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Apparatus And Method For Management Of Integrated Circuit Layout Verification Processes - Patent 5787006

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United States Patent: 5787006


































 
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	United States Patent 
	5,787,006



 Chevallier
,   et al.

 
July 28, 1998




 Apparatus and method for management of integrated circuit layout
     verification processes



Abstract

An apparatus and method for managing data obtained during the Design Rule
     Check (DRC) and Layout versus Schematic (LVS) verification procedures
     executed during the design of an integrated circuit. The apparatus is a
     data processing system which includes a database containing information
     regarding the schematics and layouts of the cells of an integrated
     circuit. The system accesses the database upon the completion of a DRC or
     LVS operation and queries the user as to whether the cell should be marked
     as successfully passing the appropriate verification procedure. A user is
     also able to access a report generating module to inspect the verification
     status of a cell in the IC design and generate a report showing the status
     of the verification procedures for each cell, organized according to one
     of several criteria.


 
Inventors: 
 Chevallier; Christophe J. (Palo Alto, CA), Hryciw; Yarema A. (San Jose, CA) 
 Assignee:


Micron Technology, Inc.
 (Boise, 
ID)





Appl. No.:
                    
 08/640,105
  
Filed:
                      
  April 30, 1996





  
Current U.S. Class:
  716/5
  
Current International Class: 
  G06F 17/50&nbsp(20060101); G06F 017/50&nbsp()
  
Field of Search: 
  
  






 364/488,489,490,491,578,468.01,468.28
  

References Cited  [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
 
 
 
5050091
September 1991
Rubin

5220512
June 1993
Watkins et al.

5301318
April 1994
Mittal

5463563
October 1995
Bair et al.

5475695
December 1995
Caywood et al.

5526517
June 1996
Jones et al.

5528508
June 1996
Russell et al.

5590046
December 1996
Arora

5623418
April 1997
Rostoker et al.



   Primary Examiner:  Voeltz; Emmanuel Todd


  Assistant Examiner:  Garbowski; Leigh Marie


  Attorney, Agent or Firm: Schwegman, Lundberg, Woessner & Kluth, P.A.



Claims  

We claim:

1.  A data processing system for use in managing and analyzing data generated during the design of an integrated circuit or an electronic system mounted on a printed circuit board,
comprising:


a database containing layout data files for a plurality of cells of the integrated circuit or system, the layout data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the layout for that cell;


an input device for allowing a user to designate a cell and its corresponding data files contained in the database;


design rule checking means for performing a design rule verification process on a layout data file of the designated cell;  and


a data processor capable of accessing the layout data file corresponding to the designated cell and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the design rule verification process to the layout data file.


2.  The data processing system of claim 1, further comprising:


a second data processor capable of accessing the modified layout data file corresponding to the designated cell and storing the time of the last modification of the layout and the appended time of successful completion of the design rule
verification process, and for processing the stored data to determine the time between the events corresponding to the stored data.


3.  The data processing system of claim 2, further comprising:


a report generator for generating a report showing the results of processing the data.


4.  The data processing system of claim 1, wherein the data processor appends the time of the successful completion of the design rule verification process in response to a user command.


5.  The data processing system of claim 1, wherein the data processor automatically appends the time of the successful completion of the design rule verification process when no errors are found upon completion of the process.


6.  The data processing system of claim 1, wherein the layout data file for the designated cell includes a reference to a layout data file for a second cell, and further, wherein the data processor is capable of accessing the layout file for the
second file and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the design rule verification process to the layout data file for the second cell.


7.  A data processing system for use in managing and analyzing data generated during the design of an integrated circuit or an electronic system mounted on a printed circuit board, comprising:


a database containing schematic and layout data files for a plurality of cells of the integrated circuit or system, the schematic data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the schematic for that cell and the layout
data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the layout for that cell;


an input device for allowing a user to designate a cell and its corresponding data files contained in the database;


layout versus schematic verification means for performing a layout versus schematic verification process on a layout data file and its corresponding schematic data file of the designated cell;  and


a data processor capable of accessing the layout data file corresponding to the designated cell and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process to the layout data file.


