Ullr Staff Manual by sjh18818

VIEWS: 18 PAGES: 31

									        Ullr
   Staff Manual



Our goal is the success of our students
  through Safety, Fun, and Learning

            Updated: 1-9-2008
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................................... 3

ULLR JOB DESCRIPTIONS ........................................................................................................................................................ 4

ULLR PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS (UPDATED 1-9-08) ........................................................................................................ 5
   BELLEVUE SKI SCHOOL - ELEMENTARY PROGRAM ........................................................................................................ 5
   BELLEVUE SKI SCHOOL - MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM ................................................................................................... 5
   BELLEVUE SKI SCHOOL - HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM......................................................................................................... 6
   ULLR SNOW SPORTS................................................................................................................................................................. 6
   HUSKY WINTER SPORTS ......................................................................................................................................................... 6
   CADET PROGRAM ..................................................................................................................................................................... 7
RIDING / SKIING MODEL........................................................................................................................................................... 8
   INTRODUCTION TO SKILLS - BY ED KANE ............................................................................................................................. 8
   PHASES OF SKILL DEVELOPMENT ...................................................................................................................................... 10
   EXERCISES................................................................................................................................................................................ 11
   CLASS HANDLING................................................................................................................................................................... 14
   TEAM BUILDING / ICE BREAKERS ....................................................................................................................................... 15
   GAMES....................................................................................................................................................................................... 17
   FINAL THOUGHTS ......................................................................................................................................................................... 19
   RACES ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 21
   ULLR PROFICIENCY RATING DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................................................... 22
     Alpine Skiing Proficiency Rating Descriptions ....................................................................................................................... 22
     Snowboarding Proficiency Rating Descriptions ..................................................................................................................... 22
ULLR POLICIES.......................................................................................................................................................................... 24
   TEACHING ASSIGNMENT POLICY (UPDATED 12-5-06) .................................................................................................................. 24
   ATTENDANCE POLICY (UPDATED 12-5-06)................................................................................................................................... 24
   LIFT ACCESS POLICY (UPDATED 2-4-03) ...................................................................................................................................... 24
   UNIFORM POLICY (UPDATED 12-8-06) ......................................................................................................................................... 25
   COMPENSATION POLICY (UPDATED 12-8-06) ............................................................................................................................... 25
   TRAINING POLICY (UPDATED 12-4-06) ......................................................................................................................................... 25
   CHAIR LIFT POLICY (UPDATED 12-4-06)....................................................................................................................................... 26
ULLR PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................................................................. 27
   SAFETY ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 27
   SKI SCHOOL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT ......................................................................................................................................... 29
     Procedure for Preventing Ski School Incidents....................................................................................................................... 29
     Procedure for Handling a Ski School Incident ....................................................................................................................... 31




CHANGE LOG:
 1/9/2008                     JQ                 ADDED SECTION ON TACTICS FOR CLASS PROBLEMS ON THE FINAL THOUGHTS PAGE, REVISED
                                                 CLASS TIMES, ADDED CHANGE LOG.
INTRODUCTION

Welcome to the Ullr Instructor Manual! This information package has been prepared so that you can know
what is expected of you and be prepared to provide a high level of professional service to our customers.
Please read over all the sections and be aware of your responsibilities. Since this manual was designed to
be a handy reference, you will want to keep it with you for use during the ski school day.

This Ullr Instructor Manual is your linkage to how Ullr is run. It is a product of your input and your views
on how Ullr can provide the best lesson experience for our students. Please let your director know if these
guidelines do not provide the information necessary for helping give our customers a first-class lesson. In
order for this manual and the Ullr policies to be effective, they must be followed. If the policies are
effective and followed, our customers will receive a consistent, quality product. In addition, each employee
will be confident in the support of Ullr management.

Have a clear goal. Find a coach. Listen to your coach. Practice. Be persistent. Enjoy the process.




Who is Ullr?

In Norse mythology Ullr was the Winter God. Ullr loved the cold, and delighted in traveling over the
country on his skis or skates. He also delighted in the chase, and pursued his game through the Northern
Forests.

He was so well skilled in the use of the bow and could go so fast on his skis that in these arts no one could
best him. As god of Hunting and Archery, he was represented with a quiver full of arrows, and a huge bow.
Skis being shield-shaped, and the snow with which he yearly enveloped the earth acting also as a shield to
protect it from harm during the winter, won for Ullr the surname of the Shield God.

In some parts of Europe still the customs of these days have survived and the skiers wear the medal with
Ullr engraved thereon as a charmed piece to protect or shield the wearer from harm when out on the snow.
ULLR JOB DESCRIPTIONS

Ullr is committed to working with you to accomplish any ski instruction goals you may set for yourself.
Here is a list of positions available in Ullr and what is required for each position:

Position              Description                                    Requirements
Cadet                 Trains for the inst. position, helps classes   Graduate of Inst. Training
Instructor            Teaches students, trains for Level 1 exam      Graduate of Inst. Training
Level 1 Instructor    Teaches students, trains for Level 2 exam      Pass Level 1 exam,>1 yr exp.
Level 2 Instructor    Teaches, supervises, trains for Level 3        Pass Level 2 exam,>2 yrs exp
Level 3 Instructor    Teaches, supervises, trains instructors        Pass Level 3 exam,>4 yrs exp
Supervisor            Teaches, helps instructors with classes        Lvl 2 or better, >5 yrs exp
Director              May teach, manages a customer program          Lvl 2 or better, >7 yrs. exp.
Technical Director    Manages instructor training program(s)         Lvl 3, TD certified,>7 yrs exp
Vice President        Manages all customer program at ski area       Lvl 3, held all prev. positions
ULLR PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS (Updated 1-9-08)


