techniques used to investigate
                             physical and biologic aspects of the ocean ecosystem. 7. Describe
                             ways in which humans and the oceans interact; provide specific
                             examples of ways in which humans have negative impacts on the
                             ocean environment.
OIS 101   Judith L. Dolan   1. Keyboard all alphabetic keys using correct fingerings by touch
                            and applying correct keyboarding techniques. 2. Keyboard at a
                            minimum of 25 net words a minute (NWAM) with one error or
                            less for 1-minute, 3-minute, and 5-minute timed writings. 3.
                            Create and edit a variety of business documents including
                            memos, letters, tables, and reports with an ending goal of zero
                            errors on the final document.
OIS 102    Judith L. Dolan   1. Keyboard at a minimum of 40 net words a minute (NWAM)
                             with one error or less for 1-, 3-, and 5-minute timed writings. 2.
                             Create and edit a variety of multi-page business documents with
                             zero errors on the final documents. 3. Compose a variety of
                             business documents at the computer with zero errors on the final
                             documents without first preparing a handwritten draft.




OIS 231.1 Judith L. Dolan    1. Demonstrate correct transcription techniques including
                             operation of transcription equipment (course objectives 1 and 2)
                             2. Produce mailable transcripts including correct English usage,
                             basic medical document formatting, and introductory medical
                             terminology (course objectives 3-6) 3. Analyze students' ability
                             to move onto OIS 231.2 Medical Transcription (course objective




OIS 231.2 Judith L. Dolan    1. Demonstrate increased proficiency with correct transcription
                             techniques including operation of transcription equipment
                             (course objective 1) 2. Produce mailable transcripts including
                             correct English usage, a variety of medical document formats,
                             and specialized medical terminology (course objectives 2 and 3)
                             3. Analyze students' interest and ability to move onto OIS 231.3
                             Medical Transcription
OIS 231.3 Judith L. Dolan     1. Mastery of transcription techniques including operation of
                              transcription equipment (course objective 1) 2. Produce mailable
                              transcripts including correct English usage, application of
                              mulitple medical document formats, and advanced medical
                              terminology (course objectives 2-3) 3. Demonstrated ability to be
                              successful in the medical transcription field.




OIS 231.4 Judith L. Dolan     1. Mastery of transcription techniques including operation of
                              transcription equipment (course objective 1) 2. Produce mailable
                              transcripts including correct English usage, application of
                              mulitple medical document formats, and advanced medical
                              terminology (course objectives 2-3) 3. Demonstrated ability to be
                              successful in the medical transcription field.




PE 114     Karl Seiler      Upon completion of this course: 1.) Students will be able to
                            identify the benefits of walking and how they relate to their
                            personal development in health, fitness, recrational and physical
                            activity. 2.) Students will be able to demonstrate proper walking
                            techniques as they identify faults and apply technique corrections
                            to improve walking.
PE 115     Karl Seiler      Upon competion of this course, the student will be able to:
                            1.)demonstrate the skill and knowledge to participate in a
                            bowling game in a league situation. 2.)demonstrate proper
                            scoring of a bowling game. 3.)identify and apply strategies
                            involved in a bowling game.
PE 117     Hugh G. Gerhardt 1.Students will feel comfortable practicing on their own. They
                            don't present safety concerns to other students,golfers or the
                            facilities. 2.Students should be able to play on a short/executive
                            golf course. Their actions should demonstrate basic knowledge of
                            written and unwritten rules and etiquette. They should not slow
                            down the pace of play. 3.Students will be able to adjust their set-
                            up to change ball flight according to learned principles. They will
                            also choose the correct short-game/trouble shot based on
                            circumstances. 4.Proper pre/in/post swing routine will lead to
                            lower scores on the golf course 5.Friendships and social
                            opportunities will grow.
PE 118   Hugh G. Gerhardt Upon completion of this course students will; 1. Have the
                          necessary skills to play a round of golf. 2. Be able to score and
                          know the basic rules and etiquette for a round of galf. 3. To be
                          able to make basic adjustments to their address and swing of a
                          golf club.




PE 119   Hugh G. Gerhardt Upon completion of this course students will; 1. Be able to
                          execute a round of golf on a regular lenght golf course. 2. To
                          demonstrate proper etiquette and rule knowlege to play a round
                          of golf. 3. To analize their swing and make adjustments via
                          technique and club selection.




PE 120   Patricia B.         *Explain and demonstrate different water safety techniques and
         Waterman            appropriate times for implementation. *Explain and demonstrate
                             differences in waves and timing involved with catching waves.
                             *Discuss the advancement of surfing as it relates technology and
                             surf sub-culture. *Apply proper body position in water while
                             surfing *Diagram different swell,and tidal directions and their
                             effect upon wave development and location. *Identify correct
                             and incorrect paddleling techniques and possible corrections
                             *Execute proper take off on wave

PE 121   Patricia B.         * Demonstrate and explain short and term repairs for simple
         Waterman            surfboard dings and gashes * Explain how wave development
                             differs based upon floor terrain. * Illustrate and explain the role
                             tides and currents play on water temperature and development. *
                             List and execute proper etiqutte in surf lineup. * Execute proper
                             take-off in above head high surf.
PE 125   John G. Aegerter    1. Upon completion of this course, students will increase their
                             knowledge and performance fitness competnecy through
                             demonstration and instructor feedback, in a practical setting and
                             or in group or indivudal participation and competition. 2. Upon
                             completion of this course students will identify faults and apply
                             technique corrections to cimporave their overall skill and
                             knowledge performance. 3. At the end of this course the student
                             will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic strength
                             and agility fitness fundamentals. Through a variety of
                             frequiences, intesnity, and duration and its role as it relates to
                             their personal development in health, fitness, recreational and
                             physical activity.
PE 128   Jon Cnossen        1.Recall the physical benefits of a total body conditioning
                            program. 2.Appraise their physical lifestyle by viewing their
                            fitness tests results. 3.Plan their own future individual activity
                            and exercise program. 4.Discover workout techniques that work
                            best for their body and lifestyle. 5.Schedule their future time to
                            include an active lifesyle and planned exercise routine.

PE 128   Jon Cnossen        1.Recall the physical benefits of a total body conditioning
                            program. 2.Appraise their physical lifestyle by viewing their
                            fitness tests results. 3.Plan their own future individual activity
                            and exercise program. 4.Discover workout techniques that work
                            best for their body and lifestyle. 5.Schedule their future time to
                            include an active lifesyle and planned exercise routine.

PE 130   John G. Aegerter   1. Upon completion of this course, students will increase their
                            knowledge and performance fitness competnecy through
                            demonstration and instructor feedback, in a practical setting and
                            or in group or indivudal participation and competition. 2. Upon
                            completion of this course students will identify faults and apply
                            technique corrections to cimporave their overall skill and
                            knowledge performance. 3. At the end of this course the student
                            will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic strength
                            and agility fitness fundamentals. Through a variety of
                            frequiences, intesnity, and duration and its role as it relates to
                            their personal development in health, fitness, recreational and
                            physical activity.

PE 135   Kelly Falcone      a. Demonstrate proper technique of the front crawl, back crawl,
                            breaststroke, butterfly, sidestroke, elementary backstroke,
                            treading water b. Ability to perform skills to ensure water
                            survival c. Understand and use basic swimming etiquette d.
                            Recognize the health benefits of swimming e. Demonstrate
                            increased swim proficiency and cardiovascular fitness

PE 136   Kelly Falcone      a. Demonstrate proper technique of the front crawl, back crawl,
                            breaststroke, butterfly, sidestroke, elementary backstroke,
                            treading water b. Ability to perform skills to ensure water
                            survival c. Understand and use basic swimming etiquette d.
                            Recognize the health benefits of swimming e. Demonstrate
                            increased swim proficiency and cardiovascular fitness

PE 137   Kelly Falcone      a. Demonstrate proper ball handling skills b. Define correct
                            offensive and defensive set-up c. Apply game strategies and
                            interpret game situations d. Practice hand eye coordination e.
                            Ability to describe, lead and practice many different intense
                            conditioning drills f. Understand and be able to perform proper
                            shooting technique
PE 141   Jon Cnossen        1. student will demonstarte proper body mechanics used for
                            tennis strokes. 2.student will be able to judge and measure their
                            skill level as an intermediate player. 3.student will be able to
                            display intermediate tennis player skills and shots. 4. students
                            will be able to appraise the level of skill and attitude of
                            themselves and others for competition levels. 5. student can
                            explain/discuss the history,strategy and rules of tennis
PE 142   Jon Cnossen        1. student will illustrate proper court postioning to perform tennis
                            shots. 2.student will recall all scoring systems.3.student will be
                            able to measure the mental side of tennis strokes and play. 4.
                            student can distinguish the difference between recreational and
                            competitive playing. 5. student can value the importance of
                            tennis tournament rules and regulations. 6. student will be able to
                            set up a basic tennis tournament. 7. student can summarize the
                            competitive aspects and preparation of tournament play.

PE 150   John G. Aegerter   Upon completion of this course, students will increase their
                            knowledge and performance of beginning weight training
                            competency through demonstration and instructor feed back in a
                            practical setting or in group or individual participation. Upon
                            completion of this course students will identify faults, safety
                            issues and applied technique corrections to improve their overall
                            skill and knowledge through perfomance. At the end of this
                            course the student will be able to demonstrate a basic
                            understanding of weight training and it's role as it relates to their
                            personal development in health, fitness, recreational and physical
                            activity.
PE 151   John G. Aegerter   Upon completion of this course, students will increase their
                            knowledge and performance fitness competnecy through
                            demonstration and instructor feedback, in a practical setting and
                            or in group or indivudal participation and competition. 2. Upon
                            completion of this course students will identify faults and apply
                            technique corrections to cimporave their overall skill and
                            knowledge performance. 3. At the end of this course the student
                            will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic strength
                            and agility fitness fundamentals. Through a variety of
                            frequiences, intesnity, and duration and its role as it relates to
                            their personal development in health, fitness, recreational and
                            physical activity.

PE 155   Karl Seiler        1. Identify the basic individual skills of volleyball. 2. Recognize
                            the basic rules of volleyball in accordance with current standards.
                            3. Students will be able to interpret and demonstrate basic
                            volleyball teamwork.
PE 156   Karl Seiler        Upon completion of this course:
                            1. Identify the basic and intermediate skills and rules of
                            volleyball in accordance with current standards.
                            2. Students will be able to perform appropriate skill postures as
                            they relate to proper volleyball technique.
                            3. Students will increase their knowledge and performance of
                            intermediate volleyball skills and competency through
                            demonstration and instructor feedback, in a practical setting and
                            or in group or individual participation and competition.


PE 157   Karl Seiler        Upon completion of this course: 1. Identify the advanced skills
                            and rules of volleyball in accordance with current standards. 2.
                            Students will be able to perform appropriate skill postures as they
                            relate to proper volleyball technique. 3. Students will increase
                            their knowledge and performance of advanced volleyball skills
                            and competency through demonstration and instructor feedback,
                            in a practical setting and or in group or individual participation
                            and competition.
PE 165   Karl Seiler        Upon completion of this course: 1.) functioning as a member of a
                            team, the student will be able to demonstrate basic softball skills
                            in batting, throwing, feilding, and baserunning as they relate to
                            game situations. 2.) students will be able to apply corrections and
                            improve their overall skill and knowledge performance

PE 170   John G. Aegerter   1. Upon completion of this course, students will increase their
                            knowledge and performance fitness competnecy through
                            demonstration and instructor feedback, in a practical setting and
                            or in group or indivudal participation and competition. 2. Upon
                            completion of this course students will identify faults and apply
                            technique corrections to cimporave their overall skill and
                            knowledge performance. 3. At the end of this course the student
                            will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic strength
                            and agility fitness fundamentals. Through a variety of
                            frequiences, intesnity, and duration and its role as it relates to
                            their personal development in health, fitness, recreational and
                            physical activity.

PE 176   Hugh G. Gerhardt The student will have an understanding of the role of an athletic
                          trainer as a medical professional. The student will recognize
                          signs and symptoms of specific athletic injuries and applied
                          acquired skill set of said injuries.
PE 180   Kelly Falcone    a. Describe and recognize basic skills of selected sports and
                          outdoor activities b. Practice problem solving skills when
                          planning outdoor activities c. Demonstrate personal
                          organizational skills d. Practice self-reliance (clothes,
                          medications, attitudes, personal hygiene) e. If possible, practice
                          helping others that may need extra help. f. Demonstrate working
                          cooperatively with others
PE 181   Kelly Falcone   a. Demonstrate basic swimming skills and aquatic exercises b.
                         Understand basic fitness related to endurance, strength and
                         flexibility c. Explain the safety involved in water exercises d.
                         Use problem solving skills when in water exercise e. Show
                         comfort in the water
PE 182   Kelly Falcone   a. Demonstrate specific weight training exercises b. Show proper
                         weight lifting technique c. Recognize proper weight training
                         exercise for different disabilities d. Understand the purpose of
                         weight training (strength, range of motion, flexibility) e. Employ
                         safe weight training practices f. Students will be able to employ
                         weight training practices for life-long physical fitness.

PE 183   Kelly Falcone   a. Understand safety of snow activities. b. Demonstrate self-
                         reliance while on trip (packing and unpacking belongings,
                         medications, attitudes, personal hygiene). c. Help other students
                         who may need extra help. d. Show proper skiing techniques e.
                         Demonstrate proper use of ski trip equipment used. f.
                         Demonstrate proper ski etiquette g. Demonstrate ability to work
                         cooperatively with classmates and Instructors in a living
                         environment.
PE 184   Kelly Falcone   a. Employ weight training exercises to increase strength, range of
                         motion and endurance b. Demonstrate various movements to
                         increase conditioning and flexibility c. Practice weight training
                         activities specific to each students’ disability d. Understand how
                         to apply a strength program to increase life-time physical fitness

PE 190   Karl Seiler     Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
                         1.)identify the rules of fastpitch softball and apply them to game
                         situations. 2.)demonstrate basic softball skills of batting,
                         catching, throwing, baserunning, and fielding. 3.)recall and apply
                         proper technique corrections to improve their overall skill and
                         knowledge performance.
PE 204   Karl Seiler     Upon completion of this course students will be able to: 1.
                         Identify plyometric, core and strength training exercises pertinent
                         to their specific sport. 2. Design a workout that will increase
                         quickness, speed, agility, overall strength and core strength. 3.
                         Assess their fitness level in regards to their specific sport.

PE 205   Karl Seiler     Upon completion of this course students will be able to: 1.
                         Identify plyometric, core and strength training exercises pertinent
                         in their specific sport. 2. Design a plyometric workout that will
                         increase quickness, speed, agility, overall strength and core
                         strength. 3. Assess their fitness level in regards to their specific
                         sport.
PE 210   John G. Aegerter    1. Upon completion of this course, students will increase their
                             knowledge and performance fitness competnecy through
                             demonstration and instructor feedback, in a practical setting and
                             or in group or indivudal participation and competition. 2. Upon
                             completion of this course students will identify faults and apply
                             technique corrections to cimporave their overall skill and
                             knowledge performance. 3. At the end of this course the student
                             will be able to demonstrate an understanding of basic strength
                             and agility fitness fundamentals. Through a variety of
                             frequiences, intesnity, and duration and its role as it relates to
                             their personal development in health, fitness, recreational and
                             physical activity.

PE 214   Kelly Falcone    a. Demonstrate skills needed to be competitive in swimming,
                          diving, or water polo. b. Understand how to employ different
                          types of training for various sports. c. Describe how to properly
                          prepare for swim meets, water polo games, and/or dive meets d.
                          Describe and employ proper time management techniques e.
                          Recognize the importance of educational goals
PE 216   Hugh G. Gerhardt Upon completion of this class students will increase their
                          competency through practical participation of individual sports
                          golf, tennis and wrestling. Upon completion of this course
                          students will be able via instructor feedback and video to identify
                          and correct skills and form for their individual sport. Upon
                          completion of this cousre students will demonstrate the value of
                          practice, drills, and routines in preperation of skills in their sport.

PE 229   Patricia B.         1. Able to oversee the inventory of an aqautic facility and
         Waterman            propose changes to make area safe for patrons. 2. Identify any
                             individual in need of assistance and resolve the situation in a
                             professional manner at an aquatic facility. 3. Consider how to
                             make the rescue and then provide all of the necessary first aid for
                             a victim.
PE 230   Patricia B.         1. Identify any individual in need of assistance and resolve the
         Waterman            situation in a professional manner at an aquatic facility. 2.
                             Consider how to make the rescue and then provide all of the
                             necessary first aid for the victim. 3. Organize with your
                             employees standard procedures any situation at your facility. 4
                             Understanding the knowledge and being able to evaluate the need
                             for higher care within the EMS system.
PE 231   Patricia B.         1. To have the ability to demonstrate the five basic styles of
         Waterman            swimming and aquatic skills. 2. Organize and prepare six levels
                             of swim class for individual of all ages. 3. Evaluate swim stroke
                             and skill of all students in classes.
PE 232   Patricia B.         1. The have the ability to organize and create a swim class
         Waterman            workout for beginner and intermediate classes at beginning,
                             middle, and end of semester. 2. To analyze and critic strokes and
                             swimming skills for students in a class. 3. Apply knowledge and
                             make changes for students' skills.
PHIL 100   Ryan Emerick    1. Clarify ethical claims and claims of political philosophy in self
                           expression and in interpretation of classic and contemporary
                           texts. 2. Analyze ethical issues and problems as well as issues
                           and problems in political philosophy. 3. Evaluate ethical
                           arguments and arguments in political philosophy for cogency.

PHIL 101   Ryan Emerick    1. Clarify claims about epistemology and metaphysics in self
                           expression and in interpretation of texts. 2. Analyze
                           epistemological and metaphysical issues and problems. 3.
                           Evaluate arguments about epistemology and metaphysics for
                           cogency.
PHIL 102   Ryan Emerick    1. Clarify claims in self expression and in interpretation of texts.
                           2. Analyze issue and problems in their context. 3. Evaluate
                           arguments for cogency.


PHIL 103   Ryan Emerick    Clarify philosophical claims in self expression and in
                           interpretation of classic and contemporary texts on human nature.
                           2. Analyze issues and problems relating to philosophical
                           inquiries into human nature. 3. Evaluate for cogency
                           philosophical arguments concerning human nature.
PHIL 105   Zachary Seech   1. Clarify claims. 2. Analyze problems and issues. 3. Evaluate
                           arguments.




PHIL 110   Ryan Emerick    1. Clarify claims in self expression and in interpretation of
                           classic and contemporary texts of and on Asian philosophy. 2.
                           Analyze issues and problems in Asian philosophy. 3. Evaluate
                           for cogency arguments relating Asian philosophy.

PHIL 115   Ryan Emerick    1.Clarify claims in self expression and in interpretation of written
                           materials. 2. Analyze issues and problems related to critical
                           thinking. 3. Evaluate arguments for cogency.


PHIL 120   Ryan Emerick    1.Clarify claims in self expression and in interpretation of written
                           material. 2. Analyze issues and problems relating to logical
                           anlaysis. 3. Evaluate arguments for cogency.


PHIL 130   Ryan Emerick    1.Clarify philosophical claims in self expression and in
                           interpretation of classic and contemporary texts. 2. Analyze
                           philosophical issues and problems. 3. Evaluate philosophical
                           arguments for cogency.
PHIL 136    Ryan Emerick       1. Clarify claims in self expression and in interpretation of
                               historical texts. 2. Analyze issues and problems in their historical
                               context. 3. Evaluate arguments for cogency.




PHIL 197    Ryan Emerick       1. Clarify claims in self expression and in interpretation of
                               classic and contemporary texts. 2. Analyze philosophical issues
                               and problems. 3. Evaluate arguments for cogency.


PHIL 250    Zachary Seech      1. Analyze philosophical concepts for clarity and philosophical
                               arguments for cogency. 2. Compare and contrast with relevant
                               similarities and distinctions textual concepts and methods of
                               analysis. 3. Compose well-organized, rational, and insightful
                               essays using college-level written language skills. 4. Describe
                               orally text content and the strengths and weaknesses of the
                               linguistic modes of presentation.

PHIL 295    Ryan Emerick       1.Clarify claims in self expression and in interpretation of classic
                               and contemporary texts. 2. Analyze issues and problems . 3.
                               Evaluate arguments for cogency.


PHOT 155 Paul W. Stachelek Students will recognize subject matter that requires various focal
                           length lenses from short to long and close-up. Students will be
                           able to determine when to change ISO settings on their cameras
                           given certain lighting conditions. Students will recognize lighting
                           situations in which flash-fill would be beneficial. Students will
                           be able to make successful long exposures with minimal noise on
                           a tripod.
PHYS 101 Takashi Nakajima Successful students will be able to understand what, why and
                          how daily physical phenomena happen. Examples are:
                          Linear motion;Understand the difference between speed and
                          velocity, velocity and acceleration, velocity and position. What
                          causes the change of velocity and why. Check it from momentum
                          and energy perspectives.
                          Angular motion;Understand the difference and similarity
                          between linear and angular motions. How and why sometimes
                          describing with angular motion is better. What is a rotational
                          inertia. How it can be changed and why it is important in angular
                          motions.
                          Matters;Atoms and Molecules. Isotopes and Ions. How arches
                          work and why it is better construction. Why and how matters can
                          change their states. Thermodynamics;
                          Electricity and Magnetism; Understand different types of
                          currents and different types of connections of electrical parts.
                          Why and how they are connected the way they are. How electric
                          and magnetism are related. How electricity is created. How and
                          why electrical appliances and devices work including, but not
                          limited to, metal detectors, traffic signal changing device, credit
                          card (any magnetic strip), motors and generators.

PHYS 130 Takashi Nakajima Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able
                          to: 1. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of neccessary
                          mathematics for physics 230. 2. Demonstrate a basic
                          understanding of introductory classical mechanics,
                          thermodynamics, and fluid dynamics which is intended for lower
                          division students who are majoring in several science and
                          engineering fields. 2. Apply physics concepts and principles of
                          classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and fluid dynamics at the
                          undergraduate college level. 3. Analytically solve quantitative
                          physics problems. 4. Apply laws of classical mechanics,
                          thermodynamics, and fluid dynamics to laboratory situations,
                          perform experiments, collect and analyze data, and prepare and
                          present reports.
PHYS 230 Takashi Nakajima Successful students will have a deep understanding of: 1.Linear
                          Motions. 2. Work-Energy relations. 3. Angular Motions.
PHYS 231 Takashi Nakajima Successful students will have a deep understanding of: 1.
                          Electrical Components. 2. Electrical Circuits. 3. Electrical
                          components used in DC and AC circuits.




POSC 100 Peter Bowman          A student will demonstrate knowledge of various theories and
                               concepts of politics, political behavior among actors, ideology
                               and political systems. Address weekly online discussion board
                               questions that analyze a political science/political theory topic.
                               Read political science and understand the interpretive qualities of
                               the text. Use critical thinking to analyze and apply political ideas,
                               such as Marxism, Leninism, Fascism, Lockian Classical
                               Liberalism, Hobbsian Social Contract Theory and Machiavelli. A
                               student will interpret the fundamental differences between
                               revolutionary movements that lead to autocratic change and those
                               reform movements that lead toward democratization. A student
                               will analyze the various types of liberal democratic political
                               systems, including, but not limited to: parliamentary systems,
                               presidential systems, semi-presidential-premier systems,
                               proportional representation electoral systems and SMP-“first past
                               the post” electoral systems.
POSC 101 Maryann Drinan   1. Students will be able to identify their own political ideology
                          and the critical elements in their own political socialization
                          process. 2. Students will identify the rights and responsibilities of
                          citizens in the political and legal process established by the US
                          Constitution. 3. Students will be able to explain the election
                          process especially as it pertains to the US President in terms of
                          the description in the US Constitution and also in terms of the
                          evolution and changes to that system. 4. Students will be able to
                          be comfortable participating in or observing government
                          activities such as becoming a member of the voting public,
                          writing letters to the editor, and attending meetings, debates, or
                          forums.




POSC 102 Peter Bowman     A student will demonstrate knowledge of American national
                          government institutions and California state politics and
                          government. Address weekly online discussion board questions
                          that analyze an American government topic. Read American
                          Politics and understand the interpretive qualities of the text. Use
                          critical thinking to analyze and apply American economic and
                          domestic policy, theories of monetary policy and Keynesian
                          fiscal policy onto contemporary issues, such as tax cuts, the
                          economic stimulus package, banking regulation and health-care
                          reform. A student will interpret the fundamental tension between
                          White House-Capitol Hill relations, including analysis of the
                          Abdication Hypothesis, Two-Presidencies Thesis, Neusdadt’s
                          “Bargaining” model and Sam Kernell’s “Going-Public” style. A
                          student will appraise the developments of the Congressional
                          committee system, the influence of party leadership and the rise
                          of party unity in both chambers of the U.S. Congress.
POSC 110 Peter Bowman     A student will demonstrate knowledge of various theories of state
                          behavior in the international system, as well as applications, case
                          studies and current events of contemporary international affairs;
                          Address weekly online discussion board questions that analyze
                          an international relations topic; Read world politics and
                          understand the interpretive qualities of the text; Use critical
                          thinking to analyze and apply IR theory onto case studies, such as
                          the world wars, the Cold War, the Iraq War and the Arab-Israeli
                          conflicts in the Middle East; A student will interpret the
                          fundamental tension between the nuclear powers and those states
                          that are aspiring nuclear regimes. A student will appraise the
                          developments of American foreign policy with regard to the
                          cases of U.S.-Soviet relations, the nuclear arms race and arms
                          control, Vietnam and Iraq.

POSC 120 Maryann Drinan   1. Students will gain competency in describing California's
                          system of direct democracy with its propositions and the use of
                          the recall. 2. Students will gain some understanding of the
                          complexity of local governments with their various functions and
                          responsibilites. 3. Students will be become more knowledgeable
                          regarding state and local governments so that they may feel more
                          confident about their own participation in the process and
                          acceptance of their role as California citizens.




POSC 130 Maryann Drinan   1. Students will be able to discuss relevant organizational models
                          including the council-manager form, the strong mayor-council
                          model, and the weak mayor system. 2, Students will be able to
                          discuss the strengths and weaknesses of bureaucratic
                          organizations in a democratic society. 3. Students are expectd to
                          show an understanding of and a sensitivity to interations with a
                          culturally diverse population. 4. Students will identify the basic
                          steps in the dispute mediation process.

POSC 295 Maryann Drinan   Students in consultation with their faculty director will establish
                          their own learning outcomes, the list of skills and/or experiences
                          they wish to gain as a result of taking the class.
PSYC 100 Karen R. Huffman Upon completion of Introduction to Psychology (100), students
                          will be able to describe and/or explain: 1. How science compares
                          and contrasts with non-science. 2. How the mind, brain, and body
                          are inseparable, and how thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are
                          biologically based. 3. How humans (and nonhuman animals)
                          learn and remember. 4. How humans change across the lifespan.
                          5. How abnormal and normal behavior can be viewed on a
                          continuum, how “abnormal” is defined by different standards,
                          and how research suggests value for many psychological
                          interventions. 6. How we affect and are affected by social forces.


PSYC 105 Terry L.             1. Demonstrate an understanding of the common elements of all
         Humphrey             families and the diversity of family life within the United States.
                              2. Analyze the meaning and function of marriage, family and
                              other intimate relationships by applying sociological and/or
                              psychological theories. 3. Identify the social factors which
                              contribute to challenges confronting modern families and
                              intimate relationships. 4. Identify the psychological and social
                              factors that affect family relationship satisfaction and stability. 5.
                              Develop strategies for improving interpersonal communication
                              and resolving conflict.
PSYC 110 Kathy Young   Knowledge and Understanding At the completion of the course
                       students will have the ability to: 1. define and provide examples
                       of the major developmental issues of nature vs. nurture,
                       continuity vs. discontinuity; stability vs. change, universality vs.
                       context-specificity 2. describe the research methods used to study
                       development 3. describe and distinguish major theoretical
                       viewpoints in human development, including psychodynamic,
                       learning, cognitive-developmental, social-cognitive and systems
                       theories. 4. describe and critically evaluate theories and research
                       relevant to development in areas which may include (but are not
                       limited to) physical development, sensory and perceptual
                       development, motor development, cognitive development,
                       language development, social development, emotional
                       development, personality development, gender identity and
                       sexual development, moral development, psychopathology 5)
                       describe the effects of earlier life stage experiences on later
                       behavior and development in each of the following life stages (if
                       applicable): prenatal, infancy, early childhood, middle and late
                       childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, middle adulthood, late
                       adulthood, and death/dying. Application At the completion of the
                       course students will have the ability to: 6) apply course concepts,
                       theories and research findings to the student’s own lifespan
                       development and to real-world problems




PSYC 120 Terry L.      1. Recognize how social perception and attributions influence
         Humphrey      social behavior. 2. Understand the origins of the self and develop
                       critical self-awareness and connections between identity and
                       behavior. 3. Evaluate the impact of prejudice and stereotyping on
                       attitudes and behavior. 4. Analyze the effects of developing pro-
                       social attitudes and behaviors on the individual and on
                       communities. 5. Apply the concepts of group influence involving
                       persuasion, conformity and obedience to their own and others'
                       experiences.
PSYC 125 Fred Rose     Students completing the course will be able to: 1) Describe the
                       impact of social and cultural factors (gender, age, race/ethnicity,
                       socioeconomic status) on sexual decision-making, risk-taking and
                       sexual health. 2)Demonstrate an understanding of sexual
                       anatomy and physiology including cause and treatments
                       associated with sexual dysfunctions. 3) Describe the reproductive
                       process in men and women as well as demonstrating an
                       understanding of family planning and contraceptive methods. 4)
                       Identify and describe the patterns of sexual development across
                       the lifespan. 5) Describe the major patterns of relationships
                       associated with love and intimacy between couples and theories
                       of how relationships develop. 6) Analyze the scientific research
                       about issues of sexual orientation and areas of ethical/legal
                       debate (e.g., abortion, infertility, and intersexuality). 7) Identify
                       the types of sexually transmitted infections and be able to
                       describe how they are prevented and treated.

PSYC 130 Judy Wilson   1. Describe the different types of feminist theory. 2. Analyze
                       media messages for gender stereotypes. 3. Use critical thinking
                       skills in evaluating research findings to detect gender bias. 4.
                       Identify the ways being female impacts relationships, work,
                       aging and health. 5. Apply feminist theory to issues such as
                       domestic violence, sexual assault and gender roles.




PSYC 145 Terry L.      Students completing the course will be able to: 1. Identify the
         Humphrey      most significant biological, psychological, and social issues of
                       aging. 2. Discuss the major theories applied to the experience of
                       aging. 3. Create a personal and family plan for successful aging
                       that applies concepts relevant to the course. 4. Identify the
                       differing needs of the elderly based on sex, race, ethnicity, and
                       class. 5. Conduct a biopsychosocial assessment of three older
                       adults applying theories and concepts acquired through the
                       course.
PSYC 150 Maria Miller      1. Evaluate personal knowledge and awareness about alcohol and
                           other drug use. 2. Deliver a clear, well-organized, verbal
                           presentation describing the behavioral, psychological, physical,
                           and social effects for one class of psychoactive substances. 3.
                           Discuss research findings related to genetic, psychological and
                           sociological factors related to substance use and abuse. 4.
                           Compare the self-help model utilized for substance abuse
                           treatment with one other treatment approach.




PSYC 205 Jay R. Alperson   1. apply their knowledge to research problems in areas such as
                           psychology, philosophy, sociology, economics, anthropology and
                           business. 2. critically analyze statistical results from the media
                           and/or professional journals of their field. 3. organize and
                           analyze data using descriptive statistics. 4. analyze research
                           projects using inferential statistics such as t-tests, analysis of
                           variance, correlation, regression and/or other appropriate
                           methods.
PSYC      Jay R. Alperson   a. Students will enter data into a statistical computer program. b.
205L                        Students will graph data using a computer program. c. Students
                            will produce descriptive statistics, such as mean, mode, variance,
                            standard deviation, and correlation coefficient. d. Students will
                            produce appropriate inferential statistics, such as t-tests, one and
                            two way analysis of variance, and non-parametric statistics. e.
                            Students will write a narrative explaining the statistical results.




PSYC 210 Roger N.           After successfully completing this course, a student should be
         Morrissette        able to: 1. Realize the degree to which biological concepts
                            underlie all psychological phenomena, 2. Demonstrate
                            knowledge of anatomical and physiological properties of the
                            Nervous, Endocrine, and Reproductive systems, 3. Understand
                            how fundamental biological processes like genetics, evolution,
                            and homeostasis play a part in the development, expression, and
                            pathology of human behavior, 4. Read and summarize a scientific
                            journal article, 5. Know how to properly behave in a laboratory
                            and how to work collaboratively with their peers, 6. Conduct
                            research on a topic in physiological psychology, summarize the
                            findings, and present these findings to the class in written (web
                            page design) and oral format.
PSYC 225 Kathy Young   Knowledge and Understanding At the completion of the course,
                       students will have the ability to: 1) describe and distinguish the
                       major perspectives for understanding human behavior and
                       psychological abnormality, including (but not limited to)
                       Biological, Psychodynamic, Behavioral, Humanistic, Cognitive,
                       and Multicultural theories. 2) demonstrate accurate knowledge of
                       the current diagnostic system used to diagnose mental illness. 3)
                       describe, distinguish and evaluate the major theories and research
                       examining the definition, causes and treatment of mental
                       disorders, including (but not limited to): Anxiety disorders,
                       Mood disorders, and Schizophrenia, and common childhood
                       disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. 4)
                       describe legal and ethical issues involved in the diagnosis and
                       treatment of mental disorders




PSYC 230 Fred Rose     Upon completing the course, students will be able to: 1) Describe
                       the basic characteristics of the science of psychology. 2)Explain
                       different research methods used by psychologists, including
                       strengths and weaknesses of different designs, types of questions
                       addressed by each, and the process of making causal inferences.
                       3) Evaluate the appropriateness of conclusions derived from
                       psychological research, including such concepts as practical vs.
                       statistical significance, effect size, and understanding basic
                       statistical results. 4) Design and conduct basic studies to address
                       psychological issues using an appropriate method. 5)Follow the
                       APA Code of Ethics in the treatment of human and nonhuman
                       participants at all phases of psychological research. 6) Generalize
                       research conclusions at an appropriate level (e.g., causal vs
                       correlational interpretations) based on the type of research design
                       used.
PSYC 235 Kathy Young         Knowledge and Understanding At the completion of the course,
                             students will have the ability to: 1. identify and describe the basic
                             learning principles and procedures from classical conditioning,
                             operant conditioning and social learning theories. 2. identify and
                             describe applications of learning theory to changing behaviors. 3.
                             identify and summarize ethical issues involved in learning
                             research and the application of learning and behavior
                             modification principles. Application At the completion of the
                             course, students will have the ability to: 4. apply basic behavioral
                             principles and procedures to problems in a variety of settings.




R CSIS 109 Leah J. Martin-   1. Use QuickBooks to effectively manage bookkeeping and
           Klement           accounting functions. 2. Demonstrate proficiency in importing
                             and exporting various file formats among accounting and
                             bookkeeping recordkeeping and file management needs. 3.
                             Present significant financial data by generating reports to satisfy
                             different report gathering needs. 4. Understand the importance of
                             using current software to manage business and personal
                             accounting and bookkeeping systems.
R CSIS 116 Leah J. Martin-   1. Recognize and utilize all keys on keyboard to a minimum 25
           Klement           wpm level. 2. Understand and synthesize in student lessons
                             computer concepts, and terminology. 3. Differentiate between
                             computer hardware and software; and operating systems and
                             application software. 4. Apply file and folder management
                             processes in applications as well as e-mail and the internet to a
                             fundamental degree.




R CSIS 127 Leah J. Martin-   After completion of the 127 Word Processing course, students
           Klement           will demonstrate the following: 1. Recognize the Word program
                             itself among a list of programs. 2. Choose from various functions
                             within Word to format documents appropriately. 3. Describe the
                             functions that they are using in writing and verbally. 4. Apply
                             Word functions to business documents.




R GCIP     Anita Sugar       At the completion of the course students will be able to produce a
149                          multi-page document with appropriate typefaces, text formatting,
                             images, style sheets, master pages, color space, and preflight for
                             print.
R GCIP    Anita Sugar        At the end of the course the student will be able to: conduct
260                          proper job searches, practice professional interviewing
                             techniques, prepare an electronic portfolio as well as a hard copy
                             portfolio, create a personal business package which includes: a
                             resume, business card, and letterhead.
R OT 70   Paul Kelly         Assess patient for common eye disorders. Identify terms,
                             procedures commonly used in an ophthalmic medical
                             environment.


RE 100    Sherry L. Gordon   1 A successful student will be able to analyze documents
                             associated with real estate transactions, determine which
                             documents are appropriate for each type of transactions, and do a
                             project involving the use of documents. 2 A successful student
                             will analyze the principles, components, and regulations of basic
                             real estate contracts and transactions, determine which are related
                             to a particular problem, and solve the problem using those
                             principles, components and regulations.

RE 110    Sherry L. Gordon   1. A student will be able to evaluate data from appraisal sources
                             to determine market trends and values, determine the information
                             that is relevant to the particular propety at hand, and write a
                             report that takes that information into consideration. 2. A student
                             will be able to determine which forms are required by various
                             lenders, choose the appropriate forms for the particular situation,
                             and create a loan package that will be complete and accurate.

RE 111    Sherry L. Gordon   A student will be able to analyze a fact situation for a residential
                             property, determine the valuation of the property using the sales
                             comparison approach, and write up a report demonstrating the
                             valuation derived. A student will be able to analyze a fact
                             situation for a residential property, determine the valuation using
                             the income approach, and write up a report demonstrating the
                             valuation derived.
RE 112    Sherry L. Gordon   1 A successful student will be able to analyze income statements
                             of businesses, determine how this relates to an appraisal of the
                             business, and perform an appraisal as evidence by a report
                             generated. 2 A successful student will analyze a business to
                             determine applicability of the concepts of going concern,
                             determine if going concern is an issue, and write a report
                             showing the applicability of going concern to the appraisal.

RE 150    Sherry L. Gordon   A student will be able to analyze an advanced residential
                             application involving complex property, ownership and market
                             conditions, determine a strategy to create an appraisal report, and
                             write a report addressing the fact situation. A student will be able
                             to perform a residential market analysis using valuation statistics
                             and models and create a report which utilizes these tools.
RE 155                     1 A student will be able to identify and analyze the preliminary
            Sherry L. Gordon
                           information vital to the binding contract in the form of escrow
                           instructions, determine which forms will be necessary, and fill in
                           the proper forms. 2 A student will critically assess the
                           importance of maintaining escrow files, dtermining the
                           apporpriate methods of maintianing files, and show how filess
                           will be maintianed by presenting an example.
RE 156   Sherry L. Gordon 1 A successful student will be able to analyze more complicated
                           escrow documents and specialized documents, determine a
                           strategy for their preparations, and prepare the correct
                           documents. 2 A successful student will analyze escrow factors
                           that are non-standard, determine which non-standard factors are
                           applicable, and write up a report utilizing the non-standard
                           factors.
READ 110 Susan P. Musgrove 1. Students will demonstrate improvement in critical, analytical,
                           and literal comprehension from pre to post reading scores on
                           standardized college-level reading tests. 2. Students will broaden
                           and expand college level vocabulary. 3. Students will increase
                           reading rate.


