Disc Drive Device Operable With Different Discs That May Exhibit Different Linear Velocities Or Circumferential Recording Densities - Patent 5689482 by Patents-68

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United States Patent: 5689482


































 
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	United States Patent 
	5,689,482



 Iida
 

 
November 18, 1997




 Disc drive device operable with different discs that may exhibit
     different linear velocities or circumferential recording densities



Abstract

An optical disc drive device performs a seek operation during a recording
     and/or reproducing mode on different discs, such as CDs or MDs,
     individually loaded thereon, which may differ from one another in linear
     velocity or circumferential recording density. The linear velocity of a
     disc is calculated as a function of the number of rotations of a disc spin
     motor and position information of the pickup head. The number of tracks
     from a current position of the pickup to a target position is determined
     by using the address of the target position and the linear velocity of the
     disc.


 
Inventors: 
 Iida; Michihiko (Kanagawa, JP) 
 Assignee:


Sony Corporation
 (Tokyo, 
JP)





Appl. No.:
                    
 08/534,658
  
Filed:
                      
  September 27, 1995


Foreign Application Priority Data   
 

Sep 28, 1994
[JP]
6-233097



 



  
Current U.S. Class:
  369/30.1  ; 369/44.28; G9B/11.038; G9B/19.017; G9B/23.091; G9B/7.043
  
Current International Class: 
  G11B 11/105&nbsp(20060101); G11B 7/085&nbsp(20060101); G11B 11/00&nbsp(20060101); G11B 23/30&nbsp(20060101); G11B 23/36&nbsp(20060101); G11B 19/12&nbsp(20060101); G11B 017/22&nbsp()
  
Field of Search: 
  
  








 369/44.28,44.29,44.34,32,50,78.04,78.05,78.06,70.14
  

References Cited  [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
 
 
 
5136560
August 1992
Hangai et al.

5216647
June 1993
Kitani

5247498
September 1993
Takekoshi et al.

5444682
August 1995
Yamada et al.



   Primary Examiner:  Tran; Thang V.


  Attorney, Agent or Firm: Frommer; William S.
Sinderbrand; Alvin



Claims  

What we claim is:

1.  A disc apparatus for performing a seek operation to a target position on one of different disc shaped recording media which may exhibit different linear velocities or
circumferential recording densities, one from another, said disc apparatus comprising:


rotating means for rotating said disc-shaped recording medium;


servo means for controlling the rotating means to rotationally drive said disc shaped recording medium at a predetermined constant linear velocity;


head means for reproducing data recorded on a recording track formed on said disc-shaped recording medium;


moving means for moving said head means radially in relation to said disc-shaped recording medium;


rotation detection means for detecting a rotation speed of said disc-shaped recording medium;


position detection means for detecting a current position of said head means;


velocity calculating means for calculating a linear velocity of said disc-shaped recording medium as a function of said rotation speed and said current position;


address means for determining a target address corresponding to said target position;  and


generating means for generating a number of tracks to said target position on said disc-shaped recording medium from said current position as a function of said current position, said target address and said calculated linear velocity.


2.  The disc apparatus according to claim 1, wherein each of said current position and said target position on said disc-shaped recording medium is represented by a cluster and sector address designated with respect to a reference position.


3.  The disc apparatus according to claim 2, wherein each cluster and sector address of said disc-shaped recording medium is recorded on said recording tracks by wobbling.


4.  The disc apparatus according to claim 3, further comprising means for reproducing said cluster and sector addresses from the disc-shaped recording medium to represent said current position.


5.  The disc apparatus according to claim 1, wherein position addresses are recorded on said disc-shaped recording medium and said position detection means detects an address of said current position from the data reproduced by said head means.


6.  The disc apparatus according to claim 5, wherein said velocity calculating means calculates said linear velocity of said disc-shaped recording medium as a function of said address of said current position.


7.  The disc apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said moving means includes a stepping motor, and said position detection means is operable to detect said current position as a function of a number of steps of said stepping motor.


8.  The disc apparatus according to claim 1, further comprising frequency generating means coupled to said rotating means for generating a frequency signal;  and wherein said rotation detection means detects said rotation speed by monitoring said
frequency signal.


9.  The disc apparatus according to claim 1, wherein said generating means includes a plurality of conversion tables, each being associated with a respective linear velocity and each storing data representing the number of tracks to different
target positions from a reference position;  and said generating means is operable to select a particular conversion table as a function of the calculated linear velocity.


10.  The disc apparatus according to claim 9, wherein said current position is represented by a cluster and sector address assigned on said disc-shaped recording medium with respect to said reference position.


11.  The disc apparatus according to claim 10, further comprising frequency generator means for generating a frequency signal representing the rotation speed at which said disc-shaped recording medium is driven;  rough servo means for controlling
said rotating means in response to said frequency signal, and means for switching rotation servo control of said rotating means from said servo means to said rough servo means when said moving means starts to move said head means from said current
position to said target position.


