Introducing SharePoint 2010 by djh75337

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                             Introducing SP 2010




UNDERSTANDING SHAREPOINT JOURNAL
Bjørn Furuknap




            Introducing
        SharePoint 2010
     UNDERSTANDING SHAREPOINT JOURNAL


Introducing SharePoint 2010




      This book is dedicated to my wife.



                       Understanding SharePoint
                          Rubina Ranasgt. 10
                         N-0190 Oslo, Norway
 Phone +47 91 39 85 86 • Web http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/
Credits
About the Author
                          Bjørn Christoffer Thorsmæhlum Furuknap is a senior solutions architect,
                          published author of Building the SharePoint User Experience, speaker, and
                          passionate SharePointaholic. He has been doing software development
                          professionally for 16 years for small companies as well as multinational
                          corporations. He has also been a teacher at a college-level school, teaching
                          programming and development to aspiring students, a job that inspired him to
                          begin teaching what he has learned and learns every day.

About Understanding SharePoint Journal
Understanding SharePoint Journal is a periodical published by UnderstandingSharePoint.com. The journal
covers few topics in each issue, focusing to teach a deeper understanding of each topic while showing how
to use SharePoint in real-life scenarios.

You can read more about USP Journal, as well as get other issues and sign up for regular updates,
discounts, and previews of upcoming issues, at http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/journal.



Other Credits
A great big thanks to Kim Wimpsett for doing the copyedit. The quality of work in this issue is greatly
attributed to her skill.
Table of Contents
New Features in SharePoint 2010 ............................................ 1
       Upgrading ....................................................................................... 1
       Installing SharePoint 2010 Beta 2 ................................................... 3
                 SharePoint 2010 Prerequisites ................................................................. 5
                 SharePoint Server Installation .................................................................. 6
                 Configuration Wizard ................................................................................ 8
       Visual Interface ............................................................................. 10
                 Ajax Editing ............................................................................................. 11
                 Browser Support ..................................................................................... 12
                 One Note on Upgrading Design.............................................................. 13
                 Themes ................................................................................................... 13
       Document and Records Management .......................................... 15
                 Document Sets ....................................................................................... 15
                 Records Management ............................................................................ 17
       Lists............................................................................................... 17
                 XSL Lists? ............................................................................................... 17
                 List View Joins ........................................................................................ 18
                 List Throttling .......................................................................................... 19
                 List Validation.......................................................................................... 19
                 External Lists .......................................................................................... 20
       User Solutions ............................................................................... 20
       Client Object Model ....................................................................... 21
       Search........................................................................................... 21
                 FAST Search .......................................................................................... 22
       Business Intelligence .................................................................... 22
       Service Applications ...................................................................... 22
                 Managed Metadata Services .................................................................. 23
       SharePoint 2010–Related Software .............................................. 25
                 Visual Studio 2010 Tools for SharePoint ................................................ 25
                 SharePoint Designer 2010 ...................................................................... 26
                 Visio 2010 ............................................................................................... 27
                 SharePoint Workspace 2010 .................................................................. 28
                 Office Web Apps ..................................................................................... 28
Introduction
Asking the right question at the right time to the right people can trigger a landslide.

Welcome to the first edition of Introducing SharePoint 2010, the new subscription
issue from Understanding SharePoint Journal. Before we dive into the contents, I
want to tell you a bit about what to expect in the coming weeks and months.

Throughout the rest of 2009 and early 2010, I will guide you through all you need to
know about the upcoming release of SharePoint. With your subscription, you’ll get a
regular issue every few weeks, describing one particular topic regarding SharePoint
2010.

If you haven’t yet purchased a subscription, you can do so now on the website at
http://www.sharepoint2010beta.com/, but feel free to properly evaluate this issue to
see whether you want the remaining issues as well. On the website, you will also find
an overview of the coming issues.

In this issue, I will focus on the new features of SharePoint and guide you through
setting up SharePoint 2010 Beta 2.

SharePoint 2010 offers large changes on the surface, but you will also be pleased to
know that the core of SharePoint remains much the same. You will quickly become
familiar with the new interface, allowing you to focus on learning new features. Of
course, with this issue to guide you, you will have a good overview of these features.
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                                                                                                    Chapter
    I N T R O D U C I N G   S H A R E P O I N T   2 0 1 0




                               New Features in
                               SharePoint 2010
                               Learning more—every day.

                               This issue of Introducing SharePoint 2010 is all about the new features of
                               SharePoint 2010. Before we look into those features, however, I’ll take a few
                               moments to talk about upgrading from SharePoint 2007 to SharePoint 2010 and
                               also walk you through installing SharePoint 2010 Beta 2.

                               Upgrading
    I C O N   K E Y
                               With the massive amount of new features in SharePoint 2010, you may think that
                               upgrading will be problematic. Many will remember the process of upgrading from
 Valuable information
                               SharePoint 2003 to 2007 and cringe. In fact, I still get requests for assistance in
   Test your knowledge        upgrading from 2003 to 2007, and in many cases, the answer sadly is that you can’t.
 Exercise
   Caution
                               However, at its core, SharePoint 2010 is not using new technology at all. It is still an
                               ASP.NET 2.0 application. In fact, if all you want to do is get your existing solutions
                               up and running on SharePoint 2010, you will likely get away with simply changing
                               the reference of the Microsoft.SharePoint.dll to the new version and recompiling.