READ 120 Carla B. Thomson 1. Students will demonstrate the ability to employ and apply
                          critical reading and thinking skills in the analysis, evaluation and
                          revision of arguments, opinions and claims (including their own).
                          2. Students will be able to read analytically and think critically at
                          a high level and demonstrate the ability to transfer critical
                          thinking skills to the interpretation and analysis of ideas
                          encountered in academic reading. 3. Students will be able to
                          utilize current technology in organizing their own thoughts and
                          communicating clearly and effectively. 4. Students will
                          demonstrate their ability to collaborate in the design,
                          development and presentation of group projects. 5. Students will
                          demonstrate their ability to collect, organize and evaluate
                          relevant evidence and experiential background needed to make a
                          decision, solve a problem or create new knowledge.




READ 30     Stanley A. Levy    1. Students will be able to recall facts from reading material 6
                               months higher than their entry level. 2. Students will be able to
                               distinguish main idea from reading passages 6 months higher
                               than their entry level.

READ 5      Stanley A. Levy    This course is offered for DRC students who are learning
                               disabled adults. "Overarching Learning Outcomes" -Improved
                               Vocabulary Skills -Greater ability to detect literal and analytical
                               thinking skills related to listening and reading activities.
READ 50   Susan P. Musgrove 1.Students will demonstrate improvement from pre to post
                            reading scores on standardized reading tests. 2.Students will
                            broaden and expand professional and academic functional
                            vocabulary. 3.Students will identify and evaluate the appropriate
                            college level textbook reading and study techniques and apply
                            them in content area courses across the curriculum.

REC 110   Dan Early          Upon completion of this course, students will increase their
                             knowledge,understanding and recoginition of Community
                             Recreation with competency through demonstration and
                             instructor feedback in a practical setting and/or in group or
                             individual participation. Upon completion of this course students
                             will identify, examine, differentiate and contrast their overall
                             knowledge of Recreation. At the conclusion of this course the
                             student will possess an understanding of the conceptual
                             foundations of play, recration and leisure.
REC 115   Dan Early          Upon completion of this course, students will apply and employ
                             increased knowledge and performance of Recreation Leadership
                             competency through practice, demonstration and instructor
                             feedback, in a practical setting and/or in group or individual
                             participation.
                             Upon completion of this course students will possess an
                             understanding of the recreation and leisure services profession.
                             At the end of this course the students will be able to demonstrate
                             and understanding of recreation leadership and its role as it
                             relates to their personal development in health, fitness, recreation
                             and physical activity.


REC 120   Dan Early          Upon completion of this course, students will increase their
                             knowledge and analysis of Recreational Team Sports with
                             competency through demonstration and instructor feedback, in a
                             practical setting an or in group or individual participation. Upon
                             completion of this course, students will analyse skills/abilities,
                             diversity with in the community and institution to improve and
                             enhance the overall recreation and leisure sports experience. At
                             the end of this course the students will be able to articulate an
                             understanding of Recreation Team Sports and the important role
                             it plays in personal and social development.
RS 101   Craig A. Forney   1. Knowledge of core practices, beliefs, and institutions of major
                           religions across the globe. 2. Ability to compare and contrast the
                           teachings and characteristics of the world religions. 3.
                           Knowledge of the key elements that make up a tradition of
                           religion. 4. Ability to identify and analyze the influence of
                           religion on cultures and societies of the world. 5. Sensitivity to
                           the diversity of religion including the diverse variations within a
                           religion.
RS 102   Craig A. Forney   1. Ability to identify, describe, and analyze the historical
                           influence of religion in the United States. 2. Knowledge of major
                           events, movements, and traditions in American religious history.
                           3. Ability to identify and describe core characteristics of major
                           movements and traditions of religion in the history of the United
                           States. 4. Sensitivity to the diversity of religion in American
                           history. 5. Ability to compare and contrast ways in which
                           religious communities have interacted with society of the United
                           States.
RS 105   Craig A. Forney   1. Ability to identify, describe, and analyze the key elements of a
                           religion. 2. Knowledge of classic theories regarding the study of
                           religion. 3. Ability compare and contrast the role of rituals,
                           symbols, and myth between traditions of religion. 4. Sensitivity
                           to the diversity of religion in the dimensions of ritual, symbol,
                           and myth. 5. Ability to identify, describe, and analyze how
                           people are religious in unconventional ways.




RS 108   Craig A. Forney   1. Identify and analyze the historical influence of Christianity on
                           societies from ancient to recent times. 2. Identify and describe
                           core characteristics of major movements and communities in
                           Christian history. 3. Compare and contrast the roles of
                           Christianity in relations with societies and governments. 4.
                           Recognize and assess the role of political and social factors in the
                           history of Christianity. 5. Demonstrate knowledge of Christianity
                           in various settings of time and place. 6. Show sensitivity to the
                           diverse forms of Christianity.
RS 110    Craig A. Forney   1. Ability to identify and analyze the influence of religion and
                            religious communities on the culture of the United States. 2.
                            Knowledge of core characteristics for major communities of
                            religion in the United States. 3. Ability to compare and contrast
                            the characteristics of religious communities of the United States.
                            4. Knowledge of what is "American" about religion in the United
                            States. 5. Sensitivity to diverse forms of religion in the United
                            States. 6.Ability to recognize and evaluate the influence of race,
                            class, and gender on religious communities of the United States.

RS 120    Craig A. Forney   1. Ability to identify and analyze the influence of religion and
                            religious communities on the culture of the United States. 2.
                            Knowledge of core characteristics for major communities of
                            religion in the United States. 3. Ability to compare and contrast
                            the characteristics of religious communities of the United States.
                            4. Knowledge of what is "American" about religion in the United
                            States. 5. Sensitivity to diverse forms of religion in the United
                            States. 6.Ability to recognize and evaluate the influence of race,
                            class, and genderon religious communities of the United States.

RTV 100   Lisa Faas         1. Recognize key differences between broadcast TV, cable and
                            internet programming.
                            2. Research and design a radio station format.
                            3. Express their views on the influence of broadcasting/media in
                            our culture.
                            4. Use the internet to identify resources in the broadcast and
                            media industries.
                            5. Compare radio and TV ratings used for programming and
                            advertising purposes.
SOC 100   Terry L.   Students completing the course will be able to: 1)Describe the
          Humphrey   sociological imagination and apply its emphasis on the
                     interconnections between individuals and macro-level forces to a
                     better understanding of their own lives and the society in which
                     they live. 2)Compare and contrast the three main theoretical
                     paradigms in Sociology and analyze social phenomena from
                     these different perspectives. 3)Demonstrate the ability to think
                     critically about knowledge, how it is defined, generated, and
                     interpreted and understand the basic principles of quantitative
                     and qualitative scientific research methods. 4)Understand the
                     process of social interaction and describe the role of culture and
                     socialization in the development of the self. 5)Explain the ways
                     in which social stratification manifests itself in society and be
                     able to link stratification to life chances. 6)Describe the major
                     social institutions of society and the ways in which these
                     institutions shape individual and group behavior. 7)Demonstrate
                     an understanding of the nature of social movements and the
                     connections between inequality, social justice and activism.




SOC 100   Terry L.   Students completing the course will be able to: 1)Describe the
          Humphrey   sociological imagination and apply its emphasis on the
                     interconnections between individuals and macro-level forces to a
                     better understanding of their own lives and the society in which
                     they live. 2)Compare and contrast the three main theoretical
                     paradigms in Sociology and analyze social phenomena from
                     these different perspectives. 3)Demonstrate the ability to think
                     critically about knowledge, how it is defined, generated, and
                     interpreted and understand the basic principles of quantitative
                     and qualitative scientific research methods. 4)Understand the
                     process of social interaction and describe the role of culture and
                     socialization in the development of the self. 5)Explain the ways
                     in which social stratification manifests itself in society and be
                     able to link stratification to life chances. 6)Describe the major
                     social institutions of society and the ways in which these
                     institutions shape individual and group behavior. 7)Demonstrate
                     an understanding of the nature of social movements and the
                     connections between inequality, social justice and activism.
SOC 110   Kalyna Katherine   Students completing the course will be able to: 1.) Identify
          Lesyna             current social problems and the social and historical factors
                             influencing them. 2.) Compare and contrast the main theoretical
                             paradigms in sociology and analyze social problems from these
                             different perspectives. 3.) Demonstrate critical thinking in the
                             analysis of social policies and proposals. 4.) Understand the role
                             of social movements and other forms of activism in the solving of
                             social problems.




SOC 115   Terry L.           1. Describe and apply the major theoretical approaches to
          Humphrey           understanding gender and the social experiences of women. 2.
                             Describe the social-psychological theories of gender
                             differentiation and socialization and their role in the development
                             of the self. 3. Identify the effects of societal institutions and
                             power structures on the material conditions of women. 4.
                             Demonstrate an understanding of how social location
                             characteristics such as race/ethnicity, class, age, religion,
                             geographical location, culture and sexual orientation affect
                             women's differing life experiences. 5. Identify how historical
                             conditions including social movements (e.g. First and Second
                             Wave Feminism) assist in understanding women's contemporary
                             social and political experience.
SOC 130   Kathy Grove   1. Understand and apply sociological theories and concepts to
                        analyze the experience of health and illness, including chronic
                        illness and disability. 2.Describe the impact of race/ethnicity,
                        gender, age, socioeconomic status,sexual orientation, and
                        disabilities on health status and the experience of health and
                        illness.3.Explain how economic, political, and institutional
                        structures shape health, illness and disease.4.Understand how
                        social and cultural factors influence interactions between
                        consumers and providers of health services.5. Demonstrate an
                        awareness of contemporary debates in health and social policy,
                        including proposals for health care reform. 6. Demonstrate the
                        ability to think critically about ethical issues connected to
                        medical treatments and technologies. 7. Analyze the role of
                        activists in the health care system. 8. Access, use, and interpret
                        data to effectively communicate about health issues.

SPAN 101 Kathleen M     1) Apply the basic structures of Spanish grammar to
         Sheahan        communicate effectively. 2) Formulate declarative and
                        interrogative sentences at an elementary level. 3) Construct a
                        narrative in paragraph form about personal events using the
                        present and near future tenses. 4) Speak Spanish at an elementary
                        level with effective pronunciation and intonation. Demonstrate
                        signs of spontaneity in speech. 5) Understand basic written
                        language and summarize its meaning. 6) Deduce meaning from
                        complex spoken language and authentic written materials. 7)
                        Recognize the diversity among Hispanic cultures. Compare these
                        cultures to one’s own culture.
SPCH 120 Patrick R. Mills   1. Analyze human communication processes from a number of
                            scientific perspectives. 2. Develop enhanced sensitivity to and
                            appreciation for individual and cultural variation in human
                            communication. 3. Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge of
                            human communication to practical and research problems
                            through writing and discussion.




SPCH 145 Christopher R.     1) Students will participate in the process of planning a speech
         Lowry              tournament. 2) Students will acquire the ability to host and
                            manage a speech tournament. 3) Students will develop the ability
                            to solve or trouble-shoot problems that are unique only to speech
                            tournaments. 4) Students will acquire the ability to collect
                            tournament data and tabulate the results.




SPCH 150 Christopher R.     1. Manage nervousness to perform in a public setting. 2. Apply
         Lowry              the basic principles of speech communication to develop debate
                            arguments informed by current credible research. 3. Demonstrate
                            knowledge of debate preparation, process, and practice.
SPCH 160 Christopher R.    1) The student will develop advanced research skills to collect
         Lowry             evidence for platform, limited preparation, and oral interpretation
                           speeches. 2) The student will develop proper speech writing
                           skills with an emphasis on organization and style. 3) The student
                           will acquire the ability to deliver a speech with confidence. 4)
                           The student will acquire the ability to critically evaluate the
                           strengths and weaknesses of a speech.


SPCH      Christopher R.   The student leaning outcomes will depend on the specific topic
197A      Lowry            covered. A set of learning outcomes will be developed for each
                           topic class and included in an outline developed by the instructor.

SPCH 290 Christopher R.    1) Students will recognize the descriptions, rules, and
         Lowry             expectations of the various individual and debate events offered
                           in forensics competition. 2) Students will participate in the
                           process of competing, administering, and hosting a forensics
                           tournament. 3) Students will acquire the ability to write, edit,
                           memorize and deliver platform, limited preparation, and oral
                           interpretation events (Individual Events). 4) Students will
                           develop the ability to construct, present, and refute affirmative
                           and negative cases in a debate setting.




TA 100    Michael A.       1. Articulate ways in which pays and performances reflect
          Mufson           society and pose questions that illuminate the human condition.
                           2. Identify the contribution of the production elements - set,
                           lighting, costume, make-up and sound -- to the overall theatrical
                           experience. 3. Effectively collaborate and communicate using the
                           particular elements and language, signs and symbols of "stage"
                           performance. 4. Understand and articulate the distinct production
                           roles and processes of the individual, interpretive theatre artists -
                           playwright, director, designer and actor. 5. Understand and
                           communicate with the specialized vocabulary of theatre practice.
                           6. Distinguish between various theatrical genre's, styles and
                           historical periods. 7. Recognize how the theatrical elements
                           create a dynamic and unique encounter between the spectator and
                           the performance.
TA 115   Michael A.   Students will be able to: 1.Effectively communicate using the
         Mufson       terminology related to the acting process and the language of
                      theatre. 2.Collaborate effectively in an ensemble environment.
                      3.Analyze a scene from the perspective of an actor 4.Apply
                      discipline and focus to the process of rehearsing a scene
                      5.Synthesize the methods and techniques of the class to play a
                      truthful through-line of actions and maintain a moment-to-
                      moment reality through the effective use of body, voice and
                      imagination. 6.Assess her own and other actors performance with
                      specific and detailed discussion of the tools and techniques of
                      acting.


TA 116   Michael A.   1. Analyze a play for detaled understanding and definition of the
         Mufson       given circumstance. 2. In the context of the given circumstances,
                      analyze a scene for objectives, tactics, beats, and turning points.
                      3. Create and score the physical life of the character within the
                      scene. 4. Perform a scene with moment-to-moment commitment
                      an objective and specific actions to accomplish that objective. 5.
                      Perform a scene with attention to beats, tactics, turning points. 6.
                      Perform a scene as if experiencing the circumstances for the first
                      time, really listening to scene partners and affecting scene
                      partners with committed actions. 7. Demonstrate the ability to
                      respond to coaching and notes.

TA 119   Michael A.   1. Students will understand the basic anatomy and physiology of
         Mufson       the vocal instrument. 2. Students will acquire an awareness of the
                      relationship between posture, relaxation, breath, voice and
                      presence. 3. Students will acquire the basic skills for healthy
                      projection and articulation. 4. Students will use their knowledge
                      and awareness for expressive interpretation and communication
                      of text.




TA 125   Michael A.   Students should aquire greater artistic sensibility regarding texts.
         Mufson       Students should acquire more sophisticated insight into the
                      auditory, visual, olfactory and kinesic possibilities for
                      interpreting texts for audiences. Students should achieve greater
                      self confidence in their presentational abilities.
UP 85   Nancy J. Galli   The key student learning outcomes for this course are: 1.
                         Comprehension of and implementation of safety procedures. 2.
                         Evaluation and selection of the correct tool for a specific task. 3.
                         Identification, analysis,and selection of fabrics for their
                         appropriate usage. 4. Understand, identify, classify all pieces of
                         an upholstery pattern for any item of furniture. 5. Calculate
                         material and labor costs to propose the correct financial estimate
                         for a job. 6. Operate a commercial sewing machine. 7.
                         Measure,calculate the amount of fabric, do a pattern layout, and
                         cut the fabric for new upholstery projects.
UP 86   Nancy J. Galli   1. Successful students will produce an upholstered piece of
                         furniture based on their ability to analyze the appropriate
                         methods of application, evaluate the options in fabric and
                         technique, and apply these advanced techniques to the
                         completion of the project. 2. Successful students will draw or
                         illustrate, using appropriate measurement techniques, the
                         intended design or redesign of the upholstered piece of furniture.
                         3. Successful students will set up a business plan for their own
                         upholstery business upon completion of the program.

UP 88   Nancy J. Galli   1. Successful students will produce a restored piece of furniture
                         based on their ability to analyze the appropriate techniques of
                         restoration, evaluation of style, age, fabric, and types of exterior
                         wood, and apply the correct techniques to the completion of the
                         project. 2. Successful students will have a working knowledge of
                         the tools and materials needed for successful completion of the
                         restored project. 3. Successful students will set up a business
                         plan for their own antique restoration business upon completion
                         of the program.
UP 90   Nancy J. Galli   1. Using specialized tools and equipment the successful student
                         will observe, assess, and choose the most appropriate methods to
                         upholster or reupholster the seats, doors, and/or console of an
                         automobile. 2. The successful student will appropriately install or
                         reinstall upholstery in an automobile while maintaining the
                         integrity of the various computerized systems, sound equipment,
                         and/or alarm systems in a given car. 3. The successful student
                         will prepare a cost analysis after completion of measurements,
                         calculation of needed fabric, and discovery of needed finishing
                         materials unique to each job.

UP 95   James E Duvall   1. The student will be able to identify window types and analyze
                         appropriate treatments based on function, shape, construction,
                         room design/style, and lighting. 2. Evaluate a variety of fabrics
                         and construct window treatments using appropriate methods and
                         techniques.
UP 96     James E Duvall    1. The student will successfully construct a pillow, lampshade,
                            bedspread, pillow shams, slipcovers, and table coverings. 2. The
                            student will select a fabric appropriate to the end use of the
                            product. 3. The student will create a business plan in order to
                            establish a profitable enterprise upon completion of the
                            coursework.

UP 97     James E Duvall    1. identify new upholstery industry information that relates to
                            upholstery design and construction. 2. apply new techniques
                            based on information relating to upholstery design and
                            construction.




WELD 145 Jay Miller         1. Students will be able to prepare pipe joints for welding. 2.
                            Students will be able to weld in the all positions. 3. Students will
                            be able to inspect welds and tests according to codes.


WTE 100   Mollie R. Smith   1. A student will be able to determine the flow of water through a
                            pipeline from a typical water distribution system and calculate
                            the dosage rate of chlorine required in order to meet the
                            necessary guidelines. 2. A student will be given a map of a
                            typical water distribution system and will be required to plot
                            representative water sample test stations for bacteriological
                            sampling based on the population served within the system
                            according to Title 22 of the Health and Safety Code. 3. Students
                            will be given a customer service complaint and will be required
                            to write a report, including a short essay, explaining what actions
                            they would take and how they would resolve the issue for the
                            customer.

WTE 105   Mollie R. Smith   1. A student will be able to interpret and apply the requirements
                            of the Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR) and demonstrate
                            in writing, how the major processes of treatment plant operations
                            are subject to the guidelines set forth by the SWTR. 2. Given a
                            set of hydraulic figures derived from actual treatment plant
                            conditions; a student will be asked to perform the necessary
                            mathematical calculations required to provide a solution to the
                            operational math problem. 3. Presented with a list of known
                            drinking water contaminants; a student will complete a table with
                            information regarding health effects of the contaminants, Best
                            Available Technology (BAT), and correct regulations and
                            contaminant levels allowed for each contaminant.
WTE 150   Mollie R. Smith   SLO - Given laboratory reports, students will be required to
                            evaluate laboratory data, compare the data to published drinking
                            water Maximum Contaminant Levels, and determine the
                            appropriate notification and sampling protocols as specified in
                            state and federal drinking water regulations. SLO - Given water
                            samples, students will analyze for alkalinity, chlorine, color,
                            conductivity, hardness, odor, and turbidity. Students will be
                            required to read and follow Standard Operating Procedures in
                            order to calibrate instruments and perform the analyses. Students
                            will keep records of calibration, quality control, raw data and
                            calculations.

WTE 205   Mollie R. Smith   SLO 1: Each student will demonstrate the ability to research and
                            write a two-page paper, on an instructor approved management
                            or water related subject, intended to motivate, inform, convince
                            or entertain the recipient. SLO 2: Students will be presented with
                            a drawing of a distribution system showing tanks, piping, and
                            valves along with their elevations, sizes, pressures and other
                            relevant information. Students will be asked to analyze the
                            information and demonstrate the ability to accurately solve the
                            problems, finding missing variables for volume, flow, velocity,
                            and chemical dosage rates. SLO 3: Students with be given a
                            schematic of a typical control system. Demonstrating a basic
                            knowledge of instrumentation and controls, students will identify
                            and explain the functionality and importance of the equipment
                            shown. SLO 4: Students will demonstrate a thorough knowledge
                            of source waters, the advantages/disadvantages of using each
                            source, and the infrastructure that would be needed with each
                            source to allow use in a potable water distribution system.


WTE 210   Mollie R. Smith   SLO: A student will be able to obtain source water quality data,
                            identify the treatment processes, and regulatory requirements for
                            removal/disinfection from one of the regional water treatment
                            plants in San Diego or Riverside Counties. SLO: Given several
                            hydraulic properties and required effluent water quality for a
                            treatment process or a plant, a student will be required to perform
                            mathematical calculations to achieve the specified effluent water
                            quality and meet regulatory disinfection requirements. SLO:
                            Students will demonstrate knowledge of the various State and
                            Federal regulations including: SWTR, Total Coliform Rule,
                            Interim Enhanced SWTR, LT1ESWTR, LT2ESWTR, D/DBP
                            Rules, Record Keeping requirements and public notification
                            requirements.
ZOO 200   A Carey Carpenter a. Key student learning outcomes for this course are: i. Basic
                            organization of histology, specifically the relationships between
                            tissue-level organization and the eleven organ systems ii. Proper
                            application of directional and regional terminology to describe
                            anatomical features. iii. Relationship between structures and
                            functions of the organ systems. iv. Detailed comprehension of the
                            gross anatomy of the organ systems. v. Comprehension of the
                            evolutionary significance of anatomical differences between
                            components of various organ systems.




ZOO 203   Ralph E. Ferges    A student who successfully completes this course should be able
                             to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the organs and processes
                             involved in the normal functioning of the nervous,
                             cardiovascular, muscular, urinary, and respiratory systems. 2.
                             Identify the likely site and nature of disorders in these systems
                             based on presentation of generalized signs and symptoms. 3.
                             Describe the interactions between these systems in maintaining
                             homeostasis, both in general and in specific scenarios such as
                             exercise, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, blood loss, poor
                             respiratory function, and others. 4. List and describe a variety
                             environmental inputs to the body, their effects, and how the body
                             compensates for those effects to maintain homeostasis. 5.
                             Produce graphs and charts to concisely and accurately convey
                             experimental data in a scientific format. 6. Summarize and
                             evaluate experimental data in the writing of a scientific research
                             report.
                                                   Methods
Assessment                                         Reviewed
                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




This is the first addition of SLOs. Faculty will   Yes
review and discuss summer 2009, and revise
accordingly.




                                                   Yes
1. Instructor will measure student competency     Yes
through periodic use of direct assessment,
classroom assignment, written analysis, and oral
presentation in which student demonstrates
application of personal knowledge to goal setting
and life planning. 2. Instructor will measure
student competency through periodic use of
direct assessment, classroom assignment, essay,
journal writing, and objective testing; student
demonstrates knowledge of and use of
appropriate study skills and learning strategies.

An addition of global perspectives relative to     Yes
indigenous knowledge was evaluated as being a
current orientation among American Indian
Studies Association scholars to include in our
entry level course.




                                                   Yes


Changes to the Methods of Assessment were          Yes
made based upon the current direction of the
Native American artistic field and the influence
of technology.
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
It was agreed that in addition to two exams that   Yes
written work include two papers, a cultural case
study and a historical event analysis. In both
cases specific objectives of inquiry reduce the
rote/ blow by blow style of papers.




An addition of an innovation paper was added to Yes
the case study paper.




Instead of four exam, we will assess with weekly Yes
short answer quizzes, with a final paper on
contemporary issues and concern for Native
American peoples in Tribal communites today.
Some test questions have been updated, but the Yes
overall assignments to include the practicum and
site report paper have remained pertinent to the
SLO's.




Interactive assessments such as a practicum and   Yes
museum gallery visit reviews have been more
established as requirements. Exams use more
visuals in conjunction with media games as
review.
                              Yes




Add more written assigments   Yes




                              Yes
                                                   Yes




The methods of assessement include case            Yes
studies, dmemonstration of knowledge by
actually processing a hypothetical case.




The student will be assessed by objective and       Yes
subjective test as well as by their ability to draw
flow charts of the various aspets of the criminal
justice system. The student will also be assessed
on their legal logic and writing ability when they
submit case briefs.




Students are assessed on a weekly and bi-          Yes
semester basis using objective and subjective
test. The student is also required to submit six
case briefs throughout the semester where legal
research knownledge, legal logic, and writing
skills are assessed.




Assessment methods will vary depending on the      Yes
specific topics presented in the course.
                                                Yes




Assessment methods will vary depending on the   Yes
specific topics presented in the course.




This course involves very subjective data and    Yes
tests were added or modified to emphasize more
critical thinking about American culture rather
than historical events and facts. Many students
have weak backgrounds in American history and
geography, so a baseline background is
necessary but kept to a minimum. Artistic form
and influence are emphasized as per the national
trend in the field of American Studies.
We updated the Methods of Assessment to           Yes
reflect actual practice and linked them more
tightly to the revised course objectives and SLOs




The 100L course is an integrated lab which         Yes
serves to supplement the Anthropology 100
lecture series. We are continually updating the
offerings of this course to improve the level of
conselience with the lecture program.
Allocations of the forms of assesment used in
this course are flexible reflecting the number and
types of labs made available. However, no major
recommendations for the general methods of
assesment were made at this time.
Yes
We updated the Methods of Assessment to            Yes
reflect actual practices and linked them more
tightly to the SLOs and revised course objectives.




Currently there is one full-time faculty member   Yes
that teaches Anth 137. Methods of assessments
has been discussed with other cross-discplinary
faculty members.
Methods of assessment were discussed when the Yes
course was recently created, however there have
been no revisions as the class has yet to be
offered.




                                             Yes
We updated the Methods of Assessment to            Yes
reflect actual practice and linked them more
tightly to the SLOs and revised course objectives.




The course is being taught for the first time;     Yes
however, some changes have already been made.
Given the one unit nature of the class and
subjects covered, in the future, the focus will be
on short quizzes (instead of exams/tests), class
question and answer participation, homework
focused on both reading and the preparation of a
portfolio that includes rewritten class notes,
documents, and summary explanations where
appropriate.

This has been an ongoing process using student Yes
essay course evaluations, objective and essay
exam questions, and a term paper. The class
objectives have been clarified and become more
focused and essay questions have been added to
exams to ensure students can adequately explain
such issues as the difference between knowledge
and belief, the nature of the scientific method,
and the process of evolution. Improved diagrams
or schematics to convey these concepts have also
been implemented. Please note that Dr. Philip de
Barros is the only instructor teaching this class,
which is taught about once per year.
This course has not been taught since 2004 and Yes
will next be taught in the Spring of 2010. The
COR was revised in the Fall of 2008 and SLOs
have just been written for the first time. Methods
of Assessment have been revised to reflect these
SLOs. This class is taught only by Dr. Philip de
Barros.




                                              Yes
Currently there is one full-time faculty member   Yes
that teaches Anth 137. Methods of assessments
has been discussed with other cross-discplinary
faculty members.




We updated the Methods of Assessment to            Yes
reflect actual practice and linked them more
tightly to the SLOs and revised course objectives.
We updated the Methods of Assessment to            Yes
reflect actual practices and linked them more
tightly to the SLOs and revised course objectives.




We updated the Methods of Assessment to            Yes
reflect actual practice and linked them more
tightly to the SLOs and revised course objectives.
We updated the Methods of Assessment to            Yes
reflect actual practices and linked them more
tightly to the SLOs and revised course objectives.




We updated the Methods of Assessment to            Yes
reflect actual practices and linked them more
tightly to the SLOs and revised course objectives.
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program director    Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program directors          Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors          Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors          Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Learning outcome assessment: 1.) Students will     Yes
be required to pass a written test with a
minimum score of 70%. 2.) Mandatory
participation in manipulative project and tasks
will be evaluated as stated in the course rubric
with 75% proficiency.
Program coordinator and program director           Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




1. Students will be required to pass a written test Yes
with a minimum score of 70%. 2. Mandatory
participation in manipulative project and tasks
will be evaluated as stated in the course rubric
with 75% proficiency.




Program coordinator and program director           Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




Program coordinator and program directors   Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.
Program coordinator and program directors      Yes
reviewed the list of assessments and made
additions to the list.




The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the R/SB Yes
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




The program coordinator and faculty at the San   Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.
The program coordinator and faculty at the San    Yes
Diego Electrical Training Trust (SDETT)
reviewed the laundry list of assessments and
provided a comprehensive list that are used in
the classroom.




Students currently demonstrate competency          Yes
through aural and written exams, oral
presentations, assignments in the language
laboratory, and collaborative speaking activities.
Faculty shared techniques for assessing listening
comprehension and speaking skills. There is
consensus regarding the importance of including
laboratory work in the overall assessment of
students.




Students currently demonstrate competency          Yes
through aural and written exams, oral
presentations, assignments in the language
laboratory, and collaborative speaking activities.
Faculty share techniques for assessing listening
comprehension and speaking skills. There is a
consensus regarding the importance of including
laboratory work in the overall assessment of
students.
This is a new course   Yes




                       Yes
Yes
      Yes




      Yes




      Yes




Yes   Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
                                                 Yes




The instructor of record will incorporate a final Yes
project that will reflect the art concepts that need
to be addressed in order to fulfill the
requirements of the course.




The student will be assessed via                  Yes
experiential/cognitive approaches of sign
language interaction in the classroom
(homework,instruction, language
modeling)written receptive tests, expressive sign
projects.
1. Written receptive exams in ASL gloss 2. Sign Yes
production skills exams 3. Exams for grammar in
written English


1. Written receptive exams in ASL gloss 2. Sign Yes
production skills exams 3. Exams for grammar in
written English.


Revisions reflect course activities and          Yes
deliverables.
Assessment of SLOs will be determined using a Yes
set of questions that will be embedded into
exams administered during the semester.
Questions will be designed to assess a student’s
ability to demonstrate an understanding of each
outcome. If the student scores 60% on each
assessment, that particular SLO was successfully
met by that student. If 60% of the class earns
60% on each SLO, then the outcome has been
successfully met for that class.




Currently these concepts are assessed through     Yes
completion of laboratory exercises and through
questions on various quizzes throughout the
semester.




Assessment will be determined by a set of          Yes
questions that will be embedded into quizzes
administered during the semester. The questions
will be designed to set up the conditions, i.e.,
position, or phase of the Moon or local time; and
the student will have to calculate the unknown
variable. Assessment will be determined by
giving the student an image of a cratered surface
or a verbal description of a cratered surface
embedded into quizzes administered during the
semester. The questions will be designed to
assess a student's ability to identify the various
crater features.
The current method of assessment is through the Yes
completion of homework assignments. Students
are then required to demonstrate their knowledge
of the concepts by successful completion of
targeted questions included on various quizzes
and exams throughout the semester.




                                               Yes




                                               Yes




                                               Yes




                                               Yes




                                               Yes
                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes




Assesments are to include: 1. ASE examinations Yes
2. Completion of On Demand 5 assignments 3.
Completion of trainer board assignments 4.
Completion of simulator assignments




                                                 Yes




The current method of assessment includes four   Yes
unit examinations as well as a term paper. No
changes have been made during the past few
years.
Student knowledge is assessed by four written    Yes
exams and a comprehensive final exam that are
based on sample questions provided by the
Federal Aviation Administration. These
questions cover the knowledge and
understanding required for both the knowledge
and practical tests. There have been no recent
changes to this method of assessment.




Student knowledge is assessed by five written    Yes
exams and a comprehensive final exam that are
based on sample questions provided by the
Federal Aviation Administration. These
questions cover the knowledge and
understanding required for both the knowledge
and practical tests. There have been no recent
changes to this method of assessment.




Student knowledge is assessed by five written    Yes
exams and a comprehensive final exam that are
based on sample questions provided by the
Federal Aviation Administration. These
questions cover the knowledge and
understanding required for both the knowledge
and practical tests. There have been no recent
changes to this method of assessment.
Student knowledge is assessed by five written        Yes
exams and a comprehensive final exam that are
based on sample questions provided by the
Federal Aviation Administration. These
questions cover the knowledge and
understanding required for both the knowledge
and practical tests. In addition, students must
prepare a series of written lesson plans and make
at least two presentations of a lesson to the class.
There have been no recent changes to this
method of assessment.




Student knowledge is assessed by five written        Yes
exams and a comprehensive final exam that are
based on sample questions provided by the
Federal Aviation Administration. These
questions cover the knowledge and
understanding required for both the knowledge
and practical tests. In addition, students must
prepare a series of written lesson plans and make
at least two presentations of a lesson to the class.
There have been no recent changes to this
method of assessment.
The current method of assessment includes two    Yes
unit examinations and a comprehensive final
exam that consists of a flight between two
assigned airports. No changes have been made
during the past few years.




The current method of assessment includes three Yes
unit examinations, class participation, and a term
paper. No changes have been made during the
past few years.




The current method of assessment includes four   Yes
unit examinations as well as a term paper. No
changes have been made during the past few
years.
The current method of assessment includes a    Yes
comprehensive final examination conducted in a
flight simulator. In addition, informal
observations of student progress in the flight
simulator are randomly made during the
semester. No changes have been made during the
past few years.




The current method of assessment includes five   Yes
unit examinations as well as a term paper. No
changes have been made during the past few
years.




The current method of assessment includes five   Yes
unit examinations as well as a term paper. No
changes have been made during the past few
years.
The method of assessment will include            Yes
demonstration of the Garmin G1000 and 430/530
systems on a computer that simulates the actual
operation of the system as well as written exams
and class participation.




The methods of assessment will vary depending    Yes
on the specific topic covered. The methods of
assessment will be developed for each specific
topics class and included in the outline
developed by the instructor.
The current method of assessment includes four   Yes
examinations.




The current method of assessment includes three Yes
exams, a paper, and an oral presentaiton before
the class.
The current method of assessment includes          Yes
seven unit examinations as well as class
participation. No changes have been made
during the past few years.




This course has not yet been offered. The          Yes
planned method of assessment includes six unit
examinations as well as class participation.




The method of assessment will vary depending        Yes
on the specific project or research but will likely
include a research paper and/or completion of a
specific project. The specific method of
assessment will be developed for each student's
project or research paper and will be included in
the written contract.
The current method of assessment is dictated by Yes
the Federal Aviation Administration. Faculty
members are not able to change this method of
assessment.
The current method of assessment is dictated by   Yes
the Federal Aviation Administration. Faculty
members are not able to change this method of
assessment.




The current method of assessment is dictated by   Yes
the Federal Aviation Administration. Faculty
members are not able to change this method of
assessment.




The current method of assessment is dictated by   Yes
the Federal Aviation Administration. Faculty
members are not able to change this method of
assessment.




The current method of assessment is dictated by   Yes
the Federal Aviation Administration. Faculty
members are not able to change this method of
assessment.
Assessment in this course was originally based     Yes
upon testing different cognitive levels of subject
mastery, including knowledge, comprehension,
application, analysis, and synthesis. We have
added the requirement for students to practice
and demonstrate basic laboratory skills and
techniques, and the requirement for students to
apply the scientific method to preparation of
formal lab reports, including analysis and
discussion of experimental results.




Student comprehension of SLO's #1 and #2 will     Yes
be assessed during the Fall semester of each
year, with SLO #1 being assessed the first year
and SLO #2 being assessed during the 2nd year.
Assessment will continue to alternate with one
SLO assessed each year in which the course is
offered. Assessment methods may include
reports, projects, quizzes, exams, or other
methods as determined by the course instructor.

Student comprehension of the SLO will be          Yes
assessed each year in which the course is
offered. Assessment methods may include
reports, projects, quizzes, exams, or other
methods as determined by the course instructor.




Student comprehension of the SLO's will be        Yes
assessed on an annual basis for the years in
which the course is offered. Assessment methods
may include reports, projects, quizzes, exams, or
other methods as determined by the course
instructor.
Assessment in the course was originally based     Yes
on testing different cognitive levels of subject
mastery (ranging from knowledge,
comprehension, application, analysis and
synthesis). We have added to this the
requirement for students to research specific
topics throughout the course in order to extend
and reinforce lecture and textbook content.
These research assignments will require students
to independently learn new topics related to
human genetics and to apply and relate concepts
learned in the course to these researched topics.

Assessment in the course was originally based     Yes
on testing different cognitive levels of subject
mastery (ranging from knowledge,
comprehension, application, analysis and
synthesis). We have added to this the
requirement for students to research specific
topics throughout the course in order to extend
and reinforce lecture and textbook content.
These research assignments will require students
to independently learn new topics related to
human genetics and to apply and relate concepts
learned in the course to these researched topics.

Assessment in the course will be based on           Yes
measuring cognitive levels of subject mastery
(e.g. knowledge, comprehension, application,
analysis, etc.), on specific questions/prompts
related to the slo being considered via
examination questions (multiple choice or
essay), essay questions, laboratory exercises, or
other means as determined by individual
instructors. In each evaluation period, instructors
will assess class performance on the
questions/assignments relevant to the slo being
considered.
                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes




Students are expected to research a relevant       Yes
topic associated with the ecosystem visited and
make an oral presentation of findings to peers.
Their expertise is called upon by others during
the field experience.
Field notes and journals require that students
record their observations in a meaningful way
that encourages writing, reflection and critical
thinking.
Both of the above activities have been
incorporated into the field courses over the years
resulting in a richer learning experience.

Assessment methods will vary based on the         Yes
specific topics covered in the course.
Successful students will have mastered the         Yes
learning objectives stated for the course. The
level of success will be assessed through the
evaluation of student projects which require the
correct application of concepts and techniques
needed to successfully design, conduct and
analyze experiments. In addition to student
projects traditional examination methods are
used, testing multiple cognitive levels (including
knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis
and synthesis).


Methods of assessment will vary depending on      Yes
the specific topic covered.




                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes




Exams Written reports Oral presentations on       Yes
current events




                                                  Yes
                                                Yes

                                                Yes

                                                Yes




                                                Yes




                                                Yes




This is new course, discussions led to agreement Yes
as to the need for this course.




                                                Yes




none                                            Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
                                                Yes




                                                Yes




                                                Yes




Method of assessment will be quizzes and a final Yes
test of the subject matter.




