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					                 STATE OF ARKANSAS CONSOLIDATED PLAN
                              Annual Performance and Evaluation Report

                         Reporting Period: July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008



INTRODUCTION

This Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) provides data on the amount and

use of housing and community development funds received from the U. S. Department of Housing and

Urban Development (HUD) by the State of Arkansas during the program year, July 1, 2007 through June

30, 2008. The investment of housing and community development resources administered by Arkansas

State Government is guided by the five-year Consolidated Plan published on May 15, 2005. The state

develops and publishes an Annual Update to the Consolidated Plan for directing its federally funded

housing and community development programs during the upcoming year, and each year the state

publishes the Annual Performance and Evaluation Report for the preceding program year. The state’s

Consolidated Plan Committee oversees the long range and annual planning process. The Consolidated Plan

Committee consists of representatives of the Arkansas Economic Development Commission (AEDC), the

Arkansas Development Finance Authority (ADFA), the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH), and

Arkansas Department of Human Services (ADHS).



A.     RESOURCES MADE AVAILABLE TO THE STATE

During the Consolidated Plan program year ending June 30, 2008, the State received $34,381,730 from

HUD programs. In addition, the state received $4,255,879 from the Department of Energy, allocated

$7,600,283 in Low Income Housing Tax Credits and issued almost $47,434,319 in mortgage revenue

bonds. Table 1 lists each program and indicate the amount anticipated to be received and the amounts

actually received during the program year. The following statements explain any differences between

actual and planned amounts.
                                            1
   Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program funding levels were consistent with

    anticipated amounts. Program income was estimated to be $2,000,000. Program income was

    actually $1,951,636.27, which is less than anticipated by $48,363.73. This amount was added to the

    Economic Development Commission budget for the FY 2007 allocation.



   HOME Program funding levels were consistent with anticipated amounts. Program income was

    estimated to be $1,000,000.    Program income was actually $1,776,958, which is more than

    projected by $776,958. Program income was used prior to entitlement funding.



   Emergency Shelter Grants (ESG) funding levels were consistent with anticipated amounts.



   Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) funding levels were consistent with

    planned amounts.



   Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program (DOE/WAP) funding levels were

    consistent with the planned amounts.



   Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) are allocated on a calendar-year basis and not within

    the Consolidated Plan program year. The figures shown below are for the calendar year ending

    December 31, 2007.



The LIHTC administered by ADFA had $1,361,806 returned for this reporting period which will be

used next year.




                                           2
Table 1: Resources Made Available to the State during the Reporting Period.

Source                 State Agency       Anticipated           Actual          Difference of
                                           FY 2007             FY 2007          Actual and
                                           Amount              Amount           Anticipated

Federal
 DHUD/HOME             ADFA              13,023,210          13,023,210              -0-
 DHUD/CDBG             AEDC              19,446,190          19,446,190              -0-
 DHUD/ESG              ADHS/OCS           1,192,330           1,192,330              -0-
 DHUD/HOPWA            ADH                  720,000             720,000              -0-
 DOE/WAP               DHS/OCS            4,255,879           4,255,879              -0-
 LIHTC                 ADFA               8,131,731           8,131,731              -0-
Total (Federal)                         $46,769,340         $46,769,340

State
  MRB                  ADFA              132,087,365        132,087,365               -0-
Total (State)                            132,087,365        132,087,365               -0-

Grand Total                             $178,856,705        $178,856,705              -0-




B. INVESTMENT OF AVAILABLE RESOURCES


State and federal policies guide and direct investment of available resources from each Arkansas housing,

community and economic development program. This section of the CAPER reports on how the resources

were used to accomplish program objectives.




                                              3
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM

The Arkansas Economic Development Commission administers the CDBG program for rural areas of the

state that are not CDBG Entitlement Cities.



   CDBG Program Priorities: The Annual Plan for July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008 established the

    following priorities for CDBG funded projects.



Goal 1: Enhance a suitable living environment for the citizens of Arkansas by improving the availability,

accessibility and affordability of public facilities.



Objective 1.1: Enhance a Suitable Living Environment for senior citizens.
Outcome: Availability, Accessibility
Outcome Statement: Enhance a suitable living environment for the senior citizens of Arkansas through

the improved access to, and availability of Senior Citizen Centers.



                Performance Indicator 1.1: In FY 2007 the State of Arkansas, in partnership with the Area

                Agencies on Aging, will make available approximately $960,000 in CDBG funds for the

                construction, expansion or renovation of Senior Centers in four of the eight regions of the

                state served by the Area Agencies on Aging. These centers will provide transportation

                services, meals, senior health clinics, and centers for socialization for approximately 400

                senior citizens, 100% of whom are below 80% of the area median income.



                Actual Accomplishments: As of June 30, 2008 the state had executed grant agreements for

                3 new or expanded senior centers. These centers will provide improved access and

                availability to senior services for approximately 1,821 senior citizens, 100% of whom are of

                low to moderate income.
                                                  4
Objective 1.2: Enhance a Suitable Living Environment through improved access to affordable health

services.

Outcome: Availability, Accessibility, and Affordability

Outcome Statement: Enhance a suitable living environment for the citizens of Arkansas by improved

availability, accessibility, and affordability of health services.



                Performance Indicator 1.2: In FY 2007 the State of Arkansas, in partnership with the

                Arkansas Department of Health, will make available approximately $395,000 in CDBG

                funds for the construction, expansion or renovation of at least one County Health Unit in the

                state. This unit will provide health screenings and health services to approximately 500

                persons, more than 51% of whom will be below 80% of the area median income.



                Actual Accomplishments: As of June 30, 2008 the state had executed a grant agreement

                for one new public health building. This public health building will provide improved

                availability, accessibility, and affordability of health services to approximately 1,125

                persons, 100% of whom are of low to moderate income.




Objective 1.3: Enhance a Suitable Living Environment through improved access to affordable child care

services.

Outcome: Availability, Accessibility, and Affordability

Outcome Statement: Enhance a suitable living environment for the citizens of Arkansas by improved

availability, accessibility, and affordability of Child Care Services.




                                                  5
               Performance Indicator 1.3: In FY 2007 the State of Arkansas, in partnership with the

               Arkansas Department of Human Services, will make available approximately $720,000 in

               CDBG funds for the construction, expansion or renovation of child care centers in the state.

               These centers will provide affordable child care services to approximately 100 children,

               more than 51% of whom will be from families that are below 80% of the area median

               income.



               Actual Accomplishments: As of June 30, 2008 the state had executed grant agreements for

               3 new child care centers. These centers will provide improved availability, accessibility,

               and affordability of affordable child care to approximately 204 persons, 62% of whom are of

               low to moderate income.



Objective 1.4: Enhance a Suitable Living Environment through improved access to community centers

and affordable fire protection.

Outcome: Availability, Accessibility, and Affordability

Outcome Statement: Enhance a suitable living environment for rural Arkansans through the improved

access to Community Centers, and through the availability of affordable fire protection services.



                       Performance Indicator 1.4: In FY 2007 the State of Arkansas, in partnership with

                       the Arkansas Department of Rural Services, will make available approximately

                       $500,000 in CDBG funds for the construction, expansion or renovation of

                       Community Centers and Fire Stations, and for the purchase of fire trucks and fire

                       protection equipment in cities and unincorporated rural areas with a population of

                       less than 3,000 persons. These centers will provide meeting areas and will provide

                       fire protection for approximately 500 families, more than 51% of whom will have

                       incomes below 80% of the area median income.
                                               6
                       Actual Accomplishments:         As of June 30, 2008 the state had executed grant

                       agreements for 3 new community centers and executed grant agreements for 10 fire

                       protection projects. These projects will enhance a suitable living environment for

                       approximately 9,513 rural Arkansans through the improved access to Community

                       Centers, and through the availability of affordable fire protection services.




Objective 1.5: Enhance a Suitable Living Environment through improved

access to public facilities and public infrastructure, and through funding for innovative projects.

Outcome: Availability, Accessibility, and Affordability

Outcome Statement: Enhance a suitable living environment for the citizens of Arkansas through

improvements in the availability, accessibility and affordability of public facilities, public infrastructure

and projects of an innovative nature.



               Performance Indicator 1.5: In FY 2008 the State of Arkansas will make available

               approximately $720,000 in CDBG funds for the construction of public infrastructure,

               including such projects as drainage, streets, and roads. Funds will be available for the

               construction of public facilities, including such projects as homeless shelters, youth centers,

               and halfway houses. Funds will also be available for projects deemed to be of an innovative

               nature. These grants will be awarded through a competitive process. At least 51% of all

               persons benefiting from this line item will have incomes below 80% of the area median

               income, or the project will meet another national objective, such as the elimination of slum

               and blight or to address an urgent need.




                                                7
Note that additional funds may be provided for this line item in the future through the

deobligation of unused funds from other line items, or from deobligated funds from previous

funding years.



Actual Accomplishments: As of June 30, 2008 the state had issued four commitments

under this line item from 2007 funds, as well as one other commitment from funds

deobligated from a previous year. A commitment was made for the expansion of a food

pantry that will enhance the living environment for approximately 200 persons through

improved access to services offered by the pantry. One hundred percent of the persons

served by the shelter will be of low to moderate income.



A commitment was made for the construction of a recreational facility that will enhance the

living environment for approximately 143 developmentally disabled persons through the

improved availability of exercise and recreational facilities. One hundred percent of the

persons served by the center will be of low to moderate income.



Commitments were made to two Arkansas communities for residential drainage

improvements. These improvements will enhance the quality of life to 1,305 persons, at

least 61% of whom are of low to moderate income.



A commitment was made from a previous funding year paving of city streets in a small

Arkansas town.       These improvements will enhance the living environment for

approximately 158 persons through improved access to city services. Approximately 119 of

the persons served by the access road will be of low to moderate income, for an LMI

percentage of 75%.


                               8
Goal 2: Enhance a suitable living environment for the citizens of Arkansas by improving the availability,

accessibility and affordability of public infrastructure.



Objective 2.1: Enhance a Suitable Living Environment through the construction of water and sewer

systems.

Outcome: Availability, Accessibility, and Affordability

Outcome Statement: Enhance a Suitable Living Environment for the citizens of Arkansas through the

availability of clean, safe drinking water and safe sanitary sewer systems.



               Performance Indicator 2.1: In FY 2007 the State of Arkansas will enhance a suitable

               living environment for the citizens of Arkansas by providing improved access to clean, safe

               drinking water and safe sanitary sewer systems. In partnership with the Arkansas Natural

               Resources Commission, the state will make available approximately $8,220,000 in CDBG

               funds for the construction or expansion water and sewer projects. At least 51% of all

               households benefiting from this line item will have incomes below 80% of the area median

               income.



               Actual Accomplishments: As of June 30, 2008 the state had executed 4 grant agreements

               for the extension of drinking water systems. These projects will enhance a suitable living

               environment for approximately 2,071 persons through the improved availability of clean

               safe drinking water. Approximately 51% of the persons served will be of low to moderate

               income.



               One grant was executed for the extension of sanitary sewer. This project will enhance a

               suitable living environment for approximately 125 persons through the improved access to


                                                 9
              sanitary sewer service. Approximately 62% of the persons served by this project will be of

              low to moderate income.



Goal 3: Improve the economic opportunity of the citizens of Arkansas by identifying and funding
economic development projects which provide access to new jobs.


Objective 3.1: Improve Economic Opportunities by identifying and funding projects which provide
access to new jobs.
Outcome: Accessibility
Outcome Statement: Improve economic opportunities through activities aimed at improving the
conditions needed for successful business and economic development.


              Performance Indicator 3.1: In FY 2007 the State of Arkansas will identify and fund

              projects which lead to employment opportunities for the citizens of Arkansas. The State will

              make available $7,350,000 in CDBG funds to provide grants to cities and counties to fund

              eligible economic development activities primarily grants for the improvement of public

              infrastructure related to the location or expansion of industry in the state, and to capitalize

              loans that benefit businesses and industries that are locating or expanding in Arkansas. At

              least 51% of all new jobs created or retained by these projects will be held by or made

              available to persons with household incomes below 80% of the area median income.



              Actual Accomplishments: As of June 30, 2008 the state had executed 7 grant agreements

              for economic development and had issued commitments for 4 additional projects. These

              projects will improve economic opportunities for approximately 500 rural Arkansans

              through the improved access to job opportunities. Approximately 51% of the new jobs

              created by these projects will be made available to persons of low to moderate income.