8.  The data processing system of claim 7, further comprising:


a second data processor capable of accessing the schematic and modified layout data files corresponding to the designated cell and storing the time of the last modification of the schematic and layout and the appended time of successful
completion of the layout versus schematic verification process, and for processing the stored data to determine the time between the events corresponding to the stored data.


9.  The data processing system of claim 8, further comprising:


a report generator for generating a report showing the results of processing the data.


10.  The data processing system of claim 7, wherein the data processor automatically appends the time of the successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process when no errors are found upon completion of the process.


11.  The data processing system of claim 7, wherein the data processor appends the time of the successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process in response to a user command.


12.  The data processing system of claim 7, wherein the layout data file for the designated cell includes a reference to a layout data file for a second cell, and further, wherein the data processor is capable of accessing the layout file for the
second file and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process to the layout data file for the second cell.


13.  A data processing system for use in managing and analyzing data generated during the design of an integrated circuit or an electronic system mounted on a printed circuit board, comprising:


a database containing schematic and layout data files for a plurality of cells of the integrated circuit or system, the schematic data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the schematic for that cell and the layout
data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the layout for that cell;


an input device for allowing a user to designate a cell and its corresponding data files contained in the database;


design rule checking means for performing a design rule verification process on a layout data file of the designated cell;


layout versus schematic verification means for performing a layout versus schematic verification process on a layout data file and its corresponding schematic data file of the designated cell;  and


a data processor capable of accessing the layout data file corresponding to the designated cell and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the design rule verification process and a successful completion of the
layout versus schematic verification process to the layout data file.


14.  The data processing system of claim 13, further comprising:


a second data processor capable of accessing the schematic and modified layout data files corresponding to the designated cell and storing the time of the last modification of the schematic and layout and the appended times of successful
completion of the design rule and layout versus schematic verification processes, and for processing the stored data to determine the time between the events corresponding to the stored data.


15.  The data processing system of claim 14, wherein the second data processor processes the data to determine the time between the last modification of the schematic and the last modification of the layout.


16.  The data processing system of claim 14, wherein the second data processor processes the data to determine the time between the last modification of the layout and the time of the successful completion of the design rule verification process.


17.  The data processing system of claim 14, wherein the second data processor processes the data to determine the time between the last modification of the layout and the time of the successful completion of the layout versus schematic
verification process.


18.  The data processing system of claim 14, further comprising:


a report generator for generating a report showing the results of processing the data.


19.  The data processing system of claim 18, further comprising:


an output device for displaying the contents of the generated report to the user.


20.  The data processing system of claim 18, wherein the report generator generates a report showing the output times sorted according to a name of the cell.


21.  The data processing system of claim 13, wherein the data processor appends the time of the successful completion of the design rule and layout versus schematic verification processes in response to a user command.


22.  The data processing system of claim 13, wherein the data processor automatically appends the time of the successful completion of the design rule and layout versus schematic verification processes when no errors are found upon completion of
the processes.


23.  The data processing system of claim 13, wherein the layout data file for the designated cell includes a reference to a layout data file for a second cell, and further, wherein the data processor is capable of accessing the layout file for
the second file and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the design rule verification process and a successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process to the layout data file for the second cell.


24.  A method of managing and analyzing data generated during the design of an integrated circuit or an electronic system, comprising:


constructing a database containing layout data files for a plurality of cells of the integrated circuit or system, the layout data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the layout for that cell;


designating a cell and its corresponding data files contained in the database;


performing a design rule verification process on a layout data file of the designated cell;  and


accessing the layout data file corresponding to the designated cell and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the design rule verification process to the layout data file.


25.  The method of claim 24, wherein the time of the successful completion of the design rule verification process is automatically appended to the data file when no errors are found upon completion of the process.


26.  The method of claim 24, further comprising the steps of:


accessing the modified layout data file corresponding to the designated cell and storing the time of the last modification of the layout and the appended time of successful completion of the design rule verification process in a storage device; 
and


processing the stored data to output the time between the events corresponding to the stored data.