Method of assessment will be quizzes and a final Yes
test of the subject matter.




Method of assessment will be: SLO-1: Students Yes
will be asked to analyze a chemical investigation
as embedded questions on an exam and results
will be measured over time and across all class
sections. SLO-2: Use of standardized questions
embedded in exams which address the SLO.
SLO-3: Students will prepare specifically-
selected, written lab reports for which a rubric
will be followed. The instructor will observe
student technique/performance and evaluate it
against a standard protocol.
Method of assessment will be: SLO-1: Students Yes
will be asked to analyze a chemical investigation
as embedded questions on an exam and results
will be measured over time and across all class
sections. SLO-2: Use of standardized questions
embedded in exams which address the SLO.
SLO-3: Students will prepare specifically-
selected, written lab reports for which a rubric
will be followed. The instructor will observe
student technique/performance and evaluate it
against a standard protocol.

Method of assessment will be quizzes and exams. Yes




Method of assessment will be quizzes and exams. Yes




Method of assessment will be: Use of                 Yes
standardized questions embedded in exams
which address the three SLOs and are measured
over time and across all class sections.




Method of assessment will be: SLO-1: Use of          Yes
standardized questions embedded in exams
which address the SLO. SLO-2: Students will
prepare specifically-selected, written lab reports
for which a rubric will be followed. The
instructor will observe student
technique/performance and evaluate it against a
standard protocol.
Method of assessment will be: SLO-1: Students Yes
will be asked to analyze a chemical investigation
as embedded questions on an exam and results
will be measured over time and across all class
sections. SLO-2: Use of standardized questions
embedded in exams which address the SLO.

Method of assessment will be: SLO-1: Students Yes
will be asked to analyze a chemical investigation
as embedded questions on an exam and results
will be measured over time and across all class
sections. SLO-2: Students will prepare
specifically-selected, written lab reports for
which a rubric will be followed. The instructor
will observe student technique/performance and
evaluate it against a standard protocol.

Method of assessment will be: SLO-1: Students Yes
will be asked to analyze a chemical investigation
as embedded questions on an exam and results
will be measured over time and across all class
sections. SLO-2: Use of standardized questions
embedded in exams which address the SLO.

Method of assessment will be: SLO-1: Students Yes
will be asked to analyze a chemical investigation
as embedded questions on an exam and results
will be measured over time and across all class
sections. SLO-2: Students will prepare
specifically-selected, written lab reports for
which a rubric will be followed. The instructor
will observe student technique/performance and
evaluate it against a standard protocol.

Method of assessment will be: SLO-1: Students Yes
will be asked to analyze a chemical investigation
as embedded questions on an exam and results
will be measured over time and across all class
sections. SLO-2: Students will prepare
specifically-selected, written lab reports for
which a rubric will be followed. The instructor
will observe student technique/performance and
evaluate it against a standard protocol.
Methods of assessment include exams and            Yes
formal experimental write-ups.




SLO-1: Students will be asked to analyze a       Yes
chemical investigation as embedded questions on
an exam and results will be measured over time
and across all class sections. SLO-2: Students
will prepare specifically-selected, written lab
reports for which a rubric will be followed. The
instructor will observe student
technique/performance and evaluate it against a
standard protocol. SLO-3: Students will
complete Organic Chemistry 221
lecture/laboratory with a grade of C or higher.

Methods of assessment include exams and            Yes
formal experimental write-ups.




Method of assessment will be: Students will         Yes
prepare specifically-selected, written lab reports
for which a rubric will be followed. The
instructor will observe student
technique/performance and evaluate it against a
standard protocol. Students will then be given a
comprehensive (national), final examination
administered by the American Chemical Society
and evaluate it against the national score results.

Mothods of assessment include exams, and           Yes
formal experimental write-ups.
Students currently demonstrate competency          Yes
through aural and written exams, oral
presentations, assignments in the langrage
laboratory, and collaborative speaking activities.
Faculty shared techniques for assessing listening
comprehension and speaking skills. There is
consensus regarding the importance of including
laboratory work in the overall assessment of
students.




Methods of Assessment will be determined each Yes
time new content is developed for this topics
course.




Students currently demonstrate competency          Yes
through aural and written exams, oral
presentations, assignments in the langrage
laboratory, and collaborative speaking activities.
Faculty shared techniques for assessing listening
comprehension and speaking skills. There is
consensus regarding the importance of including
laboratory work in the overall assessment of
students.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.
Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.
Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.


                                               Yes
FUNCTIONING AS A MEMBER OF A TEAM Yes
STUDENTS WILL CRITICALLY REVIEW
AND SYNTHESIZE THE FINDINGS
RELEVANT TO THE UNDERSTANDING OF
CHICANO POLITICS IN THE AMERICAN
POLITICAL SYSTEM.




Critical essays, class discussions and exams will Yes
privide systematic evaluations on how the course
content is enhancing their appreciation for
diversity within Mexican culture and also
between world cultures.




                                                 Yes




None                                             Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes
       Yes




       Yes




none   Yes




none   Yes
                                               Yes




                                               Yes




we revised our front desk evaluation form to   Yes
better capture data.
we revised our front desk evaluation form to   Yes
better capture data.




                                               Yes
Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes




pending                                          Yes
pending                                          Yes
The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.




The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.
The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.




The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.




The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.
The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.




The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.




The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.
The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.




The current method of assessment in the course   Yes
consists of faculty observation of performance
where the student presents repertoire learned
during the semester. this includes but is not
limited to demonstation/embodiment of specific
genres of movement, improved performance
quality, and ability to work as a group.




                                                 Yes




Portfolio review occurs as an exit requirement   Yes
for the class. Progression of work is seen in
chronological order.

Portfolio review occurs as an exit requirement   Yes
for the class. Progression of work is seen in
chronological order.

Drawing tests                                    Yes
Students will be able to interpret, describe and   Yes
produce correct 2 dimensional drawings to
describe 3 dimensional objects.

                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




Skills evaluation using AutoCAD                    Yes

                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes
                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes




1. An all assignment portfolio review is required Yes
on exit from this course. 2. Student's personal
reflections of service learning are written as the
final.
                                                Yes




                                                Yes




Added more written analysis of current issues - Yes
for example the impact of inflation on wages. A
variety of Assessment techniques are necessary
to measure student achievement included but not
limited to: - Objective and essay exams - Critical
analysis papers - Document analysis - Projects -
Web presentations

Added more written analysis of current issues - Yes
for example the impact of inflation on wages. A
variety of Assessment techniques are necessary
to measure student achievement included but not
limited to: - Objective and essay exams - Critical
analysis papers - Document analysis - Projects -
Web presentations

Exams and short papers will be used to asses.   Yes




                                                Yes
Exams and short papers will be used to asses.    Yes




Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.




Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.




Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.




Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.
Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.




Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.




Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.




Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.
Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.




Assessments consist of written quizzes and tests, Yes
class participation, and instructor evaluation of
lab activities.




                                                   Yes




1. Students will correctly utilize/use              Yes
stethoscopes, blood pressure cuffs, pen lights
and airway mangement equipment to assess
patients. 2. Students will evaluate vital sign
findings to gain insight into proper patient care
based on patient status. 3. Students will
demonstrate use of the guideline of 5 parts of the
run, review of differential diagnosises of similiar
patient medical and trauma conditions to provide
accurate care.
                                                    Yes




Changed homework assignment to one 18 page         Yes
document that will relate signs and symptoms to
disease pathology and treatment.
Added simulations.                               Yes




The current method of assessment used is as       Yes
follows: 1. Megacode- demonstration method as
a team leader in a scenario based situation
evaluated by instructor. Evaluating knowledge of
protocols, medications and techniques learned
during course. If student fails this station, he
may repeat the station one time. 2. Oral Airway-
demonstration method in a scenario based
situation evaluated by instructor. Evaluating the
students ability to correctly insert OPA/NPA,
and provide appropriate ventilation method using
a bag-valve mask. ET intubation will be
presented as a teaching station, not a testing
station. 3. CPR/AED- demonstration method,
evaluated by instructor in a scenario based
situation using current American Heart
Association guidelines for a one rescuer
response. 4. Written Exam- must pass AHA
multiple choice exam with a minimum score of
84%. If student fails the written exam, he may
retake the exam once. Note- instructors utilize
approved AHA grading and skills check sheets
when assessing students.
The current methods of assessment used are as    Yes
follows: Pretest is provided for the course,
however is considered optional. Student must
pass a written post-test with a score of 80% or
above. The student may repeat the written exam
after reviewing with the instructor. It is
recommended this be done on a different day.
This is at the discretion of the instructor.
Students must demonstrate proficiency as a team
leader in scenario based megacodes including: -
Cardiovascular emergencies - Child and family
interaction - Children with special care needs -
Emergency delivery and newborn stabilization -
Medical emergencies - Trauma




none, new course                                 Yes




Student demonstration of skills to perform CPR   Yes
to the Health Care Personnel Level. Student
demonstration of skills to operate an AED
Student taking and passing the American Heart
Association written exam
Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.




                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes




Short papers and group/individual projects were   Yes
added to better assess students’ knowledge and
understanding.




After several discussions and a review of         Yes
articulation, the English department plans to
revise the writing requirements to more closely
align with the UC and CSU requirements for
transfer.
After several discussions and a review of         Yes
articulation, the English department plans to
revise the writing requirements to more closely
align with the UC and CSU requirements for
transfer.

                                                  Yes
                                                  Yes
                                                  Yes




The English department faculty worked through     Yes
several revisions of the English 50 final exam
rubric and adopted the new rubric in the spring
of 2008.


                                                  Yes




The students are required to keep a logbook in    Yes
which they note all important information and
assignments gathered throughout the semester.
The notebook is graded for its content in
thoroughness and accuracy.
It was suggested that we introduce a project     Yes
requirement, in which students identify a need
and then design and build a solution.




It was suggested that we introduce a project     Yes
requirement, in which students identify a need
and then design and build a solution.
                                          Yes




                                          Yes




Methods of assessment include homework,   Yes
quizzes, projects and exams.
Methods of assessment include homework,      Yes
quizzes, projects and exams.




Methods of assessment include homework,      Yes
quizzes, projects, lab reports and exams.




Current assessments include exams, homework, Yes
in-class activities, projects, and quizzes.
Assessment of SLOs will be determined by a set
of multiple choice questions that will be
embedded into exams administered during the
semester. Questions will be designed to assess a
student’s ability to demonstrate an understanding
of each outcome. The assessment will be
administered to 50% of sections offered in the
fall semester of each year; sections to be
assessed will be chosen at random.
Students in this course demonstrate both a           Yes
passive and active ability to apply the rules for
standard American English speech production
through written analysis of English
words/syllables/phrases/sentences, and through
spoken language production. The spoken
language assessments consist of voice recording
tasks which are analyzed by both the students
and instructor. The written analysis is based on
listening tasks, and is also assessed by the
instructor to determine students' ability to apply
the rules they have learnt in class.




                                                     Yes




A final, in-class, 2.5 hour essay exam. The          Yes
faculty decided to share essay results for analysis.




                                                     Yes
This is single course which is only taught by one Yes
faculty member who frequently participates in
conferences and discussions and reads current
findings in the field in order to assure that
effective and current methods of assessment are
utilized in this course. When the course was
offered as multiple sections, the faculty members
teaching the courses discussed their assessments
regularly.




Students currently demonstrate competency         Yes
through module assessments. These assessments
will be periodically reviewed by faculty to
ensure their accuracy and effective assessment of
the module content.




Students currently demonstrate competency         Yes
through module assessments. These assessments
will be periodically reviewed by faculty to
ensure their accuracy and effective assessment of
the module content.




Students currently demonstrate competency         Yes
through module assessments. These assessments
will be periodically reviewed by faculty to
ensure their accuracy and effective assessment of
the module content.
Students currently demonstrate competency         Yes
through module assessments. These assessments
will be periodically reviewed by faculty to
ensure their accuracy and effective assessment of
the module content.




Students currently demonstrate competency          Yes
through module assessments. These assessments
will be periodically reviewed by faculty to
ensure their accuracy and effective assessment of
the module content. It has been decided to add a
final assessment test for the student's vocational
ESL area that will assess the entire program.




                                                  Yes




Written reports, Oral presentations, Exams.       Yes




                                                  Yes




Project based Exam                                Yes
Tests Final Exam Final Project Oral Presentation Yes
Class Participation




Exams Written reports Oral presentations on     Yes
current events




Coordinate and implementation of a fashion show Yes




                                                Yes




                                                Yes
       Yes




none   Yes




none   Yes




       Yes




       Yes




       Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
                                                Yes




none                                            Yes

                                                Yes




none                                            Yes




                                                Yes




                                                Yes




Currently, only one section of this course is   Yes
offered each year. Methods of assessment
inlcude: Class participation, exams, oral
presentations, quizzes and projects.
Faculty members use various methods of              Yes
assessment including (but not limited to)
traditional testing and quizzes, written responses,
presentations, special individual project
assignments, and group projects.




Faculty members use various methods of              Yes
assessment including (but not limited to)
traditional testing and quizzes, in class written
responses, oral presentations, special project
assignments, and group projects.




While written exams (including both objective       Yes
and subjective/ essay-type questions) are the
primary method of assessment, other measures
such as written assignments, group or individual
projects, class participation and attitudinal
surveys are used.




Faculty members use various methods of              Yes
assessment including (but not limited to)
traditional testing and quizzes, in class written
responses, oral presentations, special project
assignments, and group projects.




                                                    Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes




Students currently demonstrate competency          Yes
through aural and written exams, oral
presentations, assignments in the language
laboratory, and collaborative speaking activities.
Faculty shared techniques for assessing listening
comprehension and speaking skills. There is
consensus regarding the importance of including
laboratory work in the overall assessment of
students.
Students are assessed through quizzes, online      Yes
journaling, projects, research papers, classroom
dialogue, critique and group participation.




I evaluate the students work pojects By working    Yes
with the students one on one. I evaluate the
student implementation of SLO by oral
communication about the positive and negative
aspect of their projects.




Exams, projects, writing, assignments, and skill   Yes
demonstrations.

Exams, projects, writing assignments, and skill    Yes
demonstrations

1. Research reports evaluated for accuracy and     Yes
thoroughness. 2. Presentations, print-out
professional mounted on boards, reviewed by
class and instructor.

Students are assessed through quizzes,projects, Yes
research papers, classroom dialogue, critique and
group participation.
                                               Yes




We assess the students progress as we teach the Yes
course by working with the student one on one
during hands on project development. We assess
and evaluate the students knowledge by
reviewing 4 completed projects through out the
semester. The projects incorporate each of the
course objectives at different times.


Project based learning.                        Yes


project based learning                         Yes
Assessment methods for this class include tests Yes
using both multiple choice and short essay
questions. Also, an outside assignment is
required. Examples of such outside assignments
include article reviews, web-based research,
topic papers and photo assignments. Assessment
of SLO’s will be determined using a set of
multiple choice questions that will be embedded
into tests administered during the semester.
Questions will be designed to assess a student’s
ability to demonstrate an understanding of each
outcome. The assessment will be administered to
50% of sections offered during the fall semester
of each year with sections to be assessed chosen
at random.




                                                  Yes


Assessment methods for this class include          Yes
weekly in-class graded lab or field trip
assignments, and in-class quizzes using both
multiple choice and short essay questions.
Assessment of SLO's will be determined using a
set of multiple choice questions that will be
embedded into quizzes administered during the
semester. Questions will be designed to assess a
student's ability to demonstrate an understanding
of each outcome. The assessment will be
administered to 50% of sections offered during
the fall semester of each year with sections to be
assessed chosen at random.
Students' theoretical knowledge will be assessed Yes
through a combination of examinations, class
discussions, critical literature reviews, and
quizzes.




Students' theoretical knowledge will be assessed Yes
through a combination of examinations, class
discussions, classwork, and group projects.




                                                Yes
Assessment methods for this class include tests Yes
using both multiple choice and short essay
questions, and diagrams. Also, an outside
assignment is required. Examples of such outside
assignments include article reviews or topic
papers. Assessment of SLO’s will be determined
using a set of multiple choice questions that will
be embedded into tests administered during the
semester. Questions will be designed to assess a
student’s ability to demonstrate an understanding
of each outcome. The assessment will be
administered to 50% of sections offered during
the fall semester of each year with sections to be
assessed chosen at random.




Assessment methods for this class include tests Yes
using both multiple choice and short essay
questions. Also, an outside assignment that
includes either article reviews or a photo
assignment is required. Assessing the outside
assignment from past semesters has led to using
the photo assignment more frequently. The photo
assignment asks students to take pictures of and
describe potential natural hazard/disaster sites so
that they can recognize potential sites in the
field. Assessment of SLO’s will be determined
using a set of multiple choice questions that will
be embedded into tests administered during the
semester. Questions will be designed to assess a
student’s ability to demonstrate an understanding
of each outcome. The assessment will be
administered to 50% of sections offered during
the fall semester of each year with sections to be
assessed chosen at random.
Current methods of assessment include the use       Yes
of examinations, computer generated quizzes,
and computer exercises to measure student
learning. Furthermore, a research project is also
required of each student in order to confirm the
student's theoretical and technical competency.




Assessments include written tests, a field          Yes
assignment dealing with students' particular
physical geographic or geologic interests, and
participation in a field trip or written report
dealing with one specific province.


Current methods of assessment include the use     Yes
of examinations and computer learning modules
to gauge student understanding of class
materials. Students are given weekly learning
modules, whereby students are required to apply
their technical and theoretical knowledge to
answer the modules' questions. In addition,
students are required to undertake an individual-
designed or instructor-assigned semester project
that requires the demonstration of effective
organization and technical competencies.
Current methods of assessment include the use       Yes
of examinations and computer class exercises to
gauge student learning. Furthermore, a research
project is also required of each student in order
to confirm the student's technical competency.




Current methods of assessment include the use    Yes
of examinations and computer learning modules
to gauge student understanding of class
materials. In addition, students are required to
submit semester projects and research papers
which demonstrate their technical competencies.
Current methods of assessment incorporate           Yes
feedbacks from the students' internship
supervisors. In addition, each student must
submit a final paper in order to receive credit for
the course.




Current methods of assessment includes the use      Yes
of examinations and computer class exercises to
gauge student understanding. Furthermore, an
oral presentation is also required in order to
reinforce students' presentation skills and their
knowledge of remote sensing applications.
Students' technical and theoretical proficiencies Yes
will be assessed through a combination of
examination, research project, learning modules,
and skill quiz.




Students' technical and theoretical proficiencies   Yes
will be assessed through a combination of
examination, class discussion, class work, and
research projects.
Students' technical and theoretical proficiencies Yes
will be assessed through a combination of
examination, semester project, learning modules,
and skill quiz.




                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes




After discussions with other members of the      Yes
department it was decided that current
assessment methods are adequate. These
methods include, exams, assignments, field
problems and papers.
Assessment is currently accomplished through       Yes
imbedded questions in lab and field assignments
and in-class quizzes. All labs are cooperative in
that students work together in small groups,
using continuous feedback from the instructor to
advance progress towards the laboratory goals
for that day. All instructors who teach the course
have had input into this methodology.




Current assessment is done through exams and      Yes
written assignments specifically through
imbedded questions. As only one instructor
teaches this course, there have been no inter-
professorial discussions.


Part (A) above is assessed via imbedded           Yes
questions within the final exam, particularly via
a generalized geologic cross section from the
Pacific ocean to the Great Plains. Part (B) is
assessed via imbedded questions within the final
exam particularly via a drawing of a phylogenic
tree of the 2 orders of dinosaurs.




Part (A) above is assessed via imbedded           Yes
questions within the final exam, particularly via
a generalized geologic cross section from the
Pacific ocean to the Great Plains. Part (B) is
assessed via imbedded questions within the final
exam particularly via a drawing of a phylogenic
tree of the 2 orders of dinosaurs.




Currently, these outcomes are assed via          Yes
imbedded questions within the laboratory final
exam. The lab final consists of several
rock/fossil specimens and several geologic maps.
Discussions revealed that the current assessment
process is adequate.
Current assessment is through imbedded essay      Yes
questions given each day as the field course
progresses.




Students currently demonstrate competency          Yes
through aural and written exams, oral
presentations, assignments in the language
laboratory, and collaborative speaking activities.
Faculty shared techniques for assessing listening
comprehension and speaking skills. There is
consensus regarding the importance of including
laboratory work in the overall assessment of
students.




                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes
Methods of assessment may include quizzes,         Yes
essay exams, book reviews, history research
projects, classroom presentations.




The California government requirement was          Yes
discussed resulting in a significant revision in
discipline behavior towards this requirement.
See below.




Methods of assessment may include quizzes,         Yes
essay exams, book reviews, history research
projects, classroom presentations.
Methods of assessment may include quizzes,          Yes
essay exams, book reviews, history research
projects, classroom presentations.




Methods of assessment may include quizzes,          Yes
essay exams, book reviews, history research
projects, classroom presentations.




History faculty may use written assignments         Yes
including but not limited to: essay exams,
research papers, book reviews, document
analysis, Web presentations, historical
portfolios. History faculty may use oral
feedback, including but not limited to: Socaratic
method,, oral presentations, debates, historical
reenactments.


Methods of assesment include essay exams,           Yes
book reviews, history research projects, class
room presentations.
Methods of assessment may include quizzes,       Yes
essay exams, book reviews, historical research
projects, classroom presentations, etc.




Methods of assessment may include quizzes,       Yes
essay exams, book reviews, historical research
projects, classroom presentations, etc.
Methods of assessment may include quizzes,       Yes
essay exams, book reviews, historical research
projects, classroom presentations, etc.
Methods of assessment may include quizzes,       Yes
essay exams, book reviews, historical research
projects, classroom presentations, etc.




Methods of assessment may include quizzes,       Yes
essay exams, book reviews, historical research
projects, classroom presentations, etc.
Methods of assessment may include quizzes,       Yes
essay exams, book reviews, historical research
projects, classroom presentations, etc.




                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes




                                                 Yes
                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes




                                                  Yes




The addition of "Green" technology in the          Yes
making of fabrics and the end-use of fabric in the
environment has been included.




The student is required to develop a needs         Yes
assessment and plot the finished exercise for
portfolio inclusion independently. The SLO
integrates design content and the activity applies
all that has been learned in discrete skills and
with lab tools available in an authentic
application.
The student is required to develop a needs         Yes
assessment and plot the finished exercise for
portfolio inclusion independently. The SLO
integrates design content and the activity applies
all that has been learned in discrete skills and
with lab tools available in an authentic
application.
The student must be able to propose and analyze Yes
a project for which only pieces are provided. The
student must know how to create a drawing set
plan, section and elevation to ideate and
construct a personal design. They also must
appraise the proper software (Revit, 20-20 or
AutoCAD) to deliver a clear drawing set and
show the work in 3 dimensions.

Projects build through a succession of           Yes
increasingly complex challenges. Each project is
given a rubric for individual improvement.




                                                 Yes




Students currently demonstrate competency         Yes
through oral and written exams, written
homework assignments, assignments in the
language laboratory, in-class exercises, and
collaborative speaking activities. Faculty shared
techniques for assessing listening comprehension
and speaking skills. There is consensus regarding
the importance of including laboratory work in
the overall assessment of students.
Students currently demonstrate competency         Yes
through oral and written exams, written
homework assignments, assignments in the
language laboratory, in-class exercises, and
collaborative speaking activities. Faculty shared
techniques for assessing listening comprehension
and speaking skills. There is consensus regarding
the importance of including laboratory work in
the overall assessment of students.




Methods of assessment will be determined by      Yes
instructor each time new content is developed
for this topics course.




Students currently demonstrate competency         Yes
through oral and written exams, written
homework assignments, assignments in the
language laboratory, in-class exercises, and
collaborative speaking activities. Faculty shared
techniques for assessing listening comprehension
and speaking skills. There is consensus regarding
the importance of including laboratory work in
the overall assessment of students.
Students are assessed based on written             Yes
examination, aural (listening) tests, one-on-one
interviews and reviews of student-created voice
files for purposes of analyzing pronunciation,
oral presentations, language laboratory
assignments and group projects among other
collaborative activity.




Methods of assessment will be determined each      Yes
time new content is developed for this topics
course.




1. Students will analyze reference questions in    Yes
written and verbal exercises. 2.Students will
prepare a pathfinder which analyzes content,
accuracy, timeliness and usefulness of reference
sources. 3.Students will match referece requests
with reference sourses.
                                                   Yes




The methods of assessment described here are    Yes
the current methods of assessment. Now they are
available in Curricunet.
                                                 Yes


Objective exams, written exercises which        Yes
include analysis of medical terms and
interpretation of specific case studies to
demonstrate application of knowledge. Games of
recognition of word elements similar to "bingo"
to reinforce memorization and comprehension of
word elements as well as CD quizzes and games.

Methods of assessment may include class          Yes
participation, tests, group projects, homework,
and lab activities. Furthermore, there will be
both formal and informal discussions among
department members to determine whether
students are successful in their Prealgebra
courses. These discussions can be augmented
with data from our Research and Planning Office.




Methods of assessment may include class          Yes
participation, quizzes, tests, group projects,
homework, lab activities and papers.
Furthermore, there will be both formal and
informal discussions, amongst department
members, to determine whether students are
successful in this course.




After discussion with faculty who are teaching   Yes
this course, revisions have been made to provide
more opportunities outside of standard measures
(tests & quizzes) for students in this class to
demonstrate what they've learned. These include
individual and group projects, individual and
group demonstrations and presentations, and
adding an oral component to written tests in
which students are asked to demonstrate a
concept or solve a problem.
Methods of assessment include quizzes, tests,      Yes
and may include some projects. These methods
were reviewed and discussed by faculty who
teach this course. There are no current
recommendations for revision.




Methods of assessment include quizzes, tests,    Yes
and some group projects. These methods were
reviewed and discussed by faculty who teach this
course. There are no current recommendations
for revision.

Current assessments include exams, homework,       Yes
in-class activities, projects and quizzes.
Assessments will consist of a set of questions
that will be embedded into exams administered
during the semester. Questions will be designed
to assess a student's ability to demonstrate and
understanding of each outcome. Assessments
will be administered during the fall semester of
each year.




Methods of assessment may include class            Yes
participation, quizzes, tests, group projects,
homework, lab activities and papers. Each of
these assesment tools are used to evaluate both
the calculus concepts, skills, and applications
found in the social sciences and business.
Current assessments include exams, homework,        Yes
in-class activities, projects and quizzes.
Assessments will consist of a set of questions
that will be embedded into exams administered
during the semester. Questions will be designed
to assess a student's ability to demonstrate an
understanding of each outcome. Assessments
will be administered in the fall semester of each
year.




Methods of assessment may include class             Yes
participation, quizzes, tests, group projects,
homework, lab activities and papers.
Furthermore, there will be both formal and
informal discussions, amongst department
members, to determine whether students are
successful in their college level courses.




Current assessments include exams, homework,        Yes
in-class activities, projects, and quizzes.
Assessments will consist of a set of questions
that will be embedded into exams administered
during the semester. Questions will be designed
to assess a student's ability to demonstrate an
understanding of each outcome. Assessments
will be administered in the fall semester of each
year.
Methods of assessment may include class            Yes
participation, tests, group projects, homework,
lab activities and papers. Furthermore, there will
be both formal and informal discussions among
department members to determine whether
students are successful in their future algebra
courses. These discussions can be augmented
with data from our Research and Planning Office.




Methods of assessment include quizzes, tests,     Yes
and may include some projects. These methods
were reviewed and discussed by faculty who
teach this course. There are no current
recommendations for revision.

                                                  Yes




Methods of assessment may include class           Yes
participation, quizzes, tests, group projects,
homework, lab activities and papers.
Furthermore, there will be both formal and
informal discussions, amongst department
members, to determine whether students are
successful in this course.




Methods of assessment include quizzes, tests,    Yes
and some group projects. These methods were
reviewed and discussed by faculty who teach this
course. There are no current recommendations
for revision.

Methods of assessment include quizzes, tests,    Yes
and some group projects. These methods were
reviewed and discussed by faculty who teach this
course. There are no current recommendations
for revision.
Methods of assessment may include class          Yes
participation, quizzes, tests, group projects,
homework, lab activities and papers.
Furthermore, there will be both formal and
informal discussions amongst department
members, to determine whether students are
successful in this course.




Methods of assessment may include class
participation, quizzes, tests, group projects,
homework, lab activities and papers.
Furthermore, there will be both formal and
informal discussions, among department
members, to determine whether students are
successful in Math 50B. These discussions can
be augmented by data from our Research and
Planning Office.
Methods of assessment may include class           Yes
participation, quizzes, tests, group projects,
homework, lab activities and papers.
Furthermore, there will be both formal and
informal discussions, among department
members, to determine whether students are
successful in intermediate algebra. These
discussions can be augmented by data from our
Research and Planning Office.




Methods of assessment may include class           Yes
participation, quizzes, tests, group projects,
homework, lab activities and papers.
Furthermore, there will be both formal and
informal discussions, amongst department
members, to determine whether students are
successful in this course.




                                                  Yes




Assessment in this course has been based on        Yes
primarily on testing different cognitive levels of
subject mastery (ranging from knowledge,
comprehension, application, analysis and
synthesis) via exams. In addition students work
in small groups (2-4) to develop their own
research project. Students research scientific
literature to analyze background information for
their project. They then apply the scientific
method to create their own research experiment,
which they actually perform in the laboratory.
The project culminates in a formal written report
summarizes their literature research, describes
their experimental protocol, analyses their data
mathematically and in graph form, and
synthesizes conclusions from analysis.
Assessment in this course has been based on        Yes
primarily on testing different cognitive levels of
subject mastery (ranging from knowledge,
comprehension, application, analysis and
synthesis) via exams. In addition students work
in small groups (2-4) to develop their own
research project. Students research scientific
literature to analyze background information for
their project. They then apply the scientific
method to create their own research experiment,
which they actually perform in the laboratory.
The project culminates in a formal written report
summarizes their literature research, describes
their experimental protocol, analyses their data
mathematically and in graph form, and
synthesizes conclusions from analysis.


1. Written assignments and tests. 2. Written and    Yes
aural assignments and tests. 3. Written
assignments and tests. 4. Written assignments
and tests.




1. Written assignments and tests. 2. Written        Yes
assignments and tests. 3. Written assignments
and tests. 4. Written assignments and tests.




Revisions decided upon: 1.Arrive at a               Yes
standardized music reading test that will insure
that students are reading at the required fluency
for success in the course. 2. Determine a set of
successful outcomes that will be uniform across
course sections and various teachers.
                                              Yes




The current method of assessment in the course Yes
consists of a 'faculty jury' - i.e. a forum where
the student presents repertoire learned during the
semester, along with a demonstration of any
techniques learned during the semester (here
technique being the specific instrumental, rather
than musical/interprative skills needed to master
the instrument). In discussion with the faculty
members who teach this course, it was decided
that all the faculty in the instrumental section
would meet as one panel, rather than dividing the
instrumental panel into two sections. Although
this is more time consuming, it gives the student
vaulable feedback, in terms of the hand written
faculty assesments that each student receives of
his/her performance.
At present, I am the only faculty member who       Yes
has taught the course.




Revisions decided upon: 1. Arrive at a            Yes
standardizxed music reading test that will insure
that students are reading at the required fluency
for success in the course. 2. Determine a set of
successful outcomes that will be unifrom across
course sections and various teachers.




                                                   Yes




In addition to the 'demonstration' method of       Yes
assessment - i.e. the student must actually play
the piece he/she has learned, the addition of
written comments of other student's
performances was added as a way of refining
their critical abilities.
Revisions which were made as a result of            Yes
discussions with faculty members who teach this
course included the following: Students who
engage in an experimental topic will create a
contract, under the supervision of the instructor
which will state the specific goals the student
wishes to achieve in the particular experimental
topic selected. For example, if the student wishes
to learn a number of 'art songs' in Italian which
are not part of the standard curriculum, the
student would choose the songs, set up a timeline
(again with the instructor's help) for when in the
semester the songs should be learned, and then
how they will be assesed at the end. For
example, the student might agree that by the end
of the semester, they will be performed for a
student recital, and evaluated by the instructor of
record, as well as a guest evluator.


Students will be assessed on their critical        Yes
thinking skills on comprehensive exams,
research & literature reviews, and written papers.




Students will be assessed on their critical        Yes
thinking skills on comprehensive exams,
research & literature reviews, and written papers.




Class work done by students already includes     Yes
practice and perfection of interview and
assessment techniques, so no changes are needed.
Class work done by students already includes     Yes
practice and perfection of interview and
assessment techniques, so no changes are needed.




                                                      Yes




Bi-weekly discussion boards and examinations          Yes
require students to think critically and to utilize
evidenced based practices, so no changes were
needed.




                                                      Yes




Methods of assessment have been expanded to           Yes
include not only exams and homework, but also
class work, projects, and quizzes.
Current assessments include exams, homework, Yes
in-class activities, projects, and quizzes.
Assessment of SLOs will be determined by a set
of multiple choice questions that will be
embedded into exams administered during the
semester. Questions will be designed to assess a
student’s ability to demonstrate an understanding
of each outcome. The assessment will be
administered to 50% of sections offered in the
fall semester of each year; sections to be
assessed will be chosen at random.
A variety of lab activities provide hands-on         Yes
practice for each learning outcome. NOAA
marine charts are incorporated into multiple
activities. One lab specifically focuses on the
interpretation of tide charts; reference to tides is
also made on several field trips. The Advanced
Floating Lab run by the Ocean Institute in Dana
Point provides an opportunity for students to
practice measurement and sampling techniques
and, using acquired data, synthesize multiple
concepts from the course. Current assessments
include quizzes and field trip reports.
Assessment of SLO’s will be determined using a
set of multiple choice questions that will be
embedded into quizzes administered during the
semester. Questions will be designed to assess a
student’s ability to demonstrate an understanding
of each outcome. The assessment will be
administered to 50% of sections offered in the
fall semester of each year; sections to be
assessed will be chosen at random.
Current assessments include exams, homework, Yes
in-class activities, field trip reports, projects,
quizzes. A variety of lab activities provide hands-
on practice for each learning outcome. For
example, NOAA marine charts are incorporated
into multiple activities. One lab specifically
focuses on the interpretation of tide charts;
reference to tides is also made on several field
trips. The Advanced Floating Lab run by the
Ocean Institute in Dana Point provides an
opportunity for students to practice measurement
and sampling techniques and, using acquired
data, synthesize multiple concepts from the
course. Assessments will be determined using a
set of multiple choice questions that will be
embedded into quizzes and exams administered
during the semester. Questions will be designed
to assess a student’s ability to demonstrate an
understanding of each outcome. Assessments
will be administered in the fall semester of each
year.
1. Instructor visually observes students'            Yes
keyboarding techniques regularly within the first
several weeks of the course. 2. Students are
timed incrementally during each chapter. For
example, students will be timed for 1 minute for
the first third of the course; 1- and 3-minute
timings for the second third of the course; and, 1-
, 3-, and 5-minute timings for the last third of the
course (approximately). 3. Students create and
edit a number of business documents in each of
the categories listed above; ie., memos, letters,
tables, and reports. Review documents are
scrutinized for mastering of concepts learned and
practiced.
1. Instructors evaluate students' 1-, 3-, and 5-    Yes
minute timings based on course speed goals with
an accuracy goal of 1 error or less for each
minute. 2. Instructors evaluate the final copies of
selected business documents for correct
document formatting and zero errors. 3.
Instructors evaluate the final copies of selected
business documents for content, correct
document formatting and zero errors.




                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
                                              Yes




                                              Yes




This is a new course. Methods of assessment   Yes
were discussed and agreed on by philosophy
faculty.




                                              Yes




                                              Yes
Methods of assessment include exams, quizzes,   Yes
and lab reports.




Methods of Assessment may include, but are not Yes
limited to Exams/Tests and Quizzes for the
course and the increase of passing rate in 230 for
the ultimate goal.




Methods of assessment include formal            Yes
experimental write-ups and oral interviews
which address the stated SLO. These are
evaluated using an established rubric.
Methods of assessment include formal               Yes
experimental write-ups and oral interviews
which address the stated SLO. These are
evaluated using an established rubric.


Political Science faculty members may use           Yes
written assignments, including, but not limited
to: • Essay exams • Research papers • Book
reviews • Document analysis • Web Discussion
Boards Political Science faculty members may
use oral feedback, including, but not limited to: •
Socratic method • Oral presentations • Debates •
Political Reenactments
A meeting between the two full-time faculty        Yes
teaching the course was held during the fall
semester to review SLOs as developed by other
institutions and to discuss which SLOs would
best fit in the context of Palomar College given
its mission statement. No revisions, just
discussion occurred.




Political Science faculty members may use           Yes
written assignments, including, but not limited
to: • Essay exams • Research papers • Book
reviews • Document analysis • Web Discussion
Boards Political Science faculty members may
use oral feedback, including, but not limited to: •
Socratic method • Oral presentations • Debates
Political Science faculty members may use           Yes
written assignments, including, but not limited
to: • Essay exams • Research papers • Book
reviews • Document analysis • Web Discussion
Boards Political Science faculty members may
use oral feedback, including, but not limited to: •
Socratic method • Oral presentations • Debates •
IR/Historical Reenactments




Within the department, the dialogue regarding      Yes
SLOs in Californai Govenment has been
initiated.




Only one faculty member presently teaches this     Yes
class.




No revisions were made.                            Yes
Psyychology faculty met and agreed that we tend Yes
to share the same general methods of assessment
(e.g., multiple-choice tests, short-answer/essay,
etc.). No revisions were suggested.




Students are currently assessed using a variety of Yes
methods. These include taking exams and
quizzes using mult. choice, true-false, and essay
questions, writing short papers or research
papers, engaging in reflective writing within and
outside of the classroom, and/or participating in
class discussions, class demonstrations or service
learning activities in the larger community.
These assessments will be periodically reviewed
to ensure that they continue to effectively
measure student success.
                                                  Yes




The methods of assessment were expanded           Yes
beyond exams/tests to also include papers, oral
presentations, book reviews, term papers,
Discussion Boards, blogs and participation in
service learning projects.
                                                  Yes




I am the only faculty member who teaches this     Yes
course. I do ocassionally revise the assessment
methods.




Current methods of assessment include: 1.        Yes
Traditional exams and quizzes composed of
multiple-choice, true-false, and/or short-
answer/essay questions. 2. Written papers within
and outside the classroom. 3. Participation in
class discussions, class demonstrations, and/or
service learning activities in the larger
community.
I am the only full-time faculty member in the      Yes
Alcohol and Other Drug Studies program. I
discussed student learning outcomes and
assessment methods with the AODS adjunct
faculty at a special meeting in August 2008. I
also carefully reviewed the California
Association of Alcohol and Drug Educator's
(CAADE)guidelines for Alcohol and Drug
Studies Programs within Higher Education. As a
result of the meeting, and consulting with faculty
who teach or have taught the course, assessment
methods were clarified and revised.