                               To show this, let me show you a screenshot that you may think you recognize; see
                               Figure 1.




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FIGURE 1. SHAREPOINT MANAGER

Figure 1 seems familiar, yes? Well, take a close look. Beyond the title change, you
may notice that this is in fact SharePoint Manager 2007 running on a SharePoint
2010 server, showing off the same information as is shown on a SharePoint 2007
server.

How is this possible? Well, as I said, the underlying technology does not change in
SharePoint 2010. A fairly complex application such as SharePoint Manager 2007
merely needs a DLL replacement and a single code change to work just as simply
as before.

      Note

      If you want the details on how to modify SharePoint Manager 2007 to
      work with SharePoint 2010, check out the following blog article:

      http://furuknap.blogspot.com/2009/11/sharepoint-manager-2010-sort-
      of.html


The reason why the code change is required, by the way, is that SharePoint
Manager 2007 uses a hard-coded registry key to find the install path (12 hive).
Since that path changes in SharePoint 2010, an update is required. So, unless your
solution uses any hard-coded references to [12], the DLL replacement should be
enough.




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Of course, such a simple change does not necessarily utilize any new functionality
of SharePoint 2010, but it will get your current solutions up and running.

Before you start developing on SharePoint 2010 Beta 2, though, be aware that the
actual SharePoint 2010 Beta installation is not upgradable to the release candidate.
Sadly, that goes for the content databases as well, so whatever you create on
SharePoint 2010 Beta will be lost when you need to go into release.

You may also want to check out Joel Oleson’s excellent paper on upgrading
preparations:

http://www.joeloleson.com/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?List=0cd1a63d%2D183c%2D4fc
2%2D8320%2Dba5369008acb&ID=252&Web=93d9618c%2Ddf0b%2D4aa0%2
Db8b1%2Dac8c0f2e2550

Installing SharePoint 2010 Beta 2
The first thing you must do prior to installing is to check the prerequisites.
SharePoint 2010 comes with a great prerequisite installer, but this gets you only part
of the way.

Jie Li of Microsoft has posted a great list of the requirements, and you should pay
particular attention to the need for SQL Server versions, including the cumulative
updates, as well as, and this is extremely important, the requirement of having
Active Directory. That’s right, from now on, your server must be part of Active
Directory, or you will be limited to the Standalone/Basic Install mode.

Here’s Li’s article:

http://blogs.msdn.com/opal/archive/2009/11/16/installation-notice-for-sharepoint-
2010-public-beta.aspx

You should also note that, at the time of this writing, Windows 2008 R2 is not
supported because of a required hotfix that is not yet available.

      Note

       Several of the requirements will prevent you from installing and
       configuring SharePoint if they are not met, so I’m not kidding when I
       say that you should follow them.


Let’s get started.

You’ll need to have a Windows Server 2008 machine with SP1 ready. I highly
recommend using a virtual machine for this.


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Prior to even starting the SharePoint 2010 Beta .exe file, you need to make a very
important choice. For a single-server lab setup, you basically have three choices as
to what you can install:

    •    Choosing the Standalone installation option, previously known as Basic
         Install.
         This should be done in one situation, and one situation only, and that is to
         win a bet that you can install SharePoint with fewer than ten clicks of the
         mouse.

         If you have not made such a bet, you should not pick the Standalone
         installation option. To quote Shane Young, “A puppy dies every time
         someone uses the Basic Install.”

    •    Joining your server to an Active Directory domain.
         Installation of anything other than the stand-alone installation using the
         standard installer requires a domain account. Local accounts do not work.

         Actually, for this option, you have two suboptions. You can join the server
         to an existing Active Directory domain or set up the server as a separate
         domain controller. Both of these options are suboptimal, but at least they’re
         far, far, far better than the stand-alone installation.

         Refer to the following TechNet article if you decide to set up your server as
         a new domain controller:
         http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc755103(WS.10).aspx

    •    Running a PowerShell fix to create a new configuration database with local
         user credentials prior to starting the SharePoint configuration wizard.

         Neil Hodgkinson of Microsoft has posted a nice recipe; thanks to Arif
         Shafique, also from Microsoft, for tipping me about this option:
         http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blogs/fromthefield/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID
         =112

The one thing you need to note, however, is that certain features actually require
domain functionality. In my setup, I ended up creating a local AD domain controller
on the server.

        Note

        In a perfect world, you’ll have two servers set up, one running Active
        Directory and one running SharePoint 2010. Until the day memory




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      grows on trees, however, you may want to settle for one of the
      previous options.


Once you have your server set up (at this point a Windows Server 2008 SP 1
server), start the installation of SharePoint. You will initially be met with a splash
screen, as shown in Figure 2.