                                              10
Objective 3.2: Improve Economic Opportunities through access to Individual Development Accounts.
Outcome: Accessibility
Outcome Statement: Improve economic opportunities for families through improved access to Individual
Development Accounts.


               Performance Indicator 3.2:       Study the feasibility of funding Individual Development
               Accounts with CDBG funds, and provide money to fund these accounts should they prove
               feasible. One hundred percent of the households receiving these funds would have incomes
               below 80% of the area median income. This funding will be taken from the Economic
               Development Set Aside line item.


               Actual Accomplishments: The state funded has made a tentative commitment to fund

               Individual Development Accounts for $140,000 pending approval of the proposal by HUD.



CDBG Funding Allocation. Table 2 reports planned versus actual amounts of CDBG funding categories
for the reporting period.



Table 2: 2007 CDBG Allocation Plan

    Category                                         Amount             Actual Amount
                                                     Planned

State Administration                                 $ 388,924        $ 388,924.00
Technical Assistance                                 $ 192,266        $ 192,266.00
Economic Development Set-Aside                       $ 7,350,000      $ 7,350,000.00
Categorical
  Water/Wastewater                                     8,220,000        8,220,000.00
  Childcare Facilities                                   720,000          720,000.00
  Public Health Facilities                               395,000          395,000.00
  Senior Citizen Facilities                              960,000          960,000.00
  Rural Services Set-Aside                               500,000          500,000.00
  General Assistance and Innovative Projects             720,000          720,000.00
Total FY 2007 Allocation                             $19,446,190      $19,446,190.00
Estimated Program Income                               2,000,000        1,951,636.27
Total FY 2007Allocation plus Program Income          $21,446,190      $21,397,826.27


      CDBG Projects. Table 3 lists individual projects that have been funded from CDBG funds for the

       reporting period allocation as of June 30, 2008.
                                               11
Table 3: FY 2007 CDBG Funded Projects as of June 30, 2008

Grantee              Total Grant               Project Cost    Administration Cost
Categorical Grantees
Beedeville           $    50,000.00            $      45,000   $ 5,000
Benton                   618,380.00                  558,320    30,030
Brookland                200,000.00                  190,000    10,000
Calion                    50,000.00                   50,000     -
Caraway                   27,000.00                   27,000     -
Cotton Plant              36,932.00                   36,932     -
Cross County             395,000.00                  375,580    19,420
Dallas County            480,000.00                  460,580    19,420
Danville                 240,000.00                  222,080    17,920
Dyer                      50,000.00                   50,000    47,500
Faulkner County        1,507,000.00                1,421,120    85,880
Gillham                   16,531.00                   16,531      -
Gould                    182,112.00                  165,272    16,840
Gravette                  30,000.00                   30,000      -
Greenbrier               225,000.00                  212,130    12,870
Haskell                   50,000.00                   50,000      -
Independence County       45,000.00                   45,000      -
Izard County              21,579.00                   21,579     16,579
Kingsland                 50,000.00                   50,000       -
Lonoke                   219,350.00                  200,000     19,350
Newton County            225,000.00                  205,200     19,800
Oil Trough               142,675.00                  125,950     16,725
Ozark                    172,120.00                  154,000     18,120
Plainview                 26,969.00                   21,969       5,000
Prairie County            50,000.00                   46,500       3,500
Pyatt                  4,000,000.00                3,874,140    125,860
Randolph County          745,500.00                  704,050     41,450
Scott County             623,800.00                  574,770     49,030
Sebastian County         240,000.00                  231,500       8,500
Turrell                   40,989.00                   40,989      -
Warren                   225,000.00                  207,350     17,650
Economic
Development Grantees
Clarksville              400,000.00                374,580       25,421
Horseshoe Bend           191,300.00                150,000       16,300
McGehee                  217,340.00                202,700       14,640
Mississippi County     1,520,360.00              1,500,000       20,360
Paragould              1,520,300.00              1,500,000       20,300
St. Francis County       208,800.00                200,000        8,800
Wynne                  1,007,359.60              1,000,000        7,800
Totals               $16,051,376.60            $14,647,332     $720,065




                                          12
CDBG Project Beneficiary Results. Table 4 reports on the proposed total number of persons benefiting

from FY 2007 CDBG funded projects allocated during the reporting period and the estimated percentage of

low and moderate-income persons. Also, demographic information is provided.




                                            13
Table 4: CDBG FY 2007 Proposed Project Beneficiary Data as of June 30, 2008

Grantee                         Proposed        Proposed       Proposed
                                Total           LMI            LMI%
Categorical Grantees            Benefit/Jobs    Benefit/Jobs   Benefit
Beedeville                          46              33            71
Benton                             125             121            80
Brookland                           20              20           100
Calion                             516             284            55
Caraway                          1,349             754            55
Cotton Plant                       956             679            71
Cross County                     1,125           1,012            89
Dallas County                    1,564           1,564           100
Danville                           170             170           100
Dyer                               585             325            55
Faulkner County                    678             527            77
Gillham                            188             110            58
Gould                            1,305             797            61
Gravette                         1,810             947            52
Greenbrier                          70              36            51
Haskell                          2,600           1,328            51
Independence County                 78              63            80
Izard County                        98              59            60
Kingsland                          550             327            59
Lonoke                             143             143           100
Newton County                       56              29            51
Oil Trough                         200             200           100
Ozark                              449             362            80
Plainview                          188             103            54
Prairie County                     500             259            51
Pyatt                            1,073             950            88
Randolph County                    207             163            78
Scott County                       115              60            52
Sebastian County                    87              87           100
Turrell                            957             717            74
Warren                             180              91            51
Economic Development
Grantees
Clarksville                         40              21           52
Horseshoe Bend                       8               5           62
McGehee                             15               8           51
Mississippi County                  43              22           51
Paragould                           46              24           52
St. Francis County                 200             102           51
Wynne                               70              36           51
Totals                          18,300          12,218           67




                                           14
Table 5: CDBG FY 2007 Proposed Project Beneficiary Data as of June 30, 2008

 Grantee                    Proposed     Proposed    Proposed    Proposed     Proposed
                            Total        Hispanic    Female      Elderly      Handicapped
 Categorical Grantees       Minority                   HH
 Beedeville                     5           0            1          10            0
 Benton                         0           0            8          18           17
 Brookland                      0           1            5           1            2
 Calion                       185           8           38          91          140
 Caraway                       32           0           57         201           67
 Cotton Plant                 675           0          200         450            7
 Cross County                 303           0          112         154           56
 Dallas County                643         147          490       1,564          770
 Danville                       0           0          130         170           10
 Dyer                          16           0          141          93          131
 Faulkner County               21           5            0           0            0
 Gillham                       29          20            8          15           56
 Gould                      1,041           0          371         817           91
 Gravette                     129          53          101         318          393
 Greenbrier                    10           0            8           0           13
 Haskell                      175          19          195          80           41
 Independence County            1           1           12           0            8
 Izard County                   1           1            1          18            7
 Kingsland                      0           8           31          67           71
 Lonoke                        53           0            0           0          143
 Newton County                   2          0           13           9            7
 Oil Trough                    10           0           12          29           51
 Ozark                         15          29           60          45           40
 Plainview                       0          0           30          75            9
 Prairie County                  0          0           31          68           20
 Pyatt                           1          0           55         264           58
 Randolph County                 0          3             0          0            0
 Scott County                  73          65             6         20           22
 Sebastian County                0          0           21          87           14
 Turrell                         0          0           55          89           10
 Warren                        73           0           18           0           20
 Economic Development
 Grantees
 Clarksville                     8          0             5          2            0
 Horseshoe Bend                  3          2             1          0            0
 McGehee                         2          1             3          0            0
 Mississippi County             16          5             1          0            1
 Paragould                       5          0             6          0            0
 St. Francis County            116         12           29          11            3
 Wynne                          48          2            8           0            3
 Totals                      3,581        382        2,163       4,766        2,284




                                           15
CDBG Program Comments


     Changes in the state’s CDBG program objectives or subgoals are described in the 2005-2009

      Consolidated Plan.



     Programmatic changes in the state’s CDBG program are also discussed in the Consolidated Plan.



     Effective with FY 2008 the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission assumed responsibility for

      rating and ranking water and wastewater projects. Any changes in the criteria and award process

      will be provided to customers during public hearings for the consolidated annual plan update and

      meetings to be scheduled around the state. The Arkansas Natural Resources Commission will

      continuously review the CDBG program ensuring that programs funded continue to benefit low and

      moderate-income citizens and grant funds are disbursed in a timely manner.



     Plans for FY 2008 include further refinement of the application submittal and review process and

      further definition of the public participation process regarding activities to be funded. Any changes

      regarding the above will be contingent upon requirements of the Consolidated Plan.



     The state will define ways to commit funds to economic development and categorical projects in

      order to spend funds in a timely manner during the current fiscal year and future allocation years.




                                              16
   As of June 30, 2008, 100% of the CDBG allocation was obligated to projects, which primarily

    benefit low and moderate-income persons.       As of June 30, 2008, the state had a total of

    $5,065,459.60 in ED projects committed to applicants.



   Overall benefit to low and moderate-income persons

    The Economic Development Commission certifies that 100% of the CDBG funds received by the

    state during FY2007 were used for activities that benefit low and moderate-income persons. The

    state further certifies that for FY 2007 and FY 2008 it is estimated that 100% of the CDBG program

    funds received will benefit low and moderate-income persons.




                                          17
HOME Program

      HOME Program Authorization. ADFA administers the HOME Program. The following table

       reports on the use of HOME Program funds since the program’s inception in 1992.



      Since FY 92, ADFA has authorized 90% of HOME Program funds to projects and 93% of those

       funds have been formally committed to projects. For the one-year Consolidated Plan period, 74%

       of project funds have been disbursed.



Table 6: HOME Program Funds Authorized, Committed, and Disbursed for All Fiscal Years

Fiscal Year         Total               Authorized for    Committed to        Disbursed for
                    Authorization       Activities        Activities          Activities
FY 1992             $ 10,947,000        $ 9,852,300       $ 9,852,300         $ 9,852,124
FY 1993                7,520,000           6,507,735         6,507,735           6,507,553
FY 1994                8,479,000           8,139,412         8,139,230           8,108,295
FY 1995                9,544,000           8,839,180         8,839,180           8,709,553
FY 1996                9,646,000           9,252,447         9,252,447           8,996,505
FY 1997                9,767,000           8,653,237         8,580,923           8,311,633
FY 1998               10,453,000           8,885,050         8,885,050           8,658,932
FY 1999               11,320,000          10,452,065        10,167,959           9,362,351
FY 2000               11,203,000          10,082,700         9,993,216           8,400,435
FY 2001               12,668,000          11,416,200        11,416,200           9,733,358
FY 2002               12,935,000          11,641,500        11,641,500           7,934,273
FY 2003               13,871,000          12,483,900        12,483,900           8,064,228
FY 2004               15,401,701          13,933,092        13,808,544           8,437,106
FY 2005               13,889,529          12,541,382        10,944,161           6,388,271
FY 2006               12,699,718          11,425,025         9,763,817           4,091,041
FY 2007               13,023,210          11,741,251         5,521,654           1,446,894
Totals              $183,367,158        $165,846,476      $155,797,816        $123,002,552
Source: IDIS PR27




                                               18
HOME Program Priorities: The Annual Plan for July 1, 2007 through June 30, 2008 established the

following priorities for HOME-funded projects:



Goal: Improve the condition, availability, and accessibility of affordable housing in Arkansas over a five-
year period.


Objective 1: Provide Decent Housing through Homebuyer Assistance Programs.
Outcome: Affordability
Outcome Statement: Create decent housing with improved affordability by providing funding for
homebuyer assistance programs such as down payment, closing costs, and principal reduction to low-
income homebuyers.


       Performance Indicator 1.1: Increase/maintain funding for homeownership assistance programs to
       aid 100 families including first-time homebuyers by the end of FY 2007.


       Actual Accomplishments: 191 families were assisted in purchasing a home.


Objective 2: Increase Decent Housing for homebuyers through new Single-Family Housing.