                                                  Yes
                                                 Yes




Knowledge of anatomical and physiological         Yes
concepts in physiological psychology are
primarily assessed via three quizzes and three
examinations. The varied laboratory exercises
and assignments provide assessment of scientific
research via written and oral presentation
formats, conceptual development of content via
hands-on, interactive dissections, individual and
group assignments, critical thinking exercises,
and learning games.
                                                  Yes




Students are currently assessed using a variety of Yes
methods. These include taking exams and
quizzes using multiple choice, true/false, and
essay responses, designing and carrying out
group research projects, writing up the results of
those projects in APA editorial style, and
presenting the results in oral and poster formats.
These assessments will be periodically reviewed
to ensure that they continue to effectively
measure student success.
                                               Yes




QuickBooks is taught in various formats through Yes
Bus. Adm., ROP (RCSIS) and Venture;
discussions among faculty teaching in the
various departments has led to much dialogue
and sharing of teaching methodologies, textbook
decisions, delivery and resources; and
modification of course outlines, syllabi and
delivery via Blackboard.
See complete CLIC information in RCSIS 127, Yes
Word; also at
http://www.palomar.edu/ROPcompapps/CLIC/cli
c__computer_literacy_informa.htm.




Current methods for assessing this particular   Yes
course are adequate. The new Computer Literacy
pre and post testing is discussed in the next
sections and will enhance methods of assessment
in all computer classes.




Projects Exams Skills Demonstrations Writing   Yes
Assignments
Students are assessed through projects, research   Yes
papers, classroom dialogue, critique and group
participation.


No revisions were made.                            Yes




                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes
                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




                                                   Yes




The following were identified as specific           Yes
assessment tools for the overarching outcomes
listed above: Culminating Project – Group
project working through the problem solving,
reflective judgment model and culminating in
individual research paper and group
presentation. Final Exam – Essay analysis and
evaluation requiring proficiency demonstration
of critical reading and thinking skills. Reflective
Journals – Written throughout semester requiring
demonstration of metacognition and self-analysis
of developing cognitive processing.




Twice a month we review students' progress as     Yes
reflected on the Read On CAI management
program analysis. At the conclusion of the class
we review the Pre and Post test scores on the
TABE.
Continue pre and post testing of word attack      Yes
skills and integrate a miscue analysis assessment
for reading comprehension.
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
Outcome #1 will be assessed by way of in-class Yes
discussions, quizzes, and exams (i.e., formats of
multiple-choice, short answer, and essay)
Outcome #2 will be evaluated through in-class
discussion, collaborative exercises, and essays
for exams. Outcome #3 will be assessed by way
of in-class exercises, quizzes, oral presentations,
essays for exams, and a research paper. Outcome
#4 will be evaluated through in-class
discussions, collaborative exercises, and essays
for exams. Outcome #5 will assessed by way of
in-class discussion, reflection papers on visits to
religious communities, oral presentations, and
essays for exams.
Outcome #1 will be assessed by way of in-class Yes
discussion and essays for exams. Outcome #2
will be evaluated through quizzes and exams
(i.e., formats of multiple-choice, short answers,
and essay). Outcome #3 will be assessed of in-
class discussions, collaborative exercises,
quizzes, and exams (i.e., formats of multiple-
choice, short answers, and essay). Outcome #4
will be evaluated by way of in-class discussions,
collaborative exercises, reflection papers about
visits to religious communities, and essays for
exams. Outcome #5 will be assessed through in-
class discussions, collaborative exercises, and
exams (i.e., formats of multiple-choice and
essay).
Outcome #1 will be assessed by way of in-class    Yes
discussions, collaborative exercises, research
papers, and exams (i.e., multiple-choice and
essay formats). Outcome #2 will be evaluated
through collaborative exercises, quizzes,
research papers, and exams (i.e., multiple-
choice, short answer, and essay formats).
Outcome #3 will be assessed by way of in-class
discussions, collaborative exercises, and exams
(i.e., multiple-choice and essay formats).
Outcome #4 will be evaluated through in-class
discussions, reflections papers about visits to
religious communities, and essays for exams.
Outcome #5 will be assessed by way of in-class
discussions, and a research paper.




There has not yet been the opportunity for        Yes
revisions, as this is a new course.
Yes




Yes




Yes
Students are currently assessed using a variety of Yes
methods. These include taking exams and
quizzes using mult. choice, true-false, and essay
questions, writing short papers or research
papers, engaging in reflective writing within and
outside of the classroom, and/or by participating
in class discussions, class demonstrations or
service learning activities in the larger
community. These assessments will be
periodically reviewed to ensure that they
continue to effectively measure student success.




Students are currently assessed using a variety of Yes
methods. These include taking exams and
quizzes using mult. choice, true-false, and essay
questions, writing short papers or research
papers, engaging in reflective writing within and
outside of the classroom, and/or by participating
in class discussions, class demonstrations or
service learning activities in the larger
community. These assessments will be
periodically reviewed to ensure that they
continue to effectively measure student success.
Students are currently assessed using a variety of Yes
methods. The methods used by different
instructors include taking exams and quizzes
using multiple-choice, true-false, and essay
questions; writing research papers; engaging in
reflective writing within and outside of the
classroom; participating in class discussions,
demonstrations, presentations, and other
projects; and taking part in service-learning
activities in the larger community. These
assessments will be periodically reviewed to
ensure that they continue to effectively measure
student success.




Students are currently assessed using a variety of Yes
methods. These include taking exams and
quizzes, writing short papers or research papers,
engaging in reflective writing within and outside
of the classroom, and/or by participating in class
discussions, class demonstrations or service
learning activities in the larger community.
These assessments will be periodically reviewed
to ensure that they continue to effectively
measure student success.
I am the only full time faculty member teaching    Yes
this course. I have reviewed syllabi and course
goals presented in the American Sociological
Association's teaching guidebook for Medical
Sociology. I have also reviewed course material
for the Sociology of Health and Illness as it is
taught in other community colleges.




Students currently demonstrate competency          Yes
through aural and written exams, oral
presentations, assignments in the language
laboratory, and collaborative speaking activities.
Faculty shared techniques for assessing listening
comprehension and speaking skills. There is
consensus regarding the importance of including
laboratory work in the overall assessment of
students.
Students will write essays for several            Yes
examinations administered during the semester;
additionally, a 2,500 word research paper will be
assigned.




1) Participation in the tournament planning         Yes
process will be assessed through the direction
and supervision of the coaching staff/instructors
in class meetings prior to the tournament date. 2)
Hosting and managing a speech tournament will
be assessed by student participation on site
during the tournament and closely montored by
the coaching staff. 3) The ability to solve
problems that occur at tournaments will be
assessed by student participation on site during
the tournament and closely monitored by the
coaching staff. 4) Data collection and tabulation
skills will be assessed by student participation on
site at the tournament and closely observed by
the coaching staff.


1. Ability to manage nervousness will be tested    Yes
through physical observation and constructive
criticism of argument performance. 2. Student
capability to develop arguments supported by
well-warranted research will be measured
through instructor and peer feedback. 3. Student
facility with basic debate knowledge will be
measured by written feedback provided by
judges in intramural or intercollegiate
competition.
1) The students ability to research, write, and    Yes
deliver a speech will be assessed by feedback
from the instuctor during one- on-one coaching
appointments, judges at speech tournaments, and
student peers. 2) The students ability to evaluate
a speech will be assessed by observing their
speeches on video and by observing their peers
at practices and tournaments.

N/A                                               Yes




1) Recognition of rules and expectations for      Yes
various forensics events will be assessed through
one-on-one coaching with teachers and peers. 2)
Participation for competing, administering, and
hosting forensics tournaments will be assessed
by attending team practices and tournaments
throughout the semester. 3) Writing, editing,
memorizing and delivering individual events will
be assessed through practice, coaching sessions,
and critiques from judges. 4)Case construction,
presentation, and refutation in debates will be
assessed through practice, coaching sessions,
and critiques from judges.

The implementation of this class has change       Yes
considerably since this outlive was last
reviewed. Theatre provides an excellent medium
to address all learning styles and multiple
intelligences. As a result, we have discovered,
that we have a dynamic array of assessment
techniques that cover the gamut of our student's
strengths and weaknesses. Previously, instructors
assess primarily through testing. Each faculty
member has developed exciting group projects,
presentations, visual representations and multi-
media reports.
Our primary mode of assessment is observation Yes
of student work in presentation and performance.
We have devised rubrics to provide quick
feedback to students, but a great deal of the
assessment happen in the hands on coaching of
students through the exercises and etudes. We do
use some quizzes and or study guides to assess
students' facility with basic concepts and
terminology.




                                                Yes




1. Knowledge of anatomy and physiology can be Yes
assessed through through testing, quizzes and
illustrated reports. 2.Students progress in relation
to posture, relaxation, breath, voice and presence
is assessed through exercises and practice
occurring regularly throughout the semester. 3 &
4. Projection, articulation, expressive
interpretation and communication of text will be
assessed through performance etudes and
projects as well as annotated scripts. This is a
new class so there are no recommendations for
revision.

                                                Yes
Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes




Yes
                                               Yes




                                               Yes




Students will be observed performing pipe      Yes
welding safely in the lab.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.
Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.




Faculty reviewed the laundry list and added new Yes
assessments based on the student learning
outcomes. New assessments will be employed to
evaluate the new comprehensive competencies.
a. Student comprehension of SLOs will be            Yes
assessed at the end of each semester in each
section of ZOO 200. b. Assessment will consist
of an online multiple-choice exam with
questions randomly drawn from a database of
relevant questions designed to address the SLOs.
Although randomly selected, several questions
representing each of the course SLOs will be
present on the exam. c. The exam will consist of
five categories of questions: i. Histology ii. Body
organization iii. Organ system function iv. Gross
anatomy v. Evolutionary relationships d. The
exam will be available online. Students will be
required to complete it prior to the start of the
final exam. As encouragement, the online exam
will provide students with immediate feedback
and can serve as a review for the final exam.


Students are assessed utilizing a variety of      Yes
methods in this course. Understanding of factual
material presented in lecture is assessed
primarily by exams and quizzes, including
multiple-choice, matching, labeling, short
answer, and essay questions. These questions
test both the students' ability to recall and
evaluate factual information and their ability to
analyze and synthesize by presenting them with
novel scenarios and asking them to reach
conclusions based on evidence. The students'
ability to analyze, evaluate, summarize, and
present experimental data is determined with a
series of lab exercises, which includes student-
designed experiments.
Complete Course
Tests and homework problems will demonstrate whether students can successfully
master the creation and analysis of financial statements.


1 Students will successfully demonstrate mastery of the preparation of the correct
tax return for a single person by preparing a correct return. 2 Students will
successfully demonstrate mastery of the preparation of the correct tax return for a
married couple by preparing a correct return.




Students who successfully complete this course will be able to produce complete
and accurate tax returns that reflect the fact situations at hand.




Students will prepare sample tax returns for corporations, partnerships, and S
corporation. Instructor will grade tax returns and give student feedback as to
correctness.




1. Integration of accounting concepts and practice with a computerized accounting
system is demonstrated by keeping accurate company books, and by successfully
completing hands-on exams that test computerized accounting problems and
scenarios.
2. Students present their completed labs, based on real and created sample
company files on a weekly basis for review and grading. Students are observed
weekly working on these labs. Students also completed a hands-on mid-term and
final exam and files are presented to instructor.
3. Students discuss and report during and after taking the course how they are
using the skills learned in class in their businesses and at home.
Students will prepare sample payroll and sales tax returns. Instructor will grade
tax returns and give students feedback as to correctness.
1. Instructor will identify performance levels for justification and implication of
their desired academic, athletic, and career goals strategies and create a grading
rubric or other scoring method. At least 70% of students will achieve proficiency
or mastery level on all criteria. 2. Instructor will identify performance levels for
study skills and learning strategies and create a grading rubric or other scoring
method. At least 80% of students will achieve proficiency or mastery level.




1.Map quizzes with questions based on ecosystems and subsistence patterns.
Culture Paper requires student to identify culture area, ecosystems, resultant
subsistence patterns, social relationships and religious institutions reflective of
that culture's adaptation to particular ecosystems. Language phyla is also
identified and evaluated in terms of cultural traits and origins. 2.Cultural Paper
(Case Study) or Presentations will include multiple examples of diversity for a
given culture viewed from the past to present. 3.Relevant in class Discussion
questions will relate to American Indian diversity and significance within a global
setting. Culture Paper or Presentations include contemporary assessment of status
and cultural integity evaluated in a modern global context. 4.Course Quizzes,
Assignments and Examinations will have questions relating to current socio-
geopolitical issues and traditional or indignous knowledge. Cultural Paper or
presentations will include examples of traditional knowledge and current global
relevance. 5.Quizzes, Assignmnets and Examinations include material derived
from Western academic and indigenous disciplines. The Cultural Paper (Case
The students ability through objective testing are able to identify and appreciate
distinctive styles of traditional and contemporary American Indian music.

Students who successfully complete this course are able to demonstrate their
ability to recognize Native American art from a basic beginning point. Successful
students will further be able articulate the influence and relevance of Native
American art within society.
Students write research reports that demonstrate they have found relationships
between Luiseno and other Uto-Aztecan languages such as Hopi, etc. We observe
students using the grammar and syntax of Luiseño correctly, and students describe
Luiseño as a living language at the core of a vibrant culture.




Students write research reports in which they use the grammar and syntax of
Luiseño correctly. In oral and written reports, students use culturally relevant
terminology to participate in Luiseño as a living language at the core of a vibrant
culture.




Students write research reports in which they use the grammar and syntax of
Luiseño correctly. In oral and written reports, students use culturally relevant
terminology to participate in Luiseño as a living language at the core of a vibrant
culture.




Students write research reports in which they use the grammar and syntax of
Luiseño correctly. In oral and written reports, students use culturally relevant
terminology to participate in Luiseño as a living language at the core of a vibrant
culture.
1. Exam questions include the history of scholarship. In two papers, a case study
of one Plains group and an event analysis the student will include an introduction
to the primary scholar's treatment of that assigned subject. 2. Exam questions
include how cultural traits function in the adaptation to a given environment.
Also, the case study will include the specific shared aspects of the particular
group and 'classic' Plains culture traits; and any traits diverting from the 'norm'. 3.
Exam questions will elicit overall rapid changes that occurred for various Plains
cultures. The case study will include the reasons for success and failure of cultural
changes for that particular group. 4.Both papers will require a review of literature
and the various points of view about a culture and even more so in respect to the
event analysis. 5. Exam questions will be directed to evaluating a cultural trait
objectively and its function relative to a particular culture and time. In both papers
the student will be asked to focus on techonological and religous change for their
case study and in terms of impact on an event.


1. Exam questions will deal with examples of biological and cultural adaptations
in the Americas. The case study paper includes the traditional cultures specific
biological and cultural adatations to a pre-Columbian (<1492)world. 2. Exam
questions will include examples of general and specific adaptive strategies that
succeeded or failed when Native American civilizations such as when the Maya
crashed and rebuilt. The case study will track cultural changes in prehistory to
contact and to the present for the chosen Native American group. 3. Exams will
include questions of specific examples of different or contrasting approaches to
similar environmnets. 4. In both papers, the Native American group case study
and innovation paper students will provide examples of the contribution of
different academinc disciplines to their topic. 5. Exams will include questions on
the Columbian Exchange and the impact of various innovations such as the potato
or religious freedom. A specific paper on a Native American innovation will cover
impact in the Native American context and the rest of the world. 6. Exam
questions and discussion include Native Americans in the Americas today. The
case study paper includes a section on contemporary status and survival today of
their particular chosen culture.


A student will compare two different tribal groups in Indian Country describing
contemporary issues and concern for American Indian peoples today.
1. Exam questions link adaptations to regions and exemplary sites and artifacts.
The practicum identifies artifacts in terms of area and culture. 2. Essays address
moundbuilder debate in terms of history of archeaology and findings based on
contrasting methodologies. The site report includes a history of excavations and
again different findings. 3. Exam questions deal specifically with cultural
successes and failures with specific cultures such as the Hopewell or Anasazi. 4.
Exam questions include differing assessments of cultural lifestyles and the site
report includes Native American attitudes toward interpretation of the site. 5.
Essays specifically deal with the effects of NAGPRA. Site report concludes with
status of site and CRM plan.




1. Exam questions are focused on the classic California Indian artistic regions and
the subtle style variations in technique and design. 2. To be succesful in the
identification for exams on the styles of basketry and other media in the classic
California artistic regions students must elicit environmental factors driven by
media sources, function and spiritual connections to geographical space. 3. The
practicum involves the students delving into the technical and cultural context of
an art form they choose. Museum/ exhibit reviews also require analysis of
technical and culture contexual analysis. 4. Part of the practicum project and
documentation is to view the final artistic product in terms of a process from
material acquisition to use of the art form. 5. Exam questions cover changes that
occur from the Hispanic/Mission Period to Anglo American Period colonialism. 6.
Exam questions and museum/exhibit reviews include contemporary development
in California Indian art. Some instructors include an assessment of a
contemporary California Indian artist to include an evaluation of traditional
impulses to global influences.
1. Exam questions will include recognition of regional variation and the resultant
different cultures. 2. A case study assignment begins with an analysis of the
choosen culture's environment, subsistence and how those relate to social and
religious systems. 3. Exam questions, readings and written work incorporate an
expectation of the recognition of a relativistic approach. 4. Exam questions
specifically deal with the evidence in Cook's work. Also, the impact of contact is
integrated in the case study paper. 5. Classic references on California Indian
cultures are included in the readings and discussion related to Ishi and again the
case study paper includes a review of literature. 6. Exam questions will include
contemporary California Indian cultures. The final component of the case study
must include contemporary development and status of the group the student chose.
Also, a required trip to one of our local reservations includes a written assessment.




Students write research reports in which they use the grammar and syntax of
Luiseño correctly. In oral and written reports, students use culturally relevant
terminology to participate in Luiseño as a living language at the core of a vibrant
culture.
Students write research reports in which they use the grammar and syntax of
Luiseño correctly. In oral and written reports, students use culturally relevant
terminology to participate in Luiseño as a living language at the core of a vibrant
culture.




The learning outcomes are measured by essay exams that demonstrate the use of
proper legal terminology.
The student is observed while working on the hypothetical case.
They evaluate written reports for content, form, language.


The successful student will be able to describe the various steps in the criminal
justice system. The options available to both the prosecutor and defense attorneys
and the ramificaitons to each side.




The successful student who is given a set of facts describing a criminal act will be
able to access the facts and identify the crime that occurred, what the elements are
that need to be proven, state the level of crime, and the type of crimnal intent.




Demonstration methods will vary by topic, but could include (but are not limited
to written reports, demonstration of field techniques, or completion of
independent research projects.
The student will demonstrate his or her proficiency operating a 35mm SLR
camera. The student will exhibit his or her knowledge of the rules of evidence by
analyizing a case study. The student will demonstrate his or her ability to do
macro and micro photography with a 35mm camera.


Demonstration methods will vary by topic, but could include (but are not limited)
to written reports, demonstration of field techniques, or completion of
independent research projects.




1. Exam questions focus on American art forms and the need for data from
different academic disciplines to understand the context of any particular art form.
Students also do two artist/art reviews that require analysis using different
disciplines. 2. Exam questions include the basic levels of the evolution of an
individual's identity in terms of cognitive domains revealing beliefs and values.
Each student produces an essay on family history that analyzes factors shaping
their own individual identity. 3. The artist/art review requires an analysis of the
example of the artist's work and influences. 4. Exams questions require
recognition of culture change as reflected and influenced by the art forms of the
day. 5. Exam questions require the assessment of the contributions of diverse
cultural groups and the common ground needed to survive and adapt. 6. The
family/individual essay requires application of the influence of diversity to ones
own family history. 7. Discussion and exam questions elicit the comparison of
American culture to other cultures and a practicum is given on cross cultural
sensitivity.
The student learning outcomes are measured through a combination of assessment
tools: objective and/or short essay exams and quizzes, directed class discussions,
and other written assignments.




Multiple measures, both qualitative and quantitative, of student learning will be
conducted throughout the course, and upon course completion. Students will
demonstrate their knowledge and skills by participating in the following
tasks/activities which include but are not limited to: laboratory practicum analysis/
reports, class discussions, writing assignments, oral presentations, research
projects, research paper, quizzes and/or exams.
Multiple measures, both qualitative and quantitative, of student learning will be
conducted throughout the course, and upon course completion. Students will
demonstrate their knowledge and skills by participating in the following
tasks/activities which include but are not limited to: laboratory practicum
analysis/reports, class discussions, writing assignments, oral presentations,
research projects, research paper, quizzes and/or exams.
The student learning outcomes are measured through a combination of assessment
tools: objective and/or short essay exams and quizzes, directed class discussions,
and essays and/or term papers and/or cultural immersion experiences.
Multiple measures, both qualitative and quantitative, of student learning will be
conducted throughout the course, and upon course completion. Students will
demonstrate their knowledge and skills by participating in the following
tasks/activities that include but are not limited to: class discussions, writing
assignments, oral presentations, research projects, research paper, quizzes and/or
exams.




Upon completion of this course students will be able to: 1. Accurately place the
ancient civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia, South America, North America,
Europe and China on a absolute time scale. 2. Identify iconic artifact types
associated with major prehistoric archaeological industries such as the Achulian,
the Mousterian, and the Neolithic. 3. Interpret calibrated and non-calibrated
radiocarbon dates. 4. Perform a basic interpretation of a simple archaeological
stratigraphic profile. 5. Locate and summarize articles from major archaeological
journals.
1. Students will successfully compete for jobs in the field of Cultural Resource
Management. 2. Student experience gained from this course (and the overall
Archaeology Program) will assist them in transferring to a four-year school and/or
gaining entrance to graduate programs. 3. Students will be able to find placement
as field assistants on academic archaeological projects. 4. This course is basically
a skills course and students learn these skills through a constant process of
interaction between the student and instructor during classroom lab exercises.




The section on SLOs is being revised and this question will not be included in its
current form.




This question is no longer relevant. The SLO section of Curricunet is being
revised and this statement will not be included in the changes.
This question is no longer relevant. A revision to the SLO component of
Curricunet will have revised questions.




Multiple measures, both qualitative and quantitative, of student learning will be
conducted throughout the course, and upon course completion. Students will
demonstrate their knowledge and skills by participating in the following
tasks/activities which include but are not limited to: class discussions, writing
assignments, oral presentations, research projects, research papers, quizzes and/or
exams.
Multiple measures, both qualitative and quantitative, of student learning will be
conducted throughout the course, and upon course completion. Students will
demonstrate their knowledge and skills by participating in the following
tasks/activities that include but are not limited to: class discussions, writing
assignments, oral presentations, research projects, research paper, quizzes and/or
exams.




1. Students will successfully compete for jobs in the field of Cultural Resource
Management. 2. Student experience gained from this course (and the overall
Archaeology Program) will assist them in transferring to a four-year school and/or
gaining entrance to graduate programs. 3. Students will be able to find placement
as field assistants on academic archaeological projects. 4. This course is basically
a skills course and students learn these skills through a constant process of
interaction between the student and instructor during student daily participation in
the field.
1. Students will successfully compete for jobs in the field of Cultural Resource
Management. 2. Student experience gained from this course (and the overall
Archaeology Program) will assist them in transferring to a four-year school and/or
gaining entrance to graduate programs. 3. Students will be able to find placement
as field assistants on academic archaeological projects. 4. This course is basically
a skills course and students learn these skills through a constant process of
interaction between the student and instructor during student daily participation in
lab and field exercies, including archaeological survey.




1. Students will successfully compete for jobs in the field of Cultural Resource
Management. 2. Student experience gained from this course (and the overall
Archaeology Program) will assist them in transferring to a four-year school and/or
gaining entrance to graduate programs. 3. Students will be able to find placement
as field assistants on academic archaeological projects. 4. This course is basically
a skills course and students learn these skills through a constant process of
interaction between the student and instructor during student during classroom lab
exercises.
1. Students will successfully compete for jobs in the field of Cultural Resource
Management. 2. Student experience gained from this course (and the overall
Archaeology Program) will assist them in transferring to a four-year school and/or
gaining entrance to graduate programs. 3. Students will be able to find placement
as field assistants on academic archaeological projects. 4. This course is basically
a skills course and students learn these skills through a constant process of
interaction between the student and instructor during student daily participation in
lab and field exercises, including archaeological site mapping using a GPS
datalogger, a total station, and associated computer software.




1. Students will successfully compete for jobs in the field of Cultural Resource
Management. 2. Student experience gained from this course (and the overall
Archaeology Program) will assist them in transferring to a four-year school and/or
gaining entrance to graduate programs. 3. Students will be able to find placement
as field and lab assistants on academic archaeological projects. 4. This course is
primarily a skills course and students learn these skills through a constant process
of interaction between the student and instructor during student daily participation
in lab exercises, field trips, and the development of their project report.
3-1.) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and
manufacturers’ safety procedures including: using personal protective equipment;
proper connecting and operating of power equipment and tools; disconnecting
power sources before changing blades, bits, and accessories; maintaining good
housekeeping in all areas. 3-2.) Students will evaluate the potential hazards and
state the appropriate OSHA subparts, sections and subsections safety regulation.
In each scenario, the student will explain the correct procedures, personal
protective equipment, and communication tools needed to meet federal (state)
safety requirements. 3-3.) Students will interpret the project instructions to select
and prepare materials, accurately calculate measurements, and safely cut
components to the required lengths. They will apply the appropriate procedures to
assemble the project within 1/8” tolerance. 3-4.) Students will evaluate conditions,
apply safety guideline and demonstrate proper operating procedures to lift and
transport materials using the correct equipment controls and devices. 3-5.)
Students will pass a written exam, evaluate materials, perform safety checks, and
3-1.) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and
manufacturers’ safety procedures including: using personal protective equipment;
proper connecting and operating of power equipment and tools; disconnecting
power sources before changing blades, bits, and accessories; maintaining good
housekeeping in all areas. 3-2.) Students will evaluate the potential hazards and
apply the American Red Cross (ARC) emergency response procedures. In each
scenario they will use check, call, care procedures consistent with the ARC
response criteria, personal protective equipment, and communication tools needed
to meet ARC certification requirements. 3-3.) Students will interpret prints and
apply the applicable OSHA regulations to: select and stage materials, hardware
and scaffold components; perform inspections; safely erect frames, attach cross
braces, ladders and accessories; properly dismantle and store scaffold equipment.
Instructor will verify scaffolds meet requirements. 3-4.) Students will evaluate
conditions, apply safety guidelines and demonstrate proper operating procedures
to lift and navigate the course using the correct equipment controls and devices.
Instructors will verify performance meets requirements.
3-1.) Students will examine examples of the projection method and complete a
written assignment describing how object lines are transferred from pictorial
views (three dimensional) by extending perpendicular lines to create front
(elevation), top (plan) and right side views (end elevation) and section views. 3-2.)
Students will apply the page format for drawings, as described by the American
National Standards Institute (ANSI), and complete a written exercise to match
layout characteristics with print information including: drawing size, main parts,
and purpose for each designation. 3-3.) Students will interpret the contents of the
print’s title block for identification, and to compare the drawing’s size to actual
size using the stated scale. Students will apply the “Alphabet of Lines” to
construction characteristics and dimensions in two planes by matching
corresponding lines in related front (elevation), top (plan) and right side views
(end elevation) and section views.
3-1.) Students will include the following ANSI elements in their graphic
representation: title block including scale, date, page number, designation; title,
name of draftsman, material block and zone numbers. The drawing should
illustrate components using appropriate lines, views, symbols, dimensions and
related design details. 3-2.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to
correctly determine the following: building perimeter; wall segment lengths; wall
heights; openings; and types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-3.) Students will
perform geometric construction techniques to establish building lines. All
perpendicular wall layouts will be verified as accurate using Pythagorean
Theorem.

Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: panel perimeter; wall segment lengths; wall heights; openings; and
types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction techniques to establish perpendicular panel lines for formwork. All
formwork layouts will be verified as accurate using Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.)
Students will communicate verbally with instructor and project partner(s) as they
coordinate and execute sequential procedures in the construction and installation
of panel formwork, accessories and connection hardware. Students will analyze
design “pick points” and correctly re-install them in the project using safe
working load criteria for rigging panels. 3-4.) Students will follow training center
rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use
of personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation of power
equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits and
accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in all
areas.
3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: wall form perimeter; wall segment lengths; wall heights; openings; and
types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction techniques to establish perpendicular lines for formwork. All
formwork layouts will be verified as accurate using Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.)
Students will communicate verbally with instructor and project partner(s) as they
coordinate and execute sequential procedures in the construction of concrete wall
formwork, and installation of system panel accessory and connection hardware.
Students will analyze “snap tie” layout and re-locate using design criteria for
selected system form panels. 3-4.) Students will follow training center rules,
OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of
personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation of power
equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits and
accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in all
areas.

Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: wall form perimeter; wall segment lengths; wall heights; openings; and
types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction techniques to establish perpendicular lines for formwork. All
formwork layouts will be verified as accurate using Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.)
Students will communicate verbally with instructor and project partner(s) as they
coordinate and execute sequential procedures to plate, detail, assemble and
connect framed walls to local and state government codes. Students will analyze
intersecting walls and adjust openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students
will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety
procedures including: use of personal protective equipment; proper connection
and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to
change blades, bits and accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining
good housekeeping in all areas.
3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: building perimeter; wall segment lengths; rake wall heights; openings;
and types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction techniques to establish perpendicular lines for the building design.
All wall layouts will be verified as accurate using Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.)
Students will communicate verbally with instructor and project partner(s) as they
coordinate and execute sequential procedures to plate, detail, assemble and
connect framed rake and interior walls to local and state government codes.
Students will analyze intersecting walls and adjust openings to correct intentional
flaws. 3-4.) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and
manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal protective equipment;
proper connection and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnecting
power sources to change blades, bits and accessories; refraining from horseplay,
and maintaining good housekeeping in all areas.

3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: floor frame perimeter; sills; girder, beam, and floor joists length; floor
openings; subflooring, and types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students
will perform geometric construction techniques to establish perpendicular lines
for the floor plan. All floor framing layouts will be verified as accurate using
Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students will communicate verbally with instructor
and project partner(s) as they coordinate and execute sequential procedures to
measure, cut and place sills, girders, beams, joists, and subflooring to local and
state government codes. Students will analyze floor plan and adjust floor openings
to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA
requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal
protective equipment; proper connection and operation of power equipment and
tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits and accessories;
refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in all areas.

3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: stair total run; stair total rise; thread run; riser heights; landing size,
and types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction and framing square techniques to establish layout lines for framing
plan and stringers cuts. All framing layouts will be verified as accurate using the
Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students will communicate verbally with the
instructor and project partner(s) as they coordinate and execute sequential
procedures to measure, cut and place framing, stringers, stair components, and
landing to local and state government codes. Students will analyze floor plan and
adjust floor openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students will follow
training center rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures
including: use of personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation
of power equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits
and accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in
all areas.
3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: stair total run; stair total rise; thread run; riser heights; landing size,
and types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction and framing square techniques to establish layout lines for framing
plan and stringers cuts. All framing layouts will be verified as accurate using the
Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students will communicate verbally with instructor
and project partner(s) as they coordinate and execute sequential procedures to
measure, cut and place framing, stringers, stair components, and landings to local
and state government codes. Students will analyze floor plan and adjust floor
openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students will follow training center
rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use
of personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation of power
equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits and
accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in all
areas.
3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: floor plan perimeter; wall segment lengths; wall heights; openings;
siding story pole layout, and types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.)
Students will perform geometric construction techniques to establish
perpendicular lines for building lines for framing. All framing layouts will be
verified as accurate using the Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students will
communicate verbally with instructor and project partner(s) as they coordinate
and execute sequential procedures to frame exterior walls; measure, cut and place
exterior siding, trim and moldings to local and state government codes. Students
will analyze the floor plan and adjust floor openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-
4.) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and
manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal protective equipment;
proper connection and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnecting
power sources to change blades, bits and accessories; refraining from horseplay,
and maintaining good housekeeping in all areas.
3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: framing plan perimeter; pitch; span; total rise and run; unit rise and
run; ridge and common rafter lengths, and types, sizes, and quantities of materials.
3-2.) Students will perform geometric construction and framing square techniques
to establish layout lines for framing plan and roof cuts. All framing layouts will be
verified as accurate using the Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students will
communicate verbally with the instructor and project partner(s) as they coordinate
and execute sequential procedures to frame roofing plan; properly execute plumb,
seat and tail cuts, measure, cut and place ridge, common rafters, blocking and
bracing to local and state government codes. Students will analyze floor plan and
adjust floor openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students will follow
training center rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures
including: use of personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation
of power equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits
and accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in
3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: floor plan perimeter; wall segment lengths; wall heights; openings; and
types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction techniques to establish perpendicular lines for framing. All framing
layouts will be verified as accurate using the Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students
will communicate verbally with the instructor and project partner(s) as they
coordinate and execute sequential procedures to plate, detail, assemble and
connect framed walls to local and state government codes. Students will analyze
intersecting walls and adjust openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students
will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety
procedures including: use of personal protective equipment; proper connection
and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to
change blades, bits and accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining
good housekeeping in all areas.

3-1.) Students will apply the laws of refraction and reflection to explain how
telescopes sights are adjusted, and state the sequence and correct parts of the
instrument used in the set up and leveling process. 3-2.) Students will accurately
position and level the tripod and instrument over a given point; position will be
verified with a plumb-bob and the telescope will be verified as level in at least
270° using the bubble vial. 3-3.) Students will communicate verbally with
instructor and project partner(s) as they coordinate and execute sequential
procedures to sight points in layout at given distances (within 1/8”); accurately
sight points for building elevations (within .125”). 3-4.) Students will follow
training center rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures
including: use of personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation
of laser equipment and leveling instrument accessories; maintain good
housekeeping in all areas.

Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.
3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: stair total run; stair total rise; thread run; riser heights; landing size,
and types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction and framing square techniques to establish layout lines for framing
plan and stringers cuts. All framing layouts will be verified as accurate using the
Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students will communicate verbally with instructor
and project partner(s) to coordinate and execute sequential procedures to measure,
cut and place framing, stringers, stair components, and frame landing/ramp shores,
slope and soffit panels to local and state government codes. Students will analyze
floor plan and adjust floor openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students
will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety
procedures including: use of personal protective equipment; proper connection
and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to
change blades, bits and accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining
good housekeeping in all areas.
3.1) Students will state: characteristics of stair design and trim materials; and
match trims with the stair sections where they are used. 3.2) Students will use the
project stair design to locate trim types, sizes, and calculate material quantities
based on overall lengths. 3.3) Students will communicate verbally with the
instructor as they coordinate and execute sequential procedures to: measure cut
and attach crown molding, chair rail, base, and door and window trim. Instructor
will evaluate proper installation. 3.4) Students will follow training center rules,
OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of
personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation of power
equipment and tools; disconnection of power sources to change blades, bits and
accessories; good housekeeping in all areas.

3-1.) Student will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: cabinetry component sizes; overall lengths; overall heights; overall
depths, openings sizes; and types, sizes, and quantities of materials and hardware.
3-2.) Student will perform geometric construction, divider, speed and framing
square techniques to establish perpendicular lines for accurate layout of cabinet
components. All square layouts will be verified as accurate using the Pythagorean
Theorem. 3-3.) Student will communicate verbally with 0instructor as they
coordinate and execute sequential procedures to measure, cut and base frame, face
frame, drawer/door components, and align, adjust and finish sand cabinet.
Students will analyze cabinet design and adjust openings to correct intentional
flaws. 3-4.) Student will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and
manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal protective equipment;
proper connection and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnecting
power sources to change blades, bits and accessories; refraining from horseplay,
and maintaining good housekeeping in all areas.
3-1.) Student will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: cabinetry component sizes; overall lengths; overall heights; overall
depths, openings sizes; and types, sizes, and quantities of materials and hardware.
3-2.) Student will perform geometric construction, laser and framing square
techniques to establish perpendicular lines and elevations for accurate installation
of cabinetry. All square layouts will be verified as accurate using the Pythagorean
Theorem. 3-3.) Student will communicate verbally with instructor and project
partner(s) as they coordinate and execute sequential procedures to measure, place,
level, align and secure cabinetry to local and state government codes. Students
will analyze floor plan and adjust layout to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Student
will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety
procedures including: use of personal protective equipment; proper connection
and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to
change blades, bits and accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining
good housekeeping in all areas.

3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: wall segment lengths; wall heights; openings; and types, sizes, and
quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric construction
techniques to establish perpendicular lines for wall project framing. All layouts
will be verified as accurate using the Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students will
communicate verbally with instructor and project partner(s) as they coordinate
and execute sequential procedures to attach molding and trim to walls; measure,
layout and execute inside and outside miter cuts accurately; use proper fasteners
and fastening procedures. Students will analyze elevation views and adjust
openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students will follow training center
rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use
of personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation of power
equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits and
accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in all
areas.
3.1) Students will state: suitable materials; list typical plastic laminate styles and
textures; explain do and don’ts for application methods. 3.2) Students will use the
design to calculate countertop lengths, widths, angles, and cutout placement.
Students will list the materials and provide installation details. 3.3) Students will
communicate verbally with instructor as they coordinate and execute sequential
procedures to: measure, cut and assemble a basic cabinet countertop/backsplash;
fabricate and install plastic laminate. All countertops/backsplash will be evaluated
by instructor for proper installation of laminate (no cracks, bubbles, excess glue
etc). 3.4) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and
manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal protective equipment;
proper connection and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnection of
power sources to change blades, bits and accessories; good housekeeping in all
areas.
3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: door rough and types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students
will perform geometric construction techniques to establish perpendicular lines
for wall construction and door openings. All framing layouts will be verified as
accurate using the Pythagorean Theorem. 3-3.) Students will communicate
verbally with instructor and project partner(s) as they coordinate and execute
sequential procedures to frame rough opening; installation selected door frame;
properly attach for door swing; attach door and adjust fit; use proper fasteners and
fastening procedures. Students will analyze elevation views and adjust openings to
correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA
requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal
protective equipment; proper connection and operation of power equipment and
tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits and accessories;
refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in all areas.