FIGURE 2. SHAREPOINT SERVER 2010 SPLASH SCREEN

The only two useful links here are “Install software prerequisites” and Install
SharePoint Server.

SharePoint 2010 Prerequisites
Click the “Install software prerequisites” link first because this will launch a very
useful wizard that does all the heavy lifting of configuring your server for
installation, shown in Figure 3.




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      Note

      The full name of the wizard is Microsoft SharePoint Products and
      Technologies 2010 Preparation Tool. I think I’ll just call it the prep
      wizard.


You may be surprised to hear that the prep wizard is really, really good, at least
compared to both Beta 1 and previous versions of SharePoint where you usually
only got an error message if you lacked prerequisites.

The prep wizard will set up your environment and even download any required
software for you. Of course, you want your server to be connected to the Internet for
this functionality to happen.




FIGURE 3. PREREQUISITES WIZARD

Let the prep wizard finish its magic, and then click the Install SharePoint Server
option on the splash screen.

SharePoint Server Installation
Once you start the SharePoint installation, after inserting your product key and
accepting the license agreement, your first choice is whether to install a stand-alone
or server farm configuration, as shown in Figure 4.


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FIGURE 4. CONFIGURATON SELECTION

      Note

      This is where you make your important choice about which
      configuration to install. There is no simple way of changing your
      choice afterward, so consider carefully.


If you click the Standalone button, that’s basically the only choice you have to
make, but if you click the Server Farm button, you’ll need to select “Complete
installation” on the next screen. In either case, SharePoint will then continue to
install all the required files and services.

Also, if you decide to go with the farm configuration, you will need to install SQL
Server as well. Either SQL Server 2005 or 2008 will work, but you need a 64-bit
edition. For lab use, you can run this on the same server, if you have enough RAM.

Note also that for SQL Server you need to get the latest service pack and
cumulative update (CU) packages. You will not be able to configure SharePoint
after installation if you do not meet the minimum cumulative update level.
Currently, this is SQL Server 2005 SP3 CU 3 and SQL Server 2008 SP1 CU 2.

If you do not meet these requirements, SharePoint will protest during configuration
but give you an address where you can download the required CU, as shown in
Figure 5.




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FIGURE 5. SQL SERVER CU LEVEL NOT MET

You may install SQL Server at any time prior to running the configuration wizard,
so feel free to postpone the task until you have completed the SharePoint Server
installation.

Configuration Wizard
After the installation wizard completes installing files, it is time to face the
SharePoint Products Configuration Wizard. If you have ensured that you have SQL
Server running or you chose the Standalone option, you can start the configuration
wizard from the last page of the installation wizard.

If you’re going this route, there really isn’t anything you need to configure, so the
configuration wizard will just complete. If so, feel free to skip ahead to the next
section.

However, for farm installations, you need to provide a few settings for setting up the
farm, so hit Next and acknowledge the warning about restarting several services
during the configuration.

      Note

      This is where you would use Neil Hodgkinson’s PowerShell trick to
      create a configuration database if you choose to do so.


First, select to create a new farm. As in SharePoint 2007, you can also connect new
servers to existing farms, but for a single-server installation, no such farm exists.




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Next, you need to enter the configuration database connection details. These are
very similar to the SharePoint 2007 version, with the noted exception about a
mandatory domain user account for connecting to the database.

     Tip

      If you have not done so already, create a user account that will run the
      SharePoint services. You can create a normal user account without any
      special permissions, and as long as you have permissions to do so,
      SharePoint will give that user the correct permissions as part of the
      configuration setup.


Enter the name of the server you have set up, and then add the username and
password for the account that should run the services and serve as the access
account for the configuration database. Note that you need to include the domain
name in the username, as shown in Figure 6.




FIGURE 6. CONFIGURATION DATABASE SETTINGS




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Next, you need to create a passphrase for the farm. This is a new feature in
SharePoint 2010 and applies only to farm installations. Basically, any new server
that attempts to join the farm needs to supply this password in order to join the
farm.

Finally, review or modify the settings for the Central Administration web
application, and hit Next to get the summary of the configuration you have chosen.
When you click Next on the summary page, SharePoint will take its time setting up
SharePoint for you.

After configuration completes, the Central Administration website will launch, and
you can go through the Farm Configuration Wizard if you choose. The wizard
guides you through setting up the farm, including the service applications.
However, this step is optional; you can rerun the wizard at a later time or set up the
service applications manually.

Congratulations, you have now installed and configured SharePoint 2010 Beta 2.

Let’s look at what is new in SharePoint 2010. I’ll break this down into different
subsections.

Visual Interface
The most prominent change to the visual interface is the introduction of the Ribbon,
shown in Figure 7.




FIGURE 7. SHAREPOINT 2010 RIBBON

The Ribbon works much the same way as it does in Office 2007 and Office 2010
applications. The buttons on the Ribbon are contextual, meaning you’ll see buttons
and options that relate to the task you are currently performing.

For example, and this another new feature, if you want to edit the new wiki startup
page for a Team Site, you’ll get inline editing options for changing the text and
layout of that page, as shown in Figure 8.