12.  A disc apparatus for moving a head means to different positions on a disc-shaped recording medium, wherein said recording medium may exhibit a different linear velocity or circumferential recording density than another of the same type of
recording media, the disc apparatus comprising:


rotating means for rotating said disc-shaped recording medium;


servo means for controlling the rotating means to rotationally drive said disc-shaped recording medium at a predetermined constant linear velocity;


head means for reproducing data recorded on a recording track formed on said disc-shaped recording medium;


moving means for moving said head means radially in relation to said disc-shaped recording medium;


rotation detection means for detecting a rotation speed of said disc-shaped recording medium;


position detection means for detecting a current position of said head means;


velocity calculating means for calculating a linear velocity of said disc-shaped recording medium as a function of said rotation speed and said current position;


address means for determining an address corresponding to a selected position;  and


generating means for generating a number of tracks from a reference position to said selected position as a function of said reference position, said address and said calculated linear velocity.


13.  The disc apparatus according to claim 12, wherein said selected position is said current position.


14.  The disc apparatus according to claim 12, wherein said selected position is a target position.


15.  The disc apparatus according to claim 12, further comprising frequency generator means for generating a frequency signal representing the rotation speed at which said disc-shaped recording medium is driven;  rough servo means for controlling
said rotating means in response to said frequency signal, and means for switching rotation servo control of said rotating means from said servo means to said rough servo means when said moving means starts moving said head means said number of
tracks.  Description  

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION


This invention relates to a disc device adapted to perform an access operation in a record or reproduction mode for disc-shaped recording media which differ from one another in linear velocity or circumferential recording density.


Optical discs have conventionally been employed as a recording medium, for example, compact discs (CD) and Mini Discs (MDs).  MDs are classified according to their characteristics, into recordable discs capable of recording and reproducing data,
read-only premastered discs, and hybrid discs, which have a recordable area and a premastered area.  The various parameters and the recording densities used in different optical recording MDs are equivalent to those employed in various CDs.


FIGS. 4A to 4C schematically show disc formats of the above three types of MDs, namely, cross-sections of the premastered disc, the recordable disc and the hybrid disc, respectively.


In each of these discs, the innermost circular tracks of the information area are defined as a lead-in area, also called the table of contents (TOC), in which pre-recorded information (known as pit information) is used for setting the laser power
and also provides basic information for recording or reproducing the disc, as the case may be.  The remaining information area outside of the lead-in area of the disc is used as a pit area or a recordable grooved area depending on the characteristics of
the disc, i.e., recordable, read-only or hybrid.


The recordable disc, shown in FIG. 4B, will now be described in detail with reference to FIG. 5.  The recordable disc has a radius of greater than 30.5 mm.  The recordable area begins 16.0 mm from the disc's center of rotation and extends 14.5 mm
outward from that point.


In the recordable disc, cluster address information and sector address information, called address in pregroove (ADIP) signals, are recorded in a groove provided in the recordable area by wobbling the groove when the disc is molded.  The wobbled
groove enables the disc system controller to perform an access operation in a recording and a reproduction mode and to perform tracking control and spindle servo control to effect a constant linear velocity (CLV).  The ADIP signal is produced by
modulating a 22.05-kHz carrier signal with the address information.  The modulated carrier signal wobbles the groove so that it meanders approximately 30 nm from a center line of the circumferential (or spiral) track.  The optical pickup is capable of
reading the address information formed by the wobbled groove separately from the recorded signal.  In recording, information is recorded in clusters according to this address information.


FIG. 6 shows the data configuration of approximately one cluster of the recordable disc.  In FIG. 6, one cluster is composed of a link area having three link sectors LS, one sub-data sector SS and a data area having thirty-two data sectors DS.


In the read-only disc, since data has been recorded onto the disc in continuous fashion, the three sectors forming the link area are not necessary and instead are allocated as sub-data sectors SS.  Thus, the leading four sectors of a cluster in a
read-only disc are sub-data sectors.


In a disc-shaped recording medium, such as CDs or MDs, it is necessary during a seek operation to determine the number of tracks by which the optical pickup should be moved to access the track at a specified address from the track on which the
optical pickup is currently present.


Though CDs or MDs may have different linear velocities which result in different circumferential recording densities, information relating to or identifying the linear velocity or recording density is not recorded in the lead-in area (TOC) of
these discs.  Therefore, it is difficult to establish the linear velocity at an arbitrary position on the discs and there is a delay before the disc reaches a predetermined linear velocity when the optical pickup is moved to a target position during a
seek operation.


In a conventional optical disc device for performing an access operation on different discs which exhibit different linear velocities or circumferential recording densities, the distance or the number of tracks by which the optical pickup is to
be moved to access a track is calculated as a function of the target address (cluster and sector addresses).  In this conventional system a large conversion error may be generated depending upon the linear velocity of the disc, and consequently the
access time will be delayed.