Outcome: Affordability and Accessibility

Outcome Statement: Create decent housing with improved affordability and accessibility to new housing
by providing construction financing for single-family housing throughout the state via enhanced financial
mechanisms and improved communication with partners and constituents.


       Performance Indicator 2.1: Provide financing to construct 20 single-family homes for low and
       moderate-income (less than 80 percent AMI) families by the end of FY 2007.


       Actual Accomplishments: 17 families purchased newly constructed through Homeownership New
       Construction Activity.




                                              19
        Performance Indicator 2.2: Provide financing to construct at a minimum one (1) single-family
        unit for homeownership that incorporates universal design and/or Energy Star standards by the end
        of FY 2007.


        Actual Accomplishments: No single-family unit for homeownership that incorporates universal
        design and/or Energy Star standards was constructed.




Objective 3: Provide Decent Housing through Rental Assistance Programs
Outcome(s): Affordability and Accessibility
Outcome Statement: Create decent housing through improved affordability and accessibility by providing
rental subsidy and security deposit assistance for very low to moderate-income households and persons
with disabilities.


        Performance Indicator 3.1: Provide funding to assist 350 families utilizing Tenant-Based Rental
        Assistance (TBRA) by the end of FY 2007.


        Actual Accomplishments: 76 families were assisted with rental assistance.


        Performance Indicator 3.2: Provide funding to assist 100 persons with disabilities utilizing
        TBRA by the end of FY 2007.


        Actual Accomplishments: 20 persons with disabilities were assisted with rental assistance.


Objective 4: Provide Decent Housing through Multifamily Housing and other Rental Housing
Developments.
Outcome: Affordability and Accessibility
Outcome Statement: Create decent housing with improved affordability accessibility of multifamily
housing and other rental housing through the construction and rehabilitation of rental units.




        Performance Indicator 4.1: Create an additional 100 rental units throughout the state by the end of
        FY 2007.


                                                20
       Actual Accomplishments: 279 rental units were created throughout the state.




Objective 5: Create a Suitable Living Environment by forging partnerships among HUD recipient
agencies to evaluate the resources needed for infrastructure improvements to support Single-Family and
Multifamily affordable housing.
Outcome: Affordability and Accessibility
Outcome Statement: Enhanced Suitable Living Environments through improved affordability and
accessibility of infrastructure projects, which support affordable housing.


       Performance Indicator 5.1: Develop at a minimum one (1) affordable housing project, which
       combines infrastructure improvements and an affordable housing development by the end of the FY
       2007.



       Actual Accomplishments: AEDC and ADFA have partnered in the Rural Housing and Economic
       Development (RHED) grant to provide funding for some infrastructure improvements as part of
       affordable housing to be developed by nonprofit entities in the Arkansas Lower Mississippi Delta
       region.




Objective 6: Preserve Decent Housing for Homeowners through Rehabilitation of Single-Family

Housing.

Outcome: Sustainability and Affordability
Outcome Statement: Create decent housing through improved sustainability and affordability of existing
single-family housing stock through rehabilitation or reconstruction projects for low-income persons.




       Performance Indicator 6.1: Rehabilitate or reconstruct 50 housing units by funding major
       homeowner rehabilitation programs by the end of FY 2007.


       Actual Accomplishments: 92 housing units were rehabilitated or reconstructed.




                                                21
Objective 7: Preserve Decent Housing through Rehabilitation of Rental Housing.

Outcome: Sustainability and Affordability

Outcome Statement: Create decent housing through improved sustainability and affordability of existing

multifamily and other rental housing stock through rehabilitation or reconstruction projects for low-income

persons


       Performance Indicator 7.1: Rehabilitate or reconstruct 50 housing units by funding major rental

       rehabilitation programs by the end of FY 2007.

       Actual Accomplishments: 40 rental housing units were rehabilitated.




HOME Program Commitments and Completions. The following table reports project commitments and

completions for all program years. Since 1992, ADFA has completed 5,783 units of affordable housing

and has outstanding commitments for an additional 469 units. These figures do not include 3,957 Tenant

Based Rental Assistance units.




                                              22
Table 7: HOME Program Completions and Commitments by Activity for all Program Years

Activity Type    # of           Total Cost        HOME          Total Cost    HOME
                 Units/Families                   Subsidy       Per           Subsidy Per
                                                                Unit/Family   Unit/Family
Commitments
New                      135      5,870,000        5,445,000    43,481         40,333
Construction
Rehabilitation           170      7,495,633        5,660,864    44,091          33,299
Acquisition               41        221,411           55,819     5,400           1,361
Only
Acquisition &            83       2,753,942        2,499,975    33,180          30,120
Rehabilitation
Acquisition &            40       2,025,000        2,025,387    50,625          50,634
New
Construction
Total                    469    18,365,986        15,687,045    39,159          33,447

Completions
New                      888    23,925,902        23,583,837    26,943          26,558
Construction
Rehabilitation      1,770       49,744,672        49,204,867    28,104          27,799
Acquisition         2,012        8,650,456         8,652,863     4,299           4,300
Only
Acquisition &            346     7,395,299         7,348,564    21,373          21,238
Rehabilitation
Acquisition &            767    19,518,476        19,130,851    25,447          29,942
New
Construction
Total              5,783        109,234,805       107,920,982   18,888         18,661

TBRA*            3,957            -                12,948,497     -             3,272
Source: IDIS Report PR15

*Note: Number of families who have received TBRA payments. HOME Subsidy per family reflects

disbursements to date.

      Note: Commitment figures are not included in completion numbers.




                                             23
      HOME Program Completions by Tenure Type and Income Group for All Years.

       Table 8 reports program completions by tenure type for all fiscal years through June 30, 2008

       Since 1992, 48.1% of HOME Program units completed have been projects benefiting extremely low

       income families (0 to 30% of MFI) and another 24.5% of units completed have been projects

       benefiting low income families (31 % to 50 % of MFI).



Table 8: HOME Completions by Tenure Type and Income Group for all Program Years to June 30, 2008

                   Percent
                   of
All Years to       Income     Median                 Total    Total                     Reported
June 30, 2008      0-30 %     31-50 % 51-60 % 61-80% 0 to 60% 100 %                     as Vacant
Rental Activity
Units Completed     1,124       630        312          76      2,066        2,142          39
TBRA Families       2,869       813        172         104      3,854        3,958           -
Lower Income                                                                                 -
Benefit (units)    65.5%      23.7%      7.9%       3.0%       97.0%      100.0%

Homebuyer
Activities
Units Completed        85       420        299       1,356        804       2,160           32
Lower Income                                                                                 -
Benefit (units)    3.9%       19.4%      13.8%      62.8%      37.2%      100.0%

Homeowner
Activity
Units Completed      575        511        151       175        1,237       1,412               -
Lower Income                                                                                    -
Benefit (units)    40.7%      36.2%      10.7%      12.4%      87.6%      100.0%

Total
Total Units         1,784      1,561       762       1,607     4,107      5,714            71
Completed
TBRA Families       2,869        813       172         104     3,854      3,958             -
Lower Income                                                                                -
Benefit (units)  48.1%        24.5%      9.7%       17.7%      82.3%      100.0%
Source: IDIS Report PR16




                                             24
   HOME Program Completions by Tenure Type for FY 2007. HOME Program results for the

    reporting period are calculated by subtracting results cumulative to June 30, 2007 from results

    cumulative to June 30, 2008. Table 8 provides HOME Program results through June 30, 2008, and

    Table 9 provides HOME Program results through June 30, 2007.                Table 10 calculates the

    differences between Table 8 and Table 9, giving the net results for the reporting period.



    During the reporting period, HOME Program funds completed 619 units of affordable housing,

    including 319 rental units and 300 homeowner units. These figures do not include 96 units of

    Tenant-Based Rental Assistance units.



    Approximately 38.0% (0-30% AMI) of HOME Program units (including TBRA) provided during

    the reporting period benefited extremely low income families and another 62.0% benefited low and

    moderate-income families (31% - 80 %).




                                            25
Table 9: HOME Completions by Tenure Type and Income Group for all Program Years to June 30, 2007

All Years to      % of
June 30, 2007     Median
                  Income                                  Total       Total    Reported
                  0-30%     31-50%    51-60%    61-80%    0 to 60%    0 to 80% As
                                                                               Vacant
Rental Activity
Units Completed     969      542        246       66         1,757      1,823      234
TBRA Families     2,804      786        171       101        3,761      3,862        -
Lower Income                                                                         -
Benefit (units)   66.4%     23.4%     7.3%      2.9%      97.1%       100.0%

Homebuyer
Activities
Units Completed      66       380       259      1,247        705      1,952          32
Lower Income                                                                           -
Benefit (units)   3.4%      19.5%     13.3%     63.9%     36.1%       100.0%

Homeowner
Activities
Units Completed     542       471       137       170       1,150      1,320             -
Lower Income
Benefit (units)   41.1%     35.7%     10.4%     12.9%     87.1%       100.0%

Totals
Total Units        1,577     1,393       642    1,483       3,612      5,095        266
Completed
TBRA Families      2,804       786       171      101       3,761      3,862             -
Lower Income                                                                             -
Benefit (units)   48.9%     24.3%     9.1%      17.7%     82.3%       100.0%
Source: IDIS PR16




                                          26
Table 10: HOME Completions by Tenure Type and Income Group for the Reporting Period, FY 2007

July 1, 2007 to June 30,    % of
2008                        Median
                            Income                                       Total   Total    Reported
                            0-30%      31-             51-     61-       0 to    0 to     As
                                       50%             60%     80%       60%     80%      Vacant
Rental Activity
Units Completed               155            88         66      10         309    319       0
TBRA Families                  65            27          1       3          93     96       0
Lower Income Benefit                                                                        0
(units)                     22.5%      11.8%           6.9%    1.3%      41.1%   42.5%

Homebuyer Activities
Units Completed                 19           40          40     109         99     208      0
Lower Income Benefit                                                                        0
(units)                     9.1%       19.2%           19.2%   52.4%     47.6%   100.0%

Homeowner Activities
Units Completed                 33           40          14          5      87      92      0
Lower Income Benefit                                                                        0
(units)                     35.9%      43.5%           15.2%   5.4%      94.6%   100.0%

Totals
Units Completed            207           168            120     124        495     619      0
TBRA Families               65            27              1       3         93      96      0
Lower Income Benefit                                                                        0
(units)                  38.0%         27.3%           16.9%   17.8%     82.2%   100.0%
Source: IDIS Report PR16



      Housing Assistance Activities. Table 11 reports how the FY 2007 HOME Program grant was

       allocated among housing assistance activity types.



       During the reporting period, amounts actually allocated to housing assistance activities is above

       planned amounts, in two activities.




                                                  27
Table 11: HOME Program Funding Allocations by Housing Assistance Activities for FY 2007

                                               Total            Total
                                              Amounts          Amounts
                                              Planned          Allocated*
             Activity
Total Allocation                              13,023,210
CHDO Allocation 15%                            1,922,938     3,087,500
Rental Housing Program                         5,000,000     7,900,010
Homeowner Housing Programs                     4,668,313     3,971,148
Tenant Based Rental Assistance                 1,000,000     1,469,588
Total Funds for Competitive Awards            12,591,251    16,428,246
*Includes $1,776,958 in program income



      HOME Program Geographic Distribution. Table 12 illustrates how HOME Program funds were

       allocated to geographic categories for the reporting period. The Consolidated Plan established three

       principal geographic categories for distribution of HOME Program funds:



              CDBG Entitlement Cities. Fourteen cities in Arkansas qualify as CDBG Entitlement cities

              and receive CDBG funds directly from HUD. These cities exhibit urban housing problems

              and conditions, which were established as high priority concerns in the Consolidated Plan.



              Minority and Low Income Concentrations. The Consolidated Plan analyzed minority and

              low income concentrations by county in Arkansas and established priorities for housing

              assistance in these counties. Thirty-nine of Arkansas’ 75 counties were identified as having

              minority and/or low income population concentrations.



              Difficult Development Areas. Ten counties in Arkansas qualify as Difficult Development

              Areas (DDA), which are designated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban

              Development; DDA was established as high priority concerns in the Consolidated Plan.




                                              28
In addition to these three geographic categories, in subsequent years, ADFA has established high growth

counties as high priority areas for receipt of certain types of housing funds. Two separate high-growth

categories are defined: Counties with more than 10% population growth and counties with between 5%

and 10% population growth.