                                          10
FIGURE 8. INLINE EDITING

Developers can extend the Ribbon, adding new controls both to existing pages and
to new application or site pages.

By the way, you should know that the fancy new front page of the Team Site is
really nothing more than a wiki page set as the welcome page for that site. You can
read more about that in the following blog post:

http://furuknap.blogspot.com/2009/10/web-edit-in-sharepoint-2010-or-is-it.html

Ajax Editing
Another very prominent visual feature is that editing and configuring now happens
using pop-up Ajax windows, as shown in Figure 9.




                                        11
FIGURE 9. AJAX EDITING

Notice that the Ribbon also works in these pop-up windows.

Browser Support
SharePoint 2010 will support a wider range of browsers. Out of the box, SharePoint
will support IE 7 and newer, Firefox, and Safari as Tier 1 browsers. This means that
all features will work in these browsers.

Microsoft also has a set of Tier 2 browsers, where most functionality will still work
but without guarantees or support. As has been reported previously, IE 6 is on that
list, so you need to start preparing your organization for a browser upgrade if you
haven’t already moved on from IE 6.

In addition, SharePoint 2010 will be WCAG 2 compliant, meaning it will adhere to
a certain standard for accessibility.

However, and this is important, SharePoint 2010 will not be XHTML compliant.
There seems to be some confusion about this, but Andrew Connell explains this in a
blog post:

http://www.andrewconnell.com/blog/archive/2009/11/04/sharepoint-2010-changes-
to-rendering.aspx




                                         12
Still, with the new default rendering of HTML content in SharePoint 2010, you are
likely to see far fewer problems in most browsers, and for the purists among you,
you can always fix the issues you need to fix in your own site, application, and
master pages.

One Note on Upgrading Design
If you have already created your own layout and master pages, you should start
preparing to redo many of those customizations. Because of the new rendering,
many elements have changed, and your CSS will likely not work without at least
some modification.

I have actually tried this in practice. Yesterday, I took one solution containing an
intranet that I have been developing for the last couple of months. By applying the
technique explained earlier in this chapter and replacing the reference to SharePoint,
I was able to upgrade the solution to work technically perfectly with SharePoint
2010 within 15 minutes.

However, as expected, the design for the built-in elements such as the Site Actions
and Personal Actions menus looked horrible and didn’t even work.

Themes
The themes in SharePoint 2007 were a sad story. Basically, you had a set of
predefined CSS themes but no supported way to change them or add new themes.

However, themes in SharePoint 2010 are based on Office themes files (THMX
files) that allow you to use a single theme file across various Office applications and
now also SharePoint.

To make this even cooler, you can also change the themes through the web interface
to change fonts and colors, as shown in Figure 10. You even get to preview the new
theme without applying it.




                                          13
FIGURE 10. CHANGING THEME

One last thing I’ll show you is the breadcrumb that was new to the release of Beta 2.
Every page now has a folder icon with a small green arrow on it, and clicking this
icon opens a hierarchy showing the current path in the site, as shown in Figure 11.




FIGURE 11. BREADCRUMB



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      Note

      Issue 2 of this series will walk you through the various new interfaces
      to give you a head start on evaluating SharePoint 2010.


Document and Records Management
Document management gets a serious overhaul in SharePoint 2010, and features
include document IDs, document sets, in-place records management, content
organizers, and improved offline capabilities.

Document Sets
A version of this section’s content was posted on my blog late in September.

SharePoint 2010 will introduce document sets. I know a lot of people have been
looking forward to this functionality.

Basically, a document set is a container for multiple documents (d’oh!) to which
you can assign certain metadata and treat that metadata as a single entity in many
ways. For example, you can utilize the new SharePoint 2010 Document ID feature
to keep track of where a document resides in a site collection, you can use the new
managed tagging solution to assign keywords to the document set, and you can
move or copy the entire set rather than the individual files.

So, how is this piece of magic accomplished? Well, ladies and gentlemen, give a
big round of applause for the genius at Microsoft who came up with the idea of
content types.

Content Types?
A document set is just another content type. In fact, it’s a folder content type,
meaning it inherits from the 0x0120 content type, meaning that other items can
attach to the document set, meaning, well, it’s a really creative use of content types.

Oh, you didn’t know folders were just content types? Well, now you know. There’s
nothing magic to them, no container functionality really; a folder is just an item to
which other items can attach.




                                          15
Back to the document set content type. As you will see—or have seen if you check
this out after the SPC2009 conference—document sets have a pretty neat user
interface called the Document Set home page. When you click a document set in a
library, as shown in Figure 12, you get to see an overview of the set in question and
have the option of uploading new documents, editing existing documents, setting
properties for the document set, and so on. This is done by setting a custom form for
the content type; it’s a form that displays the content of the document set as well as
the neat overview page.




FIGURE 12. DOCUMENT SET OVERVIEW

However, this is just the literal surface of the document set feature, and there is so
much more you need to know.