27.  The method of claim 26, further comprising the step of:


generating a report showing the results of processing the data.


28.  The method of claim 24, wherein the time of the successful completion of the design rule verification process is appended to the data file in response to a user command.


29.  The method of claim 24, wherein the layout data file for the designated cell includes a reference to a layout data file for a second cell, and further, wherein the method includes the step of:


accessing the layout file for the second file and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the design rule verification process to the layout data file for the second cell.


30.  A method of managing and analyzing data generated during the design of an integrated circuit or an electronic system, comprising:


constructing a database containing schematic and layout data files for a plurality of cells of the integrated circuit or system, the schematic data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the schematic for that cell, and
the layout data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the layout for that cell;


designating a cell and its corresponding data files contained in the database;


performing a layout versus schematic verification process on a layout data file and its corresponding schematic data file of the designated cell;  and


accessing the layout data file corresponding to the designated cell and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process to the layout data file.


31.  The method of claim 30, further comprising the steps of:


accessing the schematic and modified layout data files corresponding to the designated cell and storing the time of the last modification of the schematic and layout and the appended time of successful completion of the layout versus schematic
verification process in a storage device;  and


processing the stored data to output the time between the events corresponding to the stored data.


32.  The method of claim 30, further comprising the step of:


generating a report showing the results of processing the data.


33.  The method of claim 30, wherein the time of the successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process is appended to the data file in response to a user command.


34.  The method of claim 30, wherein the time of the successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process is automatically appended to the data file when no errors are found upon completion of the process.


35.  The method of claim 30, wherein the layout data file for the designated cell includes a reference to a layout data file for a second cell, and further, wherein the method includes the step of:


accessing the layout file for the second file and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process to the layout data file for the second cell.


36.  A method of managing and analyzing data generated during the design of an integrated circuit or an electronic system, comprising:


constructing a database containing schematic and layout data files for a plurality of cells of the integrated circuit or system, the schematic data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the schematic for that cell, and
the layout data file for each cell containing a time of the last modification of the layout for that cell;


designating a cell and its corresponding data files contained in the database;


performing a design rule verification process on a layout data file of the designated cell;


performing a layout versus schematic verification process on a layout data file and its corresponding schematic data file of the designated cell;


accessing the layout data file corresponding to the designated cell and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the design rule verification process and a successful completion of the layout versus schematic
verification process to the layout data file;


accessing the schematic and modified layout data files corresponding to the designated cell and storing the time of the last modification of the schematic and layout and the appended times of successful completion of the design rule and layout
versus schematic verification processes in a storage device;


processing the stored data to output the time between the events corresponding to the stored data;  and


generating a report showing the results of processing the data.


37.  The method of claim 36, wherein the step of appending the time of the successful completion of the design rule verification process and the successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process to the layout data file is
performed automatically when no errors are found upon completion of the processes.


38.  The method of claim 36, wherein the step of processing the stored data determines the time between the last modification of the schematic and the layout.


39.  The method of claim 36, wherein the step of processing the stored data determines the time between the last modification of the layout and the time of the successful completion of the design rule verification process.


40.  The method of claim 36, wherein the step of processing the stored data determines the time between the last modification of the layout and the time of the successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process.


41.  The method of claim 36, wherein the step of generating a report generates a report showing the output times sorted according to a name of the cell.


42.  The method of claim 31, wherein the step of appending the time of the successful completion of the design rule verification process and the successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process to the layout data file is
performed in response to a user command.


43.  The method of claim 36, wherein the layout data file for the designated cell includes a reference to a layout data file for a second cell, and further, wherein the method includes the step of:


accessing the layout file for the second file and modifying that file by appending a time of a successful completion of the design rule verification process and a successful completion of the layout versus schematic verification process to the
layout data file for the second cell .  Description  

TECHNICAL FIELD


The present invention is directed to the design and fabrication of integrated circuits, and more specifically, to an apparatus and method for managing the design rule and layout versus schematic verification procedures used when producing such
circuits.


BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION


The design of an integrated circuit (IC) typically includes the production of a schematic representation showing the circuit elements (termed cells) for each functional unit of the IC and the interconnections between the elements.  The schematic
is translated into a physical layout which is a geometric representation of the circuit composed of polygons and interconnecting paths.  The layout specifies the position and relative dimensions of the layers of materials which are deposited on a silicon
wafer to form the circuit elements and interconnections.


A layout for an integrated circuit typically contains a multitude of cells, with each cell or group of cells corresponding to a circuit element having a defined function (e.g., a logic gate, a multiplier, a memory cell, etc.).  If the schematic
for a cell is changed during the design process, then the layout for that cell must be modified to reflect the new design.  "Layout versus Schematic" (LVS) verification is a procedure by which the schematic of the cell is compared to the layout to be
certain that the layout properly corresponds to the functionality of the schematic.  This is typically done by comparing a netlist derived form the schematic with one derived from the layout.


In addition to maintaining the proper correspondence between a schematic and the physical layout, it is also necessary that the integrated circuit design be consistent with the technology, equipment, and capabilities of the fabrication process. 
"Design Rule Checking" (DRC) is a process by which the layout is checked to make certain that the layout does not violate any of the geometrical relationships dictated by electrical rules and the fabrication process (metal-to-metal spacing, minimum
feature width, etc.).  Typically, DRC is carried out by applying DRC rules (as defined by the fabrication foundry) to a DRC program which is run on the layout database files.


During the process of designing the integrated circuit, the schematic for a cell may be changed many times.  Each time the schematic is changed, the layout is also changed to reflect the new schematic.  Thus, each change in a cell's schematic
requires a new layout and a LVS verification.  Similarly, each change in the layout (as a result of a schematic change or a change in the fabrication process) requires a DRC procedure to verify the correctness of the new layout.  An IC may contain
hundreds of cells, with cells being redesigned concurrently.  Thus, the LVS and DRC verification procedures will be executed many times, and tracking the design stage and verification status of each cell design is an important task which can reduce the
overall design time.


An alternate approach is to run the DRC and LVS procedures at the end of the overall design process.  This is generally not desirable because DRC and LVS errors discovered at that time will have affected the entire design and are more difficult
to fix at that point.  This approach would end up requiring more time overall to implement.


Presently, information regarding the verification status of an IC design can be tabulated by hand.  The disadvantage of determining the status by this method is that preparing a verification status report by hand is a slow and unreliable task. 
At the other extreme, while a purely automated system would speed up the process, it would not be capable of recognizing an error or inconsistency in the DRC or LVS verification processes.


What is desire d is an apparatus and method for managing the tracking of the results of the DRC and LVS verification procedures used in designing an integrated circuit which is faster and more reliable than the methods currently used in the
semiconductor industry.


SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION


The present invention is directed to an apparatus and method for managing the data obtained during the DRC and LVS verification procedures executed during the design of an integrated circuit.  The apparatus takes the form of a data processing
system which includes a database containing information regarding the schematics and layouts of the cells of an integrated circuit.  The data processing system accesses the database upon the completion of a Design Rule Check (DRC) operation which is
performed on a cell.  A user is then queried as to whether the designated cell should be marked as successfully passing the verification procedure by having the cell's layout file updated to reflect the current date and time.  Similarly, upon completion
of a Layout versus Schematic (LVS) operation, a user is queried as to whether the cell should be marked as successfully passing the verification procedure by having the cell's layout file updated to reflect the current date and time.


This approach allows the user to examine the results of the completed verification processes and apply a desired set of criteria in evaluating whether to update the layout file.  In addition to having the layout file updated based on user
determined criteria, the present invention may be operated in a mode in which the layout file is automatically updated upon completion of a DRC or LVS verification process in which no errors are found.


A cell's layout file may not be a single data file, but instead can consist of a set of linked files which relate to the cell and contain the data.  These linked files might include, for example, a file containing graphical layout data and a file
containing textual information and verification status updates relating to the layout.