SUMMARY AND OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION


In view of the foregoing, an object of the present invention is to provide a disc drive device which correctly obtains the distance or the number of tracks by which the optical pickup should be moved even when performing an access operation on
different discs which exhibit different linear velocities or circumferential recording densities.  It is a further object of the invention to optimize the access operation for discs of any linear velocity.


In accordance with the present invention, a disc drive device is provided for performing an access operation on different disc-shaped recording media exhibiting different linear velocities or circumferential recording densities.  The disc drive
device includes a linear velocity calculating unit for calculating the linear velocity of each of the disc-shaped recording media loaded onto the device as a function of the number of rotations of the disc-spin motor and the position information of the
disc pickup head as the latter scans the disc-shaped recording medium.  The disc drive device also includes a number-of-track generating unit for calculating the number of tracks to be moved by the head from the current head position to a target position
as a function of the address of the target position and the linear velocity of the disc-shaped recording medium.


The linear velocity calculating unit determines the current position information of the head in relation to the disc-shaped recording medium in response either to an output from a head driving unit or to address information that may be recorded
on the disc-shaped recording medium.


In the preferred embodiment, the number-of-track generating unit has a plurality of conversion tables which correlate the target position address and the corresponding number of tracks to reach that target from the current position.  The correct
conversion table is selected to calculate the number of tracks from the current position to the target position as a function of the linear velocity of the disc-shaped recording medium. 

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS


The above, and other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent in the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments of the present invention when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in
which corresponding parts are identified by the same reference numeral, and wherein:


FIG. 1 is a block circuit diagram showing the structure of an optical disc drive device in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention.


FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram showing a reference radial position r0 on a disc from which the head is driven by a stepping motor.


FIG. 3 is a flowchart showing the manner in which the head is driven to a target track in accordance with this invention.


FIGS. 4A to 4C are views showing different MD disc types and their recording layouts.


FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of a recordable MD disc format.


FIG. 6 is illustrative of the structure of approximately one cluster of a recordable MD disc. 

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION


A preferred embodiment of the present invention will now be described with reference to the attached drawings.


FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a disc drive device according to the present invention.


The disc drive device of this embodiment is an optical disc drive device 100 adapted for performing an access operation during a record or reproduction mode on different of optical discs, such as CDs or MDs, which have different linear velocities
or circumferential recording densities.  As shown in FIG. 1, the disc drive device includes a linear velocity calculating unit for calculating the velocity V [m/s] of a magneto-optical disc 2, as later described, as a function of the number of rotations
of a spindle motor 9, which acts as a disc-spin motor to rotate the magneto-optical disc, and the radial position of an optical pickup 4 relative to the magneto-optical disc.  The disc drive device 100 also includes a number-of-tracks generating unit for
calculating the number of tracks from the current position of pickup 4 to a target position in response to the address of the target position and the calculated linear velocity V of the disc 2.  The disc drive device has a system controller 15 which
includes the linear velocity calculating unit and the number-of-tracks generating unit.


The linear velocity calculating unit determines position information of the optical pickup either in response to an output from the pickup drive unit, for example, the number of steps of a stepping motor 10 which advances optical pickup 4, or in
response to address information recorded on magneto-optical disc 2 as an ADIP signal.


The number-of-tracks generating unit calculates the number of tracks from the current position to the target position by a predetermined conversion formula, as later described.  The number-of-tracks generating unit preferably is provided with a
plurality of conversion tables stored in a ROM 16, the addresses of which correspond to the target position and the data stored at each address representing the corresponding number of tracks to the target position from the current position.  The correct
table is selected to calculate the number of tracks from the current position to the target position based on the linear velocity of the magneto-optical disc.


In optical disc drive device 100, as shown in FIG. 1, the magneto-optical disc rotationally driven by spindle motor 9 is used as a recording medium.


Optical pickup 4 has optical components, such as a laser light source (e.g., a laser diode), a collimator lens, an objective lens 3, a polarization beam splitter, a cylindrical lens and a photodetector having a section for receiving a
predetermined pattern of light.  The optical pickup is positioned facing a recording magnetic head 1 with magneto-optical disc 2 located in-between.  When data is to be recorded on the magneto-optical disc, the recording magnetic head is driven by an
overwrite head (OWH) driver 5, which applies a modulated magnetic field corresponding to the recording data to the recording surface of the magneto-optical disc.  At the same time, a target track of the magneto-optical disc is irradiated with a laser
beam of predetermined power by the optical pickup via objective lens 3.  Thus, thermomagnetic recording by magnetic field modulation is performed.


Data to be recorded is supplied from a host computer 101 and through an interface circuit (I/F) 17 is supplied to an encoder included in a signal processing circuit 6.  The signal processing circuit converts the data into a recording signal by
adding an error correction code and performing eight-to-fourteen modulation (EFM).  The recording signal is then supplied to OWH driver 5, which drives recording magnetic head 1 with the recording signal.  Simultaneously, optical pickup 4 is driven by a
pulse width modulation (PWM) driver 12 so that the laser beam gains sufficient power for recording.  Thus, the temperature of the surface of the recording track is raised to the Curie point.