Custom Document Set
This all makes sense when you create a custom document set, however, and of
course, since the document set is a content type, you can in fact add your own
custom document set types.

First, document sets sport an entirely dedicated page for setting up the behavior of
the set, available from the content type setup page. You can select which content
types are allowed in a document set. This allows you to create a set of financial
documents, applications, or multimedia files and disallow adding other content than
what you intend.

You can also share metadata columns for items in the set. If you add a new column
to the document set, that column becomes available for sharing with the contained
documents. For example, you may want to add a Customer column on the
document set to store documents related to a customer, and any documents inside
the document set can then get the Customer column inherited from the set.



                                           16
You can also define which columns are displayed on the document set home page.
You can even edit the home page layout, design, and contents.

Finally, you can perform actions on the entire set. For example, Microsoft has
included a “Download set” feature that compresses all the files in a set into a single
zip file for download.

Records Management
If you have used SharePoint for records management prior to SharePoint 2010, you
will know that there are indeed many things that are left to the “wanted” feature list.

For example, the records center of SharePoint 2007 was awkward and required you
to move or copy a document away from its original location in order to utilize
records management. In SharePoint 2010, you can do in-place records management.

New features include a new content organizer that allows you to route documents
based on columns or content type, for example, by sorting all incoming documents
from a customer into a folder dedicated to that customer.

To read more about the new records management features of SharePoint 2010, I
highly recommend Mike Ferrara’s post on EndUserSharePoint.com, detailing the
changes and new features beyond what I have room for here:

http://www.endusersharepoint.com/2009/11/10/the-scoop-sharepoint-2010-records-
management/

Lists
Lists in SharePoint 2010 get an overhaul, but despite this, and as is the case for
many features, the underlying technology does not change radically. Your current
lists will continue to work, and your existing list definitions will keep rolling.

XSL Lists?
There has been some rumors that CAML View Schema is dead, and to some extent,
I am happy to tell you that this is indeed true.

If you have worked with custom views in code—perhaps you’ve read Building the
SharePoint User Experience and met Nigel—you know that creating even a simple
view in SharePoint 2007 requires thousands of lines of code.

Let me show you, in Figure 12, the default web part view of the Custom List
definition in SharePoint 2010 Beta 2.




                                          17
FIGURE 13. CUSTOM LIST VIEW

Now, I’ve closed about 20 lines of the Toolbar section, but beyond that, what you
see is all you need for a custom view in SharePoint 2010.

The trick here is that SharePoint 2010 does allow you to use XSL for your list views
rather than the dreaded CAML View schema. In this case, the list view is stored in
an out-of-the-box XSL file called main.xsl, which in turn references other XSL files
to render the output of a view.

XSL is a much more usable standard for rendering content than the CAML View
schema, and since it’s an open standard, you get much better tool support as well.
This is very evident in the new XSLT List View web part that ships with
SharePoint. Greg Chan of Microsoft has started a new series on the XSLT List
View web part on his MSDN blog:

http://blogs.msdn.com/sharepointdesigner/archive/2009/11/16/sharepoint-2010-list-
view-blog-series-part-1-introduction-to-the-new-list-view.aspx

List View Joins
This is definitely one of my favorite new features ever—not just in SharePoint, but
in any software product. Ever. This is about as cool as the original Elite game was
when it first came out.

OK, perhaps that’s a bit over the edge, but at the least, this is exceptionally cool.

You can now join data from multiple lists into a single view. That’s right, you can
now retrieve data from any list and present it as part of a single view.

This includes any external lists as well, so you can now put your legacy data
sources into SharePoint and utilize parts of that data in pure SharePoint list views as
well.


                                           18
The list join feature works much in the same way as SQL views, although the
syntax is very different. These joined views are defined in CAML code in the view
itself.

List Throttling
Another new feature of lists is automatic list throttling. You may have heard that
there was a recommended limit of 2,000 items on a single list in SharePoint 2007,
but there was no way to enforce this.

       Note

       The myth of 2,000 items applies to views only, including folder views.
       It was never a hard limit either, but one where Microsoft initially saw
       some performance degradation.

       Keep in mind, though, that the performance degradation was minimal
       and that the tests were performed on hardware from 2006.


In SharePoint 2010, administrators may enforce the limit of items in a view. By
default, this limit is set to 5,000 items, but administrators can change this for any list
or set of users or disable the feature completely.

      Note

       Issue 6 of this series will focus on all the various changes for
       SharePoint administrators.


List Validation
SharePoint 2010 also allows you to do validation of the input to a list, enforcing
either business or technical rules for what kind of data should be accepted. If you
have worked with calculated columns, the format of these validation rules is very
similar, as shown in Figure 13.




                                           19
FIGURE 14. LIST VALIDATION

For example, you can disable the editing of items using a simple validation rule
such as [Modified]<[Created]. This will disallow editing if the Modified date is later
than the Created date, which it will be for any subsequent edits after item creation.
In previous version of SharePoint, this required .NET code.