In addition, a layout for a cell may contain references to other layouts, thus creating a hierarchical tree of layouts.  This would correspond to the situation in which a cell contained other cells.  In such a case, when a DRC verification
process is executed for a particular cell, the DRC program may access and check not only the designated cell, but also each cell lower in the hierarchy.  When the layout file for the designated cell is updated to reflect completion of the DRC process,
the layout file of each linked layout file in the hierarchy below it can also be accessed and updated.


After the DRC and LVS files for the designated cell (and if desired by the user, for all related cells in its hierarchy) have been updated, or at any time during the design process, a user can access a report generating module of the present
invention to inspect the verification status of a cell in the IC design.  For each cell selected, the schematic database is accessed and the latest modification data is noted.  The layout database is then accessed and the latest modification date, latest
updated DRC procedure, and latest updated LVS procedure dates are noted.  The invention then determines the amount of time that has elapsed between the layout modification date and the schematic modification date, the layout modification date and the
updated DRC date, and the layout modification date and the updated LVS date.  The invention then sorts the data and generates a report showing the status of the verification procedures for each cell, organized according to one of several criteria.  This
permits a project manager to identify project priorities based on the time differences between the various verification procedures performed on a cell.


The apparatus and method of the present invention can be applied to the design of a board-level system as well as to integrated circuits.  This is because the process of printed circuit board layout is performed with many of the same tools and
methods as those used for integrated circuit design.


Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description and accompanying drawings. 

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS


FIG. 1 shows the functional components of a data processing system which enables a user to access the schematic design and layout design database files generated during the design of an integrated circuit.


FIG. 2 shows how the schematic design and layout design database files may be accessed by multiple users during a design project using a data processing system of the type shown in FIG. 1.


FIG. 3 is a flowchart showing the DRC and LVS verification update steps of the integrated circuit verification data management method of the present invention.


FIG. 4 is a flowchart showing the stages of the present invention which correspond to the data retrieval and analysis steps performed on data previously appended to the layout file of a cell.


FIG. 5 illustrates the contents of the database containing the schematic design and layout design data files, and the verification tracking data appended by the present invention.


FIG. 6 is an example of a report generated by the integrated circuit layout verification data management apparatus of the present invention. 

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION


FIG. 1 shows the functional components of a data processing system 10 which enables a user 14 to access the schematic design and layout design database files 12 generated during the design of an integrated circuit.  Data processing system 10
includes a computer 16 or other data processing device which is capable of accessing data files contained in database 12 in response to commands entered by means of a data input device, such as keyboard 18.  Computer 16 causes the requested data file to
be displayed on monitor or screen 20 in response to the entered command(s).


Database 12 contains graphic and textual information contained in the form of data files.  One section of the database contains data files showing the schematics of each of the cells needed for a particular integrated circuit design.  A second
section of the database (or a second database) contains data files showing the layout designs which correspond to each of the schematics.  Textual information in the form of schematic and/or layout design modification dates and verification dates (of DRC
and LVS verifications) are also stored in the appropriate sections of the database(s), in the same files as the graphical information, or in files linked to those files.  The layout modification dates are only updated if the layout is modified.  A layout
modification date cannot be changed as a result of a DRC or LVS process.


FIG. 2 shows how the schematic design and layout design files contained in database 12 may be accessed by multiple users during a design project using a data processing system 10 of the type shown in FIG. 1.  In FIG. 2, a total of three users 14
are shown accessing the files of database 12 using the components of system 10.  In a typical design environment, user 1 and user 2 would be a circuit designer (responsible for designing the schematic) or layout designer, while user 3 would be the
manager for the integrated circuit development project.


FIG. 3 is a flowchart showing the DRC 100 and LVS 110 verification update steps of the integrated circuit verification management method of the present invention.  As indicated by the figure, the schematic for a cell and the layout design are
developed concurrently.  This is because there are typically hundreds of cells in an integrated circuit design and the schematics and layouts for the cells are in various stages of completion.  In addition, the schematic is often redesigned during the
process, necessitating a new version of the layout design.