Appendix 1 lists each Arkansas county and indicates which of these categories apply to each county.

Appendix 2 provides a FY 2007 HOME Program project-by-project listing by housing activity type and

geographic category.



      Table 12 indicates the geographic distribution of FY 2007 HOME Program funds. The percentages

       for housing assistance activities add to more than 100% because of overlap among geographic

       categories.     For example, a single county may be included on both the racial/low income

       concentration list and the list of counties with lower rates of housing subsidies.




                                                29
Table 12: HOME Program Funding Geographic Allocations for FY 2007

                                                          Counties
                                          Counties with   with Lower    Counties      Counties
Competitive                               Minority &      Ratio of      with 10%      with 5%
Grants          Actual      Entitlement   Low Income      Subsidized    Population    Population
Activity       Allocation    Cities       Concentration   Housing       Gain          Gain
Total CHDO      3,087,500    467,500      2,152,500            -          935,000        -
Set Aside
Total
Homeowner       3,971,148   592,500       2,477,709       693,129       1,077,772     1,061,644
Housing
Total Rental    7,900,010   3,600,000     3,100,010       1,200,000     4,800,000     1,200,000
Program
Total TBRA      1,469,588     552,952       731,250         671,366     1,020,066     1,020,066
Grand Total    16,428,246   5,212,952     8,461,469       2,564,495     7,832,838     3,281,710


      Other HOME Program Comments.              ADFA personnel inspect all affordable housing units

       financed through HOME Program projects for new construction, owner rehabilitation, rental

       rehabilitation, mortgage subsidy, down payment assistance, and tenant-based rental assistance to

       ensure compliance with housing codes and other applicable regulations. In addition, ADFA HOME

       Program staff members monitor and assess grantees affirmative marketing actions and outreach to

       minority-owned and women-owned businesses.




                                            30
Emergency Shelter Grants Program

ESG Program funds are administered by the Arkansas Department of Human Services, Office of

Community Services (OCS) and are distributed through a competitive application process to private

nonprofit organizations that develop and operate homeless shelters and supportive services. In March of

each year, OCS mails grant round notices to its mailing list of eligible and interested applicants. Usually

300 to 400 packages are mailed. The applications are due within a six-week time period and OCS provides

a one-day technical assistance workshop early in the six-week period to instruct interested applicants on

completion of the application. Applications are then received, rated and scored and funds are awarded to

the top rated applicants.



Performance Measures: Homelessness

The Arkansas Department of Human Services will be responsible for tracking the measures for the four

objectives under the Homelessness goal of expanding and improving the housing services offered to

families and individuals in the State of Arkansas. The indicators relating to homelessness, listed below,

will be tracked quarterly by DHS and reported in the “State of Arkansas Annual Update to the

Consolidated Plan.” The first objective, to continue coordination within and among the State Continuums

of Care, has four indicators. This first objective serves to improve services offered to homeless families

and individuals through the sharing of knowledge throughout the supportive services network. Seminars,

conferences and participation in the Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) elevate the

capacity of members of the twelve Continuums of Care within the State. The indicators under this

objective measure the participation level of the Continuums and of the non-profits under them. The second

objective is to support services aimed at the prevention and elimination of homelessness. The first

indicator under this objective is a count of the number of programs assisted per year with operating costs at

a level of $10,000. Programs receiving this level of funding are established operations receiving the “Tier

2” funding levels to maintain their operations. This indicator measures the number of larger programs

                                               31
sustained by the HUD funding for monthly operating costs. The second indicator is the number of

programs assisted per year with funding for prevention activities. This indicator will be measured along

with the total number of persons served by these programs to establish an overall effectiveness measure for

the funding directed at prevention programs. The third objective, to expand emergency shelter facilities,

particularly those serving homeless families, has three indicators to measure the State’s progress. The first

two indicators directly measure the number of shelters and the persons served. The third indicator

recognizes the fact that HUD funding is not the only, and in many cases, not the primary funding source for

non-profits. To decrease non-profit agency dependency on a sole funding source they may utilize the

unified technical assistance offered through the Continuum of Care networks in obtaining additional

funding sources. This leverages the HUD funding over an increased base of nonprofit organizations. The

fourth objective with indicators measured by the Arkansas Department of Human Services is the support to

nonprofit organizations seeking to develop transitional housing opportunities for homeless persons. The

indicator measures the number of nonprofit organizations DHS is able to aid in their attempt to secure

funding sources.


Goal: Expand and improve the housing and services offered to homeless families and individuals in

Arkansas.



       Objective 1: Continue coordination within and among the State Continuums of Care.


               Indicator #1– Number of homeless outreach meetings, conferences and seminars conducted
               or attended (Strategy 1.1).
                        Accomplishment 1.1 In FY 2007 DHS/OCS
                         staff participated in 7 monthly meetings of the
                         Arkansas Continuum of Care, 10 Interagency Council
                          For the Homeless meetings and 7 Arkansas
                          Homeless Coalition meetings.



                                                32
       Indicator #2– Increase in participation of non-profit organizations in the HMIS (Strategy
       1.2).
                   Accomplishment 1.2 In FY 2007DHS/OCS
                    sponsored the Annual Homeless Conference and
                    notified over 125 non-profit organizations about the
                    conference and other homeless activities.


Objective 2: Support services aimed at the prevention and elimination of homelessness.


       Indicator #1– Number of programs assisted per year with operating costs at a level of
       $10,000 (Strategy 2.1).


                         Accomplishment 2.1 In FY 2007 DHS/OCS
                         assisted 71 programs with operating costs at a level of $10,000.


       Indicator #2– Number of programs assisted per year with funding for prevention activities
       (Strategy 2.2).


                         Accomplishment 2.2 In FY2007 DHS/OCS assisted
                         24 programs with prevention activities.


Objective 3: Expand emergency shelter facilities, particularly those serving homeless families.


       Indicator #1– Number of family shelter facilities increased (Strategy 3.1).


                         Accomplishment 3.1 In FY 2007 DHS/OCS increased the number of
                         homeless facilities serving families by two (2).


       Indicator #2– Increase in the number of persons served at shelter facilities (Strategy 3.2).


                         Accomplishment 3.2 In FY2007 DHS/OCS ESG Program decreased the
                         number of homeless served from 17,307 persons to 15,589.




                                          33
                 Indicator #3– Number of nonprofits that utilized unified technical assistance through the
                 Continuum of Care networks in obtaining additional funding sources (Strategy 3.3).


                                Accomplishment 3.3 In FY 2007 DHS/OCS assisted approximately 2
                                agencies through the Continuum of Care networks in applying for additional
                                funding.


       Objective 4: Support transitional housing opportunities for homeless.


                 Indicator #1– Number of nonprofits helped in their search in acquiring money for
                 transitional housing (Strategy 4.1).



                               Accomplishment 4.1 In FY 2007 DHS/OCS assisted over 2 agencies in their

                               search for acquiring money for transitional housing.



ESG Program provided a total of $1,093,000 during FY 2007, funding 71 projects and benefiting

approximately 15,589 homeless persons. Table 13 summarizes the ESG Program results for FY 2007-08.

See Appendix 3 for a list of ESG grantees.



Table 13: ESG Grant Information for FY 2007-08

Number of Number        Total              Rehabilitation Services     Prevention     Operations   State
Projects  of            Budget             Budget         Budget       Budget         Budget       Administration
          Beneficiaries
  71      15,589        1,093,000          13,813.38      231,762.60   61,951.92      785,472.10   59,000


ESG funds were used to supplement private donations and private volunteer time. Activities funded

include rehabilitation of shelter facilities, support services, homeless prevention activities and shelter

operations.      The estimated number of beneficiaries corresponds closely to the number of planned

beneficiaries.


                                                  34
Weatherization Assistance Program

DOE/WAP funds are administered by OCS and are distributed to one (1) non-profit and fourteen (14)

community action agencies according to a formula allocation. Although the DOE/WAP is not subject to

the Consolidated Plan regulations, the program makes an impact on affordable housing problems by

reducing monthly energy bills. Therefore, for information purposes, the annual outcomes are reported here

with other affordable housing programs.



The program year has historically been from April 1 through March 31. The formula considers the heating

degree-days, cooling degree-days, the number of elderly households in poverty in each county and the

number of non-elderly households in poverty in each county.



DOE/WAP provided a total of $5,463,978 million during FY 2006 and $4,255,879 million in FY 2007.

Table 14 summarizes program results for FY 2007. Funds not spent in the fiscal year are carried over to

the next fiscal year. Program results by subgrantee are reported on the Weatherization Assistance Program

table, which is attached. See Appendix 4, for the 2007 Weatherization Summary.



Table 14: Weatherization Assistance Program Information for FY 2007

Number              Total Units
of Agencies         Completed             Total Budget        Expenditures       % Expended
     15              1,225                $3,776,852          $3,600,159            95%


Housing Assistance Impacts of ESG and DOE/WAP.                Table 15 summarizes the FY 2007 housing

activity results for ESG and WAP.




                                               35
Table 15: Housing Assistance Impacts of ESG and WAP FY 2007 Grants

Housing Assistance Activity       ESG        WAP
Rehabilitation (units)              1           0
New Construction                    0           0
Rental Assistance                  12           0
Homebuyer Assistance (owner)         0          0
Support Services (persons)           0          0
Homes Weatherized                    0       1,225
Total                              13        1,225


Shelter Plus Care

Seven Shelter Plus Care projects were funded through the State of Arkansas during this reporting period.

All projects applied to HUD through DHS OCS. The Arkansas Supportive Housing Network organization

received a one-year grant totaling $344,244 for tenant-based rental assistance. The project locates living

quarters for homeless persons with AIDS and their families throughout the state. The budget capacity of

the project is 105 persons and 50 housing units. The Little Rock Community Mental Health Center has five

five-year grants and one renewal grant totaling $2,153,400 for tenant-based rental assistance. The purpose

of the projects is to provide supportive services and housing assistance to homeless persons and their

families in the Little Rock service area. The budget capacity of the projects is 197 persons and 160 housing

units.



Table 16 provides program results for the most recently completed program year:

Table 16: Persons Benefiting from the Shelter Care Plus Program

Program Participants  Sponsor Based           Tenant Based        Total Rental
                      Rental Assistance       Rental Assistance   Assistance
Persons Referred        N/A                          0               0
Total Number Entering   N/A                      466               466
Program




                                              36
Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA)

                                              Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA)

                                              Arkansas CAPER Report for July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2008


1. Grantee Information
HUD Grant Number                                                                     Operating Year for this report
                                                                                     From (mm/dd/yy) 07/01/07            To (mm/dd/yy)     06/30/08
ARH07-F999


Grantee Name

State of Arkansas, Arkansas Department of Health

Business Address                                        4815 West Markham, Slot 33



City, County, State, Zip                                Little Rock                  Pulaski                       Arkansas       72205

Employer Identification Number (EIN) or                 71-6007358                                          DUN & Bradstreet Number (DUNs) if applicable
Tax Identification Number (TIN)
                                                                                                            809873185
Congressional District of Business Address              Two

*Congressional District(s) of Primary Service
Area(s)
*Zip Code(s) of Primary Service Area(s)

*City(ies) and County(ies) of Primary Service
Area(s)

Organization’s Website Address                                                       Does your organization maintain a waiting list?         Yes        No

Healthyarkansas.com                                                                  If yes, explain in the narrative section how this list is administered.
Arkansashivstd.com

Have you prepared any evaluation reports?
If so, please indicate the location on an Internet site (url) or attach copy.