During reproduction, the recording track of magneto-optical disc 2 is traced with the laser beam by optical pickup 4, to perform magneto-optical reproduction using the Kerr effect.


The optical pickup detects reflected light of the laser beam radiated onto the recording track of the magneto-optical disc and supplies a detection signal to an RF amplifier 8.  The detection signal is comprised of several signal components,
including a reproduction signal corresponding to the difference in the polarization angle (Kerr angle of rotation) of the reflected laser beam from the target track, a focusing error signal due to the astigmatic method used in recording and reproduction,
a tracking error signal due to the push-pull method, and address information obtained from the above-mentioned wobbled groove.


RF amplifier 8 extracts the reproduction signal from the detection signal and supplies the reproduction signal to signal processing circuit 6.  The signal processing circuit includes a decoder which performs EFM demodulation and error correction
on the reproduction signal to generate reproduction data.  The reproduction data is then supplied to host computer 101 via interface circuit 17.


The RF amplifier also extracts the focusing error signal and the tracking error signal from the detection signal and supplies these error signals to a servo circuit 13.


The servo circuit generates a focusing servo signal and a tracking servo signal in response to the extracted focusing error signal and the tracking error signal and supplies these servo signals through PWM driver 12 to the optical pickup.  Thus,
focusing servo and tracking servo operations are performed by the optical pickup.  That is, focusing control of the optical system of the optical pickup 4 is performed so that the focusing error signal becomes zero and tracking control of the optical
system of the optical pickup 4 is performed so that the tracking error signal becomes zero.


In addition, servo circuit 13 performs a rotary servo operation to control spindle motor 9 for rotating the magneto-optical disc.  The servo circuit performs servo control of the spindle motor, via a spindle driver 11, to rotationally drive the
magneto-optical disc at a predetermined speed, for example, a constant linear velocity (CLV).


A motor control circuit 14 performs rough servo control of the spindle motor in response to a frequency generator signal (FG signal) from the spindle driver.  Motor control circuit 14 also performs rotation speed control (CLV control) of the
magneto-optical disc in response to position information from the optical pickup to achieve constant linear velocity.


The optical pickup and recording magnetic head 1 are moved to the position of the target track of the magneto-optical disc specified by the system controller 15 of optical disc drive device 100.  The movement of the optical pickup and the
recording magnetic head is controlled by motor control circuit 14, which controls stepping motor 10 to drive a thread feeding unit which is mounted on the optical pickup.  Stated more particularly, the system controller determines the radial position of
the optical pickup from a count value representing the number of steps of the stepping motor generated in the motor control circuit.  The system controller also is adapted to determine the radial position of the optical pickup from the address
information recorded in the wobbled groove of the magneto-optical disc and read by the optical pickup.


An address decoder 7 generates an address signal and a frequency-modulated carrier signal in response to a signal corresponding to the wobbled groove on the magneto-optical disc, as extracted by RF amplifier 8.  The address decoder supplies the
address signal and the carrier signal to the decoder of signal processing circuit 6; and the signal processing circuit supplies the address signal and the carrier signal to system controller 15.  The system controller compares the frequency-modulated
carrier signal with a predetermined reference clock signal to control a spindle motor control section of motor control circuit 14.


The system controller, which includes a central processing unit (CPU), controls the operation of optical disc drive device 100 and the sending and receiving of data between the host computer 101 and interface circuit 17.


Determination by the present invention of the linear velocity of disc 2 and the conversion of the target address to the number of tracks to be moved by optical pickup 4 as a function of that linear velocity of the disc now will be described.


To access a track of a specified address from the track currently being traced by optical pickup 4, the number of tracks by which the optical pickup is to be moved must be determined.  Depending upon the linear velocity or circumferential
recording density of the magneto-optical disc being used, the relation between the address and the number of tracks is not constant.  Therefore, the formula or the conversion table used to convert the address to the number of tracks must be varied.


Thus, this embodiment of the invention performs the following operation.


As shown in FIG. 2, cluster and sector addresses of a reference position on the magneto-optical disc are set to cluster address 0000.sub.(h) and sector address FC.sub.(h), respectively, in hexadecimal notation.  The radial position (the distance
from the center of rotation of the magneto-optical disc) of cluster address 0000.sub.(h) and sector address FC.sub.(h) is set to r.sub.o [m] and the sector frequency, the number of sectors scanned per period of time, is f [Hz].


The address of a current position being traced by the optical pickup is input to system controller 15 and the system controller determines the rotation speed of the disc by monitoring the FG signal from spindle driver 11 to drive spindle motor 9
(FIG. 1).


It is now assumed that the cluster and the sector corresponding to the target address are a and b, respectively, and that the resulting rotation speed is N.sub.r [rps].  In this case, when one cluster is composed of 36 sectors, the number of
sectors N.sub.ts from the position of cluster address 0000.sub.(h), sector address FC.sub.(h) to the position of cluster a, sector b is determined by the following equation.