The current schematic and layout for all of the cells in the integrated circuit are stored in the appropriate sections of the database.  As noted, they may also be stored in separate databases as well, with one database containing the schematics
and another the layouts.  Note that a layout for a particular cell may contain a reference to a layout file for another cell which is contained within the design of the designated cell.  This serves to form a linked set or hierarchical tree of related
layout cells.  The present invention may be used to update just the layout data file of the designated cell, or may be used to update the layout files of the designated cell and all other cells beneath the designated cell in the hierarchy.


A vendor supplied program is typically used to apply the appropriate manufacturing rules to the cell layouts contained in the layout database.  This serves to execute the design rule checking (DRC) 120 function.  A second program performs the
layout versus schematic (LVS) function 122 by comparing the function of the layout design for a cell to the schematic for that cell.


Both the DRC 120 and LVS 122 routines are typically embedded in a standard Electronic Design Automation (EDA) environment.  The EDA environment is a commercially available framework which includes end user level capabilities to read and write to
the schematic and layout database files.  This allows retrieval of cell names, representation data, and date of last change for the design of each cell.  In addition, most commercial EDA packages include an end user accessible procedural language which
can be used to write programs tailored to specific user needs, where such programs include a user interface and are capable of accessing and manipulating the data files.  Generally, any EDA environment and compatible procedural language which have
capabilities of the type noted may be used.


In a typical integrated circuit design program, a schematic for each cell is developed and converted to a layout.  Upon completion of a layout design, the DRC verification process is executed.  In accordance with the present invention, a
subroutine (labelled 100 in the figure) is then executed to update the layout data file for the cell.


Subroutine 100 performs two primary functions: 1) it causes a property named "good DRC done", which indicates the date of the last good DRC run, to be appended (if it does not already exist) to the layout design data file; and 2) it queries the
user as to whether the layout data file should have the "good DRC done" property updated with the current date and time.  Thus, upon completion of a DRC verification run, subroutine 100 causes a dialog box to appear on the user's terminal which queries
the user as to whether the cell's "good DRC done" property should be updated.  This permits the user to examine the DRC verification results and determine if they contain any indications of false errors or other potential problems.  The user is given the
option of updating the property by responding "Yes" to the query, or not updating the property by responding "No" or "Cancel".


If the user is satisfied with the verification results, they would respond "Yes" and the subroutine would automatically update the "good DRC done" property of the layout data file with a data string consisting of the time and date of the
completed DRC process.  This would indicate a user-determined successful verification.  If the designated cell's layout file contains references to related layout files representing a cell or cells contained within the designated cell, then the user will
have the option of updating the layout file of the designated cell, or of updating the layout files of the designated cell and the related cells.


Upon completion of the execution of subroutine 100 (or concurrent with it), LVS verification 122 is carried out.  As noted, this process verifies that the layout design correctly corresponds to the verified schematic design.  Upon completion of a
LVS verification run, and in accordance with the present invention, a subroutine (labelled 110 in the figure) is then executed to update the layout data file for the cell.


Subroutine 110 performs two primary functions: 1) it causes a property named "good LVS done" to be appended (if it does not already exist) to the layout design data file; and 2) it queries the user as to whether the layout data file should have
the "good LVS done" property updated with the current date and time.  Thus, upon completion of a LVS verification run, subroutine 110 causes a dialog box to appear on the user's terminal which queries the user as to whether the cell's "good LVS done"
property should be updated.  This permits the user to examine the LVS verification results and determine if they contain any indications of false errors or other potential problems.  The user is given the option of updating the property by responding
"Yes" to the query, or not updating the property by responding "No" or "Cancel".


If the user is satisfied with the verification results, they would respond "Yes" and the subroutine would automatically update the "good LVS done" property of the layout data file with a data string consisting of the time and date of the
completed LVS process.  This would indicate a user-determined successful verification.  As mentioned with regard to the updating of the layout files after a DRC verification, if the designated cell's layout file contains references to related layout
files representing a cell or cells contained within the designated cell, then the user will have the option of updating the layout file of the designated cell, or of updating the layout files of the designated cell and the related cells.  Note that
subroutines 100 and 110 are executed for each cell layout design.