* Service delivery area information only needed for program activities being directly carried out by the grantee




                                                                          37
2. Project Sponsor Information
Project Sponsor Agency Name                                                            Parent Company Name, if applicable

Arkansas Supportive Housing Network, Inc

Name and Title of Contact at Project                  Sandra R. Wilson, Executive Director
Sponsor Agency
Email Address                                         swilson@ashn.org

Business Address                                      PO Box 165858 – Mailing
                                                      501 Maple Street
City, County, State, Zip,                             Little Rock                        Pulaski                               Arkansas         72216
                                                      North Little Rock                                                                         72114
                                                      (501) 372-5543                                               Fax Number (with area code)
Phone Number (with area codes)
                                                                                                                   (501) 372-5457
Employer Identification Number (EIN) or               71-0728687                                                   DUN & Bradstreet Number (DUNs) if applicable
Tax Identification Number (TIN)
                                                                                                                   023206613
Congressional District of Business Location           Two, Three, Four
of Sponsor
Congressional District(s) of Primary Service          Two, Three, Four
Area(s)
                                                      District 2 –72201, 72202, 72204, 72205, 72206, 72207, 72209, 72210, 72211, 72212, 72223, 72227,
Zip Code(s) of Primary Service Area(s)                72113, 72114, 72116, 72117, 72118, 72120, 72198, 72199
                                                      District 3 – 72712, 72701, 72703, 72703, 72744, 72756, 72764, 72837, 72901, 72903
                                                      District 4 – 71753, 71601, 71603, 71655, 71730, 71753, 71901, 71913, 72104, 72150
                                                      District 2 – Conway, Little Rock, North Little Rock           District 2 - Faulkner, Pulaski

City(ies) and County(ies) of Primary Service          District 3 – Bentonville, Dover, Fayetteville, Fort Smith,    District 3 – Benton, Pope, Sebastian, Washington
Area(s)                                               Lincoln, Rogers, Springdale
                                                                                                                    District 4 – Columbia, Drew, Garland, Grant, Hot Spring,
                                                      District 4 – El Dorado, Hot Springs, Magnolia, Malvern,       Jefferson, Union
                                                      Monticello, Pine Bluff, Sheridan
                                                      District 2 - $286,344
Total HOPWA contract amount for this                  District 3 - $146,664
Organization                                          District 4 - $160,632

Organization’s Website Address                                                         Does your organization maintain a waiting list?                  Yes            No

www.ashn.org                                                                           If yes, explain in the narrative section how this list is administered.
Is the sponsor a nonprofit organization?         Yes            No

Please check if yes and a faith-based organization.
Please check if yes and a grassroots organization.




                                                                           38
2. Project Sponsor Information
Project Sponsor Agency Name                                                      Parent Company Name, if applicable

Northeast Arkansas Regional AIDS Network (NARAN)

Name and Title of Contact at Project                  Debbie Biazo, Director
Sponsor Agency
Email Address                                         debbiazo@sbcglobal.net

Business Address                                      2604 East Matthews

City, County, State, Zip,                             Jonesboro                    Craighead                         Arkansas     72401

                                                      (870)931-4448                                      Fax Number (with area code)
Phone Number (with area codes)
                                                                                                         (870) 931-4149
Employer Identification Number (EIN) or               58-2022992                                         DUN & Bradstreet Number (DUNs) if applicable
Tax Identification Number (TIN)
                                                                                                         849660402
Congressional District of Business Location           One
of Sponsor
Congressional District(s) of Primary Service          One
Area(s)
Zip Code(s) of Primary Service Area(s)                72021, 72046, 72315, 72324, 72390, 72401, 72432, 72450,72642

City(ies) and County(ies) of Primary Service          Blytheville, Brinkley, Cherry Valley, England,      Baxter, Craighead, Cross, Greene, Lonoke,
Area(s)                                               Harrisburg, Jonesboro, Lake View, Paragould,        Mississippi, Monroe, Phillips, Poinsett
                                                      West Helena
Total HOPWA contract amount for this                  $104,760.00
Organization
Organization’s Website Address                                                   Does your organization maintain a waiting list?          Yes         No

NA                                                                               If yes, explain in the narrative section how this list is administered.
Is the sponsor a nonprofit organization?           Yes            No

Please check if yes and a faith-based organization.
Please check if yes and a grassroots organization.




                                                                           39
Grantee and Community Overview

The Arkansas Department of Health, HIV/STD/Hepatitis C Section administers the HOPWA Program for the State of Arkansas.

Geography
Service areas are divided according to Arkansas’ four (4) US Congressional Districts. Arkansas provides services for all

counties with the exception of Crittenden, which is part of the Memphis Eligible Metropolitan Statistical Area (EMSA). A map

of Arkansas’ Congressional Districts can be found using the following URL:

www.nationalatlas.gov/printable/congress.html#list.


Funding
Funding for Arkansas’ four (4) US Congressional Districts was compiled using the most current epidemiological data that

showed the number of living HIV/AIDS cases in each county. The total number of cases by county was compiled for each

district; consequently, each district received a corresponding percentage of HOPWA funds.


Project Sponsors
Project Sponsors for the Program Year were as follows:
     District One – Northeast Arkansas Regional AIDS Network (NARAN)
     District Two – Arkansas Supportive Housing Network (ASHN)
     District Three – Arkansas Supportive Housing Network (ASHN)
     District Four – Arkansas Supportive Housing Network (ASHN)
Description of Services
HOPWA funds were used by the State for the following purposes:

        Administration for Grantee – three percent (3%).

Administration for Project Sponsors – seven percent (7%) allowable for administrative costs including costs for general

management, oversight, coordination, evaluation, and reporting on eligible activities

        Supportive Services – services that provide housing case management, assessment, utility and housing deposits, and

         first months’ rent.

        Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) – a housing subsidy that provides for use on the open rental market. The

         tenant holds a lease with a private landlord for a unit that is rented at or under the Fair Market Rent and that meets

         Housing Quality/Habitability Standards. The assistance must be used for any individual or family whose income does

         not exceed eighty percent (80%) of the median income for the area as determined by HUD.

        Short-Term Rent, Mortgage, and Utility Assistance (STRMU) – a housing subsidy that strives to prevent homelessness

         of mortgagor or renters in their current place of residence. Grantees may provide assistance for rent, mortgage, or

         utilities for a period of twenty-one (21) weeks in any fifty-two (52) week period.




                                                         40
Annual Performance under this Action Plan

This section discusses how HOPWA funds were allocated and the projects that were funded during the 2006 program year in

which Arkansas administered the grant.



Allocation of Funds

In order to ensure statewide access to HOPWA funds, funding for Arkansas’ four (4) US Congressional Districts was compiled

using the most current epidemiological data that showed the number of living HIV/AIDS cases in each county. The total number

of cases by county was compiled for each district; consequently, each district received a corresponding percentage of HOPWA

funds.


District                                       Counties                                                  Formula
                                                                                                         Allocation
District 1 – Northeast Arkansas Regional       Arkansas, Baxter, Clay, Cleburne, Craighead, Cross,       $104,760
AIDS Network (NARAN)                           Fulton, Greene, Independence, Izard, Jackson,
                                               Lawrence, Lee, Lonoke, Mississippi, Monroe,
                                               Phillips, Poinsett, Prairie, Randolph, Searcy, Sharp,
                                               St. Francis, Stone, Woodruff
District 2 – Arkansas Supportive Housing       Conway, Faulkner, Perry, Pulaski, Saline, Van             $286,344
Network (ASHN)                                 Buren, White, Yell
District 3 – Arkansas Supportive Housing       Benton, Boone, Carroll, Crawford, Franklin,               $146,664
Network (ASHN)                                 Johnson, Madison, Marion, Newton, Pope,
                                               Sebastian, Washington
District 4 – Arkansas Supportive Housing       Ashley, Bradley, Calhoun, Chicot, Clark, Cleveland,       $160,632
Network (ASHN)                                 Columbia, Dallas, Desha, Drew, Garland, Grant,
                                               Hempstead, Hot Spring, Howard, Jefferson,
                                               Lafayette, Lincoln, Little River, Logan, Miller,
                                               Montgomery, Nevada, Ouachita, Pike, Polk, Scott,
                                               Sevier, Union

The philosophy of the action plan emphasized the creation and perpetuation of housing options aimed at meeting the needs of

persons living with HIV/AIDS throughout the course of the disease. The action plan included housing assistance as well as

supportive services necessary to keep people in their current residences.


Program Priorities: The Annual Plan for July 1, 2007, through June 30, 2008, established the following priorities for HOPWA:


Goal 1:           Provide housing assistance and appropriate supportive services to enable low-income, HIV-positive

                  individuals to remain in their homes and to reduce their risks of homelessness.

Objective 1:      Provide tenant-based rental assistance (TBRA).

Outcome:          Housing stability.

                  Outcome Statement:                Establish and/or better maintain a stable living environment in

                                                    housing that is safe, decent, affordable, and sanitary.


                                                          41
               Performance Indicator:           Provide funding to maintain or increase assistance to one hundred

                                                (100) households utilizing tenant-based rental assistance (TBRA).

               Actual Accomplishments:          HOPWA maintained or increased assistance to one hundred

                                                twelve (112) households utilizing tenant-based rental assistance

                                                (TBRA). This was an increase of twelve (12) households over

                                                the estimated number in the annual plan.



Objective 2:   Provide short-term rent, mortgage, and utility assistance (STRMU).

Outcome:       Housing stability.

               Outcome Statement:               Establish and/or better maintain a stable living environment in

                                                housing that is safe, decent, affordable, and sanitary.

               Performance Indicator:           Provide funding to maintain or increase assistance to one hundred

                                                (100) households accessing short-term rent, mortgage, and utility

                                                assistance (STRMU) for some portion of the permitted twenty-

                                                one (21) week period.

               Actual Accomplishments:          HOPWA maintained or increased assistance to eighty-eight (88)

                                                households accessing short-term rent, mortgage, and utility

                                                assistance (STRMU) for some portion of the permitted twenty-

                                                one (21) week period. This was a decrease of twelve (12)

                                                households from the estimated number in the annual plan.




Goal 2:        Improve access to health care and other supportive services for HIV-positive individuals and their

               families.

Objective 1:   Provide support in conjunction with HOPWA-funded housing assistance.

Outcome:       Access to health care and support.

               Outcome Statement:               Improve access to health care and other supportive services.

               Performance Indicator:           To make available approximately $200,000 to provide service

                                                coordination to assist clients with obtaining housing, to

                                                coordinate a long-term plan to allow clients to remain in housing,

                                                and to coordinate complimentary supportive services.

                                                     42
                 Actual Accomplishments:           HOPWA made available approximately $195,563 to provide

                                                   service coordination to assist clients with obtaining housing, to

                                                   coordinate a long-term plan to allow clients to remain in housing,

                                                   and to coordinate complimentary supportive services. This is a

                                                   decrease of $4,437 from the estimated number in the annual plan.


Other Resources
Consortia Care of Arkansas used funds through the Ryan White CARE Act, Part B Program to provide other health care services

needed by persons living with HIV/AIDS. Those services included non-medical case management, laboratory monitoring,

mental health treatment coordination, substance abuse treatment coordination, transportation, and nutritional supplements.

Additionally, the Arkansas AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) provided medications listed on the formulary, which were

distributed statewide by a centralized pharmacy to eligible Ryan White individuals.


ASHN uses funds provided through HUD’s Shelter Plus Care and cash to leverage HOPWA. The total amount made available

to the HOPWA program participants was $240,000.


NARAN uses funds provided through HUD’s CDBG and Ryan White CARE Act, Part B funds to leverage HOPWA. The total

amount made available to the HOPWA program participants was $13,490.


Collaborative Efforts
The State Office will continue to work with its project sponsors and Ryan White CARE Act, Part B Program service providers to

ensure that HOPWA clients receive the appropriate housing, support, and healthcare services they need. The State Office

participates in the Central Arkansas Team Care for the Homeless (CATCH) continuum of care and the State Interagency Council

on Homeless by request of Little Rock HUD Field Office.



The project sponsors are members of their local continuum of care. NARAN is a member of the Northeast Arkansas Continuum

of Care, which has applied for and is waiting on notification for a HOPWA Competitive grant. ASHN is a member of Central

Arkansas Team Care for the Homeless (CATCH) continuum of care and the State Interagency Council on Homeless.


Barriers or Trends Overview

State Level
ADH faced a number of administrative barriers in its management of the HOPWA state formula program during 2007. The three

percent (3%) allowable administrative cost for HOPWA grantees is insufficient to support the administrative needs of the

project. With a 2007 grant amount of $720,000, ADH was allowed $21,600 for administrative costs, which was insufficient to

fund even one full-time position in the HIV/STD/Hepatitis C Section.
                                                        43
As HIV/AIDS becomes more of a chronic disease, clients are living longer; therefore, clients require assistance for longer

periods of time. The waiting list continues to grow as the available slots are reduced because of limited funding. The Program

will continue to strive to manage the waiting list as effectively and efficiently as possible to move people onto the Program or

into alternative forms of housing.