N.sub.ts =36.times.a+b+4 (assuming that the target address is in the area radially outside of the TOC area).  The linear velocity V of the disc is determined by the following equations:


in the TOC area, and


in the area radially outside of the TOC area, where p=.omega.N.sub.ts /.pi.f and .omega.=2.pi.N.sub.r [rad/s], d denotes a track pitch (in meters) equal to 1.6 .mu.m (=1.6.times.10-.sup.-6 m) and r.sub.o =16 mm=16.times.10.sup.-3 m.


As mentioned above, the linear velocity V can be determined based on the number of sectors N.sub.ts from the reference position to the target position and the relationship between the rotation speed N.sub.r and the FG signal.  Once the linear
velocity V is determined by the equations mentioned above, a parameter indicative of the linear velocity is stored in the memory of system controller 15 until the magneto-optical disc is unloaded from optical disc drive device 100.  In the event a
request for reproduction is received by the optical disc drive device from host computer 101, the address to which the optical pickup should be moved is determined as follows.


When a target address distanced from cluster address 0000.sub.(h), sector address FC(h) by a number of sectors N.sub.ts is sought, the number of tracks N.sub.trk by which the optical pickup should be moved is determined as follows.  N.sub.trk is
negative in the area radially inside of the cluster address 0000(h), sector address FC.sub.(h), and is positive in the area radially outside of the cluster address 0000.sub.(h), sector address FC.sub.(h).


As shown in FIG. 2, the position having a distance r0 from the disc center (center of rotation) is set as a reference position or the origin.  When the cluster address 0000(h), sector address FC.sub.(h) are set as the reference position, r.sub.0
=16 mm.  The number of tracks N.sub.trk counted from this reference position to the target position of cluster address Adc.sub.(h), sector address Ads.sub.(h) is determined by the following equations.


When Adc(h)=FFxx.sub.(h),


When Adc.sub.(h) .noteq.FFxx.sub.(h),


In the above equations, d=1.6 .mu.m (track pitch), r.sub.0 =16 mm, V=1.2 m/s to 1.4 m/s, f=75 Hz (sector frequency), and N.sub.ts =the number of sectors to the target.  Also, 4.sub.(h) is added so as to perform 1-byte operation.


The calculation to convert the number of sectors N.sub.ts to the number of tracks N.sub.trk is performed as follows.


When the linear velocity V, which is calculated by either equation (1) or (2) above, is 1.2 m/s, the number of tracks N.sub.trk is calculated by the following equations.


When Adc(h)=FFxx.sub.(h) (the target position is in the TOC area),


where N.sub.ts denotes the number of sectors from cluster address 0000(h), sector address FC(h) to the target address.


The number of sectors N.sub.ts from the reference position to the target position of, for example, cluster address Adc.sub.(h) =FF2C.sub.(h), sector address Ads.sub.(h) =13.sub.(h) is expressed as follows.


Thus, the number of tracks N.sub.trk is expressed by the following equation.


That is, the position of cluster address FFC2.sub.(h), sector address 13.sub.(h) is 357.9 tracks radially inside of the reference position.


When Adc.sub.(h) .noteq.FFxx.sub.(h) (that is, the target is in the area radially outside of the reference position),


The number of sectors N.sub.ts from the reference position to the position of, for example, cluster address Adc.sub.(h) =0400.sub.(h), sector address Ads.sub.(h) =FD.sub.(h) is expressed by the following equation.


Thus, the number of tracks N.sub.trk is expressed by the following equation.


That is, the position of cluster address 0400.sub.(h), sector address FD.sub.(h) is 4741.9 tracks radially outside of the reference position (cluster address 0000.sub.(h), sector address FC.sub.(h)).


In the foregoing embodiment, the conversion of the target address to the number of tracks is performed by calculation.  However, conversion tables as shown in Tables 1 to 5 may be used.  In this embodiment, the conversion tables are stored in ROM
16 located in system controller 15.  Thus, by using the conversion tables stored in the ROM, the system controller is capable of converting the target address to the number of tracks to be moved by optical pickup 4 without performing a mathematical
calculation.  The conversion table for linear velocity V=1.20 m/s is shown in Tables 1 and 2.  The conversion table for linear velocity V=1.40 m/s is shown in Tables 3 to 5.  In these tables, dTrack indicates the number of tracks in one cluster, that is,
track/cluster.


