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moon pictures

VIEWS: 221 PAGES: 6

									Unit: Earth and Space: The Moon

** This unit was designed for teachers to choose where to place activities in the instructional
sequence.


Objectives:
S6C2PO1- Describe how the Moon’s appearance changes during a four-week lunar cycle.
S6C2PO2– Describe how Earth’s rotation results in day and night at any particular location.
S6C2PO3- Distinguish between revolution and rotation.
S6C2PO4– Describe the role of gravity as an attractive force between celestial objects.
S6C2PO5- Compare the physical model to what it represents.
S6C2PO6- Compare shadows hourly and seasonally.
S6C3PO4 - Describe the change in position and motion of the following objects in the sky over time:
real motion-Moon, planets apparent motion (due to the motion of the Earth) – Sun, Moon, stars.
S6C3PO6- Describe efforts explore space (e.g., Apollo missions, space shuttles, Hubble space
telescopes, space probes).
S2C1PO1- Identify how diverse people and/or cultures, past and present, have made important
contributions to scientific innovations (e.g., Edwin Hubble [scientists]).
S2C2PO1- Provide examples that support the premise that science is an ongoing process that
changes in response to new information and discoveries (e.g., space exploration).



Inquiry objectives are achieved through FOSS activities


Main Topics/Activities:
** This unit was designed for teachers to choose where to place activities in the instructional
sequence.

Brain Pop: video and assessment
        Moon, Is There a Man in the Moon? (excellent preview to the unit)
        http://www.brainpop.com/science/space/moon/
        Gravity
        http://www.brainpop.com/science/motionsforcesandtime/gravity/

FOSS   Kit;   Planetary Science; Investigation 3:Parts 1 and 2
FOSS   Kit;   Planetary Science; Investigation 4
FOSS   Kit;   Planetary Science; Investigation 7
FOSS   Kit;   Planetary Science; Investigation 9

** see extension for additional FOSS units that can be utilized within this unit. Additional or
extension lessons/labs are encouraged and will extend the science curriculum to meet students
needs.




                                                                                                  1
Thematic Unit: This could be utilized during the course of this unit.
http://www.kyrene.org/schools/ninos/thematic/space~1.htm (Click on Solar System Live and view
where the sun is at every part of the day)


Materials:
FOSS Investigation kits: Planetary Science. Check FOSS lessons for the materials needed.


Background Information:
See FOSS background information in Planetary Science kit.

JPL: Educator’s Guide to Moon Phases
http://www.solarviews.com/eng/edu/moonphas.htm

NASA homepage and educational site: These sites could keep this unit going for years. Great
source for current events in space science.
http://www.nasa.gov/home/index.html?skipIntro=1
http://education.nasa.gov/home/index.html


Introductory Experience:
S6C2PO1 Describe how the Moon’s appearance changes during a four-week lunar cycle.
S6C3PO4 - Describe the change in position and motion of the following objects in the sky over time:
real motion-Moon, planets apparent motion (due to the motion of the Earth) – Sun, Moon, stars.

Online lesson plans with applets, videos and worksheets. These mirror this introductory activity on
the phases of the moon and contain additional resources.

Canadian Space Academy: Lesson on phases of the moon.
http://www.ioncmaste.ca/homepage/resources/web_resources/CSA_Astro9/files/html/module3/le
ssons/lesson4/phasesMoon.html



Adapted from The Moon Seems to Change by Franklin M. Branley
Changing Moon Materials Needed (Can be done in groups of 3 or 4)

      Flashlight
      Styrofoam Ball
      Craft Stick
      Marker
      Group Sheet
      Masking Tape (optional)
      Dark room
      Student recording sheet: file named Changing moons