   HOPWA/HUD Regulations            Planning                   Housing Availability   Rent Determination and Fair Market Rents
   Discrimination/Confidentiality   Multiple Diagnoses         Eligibility            Technical Assistance or Training
   Supportive Services              Credit History             Rental History         Criminal Justice History
   Housing Affordability            Other, please explain further

Project Sponsors
Project Sponsors indicated the following barriers:

         Housing Affordability – Arkansas is experiencing a glut of expensive housing and a lack of affordable housing. Project

          Sponsors are working with legislators to prepare a state housing trust fund to establish affordable housing in Arkansas.

         Multiple Diagnoses – Many clients have multiple diagnoses which create and require additional and/or multiple services

          that maybe outside the normal HOPWA channels. Project Sponsors will continue to partner with other Social Services

          Agencies to assist the client with their needs.

         Credit History – Available decent, safe, and affordable housing stock has decreased due to strict rental application

          requirements by landlords. Project Sponsors will continue to build relationships with landlords that are willing to assist

          our clientele and closely monitor the situation to address needs as they arise.

         Housing Availability – There is a shortage of decent, safe, and affordable housing that is more prevalent in the Delta

          Counties. Project Sponsors will continue to work with landlords in the area to locate housing.

         Rent Determination and Fair Market Rents – For clients on fixed income that are required to pay a portion of rent,

          clients are having difficulty keeping up with utilities, etc. due to rising costs.

         Technical Assistance or Training – Project Sponsors are requesting access to the Electronic Income Verification

          Program (EIV) utilized by Housing Authorities to verify income. Training in the area of proper housing inspections

          would be appreciated. Project Sponsors ability to access the EIV program would allow another avenue of checks and

          balances for income verification and in turn less chance of fraud. Training on proper inspections has been requested at

          the local level.

         Criminal Justice History – Available decent, safe, and affordable housing stock has decreased due to strict rental

          application requirements by landlords. Project Sponsors will continue to build relationships with landlords that are

          willing to assist our clientele and closely monitor the situation to address needs as they arise.




                                                                    44
            Other – Additional collaboration effort between agencies providing HOPWA and local housing authorities within their

             service areas. Some LHA’s are not aware of HOPWA and it is hard to obtain needed documents such as utility

             allowance charts. Project Sponsors will continue to educate partners about HOPWA.


Trends for the Next Five to Ten Years
HIV/AIDS epidemic trends indicate that over the next five to ten years there will be an urgent need for more affordable housing

on a long-term basis, particularly housing in areas that provide a safe, healthy environment for families or women with children.


D. Unmet Housing Needs: An Assessment of Unmet Housing Needs

1. Assessment of Unmet Need for HOPWA-eligible Households

1. Total number of households that have unmet housing needs                                            = 92


          From Item 1, identify the number of households with unmet housing needs by type of housing assistance
 a. Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (TBRA)                                                              = 50


 b. Short-Term Rent, Mortgage and Utility payments                                                     = 42
(STRMU)
 c. Housing Facilities, such as community residences, SRO                                               = 0
    dwellings, other housing facilities




                            2. Recommended Data Sources for Assessing Unmet Need (check all sources used)
  X       = Data as reported in the area Consolidated Plan, e.g. Table 1B, CPMP charts, and related narratives

          = Data established by area HIV/AIDS housing planning and coordination efforts, e.g. Continuum of Care
X = Data from client information provided in Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS)

X = Data from project sponsors or housing providers, including waiting lists for assistance or other assessments on need

          = Data from prisons or jails on persons being discharged with HIV/AIDS, if mandatory testing is conducted
          = Data from local Ryan White Planning Councils or reported in CARE Act Data Reports, e.g. number of clients with permane nt
            housing
          = Data collected for HIV/AIDS surveillance reporting or other health assessments, e.g. local health department or CDC surveillance data




                                                                        45
                                                         PART 2: Sources of Leveraging

                                                                  Total Amount of Leveraged Dollars (for this operating year)
[1] Sources of Leveraging
                                                                   [2] Housing Assistance            [3] Supportive Services and
                                                                                                    other non-direct housing costs
                                                                            =                                   =
1.   Program Income
                                                                            =                                   =
2.   Federal government (please specify):
                                                                          = 249,485.00                          =
     Shelter Plus Care Grant
                                                                           = 5,012.93                           =
     CDBG
                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =
3.   State government (please specify)
                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =
4.   Local government (please specify)
                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =
5.   Foundations and other private cash resources (please
     specify)
                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =

                                                                            =                                   =
6.   In-kind Resources
                                                                            =                                   =
7.   Resident rent payments in Rental, Facilities, and
     Leased Units
                                                                            =                                   =
8.   Grantee/project sponsor (Agency) cash
                                                                          = 254,497.93                          =
9.   TOTAL (Sum of 1-7)




                                                                 46
                             PART 3: Accomplishment Data - Planned Goal and Actual Outputs
1. HOPWA Performance Planned Goal and Actual Outputs
                                                                                                                    Output Households
                                                                                                                                                                               Funding
                                                                                                       HOPWA Assistance                     Non-HOPWA
                                HOPWA Performance
                                   Planned Goal                                                              a.               b.            c.          d.                e.                f.

                                    and Actual




                                                                                                                                                                               HOPWA




                                                                                                                                                                                            HOPWA
                                                                                                                                   Actual




                                                                                                                                                             Actual



                                                                                                                                                                               Budget




                                                                                                                                                                                            Actual
                                                                                                                  Goal




                                                                                                                                                 Goal
     Housing Subsidy Assistance                                                                              Output Households
1.   Tenant-Based Rental Assistance                                                                                                                                                     23,718
                                                                                                       100               112                                          364,508
2a. Households in permanent housing facilities that receive operating subsidies/leased units
2b. Households in transitional/short-term housing facilities that receive operating subsidies/leased
    units
3a. Households in permanent housing facilities developed with capital funds and placed in service
    during the program year
3b. Households in transitional/short-term housing facilities developed with capital funds and
    placed in service during the program year
4. Short-Term Rent, Mortgage and Utility Assistance
                                                                                                       100               88                                           69,842            61,556
5.   Adjustments for duplication (subtract)
                                                                                                                         6
6.   Total Housing Subsidy Assistance
                                                                                                       200               194                                          434,350           385,274
     Housing Development (Construction and Stewardship of facility based housing)
                                                                                                             Output Units
7.   Facility-based units being developed with capital funding but not opened (show units of
     housing planned)

8.   Stewardship Units subject to 3 or 10 year use agreements


9    Total Housing Developed

     Supportive Services                                                                                     Output Households

10a. Supportive Services provided by project sponsors also delivering HOPWA housing
     assistance                                                                                  100                     136                                          195,563           144,879
10b. Supportive Services provided by project sponsors serving households who have other housing
     arrangements                                                                               0                        67                                           0                 68,895
11. Adjustment for duplication (subtract)
12. Total Supportive Services
                                                                                                       100               203                                          195,563           213,774
     Housing Placement Assistance Activities
13. Housing Information Services
14. Permanent Housing Placement Services                                                                                                                                                15,291
                                                                                                       25                30                                           20,601
15. Adjustment for duplication
16. Total Housing Placement Assistance                                                                 25                30                                           20,601            15,291
     Grant Administration and Other Activities
17. Resource Identification to establish, coordinate and develop housing assistance resources
18. Technical Assistance (if approved in grant agreement)
19. Grantee Administration (maximum 3% of total HOPWA grant)

20. Project Sponsor Administration (maximum 7% of portion of HOPWA grant awarded)
                                                                                                                                                                      48,886            38,826
     Total Expenditures for program year (Sum of rows 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20)
                                                                                                                                                                      699,400 653,166




                                                                       47
2. Listing of Supportive Services

                    Supportive Services                        Number of Households Receiving   Amount of HOPWA Funds Expended
                                                                   HOPWA Assistance

1.    Adult day care and personal assistance

2.    Alcohol and drug abuse services
                                                                            205                            205,055.92
      Case management/client advocacy/ access to benefits
3.    & services
4.    Child care and other child services
5.    Education

6.    Employment assistance and training

      Health/medical/intensive care services, if approved
7.    Note: Client records must conform with 24 CFR §574.310

8.    Legal services

9.    Life skills management (outside of case management)
10.   Meals/nutritional services
11.   Mental health services

12.   Outreach
                                                                            157                             8,718.24
13.   Transportation

      Other Activity (if approved in grant agreement).
14.   Specify:

15.   Adjustment for Duplication (subtract)
                                                                            205                            213,774.16
      TOTAL Households receiving Supportive Services
16.   (unduplicated)




                                                               48
                                       Part 4: Summary of Performance Outcomes

          HOPWA Long-term Performance Objective: Eighty percent of HOPWA clients will maintain housing

          stability, avoid homelessness, and access care each year through 2011.



Section 1. Housing Stability: Assessment of Client Outcomes on Maintaining Housing Stability (Permanent Housing and

Related Facilities)

  [A] Permanent             [1] Total Number of     [2] Assessment: Number of            [3] Assessment: Number of
Housing Assistance         Households Receiving   Households Continuing with this          Exited Households and
                            Housing Assistance    Housing (per plan or expectation             Housing Status
                                                           for next year)
                                                                                      1 Emergency Shelter/Streets   =

                                                                                      2 Temporary Housing           = 1

                                                                                      3 Private Housing             = 30

                                                                                      4 Other HOPWA                 =
 Tenant-Based Rental               = 112                                   = 69
     Assistance                                                                       5 Other Subsidy               = 3

                                                                                      6 Institution                 = 2

                                                                                      7 Jail/Prison                 = 2

                                                                                      8 Disconnected/Unknown        = 4

                                                                                      9 Death                       = 1

                                                                                      1 Emergency Shelter/Streets   =

                                                                                      2 Temporary Housing           =

                                                                                      3 Private Housing             =

                                                                                      4 Other HOPWA                 =
Permanent Supportive              =                                    =
Housing Facilities/Units                                                              5 Other Subsidy               =

                                                                                      6 Institution                 =

                                                                                      7 Jail/Prison                 =

                                                                                      8 Disconnected/Unknown        =

                                                                                      9 Death                       =


 [B] Transitional           [1] Total Number of      [2] Of the Total Number of          [3] Assessment: Number of
Housing Assistance         Households Receiving     Households Receiving Housing           Exited Households and
                            Housing Assistance      Assistance this Operating Year             Housing Status
                                                                                      1 Emergency Shelter/Streets   =
                                                  Total number of
                                                  households that will                2 Temporary Housing           =
                                                                                  =
                                                  continue in                         3 Private Housing             =
Transitional/Short-Term                           residences:
      Supportive                                                                      4 Other HOPWA                 =
    Facilities/Units              =                                                   5 Other Subsidy               =
                                                                                  =
                                                                                      6 Institution                 =
                                                  Total number of
                                                  households whose                    7 Jail/Prison                 =
                                                  tenure exceeded 24
                                                  months:                             8 Disconnected/unknown        =

                                                                                      9 Death                       =




                                                      49
Section 2. Prevention of Homelessness: Assessment of Client Outcomes on Reduced Risks of Homelessness
(Short-Term Housing Assistance)

Assessment of Households receiving STRMU Assistance
 [1] STRMU Housing                  [2] Assessment of Housing Status                                          [3] HOPWA Client Outcomes
      Assistance
                             Maintain Private Housing without subsidy (e.g. Assistance
                             provided/completed and client is stable, not likely to seek      = 17
                             additional support)

                             Other Private Housing without subsidy                            =0              Stable/Permanent Housing (PH)
                             Other HOPWA support (PH)                                         =6

                             Other housing subsidy (PH)                                       =2

                             Institution (e.g. residential and long-term care)
                                                                                               =0


            = 88             Likely to maintain current housing arrangements, with
                             additional STRMU assistance                                       = 55
                                                                                                                 Temporarily Stable, with
                             Transitional Facilities/Short-term (e.g. temporary or transitional                Reduced Risk of Homelessness
                             arrangement)                                                       =2

                             Temporary/non-permanent Housing arrangement (e.g. gave up
                             lease, and moved in with family or friends but expects to live    =5
                             there less than 90 days)

                             Emergency Shelter/street                                          =0                  Unstable Arrangements
                             Jail/Prison                                                       =0

                             Disconnected                                                      =1


                             Death                                                             =0                           Life Event
 1a. Total number of households that received STRMU assistance in the prior operating year that also received STRMU           = 34
 assistance in the current operating year.

