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Managing Users Accounts in Windows

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					Managing Users Accounts in Windows XP Professional
In Microsoft Windows XP Professional, you will find one of three different accounts in use on any given system.


        Local user accounts allow you to log on to the local system and access resources there. If you needed to access any type of
         resource beyond the local system, you would need to provide additional credentials in most cases. Local accounts
         authenticate to the local security database.
        Domain user accounts allow you to log on to the domain the user account belongs to in order to access network resources.
         You may be able to access resources in other domains depending on how the trust relationships are defined or if any
         modifications have been made to them. Domain accounts authenticate to a domain controller and to the domain security
         database.
        Built-in user accounts allow you to perform administrative tasks on the local system and sometimes they can access local or
         network resources, depending on their configuration on the network. This too, is dependant on how trust relationships are
         defined or if any modifications have been made to them. The only two accounts created by default on a stand alone Windows
         XP Professional clean installation are Administrator and Guest.

The built-in Administrator account is enabled by default and cannot be deleted from the system. The name of the account as well as the
password can be changed, however, and this is a recommended best practice. It is also recommended that the default Administrator
account never be used or used as infrequently as possible and only when tasks need to be performed at an Administrative level. If
there is ever more than one Administrator on a workstation, each one should have an account created for their use. In the event that
you need to log administrative events, this would be easier if there were a number of different administrator accounts created rather
than a single one.

The Guest account also cannot be deleted from the system, however it is DISABLED by default and unless there is some required
operational need it should stay disabled. The only "need" for the Guest account would be a kiosk type terminal in a lobby of an office
building or hotel and in that event it could be used. If there is ever a short time need to grant access to a temporary user to a system it's
is always worth the "aggravation" to create an account.

Using the Local Users and Groups Snap-in

You would normally need to be a local administrator to perform most system configuration functions (even just taking a look at the
current configuration settings) on a Windows XP Professional system, and in some cases, there may be a local policy set by some
other administrator or if your system is in a Domain, a Domain policy setting, which may prevent you from performing some actions.

To manage local users and groups you can use the Local Users and Groups MMC and you can access this tool a number of different
ways.

One way is to select Start, right-click My Computer, and then click Manage, which will open the Computer Management MMC. Under
the System tools icon, click Local Users and Groups to open the Local Users and Groups MMC.
You can also type compmgmt.msc in the RUN box or from a command line to launch the Computer Management MMC.




What your Start Menu options look like all depend on how you have the menu set. If you are using the Classic Start Menu, you would
not see My Computer as a selection to right click on. Your options would be to click Start, select Administrative Tools and then select
Computer Management. Not a whole lot different, but perhaps just enough to confuse you.

I seem to continually repeat this from article to article, but it is important to stress, the Windows XP Professional exam rarely tests you
on Classic anything. You need to know how to get from Windows XP Professional settings to Classic and back, but in 90% of the cases
you're going to find instructions laid out in the Windows XP Professional vein. I will do my best to point out alternatives.

If you want to directly open the Local Users and Groups MMC you can type lusrmgr.msc from the RUN box or from a command line.
This will run the tool independently from the Computer Management MMC.

You can also launch the Control Panel and select the User Accounts icon as well.




[NOTES FROM THE FIELD] - User Accounts and the Local Users and Groups MMC both function differently while performing the
same task. I will cover the User Accounts functionality separately.

Adding USERS with the Local Users and Groups MMC

Adding a user is as simple as selecting Users from the left pane, right clicking it and choosing New User. You can also highlight Users
by left clicking it and going up to ACTION on the menu bar and selecting New User.




Depending on your current settings, all you may need to supply in order to create a user account is a user account name. The full user
name, description, and passwords are not required by default.
To set a password where one isn't used or to change one that is currently set, you would right click on the given account and choose
SET PASSWORD.

You can also right click on the given account and choose ALL TASKS which leads you to the single SET PASSWORD option as well.

You can also select the user with a single left click and go to ACTION in the menu to bring up the same ALL TASKS / SET
PASSWORD options as well.




Passwords are not required by default but are always a recommended best practice.

There may be a local policy set by some other administrator or if your system is in a Domain, a Domain policy setting, which may force
you to use settings that are NOT normally required by default.

For example, if you try to create an account that has a password policy in place and you do not meet the minimum requirements for
password creation, you will be presented with an error message that looks like this;




Adding GROUPS with the Local Users and Groups MMC

Adding groups is performed in much the same manner. You can select Groups from the left pane, right click it and choose New Group.
You can also highlight Groups by left clicking it and going up to ACTION on the menu and selecting New Group.




All that is required for creating a Group is the name. Descriptions do not need to be entered for the group nor do you need to add any
members.
Using USER ACCOUNTS in the Control Panel.

How USER ACCOUNTS in the Control Panel functions all depends on whether your Windows XP Professional system is in a domain or
not.

Also, how it looks depends on whether you are using the default Windows XP view or the Classic interface.

This is the default Windows XP view.




Below is the Classic view.




When you are in a domain and you open the USER ACCOUNTS icon in the Control Panel you are presented with the User Accounts
view as shown below on the USER tab.
The "domain" BUCKAROO in this example is the local system and not a domain. NORTHAMERICA is a domain. The icons for a local
account have a computer/user icon. In the above image in the Password for backup section you can see this. A DOMAIN icon in the
Users for this computer section would have a planet/user icon combination as shown below.




In order to see the properties of an account, you would select it and click on the properties button to see the following window.
On the Group Membership tab of the USER property sheet you would see three selections to choose from regarding group
memberships.




The OTHER drop down window lists all of the LOCAL groups that the user could belong to.
The OTHER drop down window lists only the local groups, regardless of whether you have chosen a user account in the local accounts
database or a domain account that is in the domain.

You can change the password for a given account from the USER tab by selecting the account and clicking the RESET PASSWORD
button, which will bring up the RESET PASSWORD window as shown below.




From the ADVANCED tab you can manage passwords that are in the local database.
By selecting the MANAGE PASSWORDS button you will open the Stored User Names and Passwords where you can add, remove or
view the properties of an account.




When you select the .NET PASSPORT WIZARD, the wizard will start and allow you to add a .NET passport to one or more Windows
XP Professional user accounts.
Selecting ADVANCED from the Advanced User Management section simply launches the Local Users and Groups MMC as if you
typed lusrmgr.msc from the RUN box or from a command line.

The secure logon section is where you would require local users to press CTRL+ALT+DEL to begin a session.

When you are not in a domain and you open the USER ACCOUNTS icon in the Control Panel you are presented with the User
Accounts view as shown below.
To change any of the listed accounts you would select CHANGE AN ACCOUNT and select the account you wish to change. It's here
that you can change the password, change the icon (picture) that is associated with the account or to set up the account to use a .NET
passport.

The CREATE A NEW ACCOUNT option allows you to do just that.

The CHANGE THE WAY USERS LOG ON OR OFF option allows you to select either FAST USER SWITCHING, (which is not allowed
when the workstation is a member of a domain) or using the standard USE THE WELCOME SCREEN option.
Fast User Switching cannot be used if the Offline Files option is enabled. Also, once your system is added to a domain you can no
longer use Fast User Switching, even if you log on to the workstation by using the local user account database.