3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: determine door angle; door hinge layout, and types, sizes, and
quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform combination and speed square
techniques to establish layout lines for door hinges, closers, latches and panic
hardware. All layouts will be verified as accurate using direct measurements and
levels. 3-3.) Students will communicate verbally with instructor and project
partner(s) as they coordinate and execute sequential procedures to properly install
and attach hinges for door swing; 1.attach closer body and arm to jamb; 2.attach
rim and vertical rod exit devices; adjust door fit and closure; use proper fasteners
and fastening procedures. Students will analyze elevation views and adjust
openings to correct intentional flaws. 3-4.) Students will follow training center
rules, OSHA requirements, and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use
of personal protective equipment; proper connection and operation of power
equipment and tools; disconnecting power sources to change blades, bits and
accessories; refraining from horseplay, and maintaining good housekeeping in all
Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.
Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




3-1.) Students will interpret the NIOSH chemical pocket guide to find chemical
routes of entry: ingestion; inhalation; puncture; absorption, and determine the type
of protective measures recommended for safe exposure. 3-2.) Students will assess
the confined space hazard and state the proper level of permit entry including:
entry conditions; monitoring; attendants; authorized entrants; testing; and
supervision. 3-3.) Students will communicate verbally with instructor and project
partner(s) as they coordinate and execute sequential procedures to properly to don
and doff protective clothing; inspect, fit test and wear both SCBA and SAR
respirators; enter and exit confined space using the correct procedures. 3-4.)
Students will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and
manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal protective equipment;
proper connection and operation of power equipment and tools; disconnecting
power sources when necessary.

Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.
Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.
Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




The Southwest Carpenters staff evaluate student program outcome data to make
decisions about adapting instructional methods as well as student preparedness.
The coordinator and faculty member continually evaluate student performance for
the purpose of improving instructional techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
3-1.) Students will interpret AWS A2.4 welding symbols to determine size, length,
location, type of weld, position of welds and process to be applied; students will
describe the characteristics of the welding process as stated by Hobart’s Institute
of Welding Technology, 3-2.) Students will weld to the AWS D1.3 standard: .king
studs in vertical position; clips in vertical position; and 1-1/2” cold rolled channel
(CRC) in the overhead position. 3-3.) Students will communicate verbally with
instructor as they coordinate and execute overhead and vertical fillet and groove
welds. All welds will be verified by CWI visual inspection and destructive testing.
3-4.) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements, and
manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal protective equipment;
proper connection and operation of welding equipment and tools; use of proper
ventilation system as necessary.




3-1.) Students will apply the appropriate math functions to correctly determine the
following: wall perimeter; wall segment lengths; wall heights; openings; and
types, sizes, and quantities of materials. 3-2.) Students will perform geometric
construction techniques to establish perpendicular lines for exterior walls. All
formwork layouts will be verified as accurate using the Pythagorean Theorem. 3-
3.) Students will communicate verbally with instructor and project partner(s) as
they coordinate and execute sequential procedures to frame exterior walls;
measure, layout and stack exterior insulation inside and outside corners
accurately; use proper fasteners and fastening procedures. Students will analyze
elevation views and adjust openings and foam designs using EIMA manufacturing
standards. 3-4.) Students will follow training center rules, OSHA requirements,
and manufacturers’ safety procedures including: use of personal protective
equipment; proper connection and operation of power equipment and tools;
disconnecting power sources when necessary.
Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.
Students will be required to pass a written test with a minimum score of 70%.
Mandatory participation in manipulative project and tasks will be evaluated as
stated in the course rubric with 75% proficiency.




3.1. The student will install a conduit system in a mock up employing necessary
trigonometric formulas to ensure proper bends. 3.2. Given a digital multi meter,
the student will determine the correct configuration for the leads on the meter to
measure current in a particular circuit. 3.3. Using another student as a prop, the
student will do an initial assessment on the victim and then demonstrate the
correct treatment for the simulated injuries.




3.1. The student will select the correct materials and tools required to perform the
following tasks: calculate and bend conduits (back-back 90°, box offset, 4-bend
saddle, and 3-bend saddle); install a ground fault circuit interrupter receptacle
(GFCI) and describe its operation; identify the National Electrical Code (NFPA
70A) requirements required for installation of basic electrical circuits and
calculation of conduit conductor fill. 3.2. The student will evaluate a given circuit
and solve for an unknown quantity by showing all required mathematical
calculations in a step-by-step procedure that includes: determining the correct
method for solving the unknown, providing all units of measure, and showing all
conversions and calculation. 3.3 The student will provide the correct number of
conductors that can occupy specific electrical raceways under given conditions.




3.1. The student will determine which substance will cause a specific or
significant impairment on a workers ability to operate power tools or motor
vehicles. The student will be able to determine which family of drugs the
particular drug belongs to, and be able to describe the San Bernardino- Riverside
Drug Awareness Policy. 3.2. The student will evaluate a given circuit and solve
for an unknown quantity by showing all required mathematical calculations in a
step-by-step procedure that includes: determining the correct method for solving
for the unknown, providing all units of measure, and showing all conversions and
calculations. 3.3. The student will research and apply code requirements for
electrical circuits installed in cable trays.
3.1. The student will select the correct over-current device rating for a given
transformer under given conditions. 3.2. The student will review a commercial set
of blue prints and identify by room, the number of devices (power, data, phone)
that are to be installed. 3.3. The student will research and apply code requirements
for electrical circuits installed in cable trays.




3.1. The student will evaluate a given electronic circuit and solve for an unknown
quantity by showing all required mathematical calculations in a step-by-step
procedure that includes: determining the correct method for solving for the
unknown; providing all units of measure; showing all conversions and
calculations including those used for the selection on components; determination
of the correct operation of the circuit; test and verification of proper operation for
a voltage-doubler circuit. 3.2. Given a signal from a transducer which varies from
4 to 20 milliamps, the student will calculate what size resistor will be needed to
convert the 4-20 mA signed to a 1-5 volt signal needed to run a device. 3.3. The
student will evaluate the equipment circuit requirements and perform
mathematical calculations in a step-by-step procedure that includes calculation of
ampacity, selection of conduit and wire size, selection of overcurrent protection,
and evaluation of total building electrical load.

3.1. The student will provide the grounding and bonding requirements for a
commercial service entrance, based on design parameters provided by the
instructor. 3.2. The student will provide the correct wire sizes, type of wire
insulation and type of raceway for an industrial water treatment facility. 3.3.
Given a transformer simulator the student will make transformer connections for a
three phase system in wye and Delta schemes.
3.1. The student will evaluate a given circuit in a step-by-step procedure that
includes: selection of proper control components; determination of the correct
operational sequence of the circuit; testing and verification of proper forward and
reverse operation of a three-phase motor . 3.2. Students will evaluate a latching
relay control circuit and provide an analysis of its operation through use of a
ladder diagram and demonstrate the operation, testing and troubleshooting of the
latching relay control circuit. 3.3Students will determine the proper conductors
and required over-current protection for the given 3-phase electrical motors.




3.1. The student will provide the material selection and installation design to build
an analog electronic circuit. 3.2. The student will evaluate conventional
(capacitors, inductors) and solid state (diodes, transistors, etc.) analog devices and
identify digital equivalents and their respective operations. 3.3. The student will
demonstrate knowledge of the personal protective requirements for working on a
three-phase electrical distribution panel as outlined under the NFPA70E
guidelines.




3.1. The student will evaluate a given fire alarm system and determine code
requirements for its installation and operation. The student will evaluate systems
for commercial, residential, and industrial facilities. 3.2. The student will evaluate
a given circuit in a step-by-step procedure that includes: selection of proper
control components: determination of the desired operation and code requirements
of an intrusion detection circuit; testing and verification of the operation of a
commercial intrusion detection system. 3.3. The student will provide the materials
and installation requirements to install a fire alarm system in commercial,
residential, and industrial facilities.
3.1. The student will evaluate criteria for a PLC installation and provide a design
showing all wiring diagrams, programming sequence, and circuit requirements.
The student will wire, program, test and verify operation of the PLC circuit. 3.2.
The student will evaluate design parameters and provide all programming needed
to solve an instructor-selected control problem. 3.3. The student will provide
material and installation criteria to meet code requirements for installation of
PLC’s and their input and output devices.




1.) The student will select the correct materials and tools required to perform the
following tasks: calculate and bend conduits (back-back 90°, box offset, 4-bend
saddle, and 3-bend saddle); install a ground fault circuit interrupter receptacle
(GFCI) and describe its operation; identify the National Electrical Code (NFPA
70A) requirements required for installation of basic electrical circuits and
calculation of conduit conductor fill. 2.)The student will evaluate a given circuit
and solve for an unknown quantity by showing all required mathematical
calculations in a step-by-step procedure that includes: determining the correct
method for solving for the unknown, providing all units of measure, and showing
all conversions and calculations. 3.) The student will provide the correct number
of conductors that can occupy specific electrical raceways under given conditions.




1.) The student will select the correct materials and tools required to perform the
following tasks: calculate and bend conduits (back-back 90°, box offset, 4-bend
saddle, and 3-bend saddle); describe the operation of a 3-phase electrical
transformer; test a three-phase and a single-phase transformer for faults using a
megohmmeter. 2.) The student will evaluate a given circuit and solve for an
unknown quantity by showing all required mathematical calculations in a step-by-
step procedure that includes: determining the correct method for solving for the
unknown, providing all units of measure, and showing all conversions and
calculations. 3.) The student will select the correct over-current device rating for a
given transformer under given conditions.
1.) The student will evaluate a given electronic circuit and solve for an unknown
quantity by showing all required mathematical calculations in a step-by-step
procedure that includes: determining the correct method for solving for the
unknown; providing all units of measure; showing all conversions and
calculations including those used for the selection of components; determination
of the correct operation of the circuit; test and verification of proper operation for
a voltage-doubler circuit. 2.) The student will evaluate a given electronic circuit
and solve for an unknown quantity by showing all required mathematical
calculations in a step-by-step procedure that includes: determining the correct
method for solving for the unknown, providing all units of measure, and showing
all conversions and calculations. 3.) The student will provide the grounding and
bonding requirements for a commercial service entrance, based on design
parameters provided by the instructor.

1.) The student will evaluate a given circuit in a step-by-step procedure that
includes: selection of proper control components; determination of the correct
operational sequence of the circuit; testing and verification of proper forward and
reverse operation of a three-phase motor. 2.) Students will evaluate a latching
relay control circuit and provide an analysis of its operation through use of a
ladder diagram and demonstrate the operation, testing, and troubleshooting of the
latching relay control circuit. 3.) Students will determine the proper conductors
and required over-current protection for given 3-phase electrical motors.




1.) The student will evaluate a given circuit and design using a step-by-step
procedure that includes: selection of proper control components; determination of
the correct operational sequence of the circuit; testing and verification of proper
operation of an industrial storage tank-filling and chemical-mixing process. 2.)
The student will be given a sequence of operation and must design and build a
PLC program that meets the specified criteria for the operation of a traffic light
system. 3.) The student will demonstrate knowledge of the personal protective
requirements for working on a three-phase electrical distribution panel as outlined
under the NFPA70E guidelines.
1.) The student will evaluate a given circuit in a step-by-step procedure that
includes: determination of the desired operation and code requirements of a fire
alarm circuit, testing and verification of the correct circuit operation of a
commercial fire alarm system. 2.) The student will evaluate a given circuit in a
step-by-step procedure that includes: selection of proper control components;
determination of the desired operation and code requirements of an intrusion
detection circuit; testing and verification of the operation of a commercial
intrusion detection system. 3.) The student will provide the materials and
installation requirements for electrical circuits in a hazardous location.




1.) The student will evaluate circuit requirements and verify the correct operation
of a given circuit. The student will build, test, troubleshoot, and verify proper
circuit operation of an analog flashing light circuit. 2.) The student will evaluate
conventional (capacitors, inductors, etc.) and solid-state (diodes, transistors, etc)
analog devices and demonstrate operation, testing, and troubleshooting techniques
for the devices and their circuits. 3.) The student will provide the material
selection and installation design to build an analog electronic circuit.




1.) The student will evaluate circuit requirements and verify the correct operation
of a given circuit. The student will build, test, troubleshoot, and verify proper
circuit operation of an analog flashing light circuit. 2.) The student will evaluate
conventional (capacitors, inductors, etc.) and solid-state (diodes, transistors, etc)
analog devices and demonstrate operation, testing, and troubleshooting techniques
for the devices and their circuits. 3.) The student will provide the material
selection and installation design to build an analog electronic circuit.
1.) The student will evaluate design criteria for a given motor control circuit and
provide a solution showing all wiring diagrams and operational sequence. The
student will test and verify correct circuit operation of motor control circuit. 2.)
The student will select the materials and outline code-compliant installation
requirements for a variety of electrical motor circuits selected by his instructor. 3.)
The student will evaluate instructor-selected motor control problems, and
demonstrate common troubleshooting methodology to find a solution.




1.) Students will evaluate electrical requirements from a CSI® Master Format
specification and produce all required installation drawings including electrical
distribution equipment layout drawings. The student will perform all
mathematical calculations required to determine the proper size of circuits used in
his drawings and utilize the National Electric Code (NFPA70A) to establish the
correct location of the circuits and utilization equipment outlets. 2.) The student
will evaluate electrical equipment requirements and solve for unknown quantities
by showing all required mathematical calculations in a step-by-step procedure that
includes solving for unknown variables while providing all units of measure. The
student will create drawings using industry-accepted conventions that list material
requirements, show placement of materials, and meet NFPA 70A requirements for
installation of electrical service equipment. 3.) Student-generated drawings will be
reviewed for code compliance, accuracy, clarity, and adherence to standard
industry conventions.


1.) The student will evaluate design criteria for a VFD and provide a solution
showing all wiring diagrams, programming sequence, and circuit requirements.
The student will test and verify circuit operation of a motor drive circuit. 2.) The
student will evaluate design parameters and provide a solution showing all
mathematical calculations needed to determine proper motor and drive selection
to meet an instructor-designated application. 3.) The student will provide material
and installation criteria to meet code requirements for installation of electrical
motor drive circuits.
1.) The student will format a word document to fit an instructor-defined objective
(request for information, jobsite report, change order, etc.) and utilize the built-in
word-processing features including design templates, spell-check, thesaurus, etc.
2.) The student will use an Excel spreadsheet to address an instructor-defined
objective (change order estimate, slurry fill calculation, conduit offset calculation,
etc.) and utilize its built-in graphing features to provide different charts to
illustrate the data set. 3.) The student will complete computer-based and written
assignments to demonstrate an understanding of computer OS, file structure,
email, and internet search capabilities.




1.) The student will evaluate construction requirements using the guest speakers’
insight to examine problems, procedures, industry conventions, liabilities, and
labor management issues typical of an electrical construction project. 2.) The
student will evaluate typical electrical construction management problems and
provide solutions showing all research in a step-by-step procedure that includes
identification and isolation of the problem, determination of the best way to
address the problem, and insight into the possible ramifications of the solution. 3.)
The student will evaluate instructor-selected jobsite problems, and propose
suitable solutions to minimize contractor liability through enforcement of OSHA
safety regulations and other mitigating strategies.




1.) The student will evaluate a given electrical installation and determine code
requirements for installation and operation of its electrical system. The student
will evaluate commercial, residential, and industrial facilities. 2.) The student will
evaluate the equipment circuit requirements and perform mathematical
calculations in a step-by-step procedure that includes calculation of ampacity,
selection of conduit and wire size, selection of overcurrent protection, and
evaluation of total building electrical load. 3.) The student will research and apply
code requirements for electrical circuits installed in cable trays.
1.) The student will evaluate the requirements of a VDV system and design an
installation strategy showing all wiring diagrams and mathematical calculations in
a step-by-step procedure needed to determine the correct components, their
quantities, and their installation location. The strategy will include system test and
documentation requirements for commercial structured cabling systems. 2.) The
student will evaluate an installed fiber optic system and provide all mathematical
calculations in a step-by-step procedure that identifies the system design
parameters, determines the appropriate materials required, and calculates system
performance based on manufacturers’ specifications. The student will take test
measurements, troubleshoot, and establish a system performance baseline. 3.) The
student will provide material and installation criteria to meet code requirements
for installation of a communications circuit in a commercial facility.




1.) The student will perform a site survey and provide a design showing system
layout, support structure, wiring diagrams, and inverter connections. The student
will provide mathematical calculations in a step-by-step procedure that shows
system voltage and current design parameters, predicted annual energy generation,
and net utility energy use after system installation. 2.) The student will complete
the installation of a working solar PV array that includes assembly of the module
mounting structure and its attachment to the building, attachment of the PV
modules to the mounting structure, wiring of modules to the inverter, and wiring
of the inverter to the electrical service equipment. 3.) The student will evaluate a
proposed solar PV system, and provide a material list, installation layout, and
other design criteria to meet code requirements for the installation.
1.) The student will evaluate service equipment requirements and provide a
solution that addresses design specifications and all National Electric Code
(NFPA70A) requirements. The student will verify selection of the correct
equipment and show that he can efficiently move and place equipment using safe
rigging and lifting techniques. 2.) The student will evaluate construction drawings
and answer questions about specified construction methods and materials through
interpretation of CSI®: Master Format specifications for an electrical distribution
system in a commercial building. 3.) The student will identify the materials and
installation techniques necessary to comply with utility requirements for
installation of an electrical service.




1.) The student will evaluate a given circuit and/or equipment problem and select
the appropriate test equipment and procedure for isolating the defect. The student
will provide and implement a corrective solution based on his test. 2.) The student
will answer oral and written questions based on his observations of the setup and
operation of the specialized test equipment. 3.) The student will evaluate
instructor-selected test conditions, and propose suitable solutions to minimize
shock and arc flash hazards. The student will develop strategies to minimize
contractor liability through application of OSHA-approved safety procedures.




1.) The student will select the appropriate welding electrode for material type and
thickness and will select proper current settings for the material/electrode
combination to produce a quality, defect-free joint. 2.) The student will evaluate
design criteria for a welding operation and select the appropriate material for a
strong, defect-free joint. The student will demonstrate all required procedures to
safely store, use, and transport volatile, compressed welding gases. 3.) The student
will complete a variety of welds demonstrating proper use of gas, electrode, and
inert gas-shielded wire welding equipment.
1.) The student will develop presentation materials that include: a daily lesson
plan, PowerPoint slides, homework assignments; reading assignments; and a
written test to determine the effectiveness of the presentation. 2.) The student will
design a problem based on a given electrical circuit, write a description of the
problem, and create a solution algorithm showing all required mathematical
calculations using a step-by-step procedure that includes: identifying the
unknown, determining the correct method for solving for the unknown, providing
all units of measure, and showing all conversions and calculations. 3.) The student
will investigate and present a code problem based on instructor-assigned subject
material and assist the class in deriving its solution.




1.) The student will evaluate criteria for a PLC installation and provide a design
showing all wiring diagrams, programming sequence, and circuit requirements.
The student will wire, program, test and verify operation of the PLC circuit. 2.)
The student will evaluate design parameters and provide all programming needed
to solve an instructor-selected control problem. 3.) The student will provide
material and installation criteria to meet code requirements for installation of
PLCs and their input and output devices.
1.) The student will evaluate a given fire alarm system and determine code
requirements for its installation and operation. The student will evaluate systems
for commercial, residential, and industrial facilities. 2.) The student will evaluate
equipment requirements (horns, strobes, relays, etc.) and perform mathematical
calculations in a step-by-step procedure that includes calculation of circuit
ampacity, selection of wire size, and evaluation of the total load requirements for
a given fire alarm system. 3.) The student will provide the materials and
installation requirements to install a fire alarm system in commercial, residential,
and industrial facilities.




1.) The student will evaluate process control equipment requirements and
calibrate the equipment based on a known reference. The student will install, test,
troubleshoot, and verify proper circuit operation. 2.) The student will evaluate an
instructor-selected temperature measurement device, and complete all steps
necessary to install, calibrate, test, troubleshoot, and operate the device within
manufacturer specifications. 3.) The student will evaluate an instructor-selected
pressure measurement device, and complete all steps necessary to install,
calibrate, test, troubleshoot, and operate the device within manufacturer
specifications.
1.) The student will develop presentation materials that include: a daily lesson
plan, PowerPoint slides, homework assignments; reading assignments; and a
written test to determine the effectiveness of the presentation. 2.) The student will
design a problem based on a given electrical circuit, write a description of the
problem, and create a solution algorithm showing all required mathematical
calculations using a step-by-step procedure that includes: identifying the
unknown, determining the correct method for solving for the unknown, providing
all units of measure, and showing all conversions and calculations. 3.) The student
will investigate and present a code problem based on instructor-assigned subject
material and assist the class in deriving its solution.




1.) Instructor based in-course Assessment 2.) Written Examination 3.) Hands-on
Lab Examination 4.) Written Final Examination




1.) Instructor based in-course Assessment 2.) Written Examination 3.) Hands-on
Lab Examination 4.) Written Final Examination
3.1. The student will evaluate system requirements and select appropriate
equipment based on industry design conventions. The student will install, test,
troubleshoot, and verify proper circuit operation of various VDV system types.
3.2. The student will evaluate an instructor-selected set of building drawings, and
complete all steps necessary to design, install, calibrate, test, troubleshoot, and
operate a given voice, data, or video system to meet manufacturer specifications.
3.3. The student will evaluate an instructor-selected building drawing, and
complete all steps necessary to build a list of all materials required to complete an
installation that meets municipal codes and industry standards.




Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation, Writing
Assignments, Laboratory Assignments, Written Exams, and Oral
Exams/Presentations. Each assessment focuses on a student’s progress as it relates
to the Learning Outcomes for this course. Class Participation (Student Learning
Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 7) Writing Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2,
3, 5, 6) Laboratory Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Written Exams Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7) Oral
Exam/Presentations (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 7)




Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation: (Student
Learning Outcomes #1,2,4,7) Writing Assignments: (Student learning Outcomes
#1,2,3,5,6) Laboratory Assignments: (Student Learning Outcomes #1,2,4,5,6,7)
Written Exams: (Student Learning Outcomes #1,2,3,5,6,7) Oral
Exam/Presentation: (Student Learning Outcomes #1,2,3,4, We have used informal
oral student assessment. We now feel the need for a standardized formal
assessment through language laboratory assignments.
Paintings done by students will be evaluated according to course objectives.
Students will turn in a minimum of six portraits completed in the classroom and as
homework during the semester.




Students demonstrate their skills through the pieces they create during the course.
Successful projects will be technically strong and will not have any cracks, pits or
warping. The glaze will be applied evenly and will be fired to maturation. The
work will also be able to function in the manner intended, it will pour well if
intended to pour, be comfortable to use and be an appropriate weight for its
function. Students will also be able to discuss work using ceramic vocabulary
during bi-weekly critiques using critical thinking skills. There is one written exam
where they can also demonstrate an understanding of the processes and
terminology used in ceramics.
-Finished original works created by students who have successfully achieved the
technical goals of this course will be structurally sound and not have any cracks or
pits. The weight will also be appropriate for the functionality of the object. -An
understanding of ceramic vocabulary will be demonstrated by its proper use in
class critiques and discussions. -An understanding of conceptual issues will be
conveyed in group critiques of finished works of the students, where they are
given an opportunity to discuss their intent and satisfaction with their work and
their classmates and instructor discuss their reactions and interpretations. -There
is one exam which allows the student to convey a knowledge and understanding of
principal ceramic processes and terminology.
Students demonstrate their skills through the pieces they create during the course.
Successful projects will be technically strong and will not have any cracks, pits or
warping. The glaze will be applied evenly and will be fired to maturation. The
work will also be able to function in the manner intended, it will pour well if
intended to pour, be comfortable to use and be an appropriate weight for its
function. Students will also be able to discuss work using ceramic vocabulary
during bi-weekly critiques using critical thinking skills. There is one written exam
where they can also demonstrate an understanding of the processes and
terminology used in ceramics.




Through exams, students will identify works of art by artist, title, period and/or
culture. Through essays and a museum paper, students will use appropriate
terminology and concepts to analyze a work of art. Through essays, students will
compare and contrast meaning and symbols in art works from different periods
and/or by different artists.

Through exams, students will identify works of art by artist, title, period and/or
culture. Through essays and a museum paper, students will use appropriate
terminology and concepts to analyze a work of art. Through essays, students will
compare and contrast meaning and symbols in art works from different periods
and/or by different artists.

Through exams, students will identify works of art by artist, title, period and/or
culture. Through essays and a museum paper, students will use appropriate
terminology and concepts to analyze a work of art. Through essays, students will
compare and contrast meaning and symbols in art works from different periods
and/or by different artists.
Through exams, students will identify works of art by artist, title, period and/or
style. Through essays and a museum paper, students will use appropriate
terminology and concepts to analyze a work of art. Through essays, students will
compare and contrast meaning and symbols in art works from different periods
and/or by different artists.


Through exams, students will identify works of art by artist, title, period and/or
style. Through essays and a museum paper, students will use appropriate
terminology and concepts to analyze a work of art. Through essays, students will
compare and contrast meaning and symbols in art works from different periods
and/or by different artists.


Students who successfully complete this course will demonstrate the overarching
learning outcomes by assembling a final portfolio which includes student
generated examples of all objectives covered in the course, as well as an analytical
paper and the supporting materials for the required audio/visual presentation.
(i.e.powerpoint)




Students demonstrate their skills through the pieces they create during the course.
Successful projects will be technically strong and will not have any cracks, pits or
warping. The glaze will be applied evenly and will be fired to maturation. The
work will also be able to function in the manner intended, it will pour well if
intended to pour, be comfortable to use and be an appropriate weight for its
function. Students will also be able to discuss work using ceramic vocabulary
during bi-weekly critiques using critical thinking skills. There is one written exam
where they can also demonstrate an understanding of the processes and
terminology used in ceramics.
Students who successfully complete this course will demonstrate the learning
outcomes by submitting a series of finished animation projects rendered out as
movies that provide clear examples for the different concepts covered in the
course.




Student will be able to create realistic and/or stylized drawings and paintings
which have a dimensional or realistic quality.




The students will demonstrate achievement by passing written tests by at least
70%. The students will be evaluated on expressive abilities on
fingerspelling/numbers, vocabulary, grammar and cultural information.




1. The students will demonstrate adequate progress (70%) on vocabulary,
grammar and non-manual markers on the written exams. 2. The students will
demonstrate adequate language skills for the intermediate level (70%) on
vocabulary, grammar and non-manual markers on the production exam on an one-
on-one basis with the instructor.
1. The students will demonstrate adequate progress (70%) on vocabulary,
grammar and non-manual markers on the written exams. 2. The students will
demonstrate adequate language skills for the advanced level (70%) on vocabulary,
grammar and non-manual markers on the production exam on an one-on-one basis
with the instructor.
Exams Research Project Presentation Written Reflections Outside Observations
The SLOs will be formally assessed during the fall semester each academic year.
Data will be compiled, evaluated and reviewed during the spring semester by the
appropriate person. Based on the evaluation, teaching strategies will be modified
with the goal of increasing student success.




Assessment of SLOs will be determined using a set of questions that will be
embedded into quizzes administered during the semester. Questions will be
designed to assess a student’s ability to demonstrate an understanding of each
outcome and the skills needed to achieve the SLO. If the student scores 60% on
each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met by that student. If 60%
of the class earns 60% on each SLO, then the outcome has been successfully met
for that class.




Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions in quizzes. If the
student scores 60% on each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 60% of the class earns 60% on each SLO, then the outcome has
been successfully met by the class.
Assessment of SLOs will be determined using a set of questions that will be
embedded into exams administered during the semester. Questions will be
designed to assess a student’s ability to demonstrate an understanding of each
outcome. If the student scores 60% on each assessment, that particular SLO was
successfully met by that student. If 60% of the class earns 60% on each SLO, then
the outcome has been successfully met for that class.




Students are able to identify basic components of automobiles. Students are able
to demonstrate shop safety prectices. Students will show competency performing
automotive service using basic automotive tools.




1. Students will develop safe work habits.
2. Students will follow correct trouble-shooting procedures during skills tests.
3. Students will provide correct responses during diagnostic tests.




1. Students will develop safe work habits.
2. Students will follow correct trouble-shooting procedures during skills tests.
3. Students will provide correct responses during diagnostic tests.




Students will complete several lab reports which indicate their success with
troubleshooting and repairing different vehicle faults.




Students will complete several lab reports which indicate their success with
troubleshooting and repairing different vehicle faults.
Students will complete several lab reports which indicate their success with
troubleshooting and repairing different vehicle faults.




The student will be observed performing each task.




Students will demonstrate their proficiencies by completing various skills
demonstrations involving safety procedures, measuring tools and machining
operations.




Students will be able to attain ASE certification. They will be able to find vehicle
specifications and procedures with 90% accuracy. They will be able to
troubleshoot and repair electrical and engine performance faults with 80%
accuracy.




Successful students will complete an engine rebuilding project which reflects the
skills developed in the class. Successful students will correctly answer questions
about engine components and operation.




The four unit exams contain questions that are designed to reveal the students
understanding of the student learning outcomes previously stated. In addition, the
term paper reveals the student's appraisal of the aviation industry today.
Students are given four unit exams as well as a comprehensive final examination.
The comprehensive final examination is designed to closely duplicate the actual
knowledge exam that will be administered by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The questions (approximately 250) that are asked on the in-class
exams are selected in a manner that the instructor can gain a comprehensive
understanding of the student's knowledge and ability to apply the material
presented in the course. At the completion of the course, students are given a pre-
addressed post card and asked to mail it back to the aviation discipline with the
score earned on the actual Federal Aviation Administration's knowledge exam. On
the post card, they are also asked to comment on areas where they felt they were
weak and would have liked additional classroom instruction.




Students are given five unit exams as well as a comprehensive final examination.
The comprehensive final examination is designed to closely duplicate the actual
knowledge exam that will be administered by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The questions (approximately 300) that are asked on the in-class
exams are selected in a manner that the instructor can gain a comprehensive
understanding of the student's knowledge and ability to apply the material
presented in the course. At the completion of the course, students are given a pre-
addressed post card and asked to mail it back to the aviation discipline with the
score earned on the actual Federal Aviation Administration's knowledge exam. On
the post card, they are also asked to comment on areas where they felt they were
weak and would have liked additional classroom instruction.




Students are given five unit exams as well as a comprehensive final examination.
The comprehensive final examination is designed to closely duplicate the actual
knowledge exam that will be administered by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The questions (approximately 300) that are asked on the in-class
exams are selected in a manner that the instructor can gain a comprehensive
understanding of the student's knowledge and ability to apply the material
presented in the course. At the completion of the course, students are given a pre-
addressed post card and asked to mail it back to the aviation discipline with the
score earned on the actual Federal Aviation Administration's knowledge exam. On
the post card, they are also asked to comment on areas where they felt they were
weak and would have liked additional classroom instruction.
Students are given five unit exams as well as a comprehensive final examination.
The comprehensive final examination is designed to closely duplicate the actual
knowledge exam that will be administered by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The questions (approximately 300) that are asked on the in-class
exams are selected in a manner that the instructor can gain a comprehensive
understanding of the student's knowledge and ability to apply the material
presented in the course. Students will also be assessed on their understanding of
fundamentals of flight in the lesson plans that they prepare. Student presentation
skills will be evluated by the presentations made in front of the class. In addition,
At the completion of the course, students are given a pre-addressed post card and
asked to mail it back to the aviation discipline with the score earned on the actual
Federal Aviation Administration's knowledge exams. On the post card, they are
also asked to comment on areas where they felt they were weak and would have
liked additional classroom instruction.




Students are given five unit exams as well as a comprehensive final examination.
The comprehensive final examination is designed to closely duplicate the actual
knowledge exam that will be administered by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The questions (approximately 300) that are asked on the in-class
exams are selected in a manner that the instructor can gain a comprehensive
understanding of the student's knowledge and ability to apply the material
presented in the course. Students will also be assessed on their understanding of
fundamentals of flight in the lesson plans that they prepare. Student presentation
skills will be evluated by the presentations made in front of the class. In addition,
At the completion of the course, students are given a pre-addressed post card and
asked to mail it back to the aviation discipline with the score earned on the actual
Federal Aviation Administration's knowledge exams. On the post card, they are
also asked to comment on areas where they felt they were weak and would have
liked additional classroom instruction.
The two unit exams and the comprehensive final exam contain questions and
problems that are designed to reveal the students understanding of the desired
student learning outcomes previously stated.




The three unit exams contain questions that are designed to reveal the students
understanding of the previously stated student learning outcomes. In addition, the
term paper and class participation contribute to the instructor's understanding of
the student's comprehension of the desired student learning outcomes.




The four unit exams contain questions that are designed to reveal the students
understanding of the student learning outcomes previously stated. In addition, the
term paper reveals the student's appraisal of selected weather phenomenon and its
possible hazard to air navigation. This is an important part of the desired student
learning outcomes.
The observation of the students in the flight simulator during the final
examination is the primary method used to determine whether students are
meeting the stated desired learning outcomes.




The five unit exams contain questions that are designed to reveal the students
understanding of the student learning outcomes previously stated. In addition, the
term paper reveals the student's understanding of one of the current navigation
systems.




The five unit exams contain questions that are designed to reveal the students
understanding of the student learning outcomes previously stated. In addition, the
term paper reveals the student's understanding of one of the current navigation
systems.
The demonstration of the Garmin G1000 and 430/530 systems on the computer
simulator will be a significant factor in determining if the students are achieving
the stated student learning outcomes. In addition, written exams will contain
questions that are designed to reveal the students level of achievement with regard
to the desired student learning outcomes.




The learning outcomes and their assessment will be dependent on the topic
covered. An explanation of how students will demonstrate that they have achieved
the stated student learning outcomes will be developed by the instructor and
included on the outline for the specific topics course.

The four examinations contain questions and problems that are designed to reveal
the students understanding of the desired student learning outcomes that were
previously stated.




The three exams contain questions that are designed to reveal the students
understanding of the student learning outcomes previously stated. In addition, the
term paper, class participation, and the oral presentations indicate how well the
students are meeting the desired student learning outcomes.
The seven unit exams are carefully written so that they contain questions that are
designed to reveal the students understanding of the student learning outcomes
previously stated. In addition, class participation reveals the students
understanding of the desired student learning outcomes.




The six unit exams will be carefully written so that they contain embedded
questions that are designed to measure the students understanding of the student
learning outcomes.




The learning outcomes and their assessment will be dependent on the approved
research or project. An explanation of how students will demonstrate that they
have achieved the stated student learning outcomes will be developed by the
instructor and included as an attachment to the contract with the student.




A Federal Aviation Administration designated pilot examiner will judge the
ability of the student based on criteria established by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The examination will consist of approximately 2 hours of activity
on the ground followed by approximately 1 1/2 hours of flight time in the actual
aircraft.
A Federal Aviation Administration designated pilot examiner will judge the
ability of the student based on criteria established by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The examination will consist of approximately 2 hours of activity
on the ground followed by approximately 1 1/2 hours of flight time in the actual
aircraft under actual and/or simulated instrument flight conditions.




A Federal Aviation Administration designated pilot examiner will judge the
ability of the student based on criteria established by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The examination will consist of approximately 2 hours of activity
on the ground followed by approximately 1 1/2 hours of flight time in the actual
aircraft.




A Federal Aviation Administration designated pilot examiner will judge the
ability of the student based on criteria established by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The examination will consist of approximately 1 hour of activity
on the ground followed by approximately 1 1/2 hours of flight time in the actual
aircraft.




A Federal Aviation Administration designated pilot examiner will judge the
ability of the student based on criteria established by the Federal Aviation
Administration. The examination will consist of approximately 1 hour of activity
on the ground followed by approximately 1 1/2 hours of flight time in the actual
aircraft.
Successful students are able to clearly describe, interrelate, and apply the terms
and concepts listed in the course outline of record for this course. Student success
will be assessed through multiple-choice, short-answer, and essay exams to test
different levels of cognitive subject mastery. In addition, student success will be
assessed through student-prepared formal lab reports which must apply the
scientific method to analysis and discussion of experimental results. Students
must also demonstrate basic required laboratory skills and techniques through
practical lab exams and quizzes.




A successful student will score 70% or above on the SLO assessment.




A successful student will score 70% or above on the SLO assessment.




A successful student will score 70% or above on the SLO assessment.
Successful students are able to clearly describe and interrelate concepts related to
the overarching learning outcomes. This is assessed on examinations requiring
written responses testing for different cognitive levels of subject mastery (ranging
from knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis and synthesis). In addition,
this assessment is based on evaluating student research projects requiring students
to apply and interrelate concepts learned in the course to independently researched
topics.




Successful students must demonstrate the ability to describe, interrelate and apply
the terms and concepts listed in the course outline of record for this course.
Student success is assessed using essay-based and multiple choice examinations to
measure different cognitive levels of subject mastery, ranging from knowledge,
comprehension, application, analysis and synthesis. In addition to essay-based and
multiple choice examinations, students are assigned several independent research
projects which are evaluated based on their accuracy, clarity and critical analysis.




Successful students will be able to clearly describe, identify, analyze, or otherwise
appropriately demonstrate mastery (as determined by individual instructor) of the
concepts related to the slo being considered. In each evaluation period, instructors
will assess class performance on the questions/assignments relevant to the slo
being considered.
To assess mastery of laboratory skills and techniques essential to advanced
biotechnology courses students must demonstrate mastery and understanding of
each laboratory skill and each laboratory technique taught in the course. This
assessment will be based on actual student demonstration of each skill and
technique taught in the course, as well as assessments based on traditional
examination methods. To assess mastery of the basic knowledge of math,
chemistry, biology, and microbiology for additional biotechnology coursework
traditional examination techniques will be used, testing different cognitive levels
of subject mastery (ranging from knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis
and synthesis).

To assess mastery of laboratory skills and techniques essential to advanced
biotechnology courses students must demonstrate mastery and understanding of
each laboratory skill and each laboratory technique taught in the course. This
assessment will be based on actual student demonstration of each skill and
technique taught in the course, as well as assessments based on traditional
examination methods. To assess mastery of the basic knowledge of math,
chemistry, biology, and microbiology for additional biotechnology coursework
traditional examination techniques will be used, testing different cognitive levels
of subject mastery (ranging from knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis
and synthesis).

Students are able to relate their experiences and knowlege to others heightening
their awareness of issues related to the environment. Because they have become
skilled observers, analysts and recorders of observations, several students have
gone on to upper division and graduate study in natural history eventually going
on to to employement in federal and state regulatory and research agencies
associated with the environment. All come away with a greater respect and
understanding of complex ecosystems and the environmental issues affecting them.




Demonstration methods will vary by topic, but could include (but are not limited
to) written reports, demonstration of field techniques, or completion of
independent research projects.
Students must complete a series of projects requiring the correct application of
concepts and techniques needed to successfully design, conduct and analyze
experiments. To successfully complete each project a student must correctly
identify the type of biological question being asked, the number and types of
biological variables involved and the appropriate experimental design required to
answer the question. Multiple projects are assigned in order to provide students an
opportunity to correct previous errors and misconceptions, and to build upon
previous knowledge and skills. In addition to student projects traditional
examination methods are used to assess mastery of specific learning outcomes by
testing multiple cognitive levels (including knowledge, comprehension,
application, analysis and synthesis).


Successful outcomes may vary depending on the topic. However, in general,
successful students will be able to demonstrate increased knowledge of the
specific biological topic covered in the course, as well as the ability to assess and
evaluate statements on the topic based on evidence.