External Lists
A competitor for the title of Best New Feature in SharePoint 2010 is the Business
Connectivity Services (BCS). BCS replaces the horrible Business Data Catalog
from SharePoint 2007, and frankly it’s a replacement you’ll love dearly if you want
to connect SharePoint to external data.

BCS allows you to connect any data source and work with the data in that data
source almost as if it were a standard SharePoint list. This is what is known as an
external list.

There are a few limitations, but you can work with the normal CRUD operations
(Create, Read, Update, Delete), and you can use external lists as part of a joined
view.

User Solutions
You may have heard about something called the Solution Sandbox. In short, the
Solution Sandbox allows you to deploy solutions to a single site collection rather
than to a web application. But it gets a lot better.




                                          20
These site collection solutions are user uploadable, so end users can create or
download solution packages and deploy them to their sites without requiring web
application permissions. This includes .NET code for certain operations as well.

This may sound very scary, allowing users to run code. This is where the Solution
Sandbox comes into play.

The Solution Sandbox runs the .NET code in a limited environment to protect both
the performance and the security of your farm. You can limit these user solutions to
prevent that one faulty solution from consuming too many resources, and you can
even block solutions that you do not want running in your environment.

Client Object Model
For developers, the new Microsoft.SharePoint.Client namespace offers an easy way
of creating client applications for use against SharePoint sites. This includes both
regular applications and Silverlight applications, as well as web-based applications.

The client object model provides a subset of the full SharePoint object model,
enough to work with major components such as lists, users, content types, sites, and
so on.

Ton Stegeman has written a blog post showing how to use the client object model in
JavaScript (or ECMAScript, really):

http://www.tonstegeman.com/Blog/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=118

What is cool with the client object model is that you as a developer do not need to
learn a completely new object model. The client object model has more or less the
same objects as the regular object model, and the behavior is also very similar.

Search
There are also improvements to search in SharePoint 2010. Search in SharePoint is
now served by three products: Search Server 2010, SharePoint Search, and FAST
Search for SharePoint 2010. Licensing is available from free (Search Server 2010)
to expensive (FAST Search for SharePoint 2010).

All the search engines offer improved search over previous versions, such as
relevance and query completion. Of course, the feature set increases with the more
expensive editions, but for most smaller organizations, the free Search Server 2010
will do a great job.




                                         21
FAST Search
After Microsoft purchased FAST Search and Transfer, everyone has been looking
forward to seeing what Redmond was going to do with the company. To us as
SharePoint people, perhaps the biggest news is that SharePoint gets a special FAST
search engine, titled FAST Search for SharePoint 2010.

FAST has been a market leader for enterprise search for many years, but unless you
had a wallet the size of Egypt, you were unlikely to be able to share in the goodness.
However, the new engine promises both cheaper and easier access to FAST for
SharePoint sites.

Business Intelligence
You find further new features in the Business Intelligence category, dubbed
Insights. Excel Services and the dashboards are still with us, but there are several
new features as well.

Related to Excel Services is SQL Server PowerPivot, a web-based service
previously known as Gemini. In short, users can now navigate and query massive
datasets in their browsers in microseconds. An Excel spreadsheet with tens of
millions of rows would take quite literally forever to download, but PowerPivot
makes filtering and working with data such as this very fast.

For enterprise license holders, Performance Point is now included. Performance
Point prior to SharePoint 2010 was a stand-alone SharePoint-based business
intelligence tool that Microsoft decided to include in the package for SharePoint
2010. Performance Point is great for setting up dashboards and getting insights into
business data, including drilling down into details in the browser.

The previously mentioned BCS improves Insights even more, allowing you to
expose other business data in SharePoint and utilize it as part of KPI dashboards or
in other business intelligence solutions.

Service Applications
A major change in architecture, however, is that of service applications. Out is the
old Shared Services Provider, and in is the new method for sharing data and
services across an organization.

Service applications are individual services such as search, user profiles, Excel
Services, and others. However, rather than being part of one monolithic application
as was the case for Shared Services, the service applications are individual services
that can be turned on and off as needed.




                                          22
Further, these service applications can expose themselves as WCF services to any
location anywhere. If you have no idea what that means, think of it like software as
a service where you can expose services in your SharePoint farm to someone else
either in your organization or on the Internet.

Companies may, for example, expose their user profile services to each other to
allow for cross-company people search. Other organizations may want to build a
giant Excel services rendering farm and allow other farms to utilize that service so
they do not have to implement it themselves.

Developers can also create new service applications and harness the power of
SharePoint to create completely new features either locally or globally.

The potential for service applications is enormous. My absolute favorite service,
however, is the Managed Metadata Services.

Managed Metadata Services
With Managed Metadata Services, you can define and manage a central set of
metadata throughout your farm. You can then use these sets of metadata as
metadata in lists or content types, as tags for tagging content, or for other uses.

These sets of metadata are stored in term sets. For each term set, you can set
permissions and optionally allow users to extend the set by providing custom
values.

One vast improvement served by the Managed Metadata Services is the optional
content types distribution. You can now centrally define and manage content types
and allow your site collections to subscribe to these content types.