                                                                                                  2
Students will be recreating a model of the phases of the moon.
   1. Have one student from each room be the “getter”.
   2. Stick the craft stick about an inch into the Styrofoam ball.
   3. Beginning at the end where the craft stick meets the Styrofoam ball, draw a line on the
        Styrofoam ball all the way around to the other side of the stick. Then draw an X on one
        half of the ball.
   The Styrofoam ball will be the moon, your head will be the Earth, and the flashlight will be the
   sun.
   4. Designate where each student that is holding the Styrofoam ball and the flashlight will
        stand (An easy way to do this is to use masking tape and tape off an area for each person).
        This spot should be used throughout the entire activity.
   5. Hold the Styrofoam ball about 6 inches above your head. Make sure the X is facing you.
   6. Turn the lights off.
   7. The person holding the flashlight should now shine the flashlight on the Styrofoam ball.
        You will not be able to see the lighted half of the Styrofoam ball. What you see is the side
        with the X. This is called a “new moon” (Ask students to identify what they think this
        phase is called before telling them).
   8. Turn the lights on.
   9. Students should fill out the appropriate part of their group sheet at this time.
   10. While still in the same spot, hold the Styrofoam ball about 6 inches above your head. Make
        sure the X is facing you.
   11. This time make a ¼ turn (about 90 degrees).
   12. Turn the lights off. The student holding the flashlight should remain in the same spot.
   13. The person holding the flashlight should now shine the flashlight on the Styrofoam ball.
        You will see a bit of the lighted half of the Styrofoam ball. This is called a “crescent
        moon” (Ask students to identify what they think this phase is called before telling them).
   14. Turn the lights on.
   15. Students should fill out the appropriate part of their group sheet at this time.
   16. While still in the same spot, hold the Styrofoam ball about 6 inches above your head. Make
        sure the X is facing you.
   17. This time turn a bit more (between 90 degrees and 180 degrees-not completely 180 degrees
        because otherwise you will see a full moon again).
   18. Turn the lights off. The student holding the flashlight should remain in the same spot.
   19. The person holding the flashlight should now shine the flashlight on the Styrofoam ball.
        You will see a bit more of the lighted half of the Styrofoam ball. This is called a “half-
        moon” (Ask students to identify what they think this phase is called before telling them).
   20. Turn the lights on.
   21. Students should fill out the appropriate part of their group sheet at this time.
   22. While still in the same spot, hold the Styrofoam ball about 6 inches above your head. Make
        sure the X is facing you.
   23. This time make a ¾ turn (about 270 degrees).
   24. Turn the lights off.
   25. The student holding the flashlight should remain in the same spot.
   26. The person holding the flashlight should now shine the flashlight on the Styrofoam ball.
        You will see a bit more of the lighted half of the Styrofoam ball. This is called a “gibbous
        moon” (Ask students to identify what they think this phase is called before telling them).



                                                                                                   3
   27. Turn the lights on.
   28. Students should fill out the appropriate part of their group sheet at this time.
   29. While still in the same spot, hold the Styrofoam ball about 6 inches above your head. Make
       sure the X is facing you.
   30. This time make a half turn (180 degrees).
   31. Turn the lights off.
   32. The student holding the flashlight should remain in the same spot.
   33. The person holding the flashlight should now shine the flashlight on the Styrofoam ball.
   34. You will see the entire lighted half of the moon. This is called a “full moon”. (Ask
       students to identify what they think this phase is called before telling them).
   35. Turn the lights on.
   36. Students should fill out the appropriate part of their group sheet at this time. You have
       now seen all of the phases of the moon.



Extension/Centers:
S6C2PO4– Describe the role of gravity as an attractive force between celestial objects. S6C2PO5-
Compare the physical model to what it represents.

      These performance objectives can be extended by doing the following activities:
          o FOSS kit; Planetary Science; Investigation 5 (various size objects can be used to
              show how different masses and weights attribute to different impacts)
          o FOSS kit; Planetary Science; Investigation 6 (mapping skill that shows the scale
              representation compared to the actual size of an object, parts of the moon)

S6C3PO6- Describe efforts explore space (e.g., Apollo missions, space shuttles, Hubble space
telescopes, space probes).
S2C1PO1- Identify how diverse people and/or cultures, past and present, have made important
contributions to scientific innovations (e.g., Edwin Hubble [scientists]).

      Brainpop videos
           o Apollo project
              http://www.brainpop.com/science/space/apolloproject/
           o International Space Station
              http://www.brainpop.com/technology/transportation/internationalspacestation/



Discovery Streaming Videos that can enhance lessons:
A Closer look at the Moon: A Space Science Series (20min)
This inspiring look at the moon helps students understand what makes Earth's nearest neighbor so
unique. Take a close look at the moon and learn why there are so many more craters on it than on
Earth. Learn how the moon affects our oceans' tides. Understand the phases of the moon and learn
what a waxing or waning moon is. Learn about lunar and solar eclipses and the moon's orbit around
Earth.