By successfully passing the examinations and completing the homework the
students will demonstrate the learning outcomes




Students will prepare sample problems for varying financial situations. Instructor
will grade the problems and give student feedback as to correctness.




The student who successfully completes this course will: 1. Understand the scope
of retailing and the impact economically in the United States and globally. 2.
Design the interior of a retail space with proper fixtures placement to best meet
the consumer image, merchandise mix,and traffic flow. 3. Write and execute a
business and advertising plan for a special event and promotional magazine.




1. Students collect ads throughout the course and discuss them in class, create
portfolios, and write analyses that demonstrate their knowledge of specific topics.
2. Students develop a research paper (independently), synthesize a creative brief
(in a team) and a create and advertising strategic plan (in a team).
1) Presentation and implementation of marketing program.

1) Assessment Methods: various writing assignments including a resume and
application for seeking employment.
1. Employer/supervisor evaluation of documented workplace objectives/projects
using a rating scale to measure how well the workplace objectives/projects were
accomplished. 2. Student written monthly reports describing, discussing, and
analyzing the workplace objectives. 3. A faculty worksite visit with the
employer/supervisor to discuss the students' progress and level of contribution
toward the achievement of organizational objectives.

1. Employer/supervisor evaluation of documented workplace objectives/projects
using a rating scale to measure how well the workplace objectives/projects were
accomplished. 2. Student written monthly reports describing, discussing, and
analyzing the workplace objectives. 3. A faculty worksite visit with the
employer/supervisor to discuss the students' progress and level of contribution
toward the achievement of organizational objectives.

1. Employer/supervisor evaluation of documented workplace objectives/projects
using a rating scale to measure how well the workplace objectives/projects were
accomplished. 2. Student written monthly reports describing, discussing, and
analyzing the workplace objectives. 3. A faculty worksite visit with the
employer/supervisor to discuss the students' progress and level of contribution
toward the achievement of organizational objectives.

Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.




Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.




Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for ; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. finish. Students display their work at show and or competitions.
Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.




Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.




Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.




Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.




Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.
Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.




Student and/or students create a product/project which is evaluated by students
and instructor for; 1. design 2. construction 3. difficulty 4. craftsmanship/quality
5. Finish. Students display their work at show and/or competitions.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2. Students successfully completing Chemistry 10 will be able to
approach mathematical problem solving in Chemistry with greater confidence and
will be more successful in subsequent Chemistry courses, students will be able to
analyze a chemical problem and choose the best method of solving the problem,
students will be able to look at a problem solution and recognize whether it makes
sense/answers the question appropriately.

Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2. Students successfully completing Chemistry 10 will be able to
approach mathematical problem solving in Chemistry with greater confidence and
will be more successful in subsequent Chemistry courses, students will be able to
analyze a chemical problem and choose the best method of solving the problem,
students will be able to look at a problem solution and recognize whether it makes
sense/answers the question appropriately.

SLO-1 &2: Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the
comparative performance of the embedded questions results. SLO-3: Students will
demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based upon the comparative performance of
the specifically-selected lab reports for which a rubric was followed.
SLO-1 &2: Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the
comparative performance of the embedded questions results. SLO-3: Students will
demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based upon the comparative performance of
the specifically-selected lab reports for which a rubric was followed.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2. Students successfully completing Chemistry 102 will be able
to explain how the basic principles of chemistry relate to their daily lives and their
surrounding environment, be able to apply scientific methods and principles in
solving problems using chemical language in the appropriate context, evaluate the
validity of scientific articles and make reasoned judgments of social issues that are
founded on general chemical processes.


Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2. Students successfully completing Chemistry 102 will be able
to explain how the basic principles of chemistry relate to their daily lives and their
surrounding environment, be able to apply scientific methods and principles in
solving problems using chemical language in the appropriate context, evaluate the
validity of scientific articles and make reasoned judgments of social issues that are
founded on general chemical processes.


Students will demonstrate their mastery of the three SLOs based on the
comparative performance of the embedded questions results.




SLO-1: Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the
comparative performance of the embedded questions results. SLO-2: Students will
demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based upon the comparative performance of
the specifically-selected lab reports for which a rubric has been developed and
followed.
Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the comparative
performance of the embedded questions results.




SLO-1: Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the
comparative performance of the embedded questions results. SLO-2: Students will
demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based upon the comparative performance of
the specifically-selected lab reports for which a rubric was followed.




Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the comparative
performance of the embedded questions results.




SLO-1: Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the
comparative performance of the embedded questions results. SLO-2: Students will
demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based upon the comparative performance of
the specifically-selected lab reports for which a rubric was followed.




SLO-1: Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the
comparative performance of the embedded questions results. SLO-2: Students will
demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based upon the comparative performance of
the specifically-selected lab reports for which a rubric was followed.
Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




SLO-1: Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based on the
comparative performance of the embedded questions results. SLO-2: Students will
demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based upon the comparative performance of
the specifically-selected lab reports for which a rubric was followed. SLO-3:
Students will be allowed to enroll in Organic Chemistry 221 lecture/laboratory.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




Students will demonstrate their mastery of the SLO based upon the comparative
performance of the specifically-selected lab reports for which a rubric was
followed and their national exam results.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.
Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation, Writing
Assignments Laboratory Assignments, Written Exams, and Oral Exam/
presentations. Each assessment focuses on a student’s progress as it relates to the
Learning Outcomes for this course. Class Participation (Student Learning
Outcomes #1, 2, 4, 5, 6) Writing Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes #3, 4,
5, 6) Laboratory Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes #1, 2, 3, 5, 6) Written
Exams (Student Learning Outcomes #2, 3, 4, 5, 6) Oral Exam/ presentations
(Student Learning Outcomes #1, 2, 3, 4, 6)




Instructor will determine success of SLO's as they pertain to each new course
being taught.




Each assessment focuses on a student's progress as it relates to the Learning
Outcomes for this course. Students are assessed in the following ways: Class
Participation: (Student Learning Outcomes #1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6) Writing Assignments:
(Student Learning Outcomes #5, 6) Laboratory Assignments: (Student Learning
Outcomes #1, 2, 4, 5, 6) Written Exams: (Student Learning Outcomes #1, 2, 4, 5,
6) Oral Exam/ presentations: Student Learning Outcomes #1, 2, 3, 6)




3. Assessment 1: Students will complete two 40 question quizzes and one 100
question midterm to assess and evaluate their understanding of the technical
requirements of the code. A 65 question final exam will assess their overall
comprehension. Assessment 2: Students will use lecture information and research
effective communication methods and write a 300 word essay that describes the
methods, performance and techniques used by inspectors to issue correction
notices, log inspections and communicate effectively with the public. The essay
will be graded for content, spelling, grammar and style
Assessment 1: Students will complete two 40 question quizzes and one 100
question midterm to assess and evaluate their understanding of the technical
requirements of the code. A 65 question final exam will assess their overall
comprehension. Assessment 2: Students will use lecture material and research the
required inspections for wood and concrete buildings to write a 300 word essay
that identifies their understanding of the required inspections. The assessment will
include a table that lists the separate inspections required for both wood and
concrete buildings. The essay will be graded for content, spelling, grammar and
style.


Assessment 1: Weekly timed quizzes will be distributed throughout the semester
to allow the student to measure their own ability to use the Code as a reference.
The quizzes will be comprised of true/false and multiple choice with mandatory
Code sections and essay questions for student verification of competency.
Assessment 2: A blank building floorplan will be distributed to students requiring
them to design an electrical system for the building. The project will include
defining electrical service size, designing a proper grounding system, completing
a panel schedule, and equipment placement throughout the building. Assessment
3: Completion of a single line diagram from the source (service) to the final
electrical outlet (motor) will be required. The design will review student skills in
the abilities to determine overcurrent devices sizing, conductor sizing, and proper
use of Code Tables 250-122, 310-16 and 430-52, and 430-152. Assessment 4: The
student will design and document grounding electrode systems, equipment
grounding paths, and bonding connections as detailed in Article 250 of the
National Electrical Code.




Assessment 1: Weekly timed quizzes will be distributed throughout the semester
to allow the student to measure their own ability to use the Code as a reference.
The quizzes will be comprised of true/false and multiple choice with mandatory
Code sections and essay questions for student verification of competency.
Assessment 2: Simple arithmetic calculations, photovoltaic design concepts,
conductor sizing, and overall equipment and conduit layouts as finalized by the
student will be evaluated for design correctness and code compliance. Assessment
3: Knowledge with electrical diagrams, grounding, conductor sizing, and
disconnect designs will all be brought to play in a completed written layout,
including mathematical calculations as well as a single line diagram. Justification
of both (calculations and single line) will be summarized in a written ½ to 1 page
essay. The resulting design will be a typical electrical system that is in common
use today in business and industrial occupancies. Assessment 4: The student will
be required to distinguish complying and non-complying items. The Notice form
will measure the student’s knowledge of proper electrical swimming pool design
and their ability to communicate to the public in a written format. Proper use of
technical terms, a working knowledge of Code requirements, and the ability to
communicate to the public in writing will be evaluated.
Assessment 1: Students will complete two 40 question quizzes and one 100
question midterm to assess and evaluate their understanding of the technical
requirements of the code. A 65 question final exam will assess their overall
comprehension. Assessment 2: Students will use lecture material and research
plan checking methods to write a 300 word essay that identifies their
understanding of the job skills necessary in plan checking services. The essay will
be graded for content, spelling, grammar and style.




Assessment 1: Students will complete two 40 question quizzes and one 100
question midterm to assess and evaluate their understanding of the technical
requirements of the code. A 65 question final exam will assess their overall
comprehension. Assessment 2: Students will use lecture material and research
structural plan checking methods to write a 300 word essay that identifies their
understanding of the job skills necessary in structural plan checking services. The
essay will be graded for content, spelling, grammar and style.




Assessment 1: Students will accurately identify basic elements required for
construction or inspection of the structure. Assessment 2: Students will identify
the structural elements such as foundations, shear resisting elements, and other
structural components.


Class Participation: answer questions directed during class Field Trip: attend
outside field trip to movie theatre and critically analyze the film screened.
STUDENTS COMPLETING THE CLASS WILL DEMONSTRATE
UNDERSTANDING OF KEY PRINCIPLES AND INFORMATION TO
POLITICAL HISTORY AND AMERICAN INSTITUTIONS THROUGH CLASS
PRESENTATIONS ON MATERIAL ASSIGNED. ALSO STUDENTS WILL
DEMONSTRATE KNOWLEDGE LEARNING BY ESSAYS,TESTS ON
CRITICAL TOPICS AND RESEARCH PAPERS AND FINAL EXAMINATION
ESSAYS REQUIRED FOR CLASS COMPLETION.




Students who successfully complete this course will demonstrate the overarching
learning outcomes by expressing their educated views in class discussion. Critical
essays will allow students to demonstrate their analytical skills. Furthermore,
students will identify and question the relevance of subject material and will
stimulate their thinking in order to strengthen and change their world views and
identities. The outcome will be both evaluated through critical writing, analysis,
and observable behavior in the classroom where students will demonstrate an
improved understanding of diversity and multiculturalism.




Examination and successfully completing lab work.
Students develop correct, simple, clear and therefore maintainable software.




Students develop robust and efficient software.




Examinations and successful completion of programming assignments
Students develop correct, simple, clear and therefore maintainable software.




Students develop robust and efficient software.




1.A questionnaire will be given to students to evaluate how well they can assess
and evaluate jobs in dental careers. Expected outcome is that 70% of students who
complete the questionnaire will correctly assess job opportunities in dental
careers. 2. Analyze success rates on a dental terminology exam. expected outcome
is that 70% of students that are enrolled in the course will receive a grade of 70%
of better on the dental terminology exam. Observe if dental terminology and
professional language is communicated in two oral presentations. Expected
outcome is that 70% of students will use at least 5 dental terms or 5 professional
phrases in the oral presentation.

1.A questionaire will be given to students to evaluate how well they can assess job
opportunities and dental careers. 2. Analyze success rates on a dental terminology
exam. Observe if dental terminology and professional language is used in a
research paper and communicated in two oral presentations.
1. Students will achieve a passing grade of (70%) seventy percent or higher on an
exam that contains case based questions which will require identification of
histological characteristics of dental structures and explain how it relates to the
selection and application of dental materials. 2. Students will achieve a passing
grade of (70%) seventy percent or higher on exam that contains case based
questions which will require identification of different oral lesions and conditions
and how they differ from normal tissues.




1. Students that complete this course will be able to achieve a passing grade of
(70%) seventy percent or higher on an exam that contains case based questions
which require selection of appropriate dental materials. 2. Students that complete
this course will be able to achieve a grade of (75%) seventy five percent or higher
on a comprehensive laboratory final exam which includes identification,
application, and properties of each material used in the laboratory .




1. Student performance will be measured during DA 90 with front desk evaluation
forms to be graded by the office staff of each dental office where students are
assigned. 2. Students will print out their work after retrieving required data on
dental software and give to instructor for assessment.
1. Student performance will be measured during DA 90 with front desk evaluation
forms to be graded by the office staff of each dental office where students are
assigned. Expected outcome is that 90% of students enrolled in DA 90 will
receive 75% or better of "almost always" on the total of the tasks that are being
evaluated. 2. Students will print out their work after retrieving required data on
dental software and give to instructor for assessment. Expected outcome is that
90% of students will receive 70% or better grade for the following tasks:
generating patient records, appointment scheduling, recall systems, accounts
payable and accounts receivable data using dental software.

1. Outcome is measured by students passing a series of laboratory evaluations on a
"manikin" showing progress in this area of dentistry and resulting in the student's
performance of these skills being deemed "clinically acceptable". A final rubric
will be used on one dental radiographic survey on a "human patient" to deem it
"clinically acceptable". 2. Outcome is measured by students achieving a passing
grade of (75%) seventy-five percent or higher on a final exam where the student
will identify ten anatomical landmarks on two randomly selected human
radiographic surveys.
1. Outcome is measured with three final clinical experiences and three final
evaluations in dental radiography on three patients, resulting in students
performance of these skills being deemed “clinically acceptable” and therefore
receiving a dental radiography license. 2.Outcome is measured by students having
three clinical experiences and three final evaluations in processing, reading and
mounting dental radiographic surveys on three patients, resulting in students
performance of these skills being deemed “clinically acceptable” and therefore
receiving a dental radiography license.




1.Outcome is measured by a laboratory evaluation that exposes students to
materials and armamentarium used in various dental specialties. Students will be
required to identify the instruments and materials in the armamentarium for each
dental speciality. 2.Outcome is measured by students successfully passing a series
of evaluations showing progress in this area of dentistry, resulting in students
performance of these skills being deemed “clinically acceptable”. After the
student passes a series of competency exams showing progress with this
procedure, a final rubric will be used to deem the restoration “clinically
acceptable.”
1.Outcome is measured by students passing a series of laboratory evaluations on a
“manikin” showing progress in this area of dentistry and resulting in students
performance of these skills being deemed “clinically acceptable”. A final rubric
will be used to deem “clinically acceptable” on two “live patients”. 2.Outcome is
measured by students passing a series of laboratory evaluations on “typodont
teeth” showing progress in this area of dentistry and resulting in student’s
performance of these skills being deemed “clinically acceptable”. A final rubric
will be used to deem “clinically acceptable” on a final evaluation on typodont
teeth.




1.Outcome is measured by students performance on a final clinical evaluation in
coronal polishing on a live patient, resulting in students performance of these
skills being deemed “clinically acceptable” and therefore receiving a coronal
polishing license. 2.Outcome is measured by students performance on four final
clinical evaluations in pit and fissure sealant placement on live patients, resulting
in students performance of these skills being deemed “clinically acceptable” and
therefore receiving their pit and fissure sealant license.
1.Students must pass a series a of laboratory competency exams showing progress
with this procedure, until they reach a "clinically acceptable" outcome for the
procedure which is required for course completion. 2. Outcome is measured by
students successfully passing a series of laboratory evaluations resulting these
skills being deemed "clinically acceptable" which is required for course
completion.




1.One year after completing this course, a survey is sent to each student to see if
they were/are employed as a dental health professional. In addition the survey
asks questions if they about preparedness for employment. This data is analyzed
and adjustments made as needed to meet this learning outcome. 2. This outcome is
measured by an evaluation form that measures the students ability to put theory
into practice. This evaluation is completed by the dental staff at each intern site,
and analyzed for student progress, and success in this area. Preclincal course work
is adjusted if criteria is not met in the course.




Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assigments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.
Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.




Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.




Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.




Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.




Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.




Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.




Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.
Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.




Through a variety of tests, quiz's and lab assignments which are combined with
observations in the class room and in the lab.




pending
pending
Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.




Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.
Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.




Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.




Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.
Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.




Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.




Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.
Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.




Assessment: Qualitative - the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based
on their own aesthetic backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students,
as well as a qualitative assessment of the technical level of the student, as
demonstrated through their execution/embodiment of choreography specified in
the dance concert format.




Students will be able to interpret, describe and produce correct 2 dimensional
drawings to describe 3 dimensional objects.
Demonstration of mechanical drafting skills and correct documentation using
AutoCAD is more appropriate


Student success will be demonstrated by a series of examinations and quizzes,
which will have objective questions in several formats and slide identification
questions. The student will also prepare a three-page term paper that examines the
work and career of a well-known modern architect.




Student success will be demonstrated by a series of examinations on the main
cultural groups. The exams will be a mixture of essay and objective questions.
The student will also prepare a three-page term paper that compares two different
cultures' expression of a similar building type.




Students will be able to lay out and detail drawings according to standard
industrial specifications
The student will demonstrate his/her knowledge of commercial materials and
building systems in several examinations and quizzes. He/she will also create a
materials notebook that demonstrates a detailed knowledge of a specific building
product.




1. A student's final architectural assignment portfolio will reflect solutions based
sustainable projects merging both economic and social integration. 2. Service
learning is a required aspect of this course and the e-drawings in coursework are a
resource both for the student and for the community.
The successful student will produce a set of construction documents (working
drawings) which demonstrate his/her understanding of the various aspects of the
construction process and the drawings required to initiate and complete that
process.




Students will pass a comprehensive final that will demonstrate they have
succesfully understood the student learning outcomes. They succesfully complete
analysis, papers, document analysis, projects or web presentations.




Students will pass a comprehensive final that will demonstrate they have
succesfully understood the student learning outcomes. They succesfully complete
analysis, papers, document analysis, projects or web presentations.




Students will pass a comprehensive final that will demonstrate they have
successfully understood the student learning outcomes. They successfully
complete analysis, papers, document analysis, projects or web presentations.




Examination questions and quizzes require students to analyze how different types
of markets affect production and consumption decisions. Examinations,
homework assignments, and projects require students to plot graphs and to explain
the variables and the conclusions of these graphs. Examinations, homework
assignments, quizzes, projects, and term papers require students to compare and
contrast the variety of economic systems. Examinations, homework assignments,
projects, and quizzes require students to use the theories of comparative advantage
and to discuss global trade.
Students will pass a comprehensive final that will demonstrate they have
successfully understood the student learning outcomes. They successfully
complete analysis, papers, document analysis, projects or web presentations.




Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.




Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.




Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.




Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.
Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.




Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.




Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.




Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.
Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.




Measurements of learning outcomes: Students will be required to achieve a total
score of 75% to demonstrate their successfully meeting the requirements of the
assessments.




By completing this course the student will receive certification from the American
Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons as a First Responder and another certification
from the American Heart Association in CPR Healthcare Provider.




1. Students will successfully demonstrate the proper technique for obtaining
patient vital signs on a minimum of 5 simulated patients. 2. Students will pass the
required (3) examinations with a score of 80% or better. 3. Students will assess,
evaluate and treat a minimum of 5 simulated patients.




1. Turn in completed and accurate EMS forms according to SD County Guidelines
for all patient contacts with a minimum of 20 contacts. 2. Turn in ride along forms
that have ratings of 2 or better signesd by the station captain. 3. Pass skills exam
with 80% or better according to National Standards.

Qualitative from the homework assignment. Observation of communication skills
in classroom.
Qualitative review of simulation grades and evaluations.




1. Students have successfully acted as a team leader in a scenario based
megacode. During the megacode the student has successfully interpreted
assessment findings, including EKG interpretation, vital signs, allergies, history
and medications information and physical findings. 2. Student has correctly
identified and diagnosed a cardiac or stroke patient and treated appropriately with
the correct airway, pharmacological, and electrical therapy (difibrillation,
synchronized cardioversion or external cardiac pacing).
Students have sucessfully acted as a team leader in a scenario based pediatric
megacode. During the megacode the student has successfully assessed a pediatric
patient, interpreted physical findings and vital signs, formulated a treatment plan
and successfully carried out the treatment plan. Students have correctly performed
skills in airway management, spinal immobilization, vascular access and pediatric
medication administration.




being developed




By completing this course the student will receive written certification for the
American Heart Association.
Assessment 1: In aggregate, students will respond with 70% accuracy. This SLO
represents 50% of the student’s grade. Assessment 2: Students accurately identify
the correct voltage, amperage, and resistance quantities. Assessment 3: Students
will accurately determine the mechanical advantage of first, second, and third
class machines to determine the ratio of force and work needed.




Grammar quizzes and chapter tests and a cumulative final exam; paragraphs and
at least one essay written throughout the semester.


1. Students read, discuss, and write about a variety of texts in order to demonstrate
their ability to analyze written arguments. 2. Students write essays, including at
least one research essay during the course of the semester.


Students will demonstrate their understanding and knowledge of course material
by successfully completing quantitative/qualitative tests and exams, homework,
short papers, and group/individual projects.




1. Students write advanced analytical essays throughout the semester. 2. Students
incorporate research and source citation into their essays.




1. Students write advanced analytical essays throughout the semester. 2. Students
incorporate research and source citation into their essays.




Student demonstrate achievement of the learning outcomes primarily in formal
and informal writing assignments; through participation in classroom discussions;
and on examinations that require students to thoughtfully engage course material.
Student success is measured primarily in formal and informal writing
assignments, including essays and reflective journals; through participation in
classroom discussions; and on examinations that require students to thoughtfully
engage course material by responding to prompts.




1. Students read essays and articles in order to practice the skills of paraphrasing,
summarizing, and the integration of quotations in the paragraphs and essays they
write throughout the semester. 2. For their final exam, students write a multi-
paragraph in response to a reading-based prompt. The essay is written in a timed,
proctored session and graded by the faculty in a holistic, normed grading session.

The learning outcomes will depend on the specific topic covered. The Methods of
Assessment will be developed for each topic class and included in an outline
developed by the instructor.

Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2.
Students will be able to effectively troubleshoot, analyze, and fix complicated
electronic devices that are based on the topics covered in class.




Students will be able to compare and contrast the electrical characteristics of
materials that are classified as semiconductors,explain how the most important
semiconductor devices are constructed and operated. Students will also be able to
construct basic electronic circuits like amplifiers using resistors, capacitors,
inductors, transformers, diodes, transistors, power supplies, and generators
following traditional lab station procedures using standard equipment, as well as
through computer simulated construction, design, and analysis, and apply
developed troubleshooting techniques to solve electronic circuit problems
utilizing electronic test equipment and computer simulated programs
Students will be able to effectively troubleshoot, analyze, and fix complicated
electronic devices that are based on the topics covered in class.




Students will be able to effectively troubleshoot, analyze, and fix complicated
electronic devices that are based on the topics covered in class.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2.
Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2.




Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions on exams. If the
student scores 70% on each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the outcome has
been successfully met for that class.
This is single course which is only taught by one faculty member who frequently
participates in conferences and discussions and reads current findings in the field
in order to assure that effective and current methods of assessment are utilized in
this course. The current faculty member teaching the courses has discussed their
assessments with previous instructors of the course.




A final, in-class, 2.5 hour essay exam. Course instructors will submit their
assessment results to the ESL Academic Program Coordinator. A series of
grammar activities, quizzes, and tests.


They are able to write a 5-paragraph timed essay on a given topic demonstrating
competence in organization, development, support and grammar. They also need
to pass a series of grammar quizzes and tests.


A final, in-class, 2.5 hour essay exam. Course instructors will submit their
assessment results to the ESL Academic Program Coordinator. Instructors give a
series of in-class and out-of-class essay assignments over the course of the
semester, including essay writing and quizzes.
Students in this course demonstrate both a passive and active ability to apply the
rules of syllable, phrase, and sentence stress through written analysis of English
words/syllables/phrases/sentences, and through spoken language production. The
spoken language consists of a speaking a number of different short texts which are
frequently recorded and analyzed by both the students and instructor. The written
analysis is based on listening tasks, and is also assessed by the instructor to
determine students' ability to apply the rules they have learnt in class.




Students are required to complete written assessments at the completion of each
module within their specific vocational ESL program. Students are also assessed
on their computer and critical thinking skills based on at least 5 specific activities.




Students are required to complete written assessments at the completion of each
module within their specific vocational ESL program. Students are also assessed
on their computer and critical thinking skills based on at least 5 specific activities.




Students are required to complete written assessments at the completion of each
study module within their specific vocational ESL program. Students are also
assessed on their speaking, listening, reading, and computer and critical thinking
skills based on at least 5 specific activities.
Students are required to complete written assessments at the completion of each
study module within their specific vocational ESL program. Students are also
assessed on their speaking, listening, reading, and computer and critical thinking
skills based on at least 5 specific activities.




Students are required to complete written assessments at the completion of each
study module within their specific vocational ESL program. Students are also
assessed on their speaking, listening, reading, and computer and critical thinking
skills based on at least 5 specific activities.




1.The students who successfully completes this course will create a plan of action
"Road Map to Success" that will help them to achieve their fashion career goals.
2.The students who successfully complete this course will create a project that
identifies careers in the fashion Industry.
3. The students who successfully complete this course will evaluate emerging
trends and predict a trend for the coming season by creating a trend research
display board.


The student who successfully completes this course will: 1.Plan and build a
wardrobe suited to meet the cultural, psychological and sociological need of self
and others. 2.Identify figure types and appropriate clothing styles. 3.Apply the
principal of design and the art elements to enhance the total look of an individual.




1. Set up and organize an exterior window at a retail location using appropriate
mannequins. 2. Set up an interior display at the campus bookstore, in class vitrine
and wall displays. 3. Draw with a scale a floor plan for a retail store. 4. Analyze
all displays by the principles of design. 5. Create a color wheel and identify the
different color schemes using accepted theories.




The student who successfully completes this course will: 1. Organize a team to
execute a display for a department and or exterior windows. 2. Interpret the theme
for a special event, design, create and execute the decorations. 3. Create a plan-o-
gram to scale for the interior of a retail location.
Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the role of Retail Buyer as business
leader through their Final Project. Students will be able to research the
demographic location of their store, determine the physio-graphics of their core
customer, and identify the appropriate merchandise to purchase for their store.
Students will demonstrate their ability to create a dollar merchandise plane and
break the dollars into classifications of merchandise. Students will formulate a
Profit and Loss Statement demonstrating their ability to properly assess how to
plan for and achieve a profitable business.
The student who successfully completes this course will: 1. Understand the scope
of retailing and the impact economically in the United States and globally. 2.
Design the interior of a retail space with proper fixtures placement to best meet
the consumer image, merchandise mix,and traffic flow. 3. Write and execute a
business and advertising plan for a special event and promotional magazine.




The student who successfully completes this course will demonstrate their
knowledge by the final project: 1.Organizing a fashion show by selecting the
theme, music, staging, merchandise and models as it relates to the target audience.
2.Coordinating vendors, budget, model auditions, and promotion. 3.Work as a
stylist to coordinate models clothing, accessories, hair, and total look.




Students will complete the three required garments, i.e. pants, blouse, and lined
jacket. Students will complete a portfolio of samplers demonstrating their skills in
advanced sewing construction techniques.
Students will complete the portfolio of samplers. They will also complete 3
required garments, self evauations and two written evaulations of garment
construction




1. evaluate flat pattern making skills and pattern manipulations with a critique of
actual student patterns. 2. Asses quality of pattern by inspecting the fit of muslin
garment constructed from pattern on the dress form. 3. Rate student's terminology
comprehension with written examination.


1. evaluate draping and advanced pattern making skills with a citique of actual
student patterns. 2. Asses quality of pattern by inspecting the fit of muslin garment
constructed from pattern on the dress form. 3. Rate student's terminology
comprehension with written examination.

1. Students will complete a series of pattern-making exercises. 2. Students will
create a production pattern and ready-to-wear garment.


1. Successfully complete an original design and create a hard-copy portfolio
demonstrating their pattern-making skills in interpretation of their design.


Students will complete a portfolio consisting of a logo, letterhead, mood board,
trend board, and technical boards demonstrating their skills in digital design for
fashion.
Assessment will be based on the students attendance and use of time to complete
required assignments during the lab period.




Effective use of time managment will be observable by the successful completion
of tailored projects. Completion of the required number of hours required for
course credit




Students will assemble and illustrate labeling and sizing examples, trim examples,
and design principle examples. They will identify their examples with the proper
fashion terminology. Students who successfully complete this course will prepare
a presentation board that analyses the quality differences in similar garments such
as, fiber content, fabric features and performance, finding and trim, sizing and fit,
stitches and seam and edge treatments.
1. Students should achieve a score of 70% or above on tests and final exam. 2.
Students should demonstrate a good working knowledge of the basic principals of
retail math when enrolled in Fashion 120, Retail Buying and/or Fashion 177,
Retail Management




Evalutation of portfolio by faculty members based on visual presentation, content
and effectual communication.
1. evaluate skills with a critique of actual student projects. 2. Rate student's
terminology comprehension with written examination.


1. evaluate pattern making skills construction with a critique of actual student
patterns and garments. 2. Asses students abilities to present their designs during
an open house presentation.

Successful students will be able to obtain immediate employment to work with
product development teams to provide both technical and design direction. A
complete technical package for a garment will be assessed for comprehensiveness,
clarity, specific details for each garment, and readiness for digital transfer.




1. The students who successfully complete this course will submit in writing
answers to fifteen short worksheets that examine their beliefs and behaviors. The
topics include self belief, goal setting, thinking, memory and study skills,
communication, stress management, managing time money and career preparation.
2.The culmination project "Roadmap to Success" is a notebook that the student
will compile that includes: An overview of their short term, intermediate and
Long term goals, An academic program plan from the counseling office,
Functional Resume and a Money Management plan.

Learning is demosntrated by the following: 1) projects demonstrating
understanding and ability to apply basic concepts of pathogen classification,
differences among various pathogens including morphology and clinical
symptoms, identification of physical and chemical contaminants and methods of
control of microorganism growth and reproduction 2) Quizzes applying material
from handouts and textbooks 3) Presentations of common food-borne pathogens
including history, morphology, clinical symptoms and methods of control tailored
to the specific organism 4) In-class discussions applying concepts to real-life
situations
Learning is demonstrated 1) by student writing assignments which summarizing
reflections on text readings 2)by student (peer to peer) discussion and feedback on
assigned topics followed by instructor feedback 3)by students visiting, reporting
(writing) and sharing (presenting)on ethnic restaurants 4) by student completion
and reflection on self-assessment inventories about therapeutic uses of foods 5)by
students organizing and contrasting their previously held notions about food
choice, culture, religion and ethnicity with new (textbook and other readings)
knowledge and 6) by student completion of objective testing measures.




Learning is demonstrated: 1)by student projects which compare their current
dietary intake to the national guidelines and recommendations. 2) by students
designing a food behavior change plan related their specific diet and lifestyle. 3)
by students organizing and contrasting their previous food,nutrition, and
physiology knowledge with new (textbook) and classroom knowledge (notes). 4)
by students writing (at various life cycle stages) about appropriate food choices
for nutritional health.

Along with test results, summarizing reading, taking notes, asking questions,
participating in discussion, preparing written assignments, completing projects
and students' self-reporting changes in knowledge or attitudes will all help provide
evidence of achievement of the learning objectives.




Learning is demonstrated: 1)Student critiques of four current scientific journal
articles 2) by student projects which apply the basic scientific concepts from the
textbook, handouts and class notes. 3) Discussion of the effects of lifestyle
(dietary and medication) choices on various health and disease processes. 4)
writing (at various life cycle stages) about appropriate food choices for nutritional
health.


Quizzes, exams, written and oral assignments demonstrate the student's ability to
describe and demonstrate their knowledge of fire hydraulics. Students will pass
assessment at a minimum of 70%.
Quizzes,exams, written and oral assignments demonstrate the student's ability to
describe and demonstrate their knowledge of hazardous materials.




Quizzes, exams, written skills, manipulative skills, physical ability exams and
physical fitness standards demonstrate the student's ability to describe and
demonstrate their knowledge of all Fire Academy subjects. Students will pass
assessments at a minimum of 80%.




Quizzes, exams, written and oral assignments demonstrate the student's ability to
describe and demonstrate their knowledge of components and performance of
modern fire apparatus.




Quizzes, exams, written and/or oral assignments demonstrate the student's ability
to describe and demonstrate their knowledge of wildland firefighting. Students
will pass assessment at a minimum of 70%.
Quizzes, exams, written and oral assignments demonstrate the student's ability to
describe and demonstrate their knowledge of fire behavior and combustion.
Students will pass assessment at a minimum of 70%.




Quizzes, exams, written and manipulative skills demonstrate the student's ability
to describe and demonstrate their knowledge of all Volunteer Fire Fighter
Academy subjects.




Quizzes, exams, written and oral assignments demonstrate the student's ability to
describe and demonstrate their knowledge of policy statements that guide fire
service organizations, create a model human resources program, and analyze
complex personnel conflicts and identify possible solutions. Students will pass
assessment at a minimum of 80%.




Quizzes, exams, written and oral assignments demonstrate the student's ability to
describe and demonstrate their knowledge of the Incident Command System,
organizational structure on the emergency scene, analyze strategies and tactic
methods, and describe the components of the safety officer position. Students will
pass assessment at a minimum of 80%.
Quizzes, exams, written and oral assignments demonstrate the student's ability to
describe and demonstrate their knowledge of fire service skills. Students will pass
assessment at a minimum of 80%.




Exams, writing and oral assignments, performance and skill tests demonstrate the
student's ability to describe and demonstrate their knowledge and proficiency in
the physical ability testing process.




Quizzes, exams, written and oral assignments demonstrate the students' ability to
describe and demonstrate their knowledge of fire service skills. Students will pass
assessment at a minimum of 70%.




Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation, Writing
Assignments, Laboratory Assignments, Written Exams, and Oral
Exams/Presentations. Each assessment focuses on a student’s progress as it relates
to the Learning Outcomes for this course. -Class Participation (Student Learning
Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 7) -Writing Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2,
3, 5, 6) -Laboratory Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7) -
Written Exams (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7) -Oral
Exam/Presentations (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 7)
Students will demonstrate understanding of historical events related to mass
communication, visual communication and graphic design through quizzes
(multiple choice, essay and fill-in-the-blank) and hands-on demonstration of
antique press operation. Students will demonstrate understanding of the design
process through critique of the gestalt principles in quizzes and classroom
dialogue. Students will demonstrate that they can explore perception principles of
seeing and believing through essay questions and classroom dialogue. Analyze
appropriate delivery mediums to deploy visual message Students will demonstrate
understanding of advertising and preconceived ideas in relation to audience
perception by writing essays. Students will demonstrate ability to utilize type to
communicate visual messages by assembling a document utilizing typefaces, thus
expressing their understanding of its visual message. Students will identify and
compare layout designs by creating a project, thus demonstrating their
understanding of layout principles. Students will recognize purpose of illustration
and photography in design critique, quizzes, and classroom dialogue. Students
Upon completion of the course the student will be able to successfully apply for
employment by using the projects and knowledge associated with the course as
portfolio material.




C = Timeline Annual Review


C = Timeline Annual Review


Students will have several examples of packaging for their portfolios that can be
used for job searches and interviews.




C=Annual Review
1. Identify types of multimedia, examples of multimedia, and the use of
technology to produce new media: written position paper. 2. Contribute to a wiki
to track the development of new media from its historical roots on a global scale
in order to place our current media in a historical and international perspective:
quality and depth of treatment of contributions as well as interaction/participation
with class members. 3. Contribute to a blog that compares, contrasts, and
integrates multimedia conceptualizations using various methods: Developments,
Paradigms, Rhizomes, Interactivity, Graphical User Interfaces, and
Hypertext/Hypermedia: quality and depth of treatment of contributions as well as
interaction/participation with class members. 4. Participate in multimedia
immersion experiences: gaming, simulations, virtual reality, and training; and
reflect and report to the class about it: quality and depth of treatment of
contributions in written dicussion board post or class discussion as well as
interaction/participation with class members. 5. Produce a narrative using new
media: a cell phone movie or other multimedia presentation integrating the themes
Each of the completed projects are evaluated and graded based on the project
objectives. The projects can be used in portfolios for application to 4 year college
programs or for employer review when entering the job market.




They will have files to take home that they created in class.


Will publish a functioning data base to the web that visitors can interact with to
input and retrieve data.
Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions in tests. If the
student scores 70% on each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the outcome has
been successfully met for that class.




Quizzes, labs, and field work all demonstrate whether a student is achieving a
learning outcome.

Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions in tests. If the
student scores 70% on each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the outcome has
been successfully met for that class.
Outcomes will be assessed through embedded questions in examinations, critical
review, and weekly exercises. If the student earns 70% or more on each of the
embedded question, that particular SLO was successfully met by that student. If
70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the student learning outcome has
been successfully met for that class.




Outcomes will be assessed through embedded questions in examinations, and the
semester project which will be an examination of a culture region of the student's
choice. If the student earns 70% of each embedded question, that particular SLO
was successfully met by that student. If 70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO,
then the student learning outcome has been successfully met for that class.




Students are assessed through written examination and/or final projects.
Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions in tests. If the
student scores 70% on each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the outcome has
been successfully met for that class.




Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions in tests. If the
student scores 70% on each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the outcome has
been successfully met for that class.
The overarching learning outcomes will be assessed through embedded questions
found in homework exercises, examinations, and the semester project. If the
student's response earns at least 70% of the credit allocated to each embedded
question, then that particular SLO has been met by the student. If 70% of the
students in the course earns 70% or more on each SLO, then the outcome has been
successfully met for that class.




The successful student will be able to understand and describe to another person
(preferably one travelling with them within California), the geologic and physical
geographic situation of any of California's geomorphic/geologic regions.




Student learning outcomes will be assessed through embedded questions in
examination, learning modules, and semester project. A student who earns 70% of
each embedded question demonstrates that he/she has successfully completed that
particular SLO. If 70% of the class earns at least 70% in each SLO, then the
outcome has been successfully met for the course.
Students' understanding of GIS data distribution theories will be gauge primarily
by their ability to select correct answers on class examinations. Furthermore,
students will be required to perform spatial queries and build custom applications
as a part of their semester projects. These semester projects in conjunction with
weekly class activities will demand students to demonstrate excellent
organization, time management, and technical skills in GIS.