On the next page, in Figure 14, you can see the overview of the various service
applications that ship out of the box with SharePoint 2010.




                                           23
FIGURE 15. SERVICE APPLICATIONS IN SHAREPOINT 2010




                              24
SharePoint 2010–Related Software
Together with SharePoint 2010, Microsoft has launched a series of related software
packages. All these software packages are also available for TechNet and MSDN
subscribers and will be available to the general public “real soon now.”

Visual Studio 2010 Tools for SharePoint
The new version of Visual Studio is said to launch at the same time as SharePoint
2010. What is most important, however, are the Visual Studio 2010 Tools for
SharePoint, offering a much improved development experience.

That’s the marketing talk, and of course “much improved” is a relative term and
likely true if you are talking about the existing Microsoft tools for SharePoint,
namely, the Visual Studio extensions for Windows SharePoint Services (VSeWSS).

      Note

      Readers may know that I am a bit fan of WSPBuilder and have yet to
      be impressed with the tools provided by Microsoft. Take this as
      coming from someone who is a huge fan of a competing product.


Visual Studio 2010 Tools for SharePoint offer a set of project and item types that
will likely speed up your SharePoint development. For example, there is a new
Visual Web Part project that makes developing web parts in a the visual designer
easier. Although this has been possible in previous versions, it did require a lot of
manual work or third-party tools such as Jan Tielens’ SmartPart for SharePoint:

http://www.codeplex.com/smartpart

One very cool feature of Visual Studio 2010 is the visual interface to configure
solutions and features. This will save you a lot of time writing manual code,
especially if you don’t speak CAML fluently.

A couple of other features are also useful. For example, you can now import a WSP
solution, including the new WSP-based site and list templates, directly into a new
SharePoint solution. This is quite possible now too, however, because WSPs are
really just CAB files with a strange extension. Unpack the CAB file, and copy the
contents into your project to achieve the same result.

You can do the same with the new reusable workflows, and that brings us nicely to
the next software package I want to mention.




                                          25
     Note

      Issues 4 of this series focuses on Visual Studio 2010 and the
      SharePoint tools, while issue 5 will focus on what is new for
      developers.


SharePoint Designer 2010
SharePoint Designer 2010 finally becomes a full Office application and looks a lot
more like a modern application than the previous version. You get the new Office
toolbar.

You can now also use SharePoint Designer for tasks that the previous version could
not, such as creating content types and even designing new Business Connectivity
Services, called External Content Types. Using SharePoint Designer 2010, you can
now create a full CRUD connection to external data without writing a single line of
code.

And of course, SharePoint Designer 2010 improves on workflows. In the previous
version, SharePoint Designer workflows were very limited and felt like an add-on
to SharePoint Designer rather than an integrated part.

However, in SharePoint Designer 2010, the workflow experience has changed
radically. I have previously written about SharePoint Designer 2010 workflows in
two blog posts, so beyond showing you a brief screenshot in Figure 15, I will
instead direct you to those posts for more details.




                                        26
FIGURE 16. SHAREPOINT DESIGNER 2010 WORKFLOW

The two first looks at SharePoint Designer 2010 are available here:

SharePoint Designer 2010 Workflows First Look

http://furuknap.blogspot.com/2009/09/sharepoint-designer-2010-workflows.html

SharePoint Designer 2010 Workflow Second Look

http://furuknap.blogspot.com/2009/09/sharepoint-designer-2010-workflow.html

      Note

      Issue 3 of this series will go deeper into SharePoint Designer 2010,
      including a workflow overview.


Visio 2010
Speaking of workflow, Visio 2010 now offers basic workflow authoring. Business
users can use familiar tools to create the outline of a workflow and then export that
workflow to a SharePoint Designer workflow for configuration.

In addition, SharePoint now offers Visio Services that visualize Visio diagrams
inside the browser. Workflows authored in Visio also get a nice visual
representation of the workflow for monitoring how the workflow, well, flows.



                                          27
SharePoint Workspace 2010
SharePoint Workspace 2010 provides offline capabilities for SharePoint data. This
role was previously partly filled by Office Groove, but SharePoint Workspace 2010
goes beyond Groove in several areas.

Sadly, I haven’t been able to test SharePoint Workspace yet. However, the Office
team has created a nice 2:50-minute YouTube video that shows off SharePoint
Workspace:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNUxYjFJEs4

Office Web Apps
Microsoft announced it was picking up the glove thrown by Google and others in
the online office application arena. Its weapon is Office Web Apps.

The programs in Office Web Apps are browser-based adoptions of familiar
applications (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote) that allow users to edit,
create, and read Office documents on a range of platforms.

Office Web Apps will run on top of SharePoint 2010 and will integrate tightly with
SharePoint. Sadly, I haven’t had the opportunity to test the new Office Web Apps,
but I recommend you drop by the official Microsoft site to see more for yourself:

http://www.microsoft.com/office/2010/




                                        28
Final Thoughts and
Additional Resources
Never stop learning.

We’ve reached the end of this first issue of Introducing SharePoint 2010. You’ve
seen an overview of the new features of SharePoint 2010 and I hope gotten your
first SharePoint 2010 lab up and running.