 1b. Total number of those households that received STRMU assistance in the two (2 years ago) prior operating years that also = 21
 received STRMU assistance in the current operating year.




                                                                     50
Section 3. HOPWA Outcomes on Access to Care and Support

1A. Status of Households Accessing Care and Support by Project Sponsors delivering HOPWA Housing Assistance/Housing
                                             Placement/Case Management

                    Categories of Services Accessed                                   Households Receiving Housing          Outcome
                                                                                   Assistance within the Operating Year     Indicator
1. Has a housing plan for maintaining or establishing stable on-going housing.                     136                      Support for
                                                                                                                          Stable Housing
2. Has contact with case manager/benefits counselor consistent with the schedule                   136                       Access to
specified in client’s individual service plan.                                                                               Support
3. Had contact with a primary health care provider consistent with the schedule                    122                       Access to
specified in client’s individual service plan,                                                                             Health Care

4. Has accessed and can maintain medical insurance/assistance.                                     111                      Access to
                                                                                                                           Health Care

5. Successfully accessed or maintained qualification for sources of income.                        106                      Sources of
                                                                                                                             Income



                                               1B. Number of Households Obtaining Employment

                    Categories of Services Accessed                                    Number of Households that           Outcome
                                                                                         Obtained Employment               Indicator
Total number of households that obtained an income-producing job                                   19                      Sources of
                                                                                                                            Income




                                                                      51
2A. Status of Households Accessing Care and Support through HOPWA-funded Services receiving
Housing Assistance from Other Sources

                      Categories of Services Accessed                                     Households Receiving HOPWA             Outcome
                                                                                        Assistance within the Operating Year     Indicator
1. Has a housing plan for maintaining or establishing stable on-going housing.                          158                      Support for
                                                                                                                               Stable Housing
2. Successfully accessed or maintained qualification for sources of income.                             154                      Sources of
                                                                                                                                   Income
3. Had contact with a primary health care provider consistent with the schedule                         126                       Access to
specified in clients individual service plan.                                                                                   Health Care

4. Has accessed and can maintain medical insurance/assistance.                                          107                      Access to
                                                                                                                                Health Care

5. Has contact with case manager, benefits counselor, or housing counselor                               96                      Access to
consistent with the schedule specified in client’s individual service plan.                                                      Support


                                               2B. Number of Households Obtaining Employment

                      Categories of Services Accessed                                        Number of Households that           Outcome
                                                                                               Obtained Employment               Indicator
Total number of households that obtained an income-producing job                                          0                      Sources of
                                                                                                                                  Income


PART 5: Worksheet - Determining Housing Stability Outcomes
1. This chart is designed to assess program results based on the information reported in Part 4.
 Permanent                    Stable Housing                          Temporary Housing                         Unstable     Life Event
 Housing                     (# of households                                (2)                              Arrangements       (9)
 Assistance                remaining in program                                                                (1+7+8=#)
                             plus 3+4+5+6=#)
 Tenant-Based                      104                                             1                               6             1
 Rental Assistance
 (TBRA)
 Permanent Facility-
 based Housing
 Assistance/Units
 Transitional/Short-
 Term Facility-based
 Housing
 Assistance/Units
 Total Permanent                   104                                             1                               6             1
 HOPWA Housing
 Assistance
 Reduced Risk of            Stable/Permanent               Temporarily Stable, with Reduced Risk of             Unstable     Life Events
 Homelessness:                   Housing                                Homelessness                          Arrangements
 Short-Term
 Assistance
 Short-Term Rent,                  113                                            150                              1             0
 Mortgage, and
 Utility Assistance
 (STRMU)
 Total HOPWA                       113                                            150                              1             0
 Housing
 Assistance




                                                                      52
Arkansas Development Finance Authority Programs


  Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program

  ADFA administers the federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program for the state. The

  program allows owners and developers of multi-family housing that is to be rented to families

  whose income is not greater than 60% of the area median, to apply for federal tax credits.

  Developers receiving tax credits sell them to corporations that use them to offset federal income

  tax liability. During 2007, ADFA authorized credits totaling $7,600,283 which when combined

  with the HOME set aside and the state tax credits, created 992 affordable, safe, decent

  apartments for low income families.



  Table 19: Low Income Housing Tax Credit Information

                   Number        Amount of
                   Of Units      Tax Credit
  LIHTC 2007         992          7,600,283


  Tax-Exempt Multi-Family Housing Bonds

  ADFA provides below market interest rate mortgages to private developers who agree to set

  rents that are affordable to low to moderate-income families. In calendar year 2007, ADFA used

  the multi-family housing bonds to finance construction of five affordable, safe, decent

  apartments for low income families.



  Table 20: Tax-Exempt Multi-Family Housing Bonds

                   Number        Amount of
                   of Units      Bonds
  TEMFH Bonds         259        12,041,000


                                              53
Single-Family Mortgage Revenue Bond (MRB) Program

The MRB Program was created in 1977 to assist primarily the low to moderate-income first-time

homebuyers to purchase homes by offering below market interest rate, 30-year mortgages.

ADFA does not originate the loans directly to homebuyers; rather, loans are originated by

participating lenders throughout the state. During the 2007fiscal year, ADFA made 1,443 MRB

loans totaling $132,087,365 with an average loan amount of $91,536.64.



Table 21: Mortgage Revenue Bond Program Information for 2007

MRB Summary for FY 2007
Total Mortgages Financed                1,443
Total Amount                     $132,087,365.00
Average Mortgage Size                  91,536.64


Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing

As lead state agency for the Consolidated Plan, AEDC adopted goals and programs to

affirmatively further fair housing and specifically to address impediments to fair housing in

Arkansas.   In addition to providing orientation and technical assistance to applicants and

grantees, AEDC monitors 100% of grantees for compliance with fair housing requirements.

AEDC makes planned site visits, reviews project records, and during the monitoring visit

identifies compliance issues or related problems and AEDC follow up with a detail review. An

exit interview is conducted with the grantee and administrator as available, and the results of the

compliance review are presented in writing to the grantee. Any follow up actions unresolved

will be addressed in the monitoring letter. At the completion of the prescribed time period,

AEDC reviews progress and take appropriate action.




                                            54
ADFA is continually addresses impediments identified in the State’s Analysis of Impediments

(A/I) through its various housing programs. In the area of real estate impediments, the lack of

homebuyer education and counseling programs was identified.            Currently, there are 24

organizations across the state providing homebuyer education courses as part of ADFA’s

HomeToOwn Program and the American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI).                   ADFA

requires each buyer that receives ADDI assistance to attend an eight hour homebuyer education

course. In the area of socioeconomic impediments, lack of decent, safe, and sanitary housing

and cost burden of housing were identified. Remedial actions included developing infill housing

to rebuild older neighborhoods.   A major activity that ADFA undertakes as part of the HOME

Program is homeowner rehabilitation. As noted in this performance report, ADFA allocated

22% of its HOME Funds for homeowner rehabilitation, which included reconstructed units in

older neighborhoods. Secondly, in regards to the cost burden of housing, a remedial action

recommended in the A/I included working with developers to provide lower cost housing.

ADFA provides funding to developers in the form of mortgage subsidies to lower the acquisition

costs of housing.      ADFA continues to fund Tenant-Based Rental Assistance to areas to

supplement their Section 8 vouchers and to communities that lack rental assistance to address the

housing cost burden.



Arkansas Fair Housing Commission
As part of the efforts to address impediments identified in the States Analysis of Impediments,
the Arkansas Fair Housing Commission was identified to develop education materials to increase
public awareness of fair housing issues. During the program year, the Arkansas Fair Housing
Commission developed a brochure explaining fair housing, including mortgage violations,
housing violations, and the complaint process. The information published by the State Fair
Housing Commission is also accessible via their website at www.arkansasfairhousing.com.



                                           55
Monitoring
The Arkansas Development Finance Authority (“ADFA”) Compliance Monitoring staff
members monitor multi-family rental projects, homeowner rehabilitation, homebuyer down
payment assistance, Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (“TBRA”), acquisition or rehabilitation of
rental housing, new construction of rental housing or any other approved use of HOME funds on
an annual monitoring schedule as required by the HOME Program. ADFA’s stated purpose of
monitoring is to ensure that housing and housing-related services are delivered in accordance
with all HOME Program requirements.              During 2007 Program Year, ADFA monitored
approximately 1,400 units.



Following is the monitoring schedule ADFA utilizes in accordance with HOME Program
regulations:

                             Property Inspection Schedule

                         Every three (3) years for projects with 1 – 4 units
                         Every two (2) years for projects with 5 – 25 units
                         Annually for projects with 26 or more units



During the period of affordability, the Compliance Monitoring staff members closely monitor
program records, Fair Housing compliance, tenant files, and housing quality standards. Staff
members also review the annual Rental Project Compliance Report and the annual Homebuyer
and Homeowner Compliance Status Report. By comparing the data on the annual reports to the
documentation in the files, ADFA staff members ensure that rent and occupancy requirements
are satisfied; that rental units are affordable to low-income and very low-income residents; that
real estate taxes and homeowners insurance premiums are paid, and that units are safe, decent
and sanitary.



C. HOUSEHOLDS AND PERSONS ASSISTED (Affordable Housing Activities)

Table 22 assimilates housing assistance information and estimates the total number of

households and persons assisted by income group and tenure type during the reporting period.


                                            56
Table 22: Households and Persons Assisted by Affordable Housing Programs

Income Groups                                      Total        Homeless
& Programs              Renters    Homeowners      Households   Persons        Grand Total
0 to 30% of MFI
  HOME TBRA                  65         0                65          0                65
  HOME Rental              155          0               155          0               155
  HOME Homeowner             0          52               52          0                52
  ESG                        0          0                 0      15,589           15,589
  DOE/WAP                  348         877            1,225          0             1,225
  Shelter Plus Care        302        N/A               302         302              302
  HOPWA                    112          88              200           0              200
  LIHTC                     64           0               64           0               64
Subtotal                 1,046       1,017            2,063      16,055           17,816
31% to 50% MFI
  HOME TBRA                27           0                27                0         27
  HOME Rental              88           0                88                0         88
  HOME Homeowner            0           80               80                0         80
  LIHTC                    47           0                47                0         47
Subtotal                  162           80              242                0        242
51% to 60% MFI
HOME TBRA                    1           0                1                0           1
HOME Rental                 66           0               66                0          66
HOME Homeowner               0          54               54                0          54
LIHTC                      881           0              881                0         881
Subtotal                   948          54             1002                0       1,002
61% to 80% MFI
HOME TBRA                     3         0                  3               0          3
HOME Rental                  10         0                10                0         10
HOME Homeowner                0       114               114                0        114
LIHTC                         0         0                 0                0          0
Subtotal                     13       114               127                0        127
Total Housing
Assistance Activities
HOME TBRA                   96            0              96            0             96
HOME Rental                319            0             319            0            319
HOME Homeowner               0          300             300            0            300
ESG                          0            0               0       15,589         15,589
DOE/WAP                    348          877           1,225            0          1,225
Shelter Plus Care             0        N/A                0            0             0
HOPWA                      112          88              200            0           200
LIHTC                       992          0              992            0           992
Multi-Family Bonds          259          0              259            0           259
MRB                          0       1,443            1,443            0         1,443
Grand Total              2,428       2,708            5,136       16,055        20,889


                                        57
D. CONSOLIDATED PLAN AFFORDABLE HOUSING GOALS

In its Consolidated Plan, Arkansas articulated several long-term goals and objectives for

increasing the supply of affordable housing in the state. This section of the CAPER reviews

those goals, objectives and priorities and comments on how they were addressed by the state

during the short-term reporting period.



      Geographic Priorities.      Higher ratings were given to counties with racial and low

       income concentrations; and housing resource agencies were encouraged to develop more

       affordable housing resources in counties with proportionately less subsidized rental

       housing.



               CDBG Program. All of the CDBG program funds were allocated to projects that

               benefit low and moderate-income families. A complete list of CDBG project

               allocations for FY 2007 is presented in Table 3, and Table 4 provides information

               on the number of CDBG beneficiaries, including low and moderate-income

               families, minorities, elderly and persons with disabilities.