One of the ways in which students demonstrate the aforementioned learning
outcomes is by selecting the correct responses on lab tests and final examinations.
Additionally, since students are usually given minimal instructions in many of the
computer learning modules, their ability to complete these exercises in a timely
and accurate manner testify to their ability to integrate data and analyze complex
geographic questions. Lastly, in the semester project and semester research paper,
students must not only produce computer output by using tools and extensions
discussed in class, but they must also demonstrate their understanding of various
analytical limitations by quantifying their findings and critiquing their own
conclusions.
GIS internship supervisors who work closely with the internship students will be
given the chance to evaluate student performance in each of the aforementioned
learning outcomes. The instructor of the internship course will coordinate with the
internship supervisor to assess whether the student has satisfactorily completed
the embedded questions in the internship survey. If the student earns 70% of each
embedded question, that particular SLO was successfully met by that student. If
70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the outcome has been successfully
met for the class.




In order to demonstrate that students have satisfactorily fulfilled the
aforementioned learning outcomes, students will be required to select correct
answers on the midterm and final examinations. Furthermore, students will be
required to submit completed hands-on classroom exercises in order to prove their
proficiencies in using the remote sensing software. Additionally, the student
presentation on applications of remote sensing will require students to evaluate
existing applications of remote sensing, and to seek out new advancements in the
discipline.
The five aforementioned overarching student learning outcomes will be assessed
in a number of ways in order to ensure student success. Firstly, by testing students'
ability to select the most appropriate answer on the skill quiz or test, we can assess
the student's theoretical understanding of the material. Secondly, the semester
project will require students to carry out a successful transportation based GIS
project. This will require students to plan a research study, acquire GIS data,
perform network analyses, and publish project outputs. The project's paper
component will require students to review related studies in order to understand
the background of their projects. Furthermore, the unexpected technical
difficulties students are expected to encounter and resolve in the project's analysis
phase will be considered an assessment of the student's independent thinking
ability.




The six aforementioned overarching student learning outcomes will be assessed in
a number of ways in order to ensure student success. Firstly, by testing a student's
ability to select the most appropriate answers on the examination, we can assess
the student's understanding of GIS and environmental studies theories. Secondly,
the semester project will require students to demonstrate their technical
proficiencies and organization skills. In the semester project, student will not only
be required to review past studies related to their work, but will also need to
acquire GIS data, perform spatial analyses, and present project results. Lastly,
students' independent thinking abilities will be assessed by measured by their
ability to troubleshoot and address unexpected technical difficulties.
The six aforementioned overarching student learning outcomes will be assessed in
a number of ways in order to ensure student success. Firstly, by testing a student's
ability to select the most appropriate answers on the examination, we can gauge
the student's understanding of basic cartography and visual perception principles.
Secondly, the learning modules will require students to analyze, critique, and
improve various map layouts. In the learning modules, students will not only be
using their knowledge to improve map layouts and focus, but will also utilize
various advanced tools (e.g. Maplex extension, map template) to produce well-
balanced maps in an efficient and professional manner. Lastly, students' technical
and theoretical knowledge will be assess by their ability to overcome labeling or
projection issues that they may encounter as they are completing their semester
map projects.




Students who transfer as geology majors do very well at 4-year colleges and
universities. Students who go on to more advanced courses here at Palomar also
do very well. We have no data as to how well other students do.
Upon completion of the course the successful student, with a standard mineral
reference manual, should be able to identify any common mineral because he/she
is familiar with the actual process of identification. The same (in terms of process
familiarity) would hold true for rock identification, structural identification and
landform identification. A success rate of 70% by each student on each embedded
question with an overall rate of 70% obtained by all students evinces a successful
student learning outcome.




Students demonstrate their proficiency via exams and assignments by successfully
answering imbedded questions related to the two tasks listed in #1 above.
Currently if a student earns a 70% on each Student Learning Outcome, and if 70%
of all the students are successful on each Student Learning Outcome, that
particular outcome is deemd to have been successful. The outcomes are assessed
through imbedded questions.

The outcomes listed above are deemed to have been met if 70% of students can
achieve a rating of 70% correct answers on the imbedded final exam questions.




The outcomes listed above are deemed to have been met if 70% of students can
achieve a rating of 70% correct answers on the imbedded final exam questions.




Students who receive an overall score of 70% are deemed successful. If 70% of
the total number of students obtain that score, the outcomes above are also
deemed successful and adequate. If such numbers are not met, more directed lab
work on the problem areas are included in subsequent semesters.
If a student achieves a grade of 70$ on each of the daily essay questions, then that
objective is deemed to have been met by that student. If 70% of the students meet
their indiviual outcomes level then the outcome itself is deemed adequate.




Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation, Written
Homework Assignments, Laboratory Assignments, Written Exams, and Oral
Presentations. Each assessment focuses on a student’s progress as it relates to the
Learning Outcomes for this course. Class Participation (Student Learning
Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 7) Writing Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2,
3, 5, 6) Laboratory Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Written Exams (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7) Oral
Exam/Presentations (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 7)




Major Assignment: Student Exams
Assessment Instrument: Multiple choice, short answer exams covering text book,
lecture and video materials.
Performance Criteria: 70% of students will score 70% or higher on exams.




Students will review their fitness tests results, workout recording and class
participation effort results with an instructor.
The accurate recall of events and historical figures, interpretation using primary
and secondary sources, college level writing will be assessed in exams and
research and writing assignments.




The California government SLO is evaluated using a variety of methods incuding:
test questions, worksheets, short essays, exams, take-home tests, online activities.
For the American history SLOs, instructors use written assignments including, but
not limited to essay exams, research papers, book reviews, document analysis,
porfolios, web presentations. Instructors also use oral feedback including but not
limited to socratic method, oral presentations, debates, historical reenactments,
historical "game shows."




The accurate recall of events and historical figures, interpretation using primary
and secondary sources, college level writing will be assessed in exams and
research and writing assignments.
The accurate recall of events and historical figures, interpretation using primary
and secondary sources, college level writing will be assessed in exams and
research and writing assignments.




The accurate recall of events and historical figures, interpretation using primary
and secondary sources, college level writing will be assessed in exams and
research and writing assignments.




Accurate recall and interpretation of events, developments, and figures may be
evaluated in text questions, worksheets, short essays, essay exams, online
activities. Research projects will be used to evaluated use and intrepretation of
primary and secondary sources.




The accurate recall of events and figures, interpretation using primary and
secondary sourses, college level writing, and assesments of cultures and
interactions will be assesed in exams and research and writing assignments.
The accurate recall of figures and events, the interpretation of primary and
secondary sources, and the college level writing skills will be assessed in quizzes,
exams, and research and writing assignments.




The accurate recall of figures and events, the interpretation of primary and
secondary sources, and the college level writing skills will be assessed in quizzes,
exams, and research and writing assignments.
The accurate recall of figures and events, the interpretation of primary and
secondary sources, and the college level writing skills will be assessed in quizzes,
exams, and research and writing assignments. In particular, each student will: 1.
Analyze the process of migration in the Americas since 1800 using the Push-Pull
method of historical analysis. 2. Compare and contrast the political, social, and
economic development of selected nations and regions.
The accurate recall of figures and events, the interpretation of primary and
secondary sources, and the college level writing skills will be assessed in quizzes,
exams, and research and writing assignments.




The accurate recall of figures and events, the interpretation of primary and
secondary sources, and the college level writing skills will be assessed in quizzes,
exams, and research and writing assignments.
The accurate recall of figures and events, the interpretation of primary and
secondary sources, and the colege level writing skills will be assessed in quizzes,
exams, and research and writing assignments.




The quizzes and essay exams are designed to address items 1 and 2 but students
often express opinions about items 3 and 4 as well. The activity report is designed
to address item 3. Item 4 is observed mostly through discussion or conversations
with students.




The quizzes and essay exams are designed to address items 1 and 2 but students
often express opinions about items 3 and 4 as well. The activity report is designed
to address item 3. Item 4 is observed mostly through discussion or conversations
with students.




Essay exams and quizzes are designed to address items 1 and 2, but students
sometimes express opinions that address items 3 and 4. The activity project is
designed to address item 3. Item 4 is observable mainly through discussions or
conversations with students.
Essay exams and quizzes are designed to address items 1 and 2, but students
sometimes express opinions that address items 3 and 4. The activity project is
designed to address item 3. Item 4 is observable mainly through discussions or
conversations with students.




Student learning outcomes and Methods of Assessment will vary with course
content.


Students complete assigned projects and successfully complete tests.




The student will demonstrate ability to work effectively with clients and trade
sources in completing an assigned project from concept to completion. Example:
Students create documentation for specifications and material installation for an
assigned project.
Various relevant reading from trade texts and websites chosen by the instructor
deal with best practices in design and are required reading before the student can
complete the analysis segment. A written evaluation of the complete proposal is
preparation for the project and a written post project reflection is the conclusion.




Drawings and applications receive considerable scrutiny for code compliance and
correctness based on industry standards.




Students will demonstrate their ability to apply the metric and standard method of
measuring on quizzes and class participation.


Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation, Writing
Assignments, Laboratory Assignments, Written Exams, and Oral
Exams/Presentations. Each assessment focuses on a student’s progress as it relates
to the Learning Outcomes for this course.
Class Participation (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 7)
Writing Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Laboratory Assignments Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Written Exams (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)
Oral Exam/Presentations (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 7)
Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation, Writing
Assignments, Laboratory Assignments, Written Exams, and Oral
Exams/Presentations. Each assessment focuses on a student’s progress as it relates
to the Learning Outcomes for this course. Class Participation (Student Learning
Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7) Writing Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes #
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) Laboratory Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 2, 3, 4, 5,
6, 7) Written Exams (Student Learning Outcomes # 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) Oral
Exam/Presentations (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7)




Instructor will determine success of Student Learning Outcomes as they pertain to
each new course being taught.




Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation, Writing
Assignments, Written Exams, and Oral Exams/Presentations. Each assessment
focuses on a student’s progress as it relates to the Learning Outcomes for this
course. Class Participation (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 5, 6) Writing
Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 6) Written Exams (Student
Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 6) Oral Exam/Presentations (Student Learning
Outcomes # 1, 2, 5, 6)
Students are assessed for: class participation; reading and reciting; written
assignments; laboratory assignments; interviews with native speakers; written
quizzes and exams; and oral presentations and examination. These assessments
measure student progress on the various Learning Outcomes for this course as
described below. Class participation: (Student Learning Outcomes #1,7) Reading
and reciting: (Student Learning Outcomes #1,2,4,5,6,7) Written assignments:
(Student learning Outcomes #1,4,6) Interviews with native speakers: (Student
Learning Outcomes #1,2,3,5,6,7) Written quizzes and exams: (Student Learning
Outcomes #1,2,3,4,5,6,7) Oral presentations and examinations: (Student Learning
Outcomes #1,2,3,4,5,6,7) Laboratory assignments: (Student Learning Outcomes
#1,2,3,4,5,6)




Instructor will determine success of Student Learning Outcomes as they pertain to
each new course being taught.




Students will be able to successfully complete the verbal and written exercises,
prepare an appropriate pathfinder document and be able to match reference
questions with the correct sources.
Students completing the topics course will be able to explain subject matter of the
topics class or demonstrate specific skills related to the class.




Instructors will have students respond to at least one question per SLO.




Instructors will have students respond to at least one question per SLO.




Students demonstrate learning by completing the methods of assessment described
in Part 2 (above), as well as through standard forms of evaluation, including a
comprehensive Final Exam.
Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions on exams. If the
students score 70% on each assessment that particular SLO is met by that student.
If 70% of the class scores 70% on each SLO then the outcome has been
successfully met for that class.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.
Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions on exams. If the
student scores 70% on each assessment; that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the outcome has
been successfully met for that class.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions on exams. If the
student scores 70% on each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 70% of the class earned 70% on each SLO, then the outcome
has been successfully met for that class.
Instructors will have students respond to at least one question per SLO.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




Students will be tested on their understanding, include a comprehensive final
examination.




Instructors will have students respond to at least one question per SLO.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.
Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.
Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2 including a comprehensive final examination.




Instructors will have students respond to at least one question per SLO.




The learning outcomes and assessment for this course will depend on the specific
topic covered. A set of SLO's will be developed for each topic class and included
in an outline developed by the instructor.

Successful students are able to clearly describe, interrelate and apply the terms
and concepts listed in the course outline of record for this course. Student
successs will be assessed using examinations that include essays, definitions, and
short answer questions to assess different cognitive levels of suject mastery
(rangeing from knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, and synthesis).
In addition, student success is measured by assessing written reports of student
research projects using a grading rubric.Specific assessments related to each SLO
are described below. SLOs 1, 2, 3, and 4 are assessed by at least 5 exams (and
possibly quizzes, and/or homework assignments) that test mastery of these topics
in knowledge, comprehension, and application. Additional active learning
exercises, in-class discussions, and analyses of journal articles may be assigned to
assess student’s ability to synthesize these outcomes. Each of these SLOs is
further reinforced by extensive laboratory assignments that require critical
application of these outcomes to understanding laboratory techniques and
experimental results. SLO 5 is assessed primarily by the successful completion
and assessment of at least 30 laboratory exercises, demonstrations of laboratory
techniques, and quizzes to test theory. Collectively, these assessments evaluate a
student’s conceptual understanding of laboratory theory, the quality of his or her
Successful students are able to clearly describe, interrelate and apply the terms
and concepts listed in the course outline of record for this course. Student
successs will be assessed using examinations that include essays, definitions, and
short answer questions to assess different cognitive levels of suject mastery
(rangeing from knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, and synthesis).
In addition, student success is measured by assessing written reports of student
research projects using a grading rubric.Specific assessments related to each SLO
are described below. SLOs 1, 2, 3, and 4 are assessed by at least 5 exams (and
possibly quizzes, and/or homework assignments) that test mastery of these topics
in knowledge, comprehension, and application. Additional active learning
exercises, in-class discussions, and analyses of journal articles may be assigned to
assess student’s ability to synthesize these outcomes. Each of these SLOs is
further reinforced by extensive laboratory assignments that require critical
application of these outcomes to understanding laboratory techniques and
experimental results. SLO 5 is assessed primarily by the successful completion
and assessment of at least 30 laboratory exercises, demonstrations of laboratory
techniques, and quizzes to test theory. Collectively, these assessments evaluate a
student’s conceptual understanding of laboratory theory, the quality of his or her




Quantitative: 1. Can the student play the scale fluently, evenly and with proper
fingering while being observed one-on-one by the instructor? Qualitative: 1. Does
the student's performance of piano pieces suitable for this level of piano
development exhibit the propor musical values and style? Measurable: 1. When a
student does a transposition, is the transposition correct in key signature, rhythm,
harmonic structure and interval? Observable: 1. When the student plays, is he/she
observing good posture, a relaxed hand position, and good placement of the
fingers?
Students demostrate outcomes by playing their part in a sectional rehearsal, or by
individual performance for the conductor. Standards of conduct can be
demonstrated during rehearsals or performances.




Students successfully complete this course, demonstrating the overarching
learning outcomes by means of the following Methods of Assessment: Qualitative
- the faculty members give a subjective judgement, based on their own aesthetic
backgrounds, of the repertoire performed by the students, as well as a qualitative
assessment of the technical level of the student, as demonstrated through their
playing of various exercises, etudes, scales, etc. as specified in the jury form.
Quantitative - Each faculty member on the panel gives a letter grade to the student
based on the standard A-F format.
Performances on and off campus demonstrate the outcome. These are attended by
faculty, and their feedback is crucial in encouraging and correcting the students'
performances.




Quantitative: Can the student lay the scales required fluently, evenly and with
proper fingering while being observed one-on-one by the instructor? Qualitative:
Does the student's performance of piano pieces suitable for this level of piano
development exhibit the proper musical values and style? Measureable: When a
student does a transposition, is the transposition correct in key signature, rhythm,
harmonic structure and itnerval? Observable: When the student plays, is he/she
observing good posture, a relaxed hand position and good placement of the
fingers?




Quantitative: The student successfully accompanies a soloist for a composition
whose duration is a minimum of 2 minutes, with out stopping or hesitating.
Qualitative: The student accomplishes the above with a minimum standard of
artistic interpretation, i.e. proper dynamics, proper balance with the soloist (not
too loud), ability to speed up or slow down with the soloist as dictated by the
music. This is qualitative as a qualified, experienced musician must make a
judgement about these things.




The instructor observes the student performance, noting places where he/she has
improved and places where there is still need for improvement. Ini addition,
fellow students give written feedback to the student that often reinforces what the
instructor has been saying. Please note that these student assessments are not part
of the 'grade evaulation' process but are helpful to the student performer as a kind
of 'peer mirror.'
These are qualitative and observable assessment methods. For example the student
will sing or play the pieces chosen. One can observe the performance and make a
qualitative assessment of the success of the perofrmance, based on the course
objectives as listed above.




Students will demonstrating an ability to think critically by: a. properly answering
test questions; b. writing a scholarly paper; and c. utilizing informatics while
researching various medications.




Students will demonstrate an ability to think critically by: a. properly answering
test questions; b. writing a scholarly paper; and c. utilizing informatics while
researching various medications.




Each week students perform interviews and physical assessment techniques on
various body systems. These are then written and submitted weekly for the
instructor to review and provide feedback.
Each week students perform interviews and physical assessment techniques on
various body systems. These are then written and submitted weekly for the
instructor to review and provide feedback.




Based upon the specific topic and objectives, the students will be able to apply
and critically analyze the information both verbally and in writing.




Each week students are required to utilize informatics and incorporate evidenced
based practices in their contributions to the discussion topics. This will necessitate
that they research and explore nursing care from a holistic perspective.




Based upon the specific objectives, the students will be able to apply and critically
analyze the information both verbally and in writing.




Each of the five overarching student learning outcomes for this course are
evaluated in several ways in order to determine a student's success. Foremost is
the student's ability to select the correct answer on an exam or quiz. This will
directly reflect the student's comprehension of the material and their ability to
apply this information. Our course also incorporates learning activities where
students learn how to evaluate sources of information as well as the data being
presented. Students will learn how to develop a conclusion based on the
information presented and how to justify their position as stated in their
conclusion. As part of these learning activities, the students are assessed based on
their performance on a graded take-home assignment or their participation in an in-
class activity.
Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions on exams and a
take-home final essay. If the student scores 70% on each assessment, that
particular SLO was successfully met by that student. If 70% of the class earns
70% on each SLO, then the outcome has been successfully met for that class.
Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions in quizzes. If the
student scores 70% on each assessment, that particular SLO was successfully met
by that student. If 70% of the class earns 70% on each SLO, then the outcome has
been successfully met for that class.
Outcomes will be assessed through a set of embedded questions on exams and a
take-home final essay. If the student scores 70% on each assessment, that
particular SLO was successfully met by that student. If 70% of the class earns
70% on each SLO, then the outcome has been successfully met for that class.
1. Students will keyboard by touch and follow correct keyboarding techniques
during drills, timed writings, and production--most of the time. 2. Students will
have successfully passed at least one timing for 1-, 3-, and 5-minute timings at the
minimum speed and accuracy goals stated in the course syllabus and from
material in the last third of the course. Most students continue to OIS 102
Intermediate Keyboarding so they must meet the minimum speed goals to be
successful in that course. 3. Students will have created and edited most review
documents with zero errors. Most students continue to OIS 102 Intermediate
Keyboarding so they must feel confident in their document formatting skills in
order to build on more complicated business documents.
1. Students will have successfully passed at least one timing for 1-, 3-, and 5-
minute timings at the minimum speed and accuracy goals stated in the course
syllabus from new material; the higher the speed, the more competitive students
will be when applying for office support positions. 2. Students will have created
and edited a variety of business documents with a majority of the documents
being correctly formatted and having zero errors; this will help build confidence
for producing documents on the job. 3. Students will have composed a variety of
business documents with a majority of the documents being correctly formatted
and having zero errors; this will help build confidence for composing documents
on the job.




1. Instructor observes and evaluates student's transcription techniques; discussion
between instructor and student on improvement of those techniques. 2. Students
submit finished transcripts which are evaluated on the above criteria as to their
usefulness in a medical facility. 3. Overall course evaluation will indicate a
vocation in this field.




1. Instructor observes and evaluates student's transcription techniques; discussion
between instructor and student on improvement of those techniques. 2. Students
submit finished transcripts which are evaluated on the above criteria as to their
usefulness in a medical facility. 3. Overall course evaluation will indicate a
vocation in this field.
1. Instructor observes and evaluates student's transcription techniques; discussion
between instructor and student on improvement of those techniques. 2. Students
submit finished transcripts which are evaluated on the above criteria as to their
usefulness in a medical facility. 3. Overall course evaluation will indicate a
vocation in this field.




1. Instructor observes and evaluates student's transcription techniques; discussion
between instructor and student on improvement of those techniques. 2. Students
submit finished transcripts which are evaluated on the above criteria as to their
usefulness in a medical facility. 3. Overall course evaluation will indicate a
vocation in this field.




Methods of Assessment include: 1.) Personal Fitness Test Assessment(pre- and
post-test): Resting Heart Rate, 3-minute step test, and blood pressure.
Quantitatively measured: 70% of students show improvement in Personal Fitness
Test. 2.) Monitoring progress charts illustrating active participation and
improvement throughout the semester.

Methods of Assessment may include: 1.)Pre- and Post-Testing of bowling scores.
70% of students should show an improvement in their handicap or outcome.
2.)Participation and progress reviews through qualitative analysis. Assessment
Instrument could include student survey, student interviews, or journal logs.

1. Major Assignment: Final examination Assessment Instrument: Multiple
Multiple choice questions golf rules and etiquette Performance Criteria: 70% of
students will score 70% or better on final 2. Major Assignment: Practical Sight
Usage Assessment Instrument: Checklist Performance Criteria: Using a 5 point
checklist with 5 different clubs students will be able to demonstrate proper
technique in addressing and hitting a golf ball. 3. Major Assignment: Student
Survey Assessment Instrument: 10 Question self-assessment survey Performance
Criteria: 70% of students will show increased confidence in golf Performance
1. Major Assignment: Final examination Assessment
Instrument: Multiple choice questiuons of golf rules and etiquette.
Performance Criteria: 70% of the students will be able to score a 80% or better.
2. Major Assignment: Practical Sight Usage Assessment Instrument: Using a 7
point checklist with 5 different clubs students will be able to demonstrate proper
technique in addressing and hitting the golf ball.
3. Major Assignment: Student Survey
Assessment Instrument: 20 Question self assessment survey.
Performance Criteria: 70% of students will show increased confidence in golf
performance.

1. Major Assignment: First Class Meeting Examination Assessment Instrument:
Multiple Choice Exam of golf rules and etiquette. Performance Criteria: 90% of
students will be able to score a 90% or higher. 2. Major Assignment: Practical
Sight Usage Assessment Instrument: 10 point checklist with 5 different clubs
students will be able to demonstrate proper technique in hitting a golf ball. 3.
Major Assignment Practical Sight Usage Assessment Instrument: 10 shot check
list with demonstration of advanced golf shots such as hook, draw, fade, flop.
Performance Criteria: Students able to perform 7 of the 10 shots listed.




Major Assignment: Daily Practice and sport specific schematics and installation.
Assessment instrument: Comprehension Evaluation through Testing (specific to
position) Performance Criteria: 70% of students will show compentency through
test performance
Students will review their fitness tests results,workout recording and class
participation effort results with an instructor.




Students will review their fitness tests results,workout recording and class
participation effort results with an instructor.




Major Assignment: Daily Practice and football schematics and installation.
Assessment instrument: Comprehension Evaluation through Testing (specific to
position) Performance Criteria: 70% of students will show compentency through
test performance




Swim technique, water safety ability and swim etiquette are all observed through
class participation. Swim tests indicate improvements in cardiovascular fitness.




Swim technique, water safety ability and swim etiquette are all observed through
class participation. Swim tests indicate improvements in cardiovascular fitness.




Class participation shows observable changes in ball handling skills, game
understanding and shooting technique. Scrimmages test the students’ knowledge
of game situations and strategies
students completing this course are subject to displaying proper tennis techniques
and shots when tested by the instructor thru on- court skill tests and or class
participation which are observable by instructor.




Demonstration takes place when student prepares for and plays in a tournament
during the class time. Students will also show demonstration by organizing the
tennis tournament will guidance of instructor.




Major Assignment: Will be able to develop a basic weight training program for
life long learning. Assessment Instrument: Daily journal of perfomance of
assigned class work out program. Performance Criteria: 70% or better will
demonstrate increased strength and fitness.




Major Assignment: Will be able to develop a advance weight training program for
lif3e long learning.
Assessment Instrument: Daily journal of perfomance of assigned class work out
program.
Performance Criteria: 70% or better will demonstrate increased strength and
fitness.




Major Assignment: Daily practice and participation.
Assessment Instrument: 12 point sight rubric.
Performance Criteria: 70% of students will score 70% or higher on rubric.
Major Assignment: Daily practice and participation.
Assessment Instrument: 12 point sight rubric.
Performance Criteria: 70% of students will score 9 or higher on rubric.




Major Assignment: Daily practice and participation.
Assessment Instrument: 12 point sight rubric.
Performance Criteria: 70% of students will score 70% or higher on rubric.
Major Assignment:Self analyze skill level.
Assessment Instrument: 10 point rubric.
Performance Criteria: 70% of students will score 7 or higher on rubric.


Methods of Assessment may include: 1.)Written composition or oral presentation
of basic skills analysis (batting, catching, throwing, baserunning or fielding).
Through qualitative analysis, 70% of students should master basic skill analysis.
2.) Monitoring progress charts illustrating active participation and improvement
throughout the semester.

Major Assignment: Daily Practice and football schematics and installation.
Assessment instrument: Comprehension Evaluation through Testing (specific to
position) Performance Criteria: 70% of students will show compentency through
test performance




Acknowleding the proper methods to be used when presented with a specific
athletic injury and or situation.


Observation is used to assess the student’s knowledge of activities, ability to be
self-reliant, problem-solving ability, proper interaction with other students and
personal organizational skills.
Class participation and demonstration is used to observe the aquatic skills, safety
and comfort in the water. Changes in fitness are observable through class
activities.


Students are assessed through observation of participation in weight lifting
activities.




Students are observed while on the ski trip to assess the course objectives. Ski
proficiency is measured at conclusion of trip by timed ski race




Students are assessed through observation of participation in fitness conditioning
activities.




Methods of Assessment may include: 1.)Written composition or oral presentation
of basic skills analysis (batting, catching, throwing, baserunning or fielding).
Through qualitative analysis, 70% of students should master basic skill analysis.
2.)Written objective test on rules and situations involved in fastpitch competition.
70% of students should score 4 out of 6 or higher.

Major Assignment: Daily practice and participation.
Assessment Instrument: 10 question/50point student survey.
Performance criteria: 70% of the students will score 35 or better on the course
exiting survey.


Major Assignment: Daily practice and participation. Assessment Instrument: 10
question/50point student survey. Performance criteria: 70% of the students will
score 35 or better on the course exiting survey.
Major Assignment: Daily Practice and football schematics and installation.
Assessment instrument: Comprehension Evaluation through Testing (specific to
position) Performance Criteria: 70% of students will show compentency through
test performance




Learning outcomes are assessed through Observing students preparation and
understanding in their water sport. Quantitative data is assessed through the
athletes results in their sport (i.e. swim race times, water polo game statistics, or
diving competition scores)


Major Assignment: Daily practice of basic skills Assessment Instrument:
Instructor checklist Performance Criteria: 80% of students will score 7 of 10 on
basic skills check list. Major Assignment: Student Survey Assessment Instrument:
10 question self-assessment survey Performance Criteria: 70% of students will
show increased confidence in their sport. Major Assignment: Technique
correction/feedback Assessment instrument: 12 point sight rubric Performance
Criteria: 70% of students will score 9 points or more.
Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.




Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.


Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.


Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.


In the area of religion, students can discuss and write about philosophical
positions in their historical contexts, and analyze both original and historical
arguments with cogency.




Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.


Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.


Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.


Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.
Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.




Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.


Course objectives #1 and #2 (from 1. above) may be assessed primarily through
class participation, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations, papers,
quizzes, and research projects. Course objective #3 may be assessed primarily
through homework and papers. Course objective #4 may be primarily assessed
through class participation, class work, and oral presentations.




Learning outcomes (1-3 above) may be assessed primarily through class
participation, class discussion, class work, exams, homework, oral presentations,
papers, quizzes, and research projects.


Each student is evaluated upon the completion of the assignment by the instructor
in terms of technical competence, ability to exhibit what the assignment has asked
for and aesthetics. Each student will present their work on an assignment in a
critique session made up of both instructor and peers.
Students demonstrate learning and understanding of the subject by the methods
described in part 2.




The increase of passing rate in physics 230.




Students demonstrate their mastery of the three SLO's based on the comparative
performance of the lab #11, Rotation & Translation in Two Dimensions.
Students demonstrate mastery of the three SLO's based on the comparative
performance of the lab #10 & 11, AC Circuit/Impedance.




One example of evolving assessment in regards to the effects of globalization and
the importance/decline of the state, professors use a variety of surveyed methods
including: • Text questions • Short essays • In class exam • Take home exam •
Online activities
Students will reveal their understandings in brief written assignments. Political
autobiographies, a qualitative approach, and political predictions during election
years, a quantitative exercise, will engage students with specific concepts. It may
be important for students to develop a student portfolio as a way to measure their
own progress on the SLOs.




One example of evolving assessment in regards to looking at recent California
governors and their relationships with the California state legislature, professors
use a variety of surveyed methods including: • Text questions • Short essays • In
class exam • Take home exam • Online activities
One example of evolving assessment in regards to the effects of globalization and
the importance/decline of the state, professors use a variety of surveyed methods
including: • Text questions • Short essays • In class exam • Take home exam •
Online activities




1. Students will analyze, discuss and be tested on their knowledge of the initiative
process and of recent propositions placed on the ballot. For example, since the
California legislature is placing multiple budget propositions on the May, 2009
ballot, students will specifically focus on these. 2. Students will read and analyze
specific issues in local government to learn about complexity of government at
this level, overlapping jurisdictions that may arise, and conflicts that develop. For
example, students often focus on the San Diego Regional Airport Controversy
with its many participants and conflicting political positions. The analysis is
quantitative yet also subjective. 3. This SLO cannot be easily measured since
there are few good ways to measure future participation. 3.

1. Tests and assignments will be used to demonstrate student knowledge of the
major models of local government organization. 2. Students will use case studies
and employ a problem-solving approach to gain an understanding of the role of a
supervisor and issues related to cross-cultural communication in a diverse society.
3. Students will reflect and discuss case studies that provide opportunites to use
mediation methods.




Students who are interns, for example, will track the time spent working in an
office and identify the major responsibilities they must complete. Other directed
studies students will keep a log of interviews they have conducted including the
types of questions they have asked and the responses received.
Assessment for Student Learning Outcome #1: Students will be given 3 multiple-
choice questions on this topic (embedded in the first unit exam), and/or one short-
answer essay (embedded in the final exam) in at least four Introductory
Psychology courses taught by two or more instructors. On the short-answer essay,
students will be asked to briefly explain how science differs from non-science,
including a discussion of: a. three or more fundamental tools and concepts used in
the science of psychology (e.g., control groups, systematic and objective gathering
of evidence, independent and dependent variables); b. the public and self-
correcting nature of psychological research (e.g., replication, peer-reviewed
journal publications); and c. specific examples of non-science (e.g., palmistry and
astrology) do not meet these standards of psychological science.

Students who successfully complete this course are able to define, describe and
apply the terms and concepts described in the course outline of record. They are
able to demonstrate their knowledge of key concepts through successful
completion of objective test questions. They are able to demonstrate their ability
to apply concepts and theroetical perspectives by successfully answering essay
questions, writing papers, participating in class discussions, making presentations
and/or participating in activities in the community and reflecting on the
connections between course content and the world outside of the classroom.
Multiple measures, both qualitative and quantitative, of student learning will be
conducted throughout the course, and upon course completion. Students who meet
these learning outcomes will demonstrate their knowledge and skills by
performing related tasks which may include, but is not limited to, class
discussions, writing assignments, oral presentations, research projects, research
paper, quizzes and/or exams and show gains on self-report college skills and
attitudinal measures of course content learning.




We are still working on developing this.
Assessment of learning outcomes will be achieved by several methods that may
include performance on exams using multiple choice, short answer, and/or essay
type responses, writing assignments (e.g., reaction papers and/or term papers), in-
and out-of-class activities, and participation in class discussions.




Outcome #1 is assessed by including an essay question on an exam which requires
the student to define and compare the various theories. Outcome #2 is assessed by
an in-class assignment which requires the student to analyze a video presentation
on media images of women. Outcome #3 is assessed by an exam question which
requires understanding and being able to identify gender bias in research.
Outcome #4 is assessed by a writing assignment which requires an in-depth
analysis of one of these areas of female experience. There are also essay exam
questions which address these areas. Outcome #5 is assessed by group discussions
and writing summaries of the discussions.




Students who successfully complete this course are able to define, describe and
apply the terms and concepts described in the course outline of record. They are
able to demonstrate their knowledge of key concepts through successful
completion of objective and subjective test questions. Their ability to apply
concepts and theoretical perspectives are assessed by successfully answering
essay questions, writing papers, participating in class discussions, making
presentations and/or participating in activities in the community and reflecting on
the connections between course content and the world outside of the classroom.
SLO-1 Students will complete an online, alcohol and other drug prevention
program and evaluate their results at the beginning and end of the course. SLO-2
Students will be given a group project to deliver an oral presentation. The
presentation will be evaluated using a group presentation rubric measuring
presentation visuals, delivery, teaching style, content coverage, preparedness,
group coordination and written information. SLO-3 Students will be given an
exam essay question that requires in-depth analysis of the etiology of substance
use and abuse. The grading rubric will evaluate format, mechanics, completion
and developed thought. SLO-4 Students will be required to attend an open
meeting of an alcohol or drug related support group such as AA, Al-Anon or NA
and report their personal reaction/bias in a written report. Students will compare
the self-help model with one other treatment approach: pharmacotherapy,
cognitive-behavioral or motivational enhancement therapy.

Students who meet these learning outcomes will demonstrate their knowledge and
skills by performing related tasks in tests and homework.
Students who meet these learning outcomes will demonstrate their knowledge and
skills by performing related tasks in tests and homework.




Successful students will be able to describe, define, and apply the fundamental
course concepts as described in the course outline of record. In the laboratory
sections, the successful students will attend, actively participate, and critical think
about and defend their knowledge of the subject matter via written, interactive,
and oral assignments. Successful students will also be able to clearly articulate
complex scientific concepts in both written and oral presentation of their final
research project.
Multiple measures, both qualitative and quantitative, of student learning will be
conducted throughout the course, and upon course completion. Students who meet
these learning outcomes will demonstrate their knowledge and skills by
performing related tasks which may include, but is not limited to, class
discussions, writing assignments, oral presentations, research projects, research
paper, quizzes and/or exams and show gains on self-report college skills and
attitudinal measures of course content learning.




Students who successfully complete this course are able to define and apply the
concepts described in the course outline of record. They demonstrate their
knowledge of these concepts through successful completion of objective test
questions. They demonstrate their ability to apply their knowledge and
understanding of these concepts through the successful design and completion of a
research project and presenting the results of that project in written, oral, and
poster formats. Their writing (both in paper and essay exam question formats) will
demonstrate critical thought in evaluating the quality of past research, the study
being described, and in generalizing the results to other settings.
Multiple measures, both qualitative and quantitative, of student learning are
conducted throughout the course, and upon course completion. Students who meet
the learning outcomes will demonstrate their knowledge and skills by performing
related tasks which may include, but is not limited to, class discussions, writing
assignments, oral presentations, research projects, research papers, quizzes and/or
exams and show gains on self-report college skills and attitudinal measures of
course content learning.




Students are observed functioning successfully in a collaborative lecture/lab
situation; demonstrate meaningful report generation; generate proper folder and
file structures; and upgrade software and manuals as needed.
1. Recognize and utilize all keys on keyboard to a minimum 25 wpm level. ---
Students demonstrate typing ability by performing typing exams weekly; progress
is monitored in logs which show accuracy, and speed progression. 2. Understand
and synthesize in student lessons computer concepts, and terminology. ---Students
discuss, take exams, and apply in hands-on quided lessons to show synthesis;
students test in hands-on exams and projects to show understanding of
fundamentals. 3. Differentiate between computer hardware and software; and
operating systems and application software. ---Students discuss, take exams, and
apply in hands-on quided lessons to show synthesis; students test in hands-on
exams and projects to show understanding of fundamentals. 4. Apply file and
folder management processes in applications as well as e-mail and the internet to a
fundamental degree. ------Students discuss, take exams, and apply in hands-on
quided lessons to show synthesis; students test in hands-on exams and projects to
show understanding of fundamentals.

1. Recognize the Word program itself among a list of programs. ---Students who
recognize the Word program itself are observed choosing the Word program from
among a list of programs and doing so repetitively. 2. Choose from various
functions within Word to format documents appropriately. ---Students who format
Word documents appropriately are producing interactive hands-on projects,
observed daily, documents are examined and scored daily, and periodic hands-on
exams are delivered and evaluated using a traditional grading scale. 3. Describe
the functions that they are using in writing and verbally. ---Students produce a
cover sheet for each of the interactive projects that they complete, stating the
objectives of the lesson; they are also interviewed by the instructor regarding their
perceived competency level in the software program. 4. Apply Word functions to
business documents. Business documents projects are presented with varying
levels of difficulty to the student and students are asked to revise the documents
until completely accurate.




C = Timeline Annual Review
C=Annual Review




Successfully perform a doctor's standard procedures as appropriate for various eye
diagnoses.




Students who are successful will demonstrate their understanding and competence
by means of tests, quizzes, and projects.




A student who successfully completes the course would be able to submit a report
that correctly uses appraisal source data in a useful fashion. A student would also
show the ability to put together an apporpriate loan package.




Students who successfully complete this class demonstrate achievment of the
learning outcomes because they are successfully able to produce reports that show
mastery of the relevant techniques.




The methods of assessment will be designed to test whether the student is
mastering the material. Problems will be geared to the objectives and outcomes
desired.




Students who successfully complete this course will be able to produce reports
which take fact situations and apply the tools of statistics and valuation models to
demonstrate their mastery of advanced residential appraisal techniques.
Successful students will demonstrate through exams and projects that they are
able to popare escrow instructions and maintain escrow files.




Students who successfully complete this course produce exams and projects
which show their mastery of the topics.




Successful students will demonstrate growth in rate, comprehension and
vocabulary as measured by the Nelson Denny Reading Test.




Papers and presentations: Rubrics detailing specific criteria for successful
completion of the project are provided to students for use in preparing
assignments and used by faculty in the assessment of the finished product to
ensure both qualitative and quantitative goals are met. Exams: Questions are
designed to elicit responses that demonstrate proficiency in specific analysis and
evaluation skills.




The TABE Reading test overall results will be reviewed and will be evaluated to
access the extent of student overall reading growth. The management analysis of
the Read On CAI software will indicate student progress of at least half a grade
level by the end of the semester.