 TABLE 1  ______________________________________ cluster Track dTrack 16*dTrack  ______________________________________ -152 FF68 -982.52 FC60 6.42 102.70 103 103  -149 FF6B -909.27 FC73 6.41 102.49 102 102  -135 FF79 -820.00 FCCC 6.34 101.49 101
101  -120 FF88 -725.31 FD2B 6.28 100.46 100 100  -105 FF97 -631.58 FD89 6.22 99.45 99 99  -90 FFA6 -538.77 FDE6 6.15 98.48 98 98  -74 FFB6 -440.77 FE48 6.09 97.47 97 97  -58 FFC6 -343.76 FEA9 6.03 96.49 96 96  -41 FFD7 -241.75 FF0F 5.97 95.48 95 95  -23
FFE9 -134.89 FF7A 5.90 94.45 94 94  -5 FFFB -29.17 FFE3 5.84 93.45 93 93  0 0000 0.00 0000 5.82 93.17 93 93  13 000D 75.44 004B 5.78 92.48 92 92  32 0020 184.70 00B8 5.72 91.49 91 91  52 0034 298.45 012A 5.65 90.48 90 90  72 0048 410.96 019A 5.59 89.50
89 89  94 005E 533.33 0215 5.53 88.46 88 88  115 0073 648.83 0288 5.47 87.50 87 87  138 008A 773.91 0305 5.41 86.48 86 86  162 00A2 902.90 0386 5.34 85.46 85 85  186 008A 1030.38 0406 5.28 84.47 84 84  211 00D3 1161.62 0489 5.22 83.48 83 83  237 00ED
1296.50 0510 5.16 82.49 82 82  264 0108 1434.88 059A 5.09 81.49 81 81  292 0124 1576.63 0628 5.03 80.49 80 80  321 0141 1721.64 0689 4.97 79.50 79 79  352 0160 1874.70 0752 4.90 78.47 78 78  383 017F 2025.81 07E9 4.84 77.49 77 77  416 01A0 2184.60 0888
4.78 76.48 76 76  450 01C2 2346.08 092A 4.72 75.48 75 75  485 01E5 2510.12 09CE 4.66 74.49 74 74  ______________________________________


 TABLE 2  ______________________________________ cluster Track dTrack 16*dTrack  ______________________________________ -152 FF68 -1073.69 FBCF 7.49 119.77 120 120  -149 FF6B -1051.25 FBE5 7.47 119.47 119 119  -139 FF75 -976.86 FC30 7.41 118.48
118 118  -128 FF80 -895.73 FC81 7.34 117.43 117 117  -118 FF8A -822.61 FCCA 7.28 116.49 116 116  -107 FF95 -742.83 FD1A 7.22 115.49 115 115  -95 FFA1 -656.58 FD70 7.15 114.42 114 114  -84 FFAC -578.22 FDBE 7.09 113.47 113 113  -72 FFB8 -493.46 FE13 7.03
112.46 112 112  -60 FFC4 -409.45 FE67 6.97 111.48 111 111  -47 FFD1 -319.27 FEC1 6.90 110.44 110 110  -34 FFDE -229.92 FF1B 6.84 109.43 109 109  -21 FFEB -141.37 FF73 6.78 108.45 108 108  -8 FFF8 -53.62 FFCB 6.72 107.49 107 107  0 0000 0.00 0000 6.68
106.92 107 107  6 0006 40.03 0028 6.66 106.49 106 106  21 0015 139.40 008B 6.59 105.45 105 105  36 0024 237.81 00ED 6.53 104.43 104 104  51 0033 335.29 014F 6.47 103.45 103 103  66 0042 431.85 01AF 6.41 102.49 102 102  83 0053 540.22 021C 6.34 101.44 101
101  99 0063 641.21 0281 6.28 100.48 100 100  116 0074 747.47 02EB 6.22 99.49 99 99  134 0086 858.84 035A 6.15 98.47 98 98  152 0098 969.09 03C9 6.09 97.48 97 97  ______________________________________


 TABLE 3  ______________________________________ cluster Track dTrack 16*dTrack  ______________________________________ 171 00AB 1084.27 043C 6.03 96.46 96 96  190 00BE 1198.26 04AE 5.97 95.48 95 95  210 00D2 1317.02 0525 5.91 94.48 94 94  231
00E7 1440.39 05A0 5.84 93.46 93 93  252 00FC 1562.44 061A 5.78 92.48 92 92  274 0112 1688.93 0688 5.72 91.48 91 91  297 0129 1819.73 071B 5.65 90.46 90 90  320 0140 1949.09 079D 5.59 89.49 89 89  344 0158 2082.61 0822 5.53 88.50 88 88  370 0172 2225.60
08B1 5.47 87.46 87 87  396 018C 2366.94 093E 5.40 86.46 86 86  422 01A6 2506.69 09CA 5.34 85.50 85 85  450 01C2 2655.46 0A5F 5.28 84.49 84 84  479 01DF 2807.72 0AF7 5.22 83.49 83 83  509 01FD 2963.34 0B93 5.16 82.49 82 82  540 021C 3122.22 0C32 5.09
81.49 81 81  572 023C 3284.23 0CD4 5.03 80.50 80 80  606 025E 3454.23 0D7E 4.97 79.48 79 79  640 0280 3622.10 0E26 4.91 78.50 78 78  677 02A5 3802.47 0EDA 4.84 77.47 77 77  714 02CA 3980.51 0F8C 4.78 76.49 76 76  753 02F1 4165.76 1045 4.72 75.49 75 75 
794 031A 4357.92 1105 4.65 74.48 74 74  836 0344 4552.15 11CB 4.59 73.48 73 73  880 0370 4752.88 1290 4.53 72.48 72 72  ______________________________________