As a subscriber, however, you can still look forward to many more issues
throughout the coming months. The next issue will walk you through more of the
new features and guide you through the changes between SharePoint 2007 and
2010.

If you haven’t purchased a subscription yet, you can do so at the Introducing
SharePoint 2010 web page:

http://www.sharepoint2010beta.com/

Until then, however, you may want to keep a keen eye on my blog, because I will
be posting several shorter articles and updates about SharePoint 2010:

http://furuknap.blogspot.com/

You can subscribe to updates as well, through the RSS feed at

http://feeds.feedburner.com/Furuknap

or using email by clicking this link (you will be prompted for an email address):

http://feedburner.google.com/fb/a/mailverify?uri=Furuknap&amp;loc=en_US

Finally, should you have questions or have problems with which you need help,
don’t be shy; send me an email at furuknap@gmail.com or
journal@understandingsharepoint.com.

Until next time, thanks for reading, and have a great SharePoint 2010 experience!

.b




                                         29
Other USP Journal Issues
What you have missed so far but can still get from our website.

Issue 1: SPCurrentUsers Explained
This issue deals with the solution SPCurrentUsers available from CodePlex and covers the following main topics:


     •     DelegateControls
     •     CustomAction, both CAML-based and Assembly-based
     •     Custom application pages in SharePoint, using code-behind files
     •     List deployment and column manipulation
     •     Solution setup using SharePoint event receivers

URL: http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/journal/volume-1/issue-1
Buy now!

Issue 2: Developing SharePoint Content Types
If you want to learn everything about developing SharePoint content types, you should get your hands on issue 2, covering
the following:


     •     Content type introduction
     •     Visual interface using FormTemplates
     •     Inheritance
     •     Behavior using event receivers
     •     Content types as folders
     •     Custom XmlDocument solutions

URL: http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/journal/volume-1/issue-2
Buy now!

Issue 3: SPTags Explained
If you have ever tried to build custom field types in SharePoint, you definitely want to pick up issue 3, covering the
following:


     •     Custom field type development
     •     SharePoint web part development
     •     Custom page development
     •     Custom web part properties
     •     Field type custom property storage

URL: http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/journal/volume-1/issue-3
Buy now!




                                                              30
Issue 4: SharePoint Designer Workflow
In issue 4 of Understanding SharePoint Journal, you will learn how to create workflows in SharePoint Designer. The issue
covers the following:


     •     Workflow in a nutshell
     •     SharePoint Designer workflow activities
     •     Workflow branching
     •     Working with variables
     •     Loops in SharePoint Designer workflows

URL: http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/journal/volume-1/issue-4
Buy now!

Issue 5: Beginning SharePoint Development
Issue 5 introduces you to development for SharePoint. You will learn the basics of various SharePoint development
techniques, including the following:


     •     Setting up your development lab
     •     Using Collaborative Application Markup Language
     •     Using the SharePoint object model
     •     Creating features and solutions from scratch
     •     Using event receivers and workflow
     •     Working with web parts

URL: http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/journal/volume-1/issue-5
Buy now!


Issue 6: SPThemes and SPTags Explained
Understanding SharePoint Journal presents two new solutions, SPThemes and SPSampleData, designed to teach you new
aspects of SharePoint development. In this issue, spanning 90 pages, you will learn the following aspects of SharePoint
development:


     •     DelegateControl development
     •     CustomAction
     •     User information list management
     •     Custom property storage using extension methods
     •     Programmatic list creation
     •     Custom application page development

URL: http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/journal/volume-1/issue-6
Buy now!


Issue 7: Introducing SharePoint Visual Studio
Workflows
In Introducing SharePoint Visual Studio Workflows, I will introduce you to authoring Visual Studio workflows and show
you various aspects of developing workflows for SharePoint in Visual Studio 2008.



                                                              31
      •     The development environment, including getting free or trial versions of all required software
      •     The workflow in a nutshell
      •     The Visual Studio workflow designer
      •     Sequential and state machine workflows
      •     SharePoint workflow activities
      •     Branching, conditions, and loops

URL: http://www.understandingsharepoint.com/journal/volume-1/issue-7
Buy now!


Special Issue 1: Using Nintex Workflow 2007
The first free issue of Understanding SharePoint Journal covers Nintex Workflow 2007. In this 128-page special issue of
Understanding SharePoint Journal, I will introduce you to Nintex Workflow 2007 and the following::


      •     How to install, configure, and test Nintex Workflow 2007
      •     How to use the Nintex workflow designer
      •     How to write completely custom workflows
      •     How to use and modify workflow templates and snippets
      •     How to use both sequential and state machine workflows, including combining the two
      •     How to develop a complete workflow solution to send “Get well soon!” greetings to sick employees
      •     Some of the gotchas, do’s and dont’s, and problems you may encounter
      •     Some best practices and advice on monitoring and managing workflows

URL: http://www.learnnintex.com/




                                                              32
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