Because the described subroutines allow the layout designer (or other user) to update the cell database files based on the customary criteria applied when manually evaluating whether a successful verification has occurred (a completed run with
either no errors, false errors, or only non-critical errors), the present invention is more flexible and less prone to error than a routine which automatically marks a cell data file as passing a DRC or LVS procedure once a verification run is completed. This is because false verification run errors would not prevent the data files from being updated when the present invention is used.  For example, a false verification run error could occur in a situation in which a pattern is to be allowed for test
purposes, but does not meet design rules allowed for the rest of the chip.  This might occur if the spacing between two metal lines was required to be at least 3 microns, but the test pattern were drawn to have a 2.5 micron spacing.  This situation would
produce a "false error" because the DRC program would check the layout to insure that all metal lines were at least 3 microns apart.


Similarly, an error missed by the DRC or LVS verification run would not cause the verification time data to be updated because the user would have the option of indicating that they did not want this to occur.  Thus, the present invention
combines the accuracy of user interpretation of verification results (in determining whether a successful verification has occurred) with a reduction in the manual labor normally required to tabulate the results.


Another form of the present invention is one in which instead of letting the user decide whether the DRC or LVS process is successful, an automated updating operation is performed to indicate a successful process.  In this "no error" update
operation, the "good DRC done" property is updated only if the output of the DRC process yields zero errors, and the "good LVS done" property is updated only if the output of the LVS process shows a match between the cell schematic and layout. 
Typically, the output of DRC and LVS programs is such that a successful conclusion of the process can easily be easily determined from a run file or output file.  That information can then be used to update the "good DRC done" or "good LVS done" property
(by noting the date/time of the successful verification procedure).  This "no error" method of automatically updating the "good DRC done" and "good LVS done" properties is not as flexible as an update procedure based on user evaluation of the
verification results which would allow a successful verification to be noted when the DRC run produces only false errors or the LVS run produces only non-critical element mis-matches.


It is also noted that the present invention can be used in the form of a data processing system which manages and processes either the DRC verification or the LVS verification data in the indicated manner.  In such a situation, two data
processing systems would be used in conjunction to perform both the DRC and LVS data management operations.  If only one of the verification procedures was needed for a particular project, then only a data management system for that procedure would be
needed.


A further aspect of the present invention is shown in FIG. 4, which is a flowchart showing the stages of the present invention which correspond to the data retrieval and analysis steps performed on data previously appended to the layout file of a
cell.  This aspect of the invention takes the form of a subroutine 120 which analyzes the "good DRC done" and "good LVS done" properties of a cell's or cells' layout design file(s) and generates a report for use in managing the development cycle of the
integrated circuit design project.


At any point in the design cycle, the project manager or a layout designer can run subroutine 120 by accessing a menu selection.  The user is then asked to select which cell or cells to inspect 122.  For each selected cell, subroutine 120 then
accesses the corresponding schematic design database file and records the last time and date at which the schematic was modified 124.  Subroutine 120 then accesses the corresponding layout design database file and records the last time and date of a
layout modification, the latest "good DRC done" time and date, and the latest "good LVS done" time and date 126.


Subroutine 120 then analyzes the recorded data to produce a report for use in managing the project.  The subroutine then determines the amount of time (in seconds, minutes, hours, or days) between the following events (indicated as stage 128 in
the figure):


1) the latest schematic modification and the latest layout modification;


2) the latest layout modification and the latest "good DRC done" update; and


3) the latest layout modification and the latest "good LVS done" update.


The subroutine then tabulates the data and generates a report (stage 130) showing each cell name, the schematic page number for that cell, the latest schematic and layout modification dates, the latest "good DRC done" date, the latest "good LVS
done" date, and the information (items 1), 2) , and 3) above) determined from stage 128, all sorted according to cell name.  The subroutine is also capable of generating reports sorted according to the properties determined in stage 128 (stage 132), or
according to date of modification or verification or another property of interest.