                                                                                                4
Getting To Know Gravity (19min)
Students learn about gravity. This learning journey demonstrates the effects of mass on gravity
and the difference between mass and weight in a way that is easy to understand and fun to watch.

Jr. Space Scientist: Riding in the Sky (8min)
Following a brief history of humans' attempt to fly, Robert H. Goddard is introduced as the
inventor of the first liquid fuel rocket. Viewers see and learn how NASA met the challenges of
gravity, orbiting, inertia, and weightlessness. The space programs and their major accomplishments
are reviewed. The Space Shuttle and its accomplishments are shown and discussed.

Jr. Space Scientist: Voyage to the Moon (10min)
Students get a close-up look at the moon through the eyes of the astronauts who first explored
Earth's closest neighbor in space. Concepts, such as the phases of the moon and gravity, are
explored. Historical review, beginning with President Kennedy's historic speech and ending with the
astronauts exploring the lunar surface, is included.

Our Home in Space (15min)
Singing puppets, colorful graphics, and NASA footage come together to teach students about the
familiar sights in our sky. Learn about the importance of the sun, some characteristics of the
Earth, what causes day and night and the change of seasons, and how the moon moves. Lastly, see
the importance of telescopes in revealing the mysteries of our solar system.

Phases of the Moon (3min)
During the 29 days it takes the moon to orbit the Earth, the moon appears to change shape from
one day to the next. These shapes are known as the phases of the moon. Of course, the moon
doesn’t really change shape; it only appears to change.


Careers in Science:
Objectives
S2C1PO1- Identify how diverse people and/or cultures, past and present, have made important
contributions to scientific innovations (e.g., Edwin Hubble [scientists]).

      Encarta Kids and Encarta Reference Library: Hubble/Hubble, Edwin Powell
NASA and JPL site have tons of additional information.


Websites:
Virtual reality moon phase pictures
http://tycho.usno.navy.mil/vphase.html

Phases of the moon: pictures and video
http://aa.usno.navy.mil/faq/docs/moon_phases.html

StarDate: great site for additional data and teacher resources
http://stardate.org/nightsky/moon/



                                                                                                     5
Objectives linked to activities:
S6C2PO1- Describe how the Moon’s appearance changes during a four-week lunar cycle.
S6C2PO2– Describe how Earth’s rotation results in day and night at any particular location.
S6C2PO3- Distinguish between revolution and rotation.
S6C2PO5- Compare the physical model to what it represents.
S6C3PO6- Describe efforts explore space (e.g., Apollo missions, space shuttles, Hubble space
telescopes, space probes).

       Brain Pop; Moon, Is There a Man in the Moon? (excellent preview to the unit)
       Discovery Videos: A Closer Look at the Moon: A Space Science Series
                         Jr. Space Scientist: Riding in the Sky
                         Jr. Space Scientist: Voyage to the Moon
                         Our Home in Space
                         Phases of the Moon

S6C2PO2– Describe how Earth’s rotation results in day and night at any particular location.
S6C2PO3- Distinguish between revolution and rotation.
S6C2PO5- Compare the physical model to what it represents.

       FOSS Kit; Planetary Science; Investigation 3: Parts 1 and 2

S6C2PO1- Describe how the Moon’s appearance changes during a four-week lunar cycle.
S6C2PO5- Compare the physical model to what it represents
S6C2PO6- Compare shadows hourly and seasonally.
      FOSS Kit; Planetary Science; Investigation 4
      FOSS Kit; Planetary Science; Investigation 9
      Thematic Unit: This could be utilized during the course of this unit.
      http://www.kyrene.org/schools/ninos/thematic/space~1.htm (Click on Solar System Live and
      view where the sun is at every part of the day)

S6C2PO5- Compare the physical model to what it represents
S6C3PO6- Describe efforts explore space (e.g., Apollo missions, space shuttles, Hubble space
telescopes, space probes).
S2C1PO1- Identify how diverse people and/or cultures, past and present, have made important
contributions to scientific innovations (e.g., Edwin Hubble [scientists]).
S2C2PO1- Provide examples that support the premise that science is an ongoing process that
changes in response to new information and discoveries (e.g., space exploration).
       FOSS Kit; Planetary Science; Investigation 7
       Brain Pop videos: International Space Station
                         Apollo Project

S6C2PO4– Describe the role of gravity as an attractive force between celestial objects.
      Brain Pop video: Gravity
      Discovery Video: Getting To Know Gravity




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