This is detemined by pre and post testing and anecedotal notes.
1.Standardized reading test such as Nelson Denny or TABE 2. Standardized
reading test such as Nelson Denny or TABE 3. Study skills reflective essay.




Major Assignment: Final Project Paper
Assesment Instrument: Instructor Evaluation
Performance Criteria: Students will score a 70% or higher via instructor grading
scale by illustration and recognizing general recreational practices.




Major Assignment: Practical experience in a Instructor supervised Internship.
Assessment Instrument: Instructor Evaluation Performance Criteria: Students will
achieve a minimum of 35 hours with an understanding and application of the
concepts of the profession and its ethical principles with professionalism as
applied to all professional practices, attitudes, and behavior in recreation and
leisure services delivery.




Major Assignment: Final examination Assessment Instrument: Multiple
choice/short answer questions Performance Criteria: 70% of students will score
70% or better on final exam questions pertaining to Recreational Sports.
Successful students will demonstrate their knowledge, skills, and sensitivity to
diversity primarily by way of class discussions, writing assignments, collaborative
exercises, oral presentations, research projects, a research paper, quizzes, and
exams (i.e., multiple-choice questions, short answers, essays). Students will show
gains made on self-report college skills, knowledge, and attitudinal measures of
course content learning.
Successful students will demonstrate their knowledge, skills, and sensitivity to
diversity primarily by way of class discussions, writing assignments, collaborative
exercises, oral presentations, research projects, a research paper, quizzes, and
exams (i.e., multiple-choice questions, short answers, essays). Students will show
gains made on self-report college skills, knowledge, and attitudinal measures of
course learning.
Successful students will demonstrate their knowledge, skills, and sensitivity to
diversity primarily by way of class discussions, writing assignments, collaborative
exercises, oral presentations, research projects, a research paper, quizzes, and
exams (i.e., multiple-choice questions, short answers, essays). Students will show
gains made on self-report college skills, knowledge, and attitudinal measures of
course learning.




Outcome #1 will be assessed by way of in-class discussions and as a focus of
essays for exams. Outcome #2 will be assessed through in-class discussions, in-
class paragraphs to identify core characteristics, quizzes, and a variety of formats
in exams (e.g., multiple-choice, short answer, and essay), and in a research paper.
Outcome #3 will be assessed by way of in-class discussions, in-class writings to
make comparisons, essays for exams, and in a research paper. Outcome #4 will be
assessed by way of in-class discussion, in-class paragraphs on social facts, and as
a key area of focus in essay questions for exams. Outcome #5 will be assessed
through in-class discussions, quizzes, and a variety of formats (e.g., multiple-
choice, short answer, essay in exams. Outcome #6 will be assessed through in-
class discussions and in essays for exams.
Outcome #1 will be assessed by way of in-class discussions and essays for exams.
Outcome #2 will be assessed through in-class discussion, exercises, and exams
(i.e., multiple-choice, short answer, and essay formats). Outcome #3 will be
assessed by way of in-class discussions, exercises, and essays for exams. Outcome
#4 will be assessed by way of in-class discussions and essays for exams. Outcome
#5 will be assessed through in-class discussions and essays for exams. Outcome
#6 will be assessed by way of in-class discussion, exercises, and essays for exams.




Outcome #1 will be assessed by way of in-class discussions, and essays for exams.
Outcome #2 will be assessed through in-class discussions, exercises, and exams
(i.e., multiple-choice, short answer, and essay formats). Outcome #3 will be
assessed by way of in-class discussions, exercises, and essays for exams. Outcome
#4 will be assessed by way of in-class discussion and essays for exams. Outcome
#5 will be assessed through in-class discussions and essays for exams. Outcome
#6 will be assessed by way of in-class discussions, exercises, and essays for
exams.


Students work in groups to design and present a new idea for a radio station
format with a contest for "best new station". Students write a research paper or
give an oral presentation about a topic of interest in the broadcast/media industry.
Students view and write a written analysis of a TV broadcast news program.
Group projects include working with TV/Radio ratings data to identify trends and
developing new networks or programs for broadcast and cable TV programming.
Both objective and subjective quizzes and exams are given. In addition, students
may participate in field trips or hear guest speakers working in the
broadcast/media field.
Students who successfully complete this course are able to define, describe and
apply the terms and concepts described in the course outline of record. They are
able to demonstrate their knowledge of key concepts through successful
completion of objective test questions. They are able to demonstrate their ability
to apply concepts and theoretical perspectives by successfully answering essay
questions, writing papers, participating in class discussions, making presentations
and/or participating in activities in the community and reflecting on the
connections between course content and the world outside of the classroom.




Students who successfully complete this course are able to define, describe and
apply the terms and concepts described in the course outline of record. They are
able to demonstrate their knowledge of key concepts through successful
completion of objective test questions. They are able to demonstrate their ability
to apply concepts and theoretical perspectives by successfully answering essay
questions, writing papers, participating in class discussions, making presentations
and/or participating in activities in the community and reflecting on the
connections between course content and the world outside of the classroom.
Students who successfully complete this course are able to define, describe and
apply the terms and concepts described in the course outline of record. They are
able to demonstrate their knowledge of key concepts through successful
completion of objective test questions. They are able to demonstrate their ability
to apply concepts and theoretical perspectives by successfully answering essay
questions, writing papers, participating in class discussions, making presentations,
and/or participating in activities in the community and reflecting on the
connections between course content and the world outside of the classroom.




Students who successfully complete this course are able to define, describe and
apply the terms and concepts described in the course outline of record. They are
able to demonstrate their knowlege of key concepts through successful completion
of objective test questions. They are able to demonstrate their ability to apply
concepts and theoretical perspectives by successfully answering essay questions,
writing papers, participating in class discussions, making presentations and/or
participating in the community and reflecting on the connections between course
content and the world outside of the classroom.
Students who successfully complete the course are able to define, describe and
apply the terms and concepts described in the course outline of record. They are
able to demonstrate their knowledge of key concepts through successful
completion of objective test questions. They are able to demonstrate their ability
to apply concepts and theoretical perspectives by successfully answering essay
questions, writing papers, participating in weekly class discussion boards, and
writing weekly reflection papers based on readings and other course material.




Students are assessed in the following ways: Class Participation, Writing
Assignments, Laboratory Assignments, Written Exams, and Oral
Exams/Presentations. Each assessment focuses on a student’s progress as it relates
to the Learning Outcomes for this course. -Class Participation (Student Learning
Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 7) -Writing Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2,
3, 5, 6) -Laboratory Assignments (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7) -
Written Exams (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7) -Oral
Exam/Presentations (Student Learning Outcomes # 1, 2, 3, 4, 7)
The essay examinations will be designed to assess the depth of student knowledge
regarding various approaches to the communication process, and student
awareness of and appreciation for diversity in the phenomenon. The research
paper will require substantial ability to apply theoretical currency to practical
problems.




Due to the unique nature of this course, the the speech tournament serves as the
testing ground by which all learning outcomes are measured. The experience and
performance of the student will be observed by the coaching staff/instructors and
through qualitative feedback from visiting schools competing at the tournament.




1. Assessment of student ability to manage nervousness will be based on
qualitiative observation of speech and debate performance. 2. Judgment of student
capacity to create well-warranted arguments informed by current research will be
evaluated based on quantity and quality of research citations. 3. Measurement of
student performance of basic debate knowledge will be based on qualitative
feedback on ballot reports and quantitative judgment of debate round results. Note
that the student's understanding of why the decision in the debate round was made
takes precedence over win/loss record.
3) The ability to research, write, and deliver a speech is easily observable and
evaluated from knowledgeable teachers and experts in the speech communication
field. Students receive qualitative feedback through written evaluations (ballots)
which include a rank and comments in comparison to other competitors in the
round. 2) The students ability to evaluate and assess the strengths and weaknesses
of a speech is qualitative and easily observable through a review of their written
critiques with knowledgeable teachers and experts in the communication field.




1) Recognition of rules and expectations will be demonstrated by observation and
feedback from ballots at speech tournaments. 2) Participation at tournaments as a
competitor or a host can be measured and observed by knowledgeable
teachers/coaches and achieved through the first-hand experience of the student. 3)
The writing and performance of an individual event is easily observable and
evaluated by knowledgeable teachers and experts in the speech communication
field. Students receive qualitative feedback through written evaluations (ballots)
which include a rank and comments in comparison to other competitors in the
round. 4) Case construction, presentation, and refutation are easily observable and
evaluated by knowledgeable teachers and experts in the speech communication
field. Students receive immediate feedback (oral critiques) after the round as well
as written evaluations ranking their performance.


Students in Introduction to Theatre have many opportunities to demonstrate the
abilities they have acquired. In Production Response Papers students must
synthesize the information from class and articulate their response to the
production through the lens of our classroom experience. Students also engage in
projects and presentations in which they take on the role of playwright, director or
designer.
The class culminates with the presentation of a memorized and rehearsed scene.
We observe the students rehearsing together in class. In their final we are able to
observe concrete elements such as a clear, specific and detailed through-line of
actions. We can also observe the extent to which the actor is responding truthfully
to the given circumstances of the scene by the use of her physicaly, senses and
connection to her scene partner. Finally, we assess the student's comprehension of
the concepts, techniques and tools of the class by their verbal and written
observations and analysis of his peers' perfomances and other theatre productions.




Students demonstrate the outcomes in three ways: 1. Performances of scenes and
monologues which cam be observed by the instructor. 2. Written analysis of plays
and performances. 3. Oral analysis of performances




1. The concrete knowledge will be easily demonstrated through testing and will
also become apparent to observation as the student physically incorporates the
knowledge in her practice. 2. Tension, relaxation, articulation and projection are
easily observable by knowledgeable teachers. 3. Expressive communication is
assessed qualitatively. The student will have a free and open voice, easily use her
range of pitch and tone, use the physical sensations of the word-sound to stimulate
her inner and outer environment and use changes in tempo, volume and intensity
appropriate to meaning and circumstances of the text.




Students should demonstrate knowledge of literary analysis through performance
and critical feedback from instructor. Students should demonstrate knowledge of
literature types through examination and discussion.
The successful student will be able to demonstrate their skill development level by
their finished products.




The students will do a self-appraisal of the completed project using a rubric to
evaluate the quality of the completed project. They will be able to explain the
techniques they used to complete their work; the instructor will assess their work
through observation and discovery.




The successful student will demonstrate their skill to restore antique furniture by
application of various restoration techniques with regard to wood restoration and
upholstery. They will also be able to identify period, style, and wood species of
the antiques they are working with.




The successful student will be able to demonstrate the various steps in
upholstering or reupholstering an automobile.




The students will do a self-appraisal of the completed project using a rubric to
evaluate the quality of the completed project. They will be able to explain the
techniques they used to complete their work; the instructor will assess their work
through observation and discovery.
The students will do a self-appraisal of the completed project using a rubric to
evaluate the quality of the completed project. They will be able to explain the
techniques they used to complete their work; the instructor will assess their work
through observation and discovery




Each course in the "topics" area is unique and the description of successful
completion will vary according to each topic. In general, the students will
demonstrate while being observed by an expert instructor their mastery of new
skills that have been ascertained during a given topics course.




Students are able to demonstrate safe practices in the welding lab. Students will
show proficiency in pipe welding using SMAW, GTAW, or GMAW processes.




1. Assessment: The student will evaluate the distribution data provided (pipeline
size, velocity of the water, biological demand) and provide a solution to meet the
required chlorine residual, showing all mathematical conversions and calculations
in a step by step manner. 2. Students will be given the section of Title 22 that
corresponds to bacteriological sampling requirements. They will evaluate the data
given about the distribution system and determine the number of sample test
stations required and where they should be located within the system based on
their interpretation of the regulations. 3. Students will be given a list of potential
solutions to different water quality issues. They will be required to evaluate the
customer’s complaint and resolve the issue. The report will be a document already
formatted for the students with sections for water quality data and an area
provided for the short essay part of the report.

Assessment 1: A student will research and write a minimum six paragraph essay
on the SWTR that includes the following components: identify purpose and key
dates of implementation (why and when); describe applicability; list regulated
pathogens and their removal requirements; and describe the parameters under
which conventional surface water treatment plants must operate in order to
comply with the provisions of the SWTR (how to achieve removal requirements).
Assessment 2: Students will evaluate hydraulic data taken from actual treatment
plant conditions and provide a solution showing all mathematical calculations in a
step by step manner that includes: identifying the unknown, determining the
correct method for solving for the unknown, providing all units of measure, and
showing all conversions and calculations. Assessment 3: Students will create a
table which lists the USEPA approved (BAT) for given contaminants, the drinking
water law(s) which regulate the contaminants, the known health effects associated
with the given contaminant, and maximum allowable levels and goals for the
contaminant.
Assessment - The student will be evaluated on his/her ability to review the data,
compare to established limits, and respond with proper reporting methods and
sampling techniques. Assessment - Students will perform the basic analyses in the
laboratory. Students will be evaluated on record keeping and accuracy of results.
The records must be clear so that a result that is put on a report can be traced back
to raw lab data, calibration and quality control records. The samples will have a
known range of values for each parameter and the students will be evaluated on
the accuracy of their results.




Assessment 1: The student’s two-page written essay will be evaluated based on
criteria including subject material, clearly defined purpose, opening statement,
supporting evidence, grammar, and appearance. Assessment 2: Using standard
waterworks formulas and conversion factors, students are to demonstrate the
ability to solve the problems by findings missing variables for volume, flow,
velocity, and chemical dosage rates. All work must be shown in an orderly
manner, labeled with proper units, and the answers must be accurate. Assessment
3: Students will be expected to identify the equipment from the drawing using
standard terminology and provide short essay form explanations of the
functionality and importance of each piece of equipment. Assessment 4: Students
will be expected to identify source waters, list the advantages and disadvantages
of using each source, and explain the different infrastructure that is required for
use of the different sources. The short essay type answers must utilize correct
terminology and demonstrate thorough knowledge of the subject.




Assessment: A student will research and write a minimum 2-page essay that
demonstrates knowledge of the source water components/quality, the treatment
processes employed, and required versus achieved removal/disinfection credits to
meet regulations. Knowledge of the treatment processes employed will include
but not be limited to parameters such as chemical dosing, overflow rates, filter
materials, backwash times, and solids processing. Assessment: Students will be
required to utilize process data, interpret the data correctly, calculate standard
chemical dosing requirement to achieve desired effluent water quality, and also
calculate detention times, chlorine contact time to achieve required disinfection
credits under the various SWTR regulations. Assessment: Students will
demonstrate knowledge requirements of each rule, record-keeping requirements
and public notification requirements for violations of the rules through test
questions and answers.
a. A successful student should be able to score in the 90 percentile in at least three
of the five categories or in the 80 percentile overall on the SLO exam.




Successful students are able to clearly describe, interrelate and apply the terms
and concepts listed in the course outline of record for this course. They are able to
describe the basic structure and function of the organ systems and also discuss the
homeostatic mechanisms that control each system. Successful students can
describe and demonstrate the use of a variety of instrumentation used to collect
experimental data concerning each system. Successful students can give specific
examples of a large variety of physiologic variables; their typical value as well as
the range of normal values and discuss their clinical significance. Successful
students can design, implement and report independent laboratory research.
Faculty Process                       Successes
We will have formal meetings to       We discovered that the course needed more
discuss student progress in meeting   emphasis on internal control procedures.
our goals.

Formal or informal meetings will be We felt that we needed more library resources
held in the future to assess our    for students to consult sources other than the
progress.                           textbook.




formal and informal meetings will     Library resources need to be increased to give
be held to assess progress.           students additional sources of information.




We plan to set up periodic informal   It was discovered that we need more library
and formal meetings.                  support.




To be determined...                   To be determined after departmental review of
                                      SLOs.




We plan to set up periodic informal   It was discovered that we need more library
and formal meetings.                  support.
The department created a committee     The committee was successful in being able to
of instructors that teach the course   clarify objectives and slo's to reflect increased
that met three times to review         emphasis of global issues relevant to indigenous
objectives and generate slo's and      knowlege. Problems still exist in the area of
assessments.                           terminology for Native American cultures and
                                       people, which will be monitored.




Both formal and informal meetings      The course is new and we will find it out what
with faculty to review student         works eventually.
projects and progress.
Faculty have used the following:       There was a growing need to augment the
examinations, homework/weekly          methods of assessment with the impact of
assignments, research papers and/or    technology. Student feedback and course critique
presentations, in-class and take-      served as the analysis for the need to update
home quizzes, extra credit projects.   assessments and evaluations.
Faculty members met face-to-face    Previously, students emerged from introductory
and over the phone to discuss the   Luiseño classes able to reproduce structured,
assessment results of previous      memorized passages from Luiseño stories, but
Luiseño classes.                    unable to carry on basic, spontaneous
                                    conversations in Luiseño. As a result of this
                                    analysis, the faculty introduced new instructional
                                    strategies to emphasize common, daily uses of
                                    Luiseño within the current culture.


Faculty members met face-to-face    Previously, students emerged from introductory
and over the phone to discuss the   Luiseño classes able to reproduce structured,
assessment results of previous      memorized passages from Luiseño stories, but
Luiseño classes.                    unable to carry on basic, spontaneous
                                    conversations in Luiseño. As a result of this
                                    analysis, the faculty introduced new instructional
                                    strategies to emphasize common, daily uses of
                                    Luiseño within the current culture.


Faculty members met face-to-face    Previously, students emerged from Luiseño
and over the phone to discuss the   classes able to reproduce structured, memorized
assessment results of previous      passages from Luiseño stories, but unable to
Luiseño classes.                    carry on basic, spontaneous conversations in
                                    Luiseño. As a result of this analysis, the faculty
                                    introduced new instructional strategies to
                                    emphasize common, daily uses of Luiseño within
                                    the current culture.


Faculty members met face-to-face    Previously, students emerged from Luiseño
and over the phone to discuss the   classes able to reproduce structured, memorized
assessment results of previous      passages from Luiseño stories, but unable to
Luiseño classes.                    carry on basic, spontaneous conversations in
                                    Luiseño. As a result of this analysis, the faculty
                                    introduced new instructional strategies to
                                    emphasize common, daily uses of Luiseño within
                                    the current culture.
We used an excel spread sheet and   Analysis of Objectives and SLOs allowed for the
an informal review meeting.         production of more focused exam questions.
                                    Many of us have been designing more specific
                                    objectives and arguments in the directions for
                                    papers that challenge as well as avoid success
                                    with a simple wikipedia download. Students
                                    enjoy a wriiten assignmnet that allows for a
                                    quest, etc.




Informal meeting.                   One topic is the aspect of student work in an
                                    online class. Also, the issue of a hybrid or
                                    specific sessions offered to students for mostly
                                    monitoring progress. A mapping component
                                    would be useful as an additional assignment or a
                                    component to the exams.




Formal and informal meetings        Visiting local Indian nations.
Informal meetings on success   Some changes have been made in exam
measurement and outcomes.      questions and the notes, especially in terms of
                               CRM and environmental law.




Informal meetings              Some logistical problems with cost to district
                               and students for museum and /or exhibit reviews
                               have been mitigated with the availability of
                               virtual shows and tours. Also, a practicum needs
                               to allow for substitution of material for
                               traditional, protected or hard to find resources.
                               The assignment needs to be flexible yet stimulate
                               the student to fully immerse into a project
                               without being superficial.
Informal meeting.                   It is a point of discussion as to the need to make
                                    this course an online offering. Instructors are not
                                    totally satisfied with the needs and value of too
                                    many online offerings.




Faculty members met face-to-face    Previously, students emerged from Luiseño
and over the phone to discuss the   classes able to reproduce structured, memorized
assessment results of previous      passages from Luiseño stories, but unable to
Luiseño classes.                    carry on basic, spontaneous conversations in
                                    Luiseño. As a result of this analysis, the faculty
                                    introduced new instructional strategies to
                                    emphasize common, daily uses of Luiseño within
                                    the current culture.
Faculty members met face-to-face     Previously, students emerged from Luiseño
and over the phone to discuss the    classes able to reproduce structured, memorized
assessment results of previous       passages from Luiseño stories, but unable to
Luiseño classes.                     carry on basic, spontaneous conversations in
                                     Luiseño. As a result of this analysis, the faculty
                                     introduced new instructional strategies to
                                     emphasize common, daily uses of Luiseño within
                                     the current culture.


Both formal and informal meetings.   none




The instructor of record will        Students following course requirement
evaluate the students demonstrated   demonstrate various level of success.
knowledge of the system and make
the appropriate evaluation of the
student.




The instructor of record will        Successes and opportunities were apparent.
evaluate the students ability to
access various crimes.




The course topic varies therefore the successes
method of analysis will vary.
We will meet at the end of the
semester and discuss the student's
progress. We will also keep an
ongoing log depicting the student's
completion of assigned tasks

the course topic varies therefore the   successes
method of analysis will vary.




Informal meetings and referencing       As stated the exams were added or modified to
to national developments in             reflect more on the subjective nature of
American Studies curricula.             American identity and culture. The family
                                        history assignment is rather new and has proven
                                        to be very successful in critical application to
                                        ones own identity and culture.
1. Anonymous class evaluation            We clarified the course objectives in terms of
forms. 2. Regular meetings between       specific concepts and processes to be learned
instructors to discuss student           and linked these objectives to the SLOs and
progress and test result trends. 3.      methods of assessment. Future discussions will
Informal post-class followup with        focus on the adequacy of the methods of
students to track their professional     assessment.
development in the field, if
applicable. 4. Palomar College
students, including anthropology
majors, have consistently shown
their ability to compete with
students from four-year programs
when it comes to class grades and
getting into graduate school. This
statement is based on informal
feedback from former students over
a 12 year period.

Student assessment results are           Practicum laboratory classes require
analyzed through: lab practicum          considerable investment in specimens, display
analysis/reports, course writing         sets, and consumables. Faculty need more
assignments, student                     instructional resources/teaching materials to
discussions/oral presentations,          provide better learning opportunities for students.
research projects, research papers,
quizzes and/or exams. The data are
also compared within sections
taught by individual instructors.
Faculty members within the
discipline have formal meetings to
discuss individual course objectives,
learning outcomes, and methods of
assessment. In addition, regular
informal meetings take place to
discuss and share different methods
of instruction and student
assessment. (For example:
successful labortary assignments,
textbook and reading choices,
available resources for students (e.g.
videos, websites), quiz and/or exam
styles, writing assignments and
research paper expectations and
requirements, and successful class
activities.
Student assessment results are         The faculty need more instructional
analyzed through: laboratory           resources/teaching materials to provide better
practicum analysis/reports, course     learning opportunities for students.
writing assignments, student
discussions/oral presentations,
research projects, research papers,
quizzes and/or exams. The data are
also compared within sections
taught by individual instructors.
Faculty members within the
discipline have formal meetings to
discuss individual course objectives,
learning outcomes, and methods of
assessment. In addition, regular
informal meetings take place to
discuss and share different methods
of instruction and student
assessment. (For example:
successful labortary assignments,
textbook and reading choices,
available resources for students (e.g.
videos, websites), quiz and/or exam
styles, writing assignments and
research paper expectations and
requirements, and successful class
activities.)
1. Anonymous class evaluation             We clarified course objectives in terms of
forms. 2. Regular meetings between        specific skills and linked these objectives to the
instructors to discuss student            SLOs and methods of assessment. Future
progress in terms of knowledge and        discussions will focus on the adequacy of the
skills as assessed through lab            methods of assessment.
exercises, home exercises, quizzes,
and a major historical cultural
resource project report. 3. Informal
post-class followup with students to
track their professional development
in the field, if applicable. 4. Palomar
college students, including
anthropology majors, have
consistently shown their ability to
compete with students from four-
year programs when it comes to
class grades and getting into
graduate school. This statement is
based on informal feedback from
former students over a 12 year
period.

Currently, student scores on
individual instructor’s course
writing assignments, student
discussions/oral presentations,
research projects, research paper,
quizzes and/or exams and student
self-report college skills and
attitudinal measures of course
content learning provide the
assessment, and this data is
compared within sections taught by
individual instructors, but not
between instructors. Faculty
members within the discipline have
formal meetings to discuss
individual course objectives,
learning outcomes, and methods of
assessment. In addition, regular
informal meetings
Student assessment results are        Not relevant at this time since the course has yet
analyzed through: course writing      to be offered.
assignments, student
discussions/oral presentations,
research projects, research papers,
quizzes and/or exams. The data are
also compared within sections
taught by individual instructors.
Faculty members within the
discipline have formal meetings to
discuss individual course objectives,
learning outcomes, and methods of
assessment. In addition, regular
informal meetings take place to
discuss and share different methods
of instruction and student
assessment. (For example: textbook
and reading choices, available
resources for students (e.g. videos,
websites), quiz and/or exam styles,
writing assignments and research
paper expectations and
requirements, and successful class
activities.)

The archaeology division of the        Previous discussions regarding the content of the
Department of Behavioral sciences      class have resulted in a slight de-emphasis on
endeavours to maintain contact with    method and theory towards a integrative world
a significant number program           prehistory approach. This aligns the class
graduates, especially those who        content more closely with transfer requirements
pursue anthropology majors at other    to UC and CSU systems.
institutions. Informal meetings are
held between the faculty on a
regular basis to discuss assessment
results, general class orientation,
and the overall effectiveness of the
pedagogy.
1. Anonymous class evaluation          We clarified the course objectives in terms of
forms. 2. Regular meetings between     specific skills to be learned and linked these
instructors to discuss student         objectives to the SLOs and methods of
progress and test result trends. 3.    assessment. Future discussions will focus on the
Informal post-class followup with      adequacy of the methods of assessment.
students to track their professional
development in the field, if
applicable. 4. Palomar College
archaeology graduates have
consistently shown their ability to
compete with students from four-
year programs when it comes to
obtaining internships, serving as
staff members for academic field
schools, and getting into graduate
school. This statement is based on
informal feedback from former
students over a 12 year period.

The course is being taught for the     This is to come later after the teaching of the
first time and Dr. Philip de Barros is class for the first time.
the only instructor for this course.




Dr. de Barros is the only instructor   See No. 2 above.
teaching this course. See also No. 2
above.
This course has not been taught       Methods of Assessment from the Fall 2008 COR
since 2004 and will next be taught in revisions were modified to reflect the newly
the Spring of 2010. The COR was       added SLOs.
revised in the Fall of 2008 and SLOs
have just been written for the first
time. Methods of Assessment have
been revised to reflect these SLOs.
This class is taught only by Dr.
Philip de Barros. SLOs and methods
of assessment will be reviewed in
2010.




Student assessment results are        At this time no needed changes are evident.
analyzed through: course writing
assignments, student
discussions/oral presentations,
research projects, research papers,
quizzes and/or exams. The data are
also compared within sections
taught by individual instructors.
Faculty members within the
discipline have formal meetings to
discuss individual course objectives,
learning outcomes, and methods of
assessment. In addition, regular
informal meetings take place to
discuss and share different methods
of instruction and student
assessment. (For example: textbook
and reading choices, available
resources for students (e.g. videos,
websites), quiz and/or exam styles,
writing assignments and research
paper expectations and
requirements, and successful class
activities.)
Student assessment results are        Currently there are no changes.
analyzed through: course writing
assignments, student
discussions/oral presentations,
research projects, research papers,
quizzes and/or exams. The data are
also compared within sections
taught by individual instructors.
Faculty members within the
discipline have formal meetings to
discuss individual course objectives,
learning outcomes, and methods of
assessment. In addition, regular
informal meetings take place to
discuss and share different methods
of instruction and student
assessment. (For example: textbook
and reading choices, available
resources for students (e.g. videos,
websites), quiz and/or exam styles,
writing assignments and research
paper expectations and
requirements, and successful class
activities.)

1. Anonymous class evaluation          We clarified the course objectives in terms of
forms. 2. Regular meetings between     specific skills to be learned and linked these
instructors to discuss student         objectives to the SLOs and methods of
progress and test result trends. 3.    assessment. Future discussions will focus on the
Informal post-class followup with      adequacy of the methods of assessment.
students to track their professional
development in the field, if
applicable. 4. Palomar College
archaeology graduates have
consistently shown their ability to
compete with students from four-
year programs when it comes to
obtaining internships, serving as
staff members for academic field
schools, and getting into graduate
school. This statement is based on
informal feedback from former
students over a 12 year period.
1. Anonymous class evaluation             We clarified course objectives in terms of
forms. 2. Regular meetings between        specific skills and linked these objectives to the
instructors to discuss student            SLOs and methods of assessment. Future
progress in terms of knowledge and        discussions will focus on the adequacy of the
skills as assessed through quizzes        methods of assessment.
and field observations. 3. Informal
post-class followup with students to
track their professional development
in the field, if applicable. 4. Palomar
College archaeology graduates have
consistently shown their ability to
compete with students from four-
year programs when it comes to
internships, serving as staff
members for academic field schools,
and getting into graduate school.
This statement is based on informal
feedback from former students over
a 12 year period.




1. Anonymous class evaluation             We clarified the course objectives in terms of
forms. 2. Regular meetings between        specific skills to be learned and linked these
instructors to discuss student            objectives to the SLOs and methods of
progress and test result trends. 3.       assessment. Future discussions will focus on the
Informal post-class followup with         adequacy of the methods of assessment.
students to track their professional
development in the field, if
applicable. 4. Palomar College
archaeology graduates have
consistently shown their ability to
compete with students from four-
year programs when it comes to
obtaining internships, serving as
staff members for academic field
schools, and getting into graduate
school. This statement is based on
informal feedback from former
students over a 12 year period.
1. Anonymous class evaluation             We clarified course objectives in terms of
forms. 2. Regular meetings between        specific skills and linked these objectives to the
instructors to discuss student            SLOs and methods of assessment. Future
progress in terms of knowledge and        discussions will focus on the adequacy of the
skills as assessed through field          methods of assessment.
observations. 3. Informal post-class
followup with students to track their
professional development in the
field, if applicable. 4. Palomar
College archaeology graduates have
consistently shown their ability to
compete with students from four-
year programs when it comes to
internships, serving as staff
members for academic field schools,
and getting into graduate school.
This statement is based on informal
feedback from former students over
a 12 year period.


1. Anonymous class evaluation             We clarified course objectives in terms of
forms. 2. Regular meetings between        specific skills and linked these objectives to the
instructors to discuss student            SLOs and methods of assessment. Future
progress in terms of knowledge and        discussions will focus on the adequacy of the
skills as assessed through lab            methods of assessment.
exercises, home exercises, quizzes,
and a major historical cultural
resource project report. 3. Informal
post-class followup with students to
track their professional development
in the field, if applicable. 4. Palomar
College archaeology graduates have
consistently shown their ability to
compete with students from four-
year programs when it comes to
internships, serving as staff
members for academic field schools,
and getting into graduate school.
This statement is based on informal
feedback from former students over
a 12 year period.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.


The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.




The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

The Southwest Carpenters staff        The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome      tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about          training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as     learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.
The Southwest Carpenters staff         The Southwest Carpenters have added more
evaluate student program outcome       tutoring, instructor training, and more hands on
data to make decisions about           training and evaluation as a result of student
adapting instructional methods as      learning outcome assessments.
well as student preparedness. The
coordinator and faculty member
continually evaluate student
performance for the purpose of
improving instructional techniques
and expanding laboratory practices.

R/SB has collected data on students    R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
for the purpose of evaluating          training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
ongoing student performance and        hands on training and evaluation as a result of
program improvement for many           student learning outcome assessments.
years. The program coordinator and
faculty members continually
evaluate student performance for the
purpose of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.

The R/SB has collected data on         R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of            training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student             hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program                student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The R/SB has collected data on         R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of            training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student             hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program                student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The R/SB has collected data on        R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.

The R/SB has collected data on        R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The R/SB has collected data on        R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The R/SB has collected data on        R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The R/SB has collected data on        R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The R/SB has collected data on        R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The R/SB has collected data on        R/SB has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on       SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of           training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student            hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program               student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.
The SDETT has collected data on         SDETT has added more tutoring, instructor
students for the purpose of             training, mandatory math tutorials, and more
evaluating ongoing student              hands on training and evaluation as a result of
performance and program                 student learning outcome assessments.
improvement for many years. The
program coordinator and faculty
members continually evaluate
student performance for the purpose
of improving instructional
techniques and expanding laboratory
practices.




We have used so far some informal       Success: As a result of this analysis, it is evident
oral student assessment. We now         that our program develops skills in the four
feel the need for a standardized        language areas: speaking, listening, reading, and
formal assessment through language      writing, as well as cultural awareness. Problems:
laboratory assignments.                 Student retention was an issue due to the class
                                        format (101A 101B).Turning the class into a full
                                        semester length class will remediate to this
                                        problem and hopefully keep more students
                                        engaged in learning Arabic. Opportunities: By
                                        retaining more students in full semester program
                                        (5 unit course), more students will be able to
                                        continue with their Arabic studies. Needed
                                        changes: We may have to consider how
                                        scheduling might affect our enrollment for the
                                        program and try different time slots.

Faculty discuss student assessment      Success: As a result of this analysis, it is evident
in informal meetings and                that our program develops skills in the four
discussions. Statistical reports are    language areas: speaking listening, reading, and
used to identify progress or areas of   writing, as well as cultural awareness.
weakness on exams and quizzes.
Individual critiques of finished        This is a new class but based on other similar
paintings. Classroom critiques of       classes, the classroom critique session has shown
finished paintings. Class discussion    remarkable results for student improvement.
of techniques used.


Students are assessed in bi-weekly      It is very important to ask students to assess
critiques during which they are         themselves so that they honestly assess the effort
asked to assess their own work as       that they are putting into the course work. I find
well as their classmates. The           that this often inspires them to put more energy
instructor gives each student           into the class. Mid-semester meetings are crucial
individual oral feedback on each        to allowing the students to have a concrete
assignment during these critiques.      understanding of their grade and what they can
The instructor meets with each          do to effect it. It also gives them private time
student during mid-semester             with the instructor to discuss any concerns or
meetings during each student is told    problems.
their grade and what they need to do
to maintain or raise their current
grade. Students are also encouraged
to discuss anything that they need
extra assistance with in class or any
aspects they would like to explore
more in depth. There is one written
exam for which the students are
given written feedback on their
understanding of ceramic's
terminology and processes and their
own assessment of their work.
-Individual mid-semester meetings      Students need the concrete mid-semester
with students as well as meetings      meeting with a grade reported as there is no
upon request. -Students are asked to   grade given in bi-weekly critiques (they are
assess their own performance and       decided later upon review of notes and projects).
then written feedback is responded     It is good to have students honestly assess their
to their evaluation. -Bi-weekly        own effort as it helps them realize the amount of
critiques are held in which each       effort they are dedicating and often encourages
assignment is discussed with a small   them to put more energy into the course.
group of students. It is important
that the groups are open and honest
with each other and clearly convey
their assessment of the student's
performance. The instructor leads
each group independently and gives
each student an individual oral
review.
Students are assessed in bi-weekly      It is very important to ask students to assess
critiques during which they are         themselves so that they honestly assess the effort
asked to assess their own work as       that they are putting into the course work. I find
well as their classmates. The           that this often inspires them to put more energy
instructor gives each student           into the class. Mid-semester meetings are crucial
individual oral feedback on each        to allowing the students to have a concrete
assignment during these critiques.      understanding of their grade and what they can
The instructor meets with each          do to effect it. It also gives them private time
student during mid-semester             with the instructor to discuss any concerns or
meetings during which each student      problems.
is told their grade and what they
need to do to maintain or raise their
current grade. Students are also
encouraged to discuss anything that
they need extra assistance with in
class or any aspects they would like
to explore more in depth. There is
one written exam for which the
students are given written feedback
on their understanding of ceramic's
terminology and processes and their
own assessment of their work.




Student exams, essays and papers        Current methods of assessment appear to
are analyzed by faculty in informal     accurately gauge students' mastery of art
meetings for demonstration of           historical material.
students' knowledge and correct
usage of art historical terms and
concepts.
Student exams, essays and papers        Current methods of assessment appear to
are analyzed by faculty in informal     accurately gauge students' mastery of art
meetings for demonstration of           historical material.
students' knowledge and correct
usage of art historical terms and
concepts.
Student exams, essays and papers        Current methods of assessment appear to
are analyzed by faculty in informal     accurately gauge students' mastery of art
meetings for demonstration of           historical material.
students' knowledge and correct
usage of art historical terms and
concepts.
Student exams, essays and papers        Current methods of assessment appear to
are analyzed by faculty in informal     accurately gauge students' mastery of art
meetings for demonstration of           historical material.
students' knowledge and correct
usage of art historical terms and
concepts.

Student exams, essays and papers        Current methods of assessment appear to
are analyzed by faculty in informal     accurately gauge students' mastery of art
meetings for demonstration of           historical material.
students' knowledge and correct
usage of art historical terms and
concepts.

Regular discussion during               Overall, the class is very well conceived and
department meetings and group           structured. The challenge currently lies in further
evaluation of student portfolios at     integrating technology and the use of computer
annual Scholarship review. Analysis     color systems into a predominantly traditionally
and evaluation of work submitted to     taught class environment.
Student Art show and Art Sale.


Students are assessed in bi-weekly      It is very important to ask students to assess
critiques during which they are         themselves so that they honestly assess the effort
asked to assess their own work as       that they are putting into the course work. I find
well as their classmates. The           that this often inspires them to put more energy
instructor gives each student           into the class. Mid-semester meetings are crucial
individual oral feedback on each        to allowing the students to have a concrete
assignment during these critiques.      understanding of their grade and what they can
The instructor meets with each          do to effect it. It also gives them private time
student during mid-semester             with the instructor to discuss any concerns or
meetings during which each student      problems.
is told their grade and what they
need to do to maintain or raise their
current grade. Students are also
encouraged to discuss anything that
they need extra assistance with in
class or any aspects they would like
to explore more in depth. There is
one written exam and one paper for
which the students are given written
feedback on their understanding of
ceramic's terminology and processes
and their own assessment of their
work.
As a department we evaluate our         At the moment the course is up-to date as far as
students' work as a group on several    concepts covered and software used are
different occasions during the          concerned. It would be interesting to investigate
school year: -during formal and         new publishing media, like for example
informal department mweetings - as      YouTube.
part of our annual faculty judged
scholarship competition -during the
selection process that precedes the
annual student artshow in the
Boehm Gallery.

Faculty members rely on finished
works of art that are designed to
fulfill certain art concepts. Formal
critiques are a regular part of the
semester. Specific learning topics
are addressed in the critiques.
Students are included in critiquing
other student works of art. Critical
thinking and problem solving is
encouraged.
Faculty will confer at least once a
year to discuss student achievement
in relation to course SLOs.




The ASL faculty meet at least once
a year to shed light on student
performance related to the identified
SLOs from previous two semesters.

The ASL faculty meet at least once
a year to shed light on student
performance related to the identified
SLOs from previous two semesters.
To date, analysis of current         To be determined.
assessment methods and te