               HOME Program.           Approximately 100% of HOME Program funds were

               allocated to geographic areas initially targeted by the Consolidated Plan. In

               addition, 68% of HOME Program funds were allocated to projects in high growth

               counties. The numbers do not add to 100% because some counties may be

               included in more than one category and projects are also funded in counties that




                                             58
do not meet any of the geographic priorities. See Appendix 2 for a full list of

projects funded by the HOME Program during the reporting period.

52% funded in counties with high concentrations of minorities and/or low income

families, including 32% of HOME funds allocated to projects in Entitlement

Cities.



16% funded in counties in Difficult Development areas;



48% funded in counties with higher than 10% population gain; and



20% funded in counties with between 5% and 10% population gain.



Emergency Shelter Grants Program.             All ESG Program funds go to

organizations that serve homeless individuals and families. Appendix 3 provides

a complete list of ESG subgrantees for the reporting period. The ESG Program

does not follow specifically the geographic targeting approach articulated in the

Consolidated Plan.    However, most of the homeless shelters are located in

counties with high proportions of minorities and low income families.



HOPWA Program.          The HOPWA program funds are allocated to regional

organizations that provide housing assistance and supportive services to persons

with AIDS/HIV or their families.




                            59
   Housing Assistance Activity Types.

          Rehabilitation.     Approximately 22% of HOME funds were allocated for

          homeowner housing rehabilitation, and about 28% of HOME funds were

          allocated for rental housing rehabilitation projects in the 2007 program year.



          New Construction.       Approximately 14% of HOME program funds were

          allocated to construct new affordable homes, and about 24% were allocated to

          construct new affordable rental housing in the 2007 program year.



          Rental Assistance. Approximately 9% of HOME program funds were allocated

          for Tenant- Based Rental Assistance, providing housing for 415 families during

          the program year.



          Homebuyers Assistance. Approximately 7% of HOME program funds were

          allocated to provide mortgage subsidies, ADDI, and HOME Downpayment

          Assistance loans.



          Supported Housing. Special needs populations are served by affordable housing

          projects funded with HOME program funds and community development projects

          funded with CDBG funds. ESG and HOPWA funds benefit directly persons with

          special needs. During the 2007 Program Year ADFA funded 1 multi-family

          project totaling 10 HOME-assisted units, which addressed special needs tenants in

          Forrest City. The organizations funded was St. Francis Assisted Living. ADFA




                                       60
           has an ongoing project with four (4) different nonprofit service providers for

           TBRA funds, which assisted tenants with special needs during the program year.



   Type and Size of Household.         The following provides information on affordable

    housing priorities assigned in the Consolidated Plan to income groups, tenure type, and

    size of households and comments on FY 2007 results for each priority.



           Type. Of the 4,834 units of affordable housing provided or developed, 44% were

           rental units (including TBRA) and 56% benefited homeowners.



           Size of Household. Statistics are unavailable to determine the size of households

           benefiting from housing assistance activities.



   Affordable Housing Objectives. The 2007 Consolidated Plan set housing assistance

    objectives to guide the allocation of affordable housing resources during the five-year

    period. The following table provides the housing objectives and the results realized

    during the reporting period.




                                        61
Table 23: Consolidated Plan Objectives and Reporting Period Results

Assistance Category         Objective(s)                   Actual Results
Homeowner Housing      Allocate approximately 20% of       22% of FY 2007 HOME Program
Rehabilitation         HOME Program funds for              funds were allocated for
                       homeowner rehabilitation.           homeowner housing rehabilitation
                                                           projects.
Rental Housing         Allocate approximately 16% of       28% of FY 2007 HOME Program
Rehabilitation         HOME Program funds for rental       funds were allocated for rental
                       housing rehabilitation.             rehabilitation
New Construction       Allocate approximately 47% of       38% of FY 2007 HOME Program
                       HOME Program funds for new          funds were allocated for new
                       construction                        construction.
New Construction and   Through the LIHTC program           A total of 1,251 units of rental
Rehabilitation         augment the financing of            housing for low income families
(LIHTC)                approximately 1,200 units of        were developed using the LIHTC
                       multi-family rental housing for     program.
                       extremely low and low income
                       households per year.
Homebuyers             Allocate approximately 10% of       7% of FY 2007HOME Program
Assistance             HOME Program funds for              funds were allocated for mortgage
                       homebuyers’ assistance              subsidies, ADDI, and HOME DPA
                       programs. *MRB funds were           loans.
                       used for down payment
                       assistance.
Homebuyers             Through the MRB program’s           The MRB program impacts for FY
Assistance             lower interest rates, assist        2008 were less than projected in the
                       approximately 1,443 families per    long-term plan.
                       year in purchasing affordable
                       single-family housing.
Tenant-Based Rental    Allocate 8% of HOME Program         7% of FY 2007HOME Program
Assistance             funds for tenant based rental       funds were allocated for TBRA.
                       assistance payments.                Additional 2% were allocated to
                                                           serve disabled individuals.
Tenant-Based Rental    Allocate approximately $0per        No funds were allocated in FY
Assistance             year of HOME Program funds for      2007 to Model Projects.
                       special Model projects that offer
                       innovative and comprehensive
                       community renewal strategies
                       addressing affordable housing
                       needs in community and
                       neighborhood revitalization
                       projects.




                                         62
Rental Assistance

The HOME Program Tenant-Based Rental Assistance program has served approximately 3,957

families during the program years from 1992 through 2007. In addition, the HOPWA program

provides tenant-based rental assistance funds each year to approximately 112 households with

HIV/AIDS. And, finally, the Shelter Plus Care program has served about 300 households per

year.



       Rental Assistance Five-Year Goal. State funded or administered affordable housing

        programs will provide tenant based rental assistance services or housing to approximately

        1,750 households during the Consolidated Plan period.



New Construction

Dramatic changes in population and demographic makeup have impacted many Arkansas

communities since 1990. High-growth counties lack the number of subsidized rental housing

units to accommodate the low income families drawn to entry-level jobs. Communities losing

population often lack the resources to address permanent supportive housing needs of elderly and

special needs populations. New construction of affordable housing and permanent supportive

housing will assist these communities impacted by dramatic population change in meeting the

underserved needs of low income families. HOME Program new construction funds are used to

leverage projects financed through the LIHTC program, the Multi-Family Housing Bond

program, and the Rural Development Services Section 515 program. During the 2007 program

year, the HOME, Section 515, LIHTC and Multi-Family bond programs combined to finance or

leverage approximately 1,251 units and a large percentage of these units are new construction.




                                            63
      New Construction Five-Year Goal. The HOME Program will finance about 600 units

       of new construction renter and homeowner units during the Consolidated Plan period.



Rehabilitation

Many small cities in Arkansas have aging older neighborhoods filled with older homes owner by

elderly persons on fixed incomes who lack resources for routine maintenance and improvements.

Thus, housing stock in many communities is deteriorating.        In addition, rental properties

available to persons who qualify for the Section 8 rental assistance program often do not meet

minimum property standards. Therefore, the State will seek to increase and leverage funding for

renter and homeowner rehabilitation programs. The HOME Program provides both renter and

homeowner rehabilitation funds. During the 2007 program year, the HOME Program financed

the rehabilitation of approximately 193 units.



      Rehabilitation Five-Year Goal. The HOME Program will finance rehabilitation of

       approximately 750 owner and rental units during the Consolidated Plan period.



In addition, families purchasing existing properties through the MRB program can include

rehabilitation costs in the mortgage financing for the house. No estimates are available for the

numbers of existing properties that include rehabilitation, which are purchased through the MRB

program.




                                            64
Acquisition

Acquiring existing properties and making them available for low income and special needs

groups is one approach to meeting affordable and supportive housing needs in areas impacted by

dramatic population changes.       In addition, acquisition of existing single room occupancy

properties can be an approach for providing transitional and permanent supportive housing for

homeless individuals.      During the 2007 program year the HOME Program has financed the

acquisition of approximately 40 units of housing utilizing mortgage subsidies. In addition, 159

ADDI loans were approved.



       Acquisition Five-Year Goal. ADFA programs will be used to acquire approximately

        500 units for use by low and moderate-income households.



In addition, the MRB program finances approximately 1,000 home purchases each year. And,

the MRB program finances a first-time homebuyer program that makes down payment assistance

available at low interest rates.



E. OTHER ACTIONS

Housing Assistance Goals to Address Homelessness. The Consolidated Plan established the

following housing assistance goals and priorities to address homelessness.

       Helping low income families avoid becoming homeless;

       Reaching out to homeless persons and assessing their individual needs;

       Addressing the emergency shelter and transitional housing needs of homeless persons;

        and



                                            65
      Helping homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent

       living.



Table 24: Homeless Priority Needs

   Homeless      Priority        Comments on Status
Priority Needs   Need           During the Reporting Period
                 Level
Assessment       High       Mental Health agencies and the Veterans Administration
Outreach                    provide some assessment outreach services. Few other
                            agencies are qualified and equipped to provide assessment
                            outreach services.
Emergency        High       Approximately 100 shelters operate in the state and ESG funds
Shelter                     assist 71of these, serving 15,589 homeless individuals and
                            families.
Transitional     High       Transitional housing resources are very limited and mostly
Housing                     provided through private donations.
Permanent        High       Demand far exceeds the supply of permanent supportive
Supportive                  housing in Arkansas. A few nonprofit organizations sponsor
Housing                     supportive housing for their clientele, but overall supply is
                            very limited.
Permanent        High       Permanent affordable housing for extremely low income
Housing                     families and persons is very limited in Arkansas. Housing
                            providers sponsor and manage very limited housing resources.




PREPARATION OF A NEW FIVE-YEAR CONSOLIDATED PLAN. The Consolidated

Plan Committee guided and directed the preparation of a new Consolidated Plan for the period

2005 through 2009. The governor designated the AEDC as the lead agency for preparation of

the Consolidated Plan. The new plan was completed in May 2005, submitted to HUD and

approved by HUD in July 2005.




                                          66
For FY 2008 the committee incorporated a Performance Measures system designed to satisfy

HUD requirements for accountability. These measures will be reflected in the CAPER for 2007-

2008.



Annual Performance Assessment.         In preparing the Annual Performance and Evaluation

Report for last fiscal year (FY2007), the Consolidated Plan Committee reviewed the

Consolidated Plan of the previous year and attempted to incorporate lessons learned from these

experiences into the new action plan. Comprehensive planning and coordinated use of state and

federal resources at the local level emerged as one of the major areas of emphasis in the new

plan. In addition, state agencies agreed to renew objectives to develop model projects that will

demonstrate effective use of housing, community and economic development resources for

problem solving at the local level.



Welfare Reform Initiatives. The agencies making up the Consolidated Plan Committee also

have representatives involved closely in implementing workforce development initiatives,

including the Transitional Employment Assistance program. The Consolidated Plan emphasizes

economic development, job development and working with community-based organizations to

benefit low income persons seeking training, employment and supportive services.



F. CONCLUSIONS

This Annual Performance Review concludes the following:

       Community and Economic Development Results. Tables 4 and 5 on pages 14 and 15

        indicate the CDBG Program directly benefited 18,300 persons or families, benefiting




                                           67
    12,218 low and moderate-income persons or families for a 67% low and moderate-

    income impact. CDBG funds were invested in high priority public facility and economic

    development projects, consistent with the Consolidated Plan long-term and short-term.



   Housing Assistance Results. Affordable housing programs made a substantial impact

    generating or providing a total of 4,834 units.     Of these, approximately 20% were

    provided through the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program, and approximately 29%

    were financed through the single family Mortgage Revenue Bond program. ESG funded

    no units, HOME funds provided 71% of the units, and the balance were provided through

    the HOPWA program and the DOE/WAP program. This output is in line with the five-

    year Consolidated Plan.



   Special Needs Populations Results.       The ESG program partially funded services and

    facilities for 15,589 homeless individuals and families, and the HOPWA program

    benefited 200 households with tenant-based rental assistance and short-term rent,

    mortgage, and utility assistance. The CDBG program expects to benefit directly 4,766

    elderly persons and 2,284 persons with disabilities. In addition, all special-needs groups

    qualify for and participate in affordable housing programs financed by ADFA.




                                        68
APPENDIX




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