 TABLE 4  ______________________________________ cluster Track dTrack 16*dTrack  ______________________________________ 522 020A 2681.24 0A79 4.59 73.48  73 73  560 0230 2854.60 0B26 4.53 72.49  72 72  600 0258 3034.60 0BDA 4.47 71.49  71 71  642
0282 3220.96 0C94 4.41 70.48  70 70  685 02AD 3409.08 0D51 4.34 69.49  69 69  731 02DB 3607.44 0E17 4.28 68.48  68 68  778 030A 3807.18 0EDF 4.22 67.49  67 67  828 033C 4016.53 0FB0 4.16 66.48  66 66  880 0370 4231.00 1086 4.09 65.48  65 65  934 03A6
4450.34 1162 4.03 64.49  64 64  991 03DF 4678.31 1246 3.97 63.49  63 63  1050 041A 4910.62 132E 3.91 62.50  62 62  1113 0459 5154.74 1422 3.84 61.49  61 61  1179 049B 5406.34 151E 3.78 60.49  60 60  1248 04E0 5665.05 1621 3.72 59.49  59 59  1320 0528
5930.53 172A 3.66 58.50  58 58  1397 0575 6209.64 1841 3.59 57.49  57 57  1477 05C5 6494.62 195E 3.53 56.50  56 56  1562 061A 6792.12 1A88 3.47 55.50  55 55  1652 0674 7101.47 1B8D 3.41 54.49  54 54  1747 06D3 7422.05 1CFE 3.34 53.49  53 53  1847 0737
7753.26 1E49 3.28 52.49  52 52  1953 07A1 8097.71 1FA1 3.22 51.49  51 51  2065 0811 8454.69 2106 3.16 50.50  50 50  2185 0889 8829.65 227D 3.09 49.49  49 49  2311 0907 9215.48 23FF 3.03 48.50  48 48  2446 098E 9620.46 2594 2.97 47.50  47 47  2590 0A1E
10043.42 273B 2.91 46.50  46 46  2743 0AB7 10483.25 28F3 2.84 45.50  45 45  2907 0B5B 10944.44 2AC0 2.78 44.50  44 44  3082 0C0A 11425.62 2CA1 2.72 43.50  43 43  ______________________________________


 TABLE 5  ______________________________________ cluster Track dTrack 16*dTrack  ______________________________________ 926 039E 4959.85 135F 4.47 71.48  71 71  973 03CD 5168.41 1430 4.41 70.50  70 70  1023 03FF 5387.17 150B 4.34 69.50  69 69 
1075 0433 5611.44 15EB 4.28 68.50  68 68  1130 046A 5845.18 16D5 4.22 67.49  67 67  1187 04A3 6083.85 17C3 4.16 66.49  66 66  1246 04DE 6327.21 18B7 4.09 65.50  65 65  1309 051D 6583.14 19B7 4.03 64.49  64 64  1374 055E 6843.11 1ABB 3.97 63.49  63 63 
1442 05A2 7110.85 1BC6 3.91 62.50  62 62  1514 05EA 7389.85 1CDD 3.84 61.50  61 61  1590 0636 7679.57 1DFF 3.78 60.49  60 60  1669 0685 7975.79 1F27 3.72 59.49  59 59  1752 06D8 8281.83 2059 3.66 58.50  58 58  1840 0730 8600.80 2198 3.59 57.49  57 57 
1932 078C 8928.53 22E0 3.53 56.50  56 56  2030 07EE 9271.51 2437 3.47 55.49  55 55  2133 0855 9625.52 2599 3.41 54.49  54 54  2241 08C1 9989.99 2705 3.34 53.50  53 53  2356 0934 10370.91 2882 3.28 52.50  52 52  2478 09AE 10767.38 2A0F 3.22 51.50  51 51 
2607 0A2F 11178.53 2BAA 3.16 50.50  50 50  2744 0AB8 11606.61 2D56 3.09 49.50  49 49  2889 0B49 12050.64 2F12 3.03 48.50  48 48  3044 0FE4 12515.61 30E3 2.97 47.50  47 47  ______________________________________


An example of using the foregoing tables to determine the number of tracks to the position of cluster address 100.sub.(h), sector address 02.sub.(h) now will be described.


A range including cluster address 100(h) is sought in Tables 1 and 2 if the linear velocity V=1.20 m/s. In this example ED.sub.(h) <100.sub.(h) <108.sub.(h), so the number of clusters from cluster address ED.sub.(h), sector address
FC.sub.(h) to the position of cluster address 100.sub.(h), sector address 02.sub.(h) is calculated as follows.


From the results of these equations, the following calculation is made.


Thus, the position of cluster address 100.sub.(h), sector address 02.sub.(h) is 19.25 clusters from cluster address ED.sub.(h), sector address FC.sub.(h) identified in Table 2.


Accordingly, the number of tracks is determined as follows.