The reports to be generated are typically determined by the user when subroutine 120 is called.  The reports are displayed on the user's terminal as well as being stored in a data file.  By inspecting the time differences between the noted
events, a layout designer or project manager can identify project priorities or obtain a quick "snapshot" of the status of the project.


If a schematic has a more recent date than a layout for a cell, it means that layout design changes may need to be done.  At the least, a LVS process needs to be run to verify that the schematic and the layout still match.  Similarly, if a
schematic has a more recent date than the "good LVS done" property, then an LVS should be run.


If a layout has a more recent completion date than the "good DRC done" property, then a DRC process should be run on the cell.  If a layout has a more recent completion date than the "good LVS done" property, then a LVS process should be run on
the cell.


Thus, the report can be used to identify those cells where the schematics are more recent than the layout or verification dates.  This can be done automatically through data comparisons performed by the program used to generate the report.  This
will tell the project manager how many cells need updates, giving them an indication of how much work still has to be done to complete the design process.


FIG. 5 illustrates the contents of the database (or databases) containing the schematic design and layout design data files, and the verification tracking data appended by the present invention.  As indicated in the figure, each cell in the
integrated circuit being designed has a corresponding schematic data file 200 and layout data file 210.  Schematic file 200 contains graphical information 202 representing the schematic for the cell, and textual information 204 representing the
modification and verification history of the schematic.  Layout file 210 contains graphical information 212 representing the layout for the cell, and textual information 214 representing the modification and verification history of the layout, and the
"good DRC done" and "good LVS done" data appended to the file by a user of the present invention.  A collection of schematic data files 200 and layout data files 210 form the database 220 which is accessed by the present invention (and which is
identified as element 12 of FIGS. 1 and 2).  The schematic and layout data files may of course be contained in separate databases.


FIG. 6 is an example of a report generated by the integrated circuit layout verification data management apparatus of the present invention.  The report shown in the figure is sorted according to cell name and indicates the date of the last
schematic change, last layout change, last "good DRC done" update, and the last "good LVS done" update.  The report also indicates those cells requiring an update of the layout, or the performance of a DRC or LVS process on the layout.


The terms and expressions which have been employed herein are used as terms of description and not of limitation, and there is no intention in the use of such terms and expressions of excluding equivalents of the features shown and described, or
portions thereof, it being recognized that various modifications are possible within the scope of the invention claimed.


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DOCUMENT INFO
Description: The present invention is directed to the design and fabrication of integrated circuits, and more specifically, to an apparatus and method for managing the design rule and layout versus schematic verification procedures used when producing suchcircuits.BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTIONThe design of an integrated circuit (IC) typically includes the production of a schematic representation showing the circuit elements (termed cells) for each functional unit of the IC and the interconnections between the elements. The schematicis translated into a physical layout which is a geometric representation of the circuit composed of polygons and interconnecting paths. The layout specifies the position and relative dimensions of the layers of materials which are deposited on a siliconwafer to form the circuit elements and interconnections.A layout for an integrated circuit typically contains a multitude of cells, with each cell or group of cells corresponding to a circuit element having a defined function (e.g., a logic gate, a multiplier, a memory cell, etc.). If the schematicfor a cell is changed during the design process, then the layout for that cell must be modified to reflect the new design. "Layout versus Schematic" (LVS) verification is a procedure by which the schematic of the cell is compared to the layout to becertain that the layout properly corresponds to the functionality of the schematic. This is typically done by comparing a netlist derived form the schematic with one derived from the layout.In addition to maintaining the proper correspondence between a schematic and the physical layout, it is also necessary that the integrated circuit design be consistent with the technology, equipment, and capabilities of the fabrication process. "Design Rule Checking" (DRC) is a process by which the layout is checked to make certain that the layout does not violate any of the geometrical relationships dictated by electrical rules and the fabrication process (metal-to-metal spac