FIG. 3 is a flow chart of the manner in which system controller 15 processes linear velocity calculation, address calculation and conversion of the address to the number of tracks for the optical pickup to be moved in disc drive device 100.


After loading of the magneto-optical disc into optical disc drive device 100, system controller 15 performs calibration step S1 and sends a control signal to the motor control circuit to control stepping motor 10 to move optical pickup 4 to the
innermost radius of the magneto-optical disc, so that the optical pickup can reproduce the information contained in the table of contents (TOC).


Then, step S2 is performed, whereby the motor control circuit controls spindle motor 9 through spindle driver 11 in response to a signal from the system controller to perform rough servo (CLV control) of the spindle motor in response to the FG
signal which is output from the spindle driver, in a manner known to those of ordinary skill in the art.


When the optical pickup is placed near the TOC area on the magneto-optical disc and the motor control circuit performs rough servo of the spindle motor, RF amplifier 8 is able to extract the reproduction signal, the focusing error signal, and the
tracking error signal from the detection signal.  Then, the system controller sends a control signal to execute the focusing and tracking servo operation of servo circuit 13.  In addition, since the servo circuit acts as the servo control for rotating
the magneto-optical disc, the system controller switches the servo control for rotation of the spindle motor from the motor control circuit to the servo control circuit.  Address decoder 7 generates the address signal in response to the signal
corresponding to the wobbled groove on the magneto-optical disc extracted by the RF amplifier, and the system controller performs step S3 to read this generated address and determine the current cluster address and sector address of optical pickup 4.


Next, the system controller executes step S4 and measures the cycle of the FG signal from spindle driver 11 which denotes the approximate rotational speed of the magneto-optical disc.


The system controller then carries out step S5 to calculate the linear velocity V of the magneto-optical disc as a function of the current address and the cycle of the FG signal.


The linear velocity V determined by the above process, or a substitute parameter indicative of the linear velocity V, is stored in a memory, such as ROM 16, of the system controller.  The system controller then performs step S6 which selects the
proper conversion table for converting the address (current or target) to the number of tracks to be moved by optical pickup 4 or, alternatively, the linear velocity, is used to select the parameters for equations (3) or (4) to calculate the number of
tracks from the current position (or address).


In the event that the system controller receives a request for reproduction, recording, or access (seek) from host computer 101 through interface circuit 17, the system controller determines from the address of the current position of the optical
pickup the target cluster and sector address as a function of equations (3) or (4) or the conversion tables.  The system controller also determines the number of tracks which the optical pickup should be moved (jumped) to reach the target address from
the current address.  To drive the pickup to the target position, the system controller switches the servo control for rotation of spindle motor 9 from servo circuit 13 to the rough servo control of motor control circuit 14.  Then, the system controller
supplies a signal to control the pickup motor control circuit to move the optical pickup to the target address.  The pickup motor control circuit generates the number of steps for stepping motor 10 to advance in response to the numbers of tracks input
from the system controller and controls the stepping motor to step the correct number of tracks.  When the counted number of tracks corresponds to the number of steps, the stepping motor stops.


In this embodiment, the movement of the optical pickup is performed by the stepping motor, however, it can be accomplished by using any other motors, such as a servo-controlled DC motor or the like.  Also, in this embodiment, the system
controller controls the pickup motor control circuit as a function of the address signal reproduced by address decoder 7 while the optical pickup is moving to the target address from the current address.


As is described above, with the device of this invention, the linear velocity of the magneto-optical disc is calculated from the frequency signal FG which, in turn, is a function of the number of rotations of the spindle motor for rotating the
magneto-optical disc, and from the position in the radial direction of the optical pick up; and the number of tracks from the current position to the target position is determined by using the calculated linear velocity and the address of the target
position.  According to the invention, by calculating the number of tracks as a function of the linear velocity of the magneto-optical disc or by selecting the proper conversion table for converting the target address to the number of tracks to be moved
by optical pickup 4 as a function of the linear velocity of the disc, the distance or the number of tracks from the current position to the target position can be correctly determined.  Accordingly, the seek operation can be optimized for discs
exhibiting different linear velocities and quick access can be realized.


In the above-described embodiments, magneto-optical discs, such as MDs, constitute the disc-shaped recording medium.  However, the same effects can be obtained when using a CD, a re-writable optical disc of phase change type or a magnetic disk.


In the present invention as described above, the linear velocity of the disc-shaped recording medium is determined as a function of the number of rotations of the spin motor which rotates the disc-shaped recording medium and also as a function of
the head position in the radial direction of the disc-shaped recording medium.  The number of tracks to move the head from the current position to the target position is determined by using the address of the target position and the linear velocity.  By
reason of this invention, the distance or the number of tracks by which the optical pickup should be moved during the seek operation can be correctly determined even when the disc drive uses different disc-shaped recording media exhibiting different
linear velocities or circumferential recording densities.


Having described preferred embodiments of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited solely to those precise embodiments and that various changes and modifications could be effected therein by one skilled in the art
without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.


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