BELLEVUE SKI SCHOOL - ELEMENTARY PROGRAM

Client:        Elementary-age students, Grades 2 thru 5
Duration:      8 Weeks, Saturdays at Summit Central
Class Size:    6 to 8 MAX
Hours:         9:00 AM -     Morning Instructor Clinics (45 minutes)
               10:00 AM - Instructor Meeting in Ullr building at the base of Triple-60
               10:30 AM - Morning Classes Start
               12:45 PM - Lunch
               1:30 PM -     Afternoon Classes Start
               3:45 PM -     Classes End - Students return to buses
               4:30 PM -     Afternoon Instructor Clinics (45 minutes)
               5:30 PM -     End of Day
Assignments: Each instructor is assigned a single class that they work with for both AM and PM sessions
for all 8 weeks.



BELLEVUE SKI SCHOOL - MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM

Client:        Middle School-age students, Grades 6 thru 8
Duration:      8 Weeks, Saturdays at Summit Central
Class Size:    8 to 10 MAX
Hours:         9:00 AM -     Morning Instructor Clinics (45 minutes)
               10:30 AM - Instructor Meeting in Ullr building at the base of Triple-60
               11:00 AM - 1st Period Classes Start
               12:30 PM - 1st Period Classes End
               1:00 PM -     2nd Period Classes Start
               2:30 PM -     2nd Period Classes End
               3:00 PM -     3rd Period Classes Start
               4:30 PM -     3rd Period Classes End
               4:30 PM -     Afternoon Instructor Clinics (45 minutes)
               5:00 PM -     Students return to buses
               5:30 PM -     Buses leave the ski area

Assignments: Each instructor is assigned a minimum of 2 class periods each day for all 8 weeks except for
those instructors assigned to Level 1 and 2 classes which meet twice each Saturday for the first three weeks
(that makes 3 class periods for the first three weeks and 2 class periods for the last 5 weeks).
BELLEVUE SKI SCHOOL - HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM

Client:        High School-age students, Grades 9 thru 12
Duration:      8 Weeks, Saturdays at Summit Central
Class Size:    8 to 10 MAX
Hours:         9:00 AM -     Morning Instructor Clinics (45 minutes)
               10:30 AM - Instructor Meeting in Ullr building at the base of Triple-60
               11:00 AM - 1st Period Classes Start
               12:30 PM - 1st Period Classes End
               1:00 PM -     2nd Period Classes Start
               2:30 PM -     2nd Period Classes End
               3:00 PM -     3rd Period Classes Start
               4:30 PM -     3rd Period Classes End
               4:30 PM -     Afternoon Instructor Clinics (45 minutes)
               5:00 PM -     Students return to buses
               5:30 PM -     Buses leave the ski area

Assignments: Each instructor is assigned a minimum of 2 class periods each day for all 8 weeks except for
those instructors assigned to Level 1 and 2 classes which meet twice each Saturday for the first three weeks
(that makes 3 class periods for the first three weeks and 2 class periods for the last 5 weeks).

ULLR SNOW SPORTS

Client:      Families (Adults, teens, and children as young as 3 years old)
Duration:    4 or 8 Weeks, Saturdays and/or Sundays
Class Size:  3 to 6 MAX
Hours:       9:00 AM -      Morning Instructor Clinics (45 minutes)
             10:00 AM - Instructor Meeting in Ullr building at the base of Triple-60
             10:30 AM - Morning Classes Start
             12:30 PM - Lunch – students meet parents
             1:30 PM -      Afternoon Classes Start
             3:30 PM -      Classes End - Students meet parents
             4:30 PM -      Afternoon Instructor Clinics (45 minutes)
             5:30 PM -      End of Day
Assignments: Each instructor is assigned based on the needs of the program.

HUSKY WINTER SPORTS

Client:      Young Adults
Duration:    3 or 6 Weeks, Saturdays and Sundays
Class Size:  3 to 6 MAX
Hours:       9:30 PM -      Instructor Meeting in Ullr building at the base of Triple-60
             10:00 AM - Morning Classes Start (Sunday)
             12:00 AM - Morning Classes End
             12:00 AM - Lunch
             3:00 PM -      Afternoon Classes Start (Saturday)
             5:00 PM -      Afternoon Classes End
Assignments: Each instructor is assigned based on the needs of the program.
CADET PROGRAM

Goal:
Prepare individuals for future employment as a snow sports instructor with Ullr, Inc.

Summary:
The focus of this eight-week program is to help cadets understand the PSIA Skiing, Riding, and
Teaching Models. This will be accomplished through clinics and “on the job” training.

Each cadet will be matched with an experienced instructor during the teaching day. This
experienced instructor will be a mentor to the cadet for the season. During each class period that
the cadet spends with his/her mentor, the cadet will be asked to teach one exercise appropriate
for the class. Cadets will also be required to bring back to the cadet clinic something that they
learned from their mentor instructor. This can be an exercise, class handling technique, or
anything they found valuable. This will be shared during the cadet clinic period. The clinic will
also incorporate an exercise the cadet will be teaching that day, or the next week.

This course runs eight weeks. The degree of participation will determine the degree of success.
More participation will lead to better skills and increase the chance to be hired as an instructor.
Off the hill preparation is recommended in order to be ready to help your mentor instructor as
well as present material to your fellow cadets at clinics each week.

The program will start promptly at 10 AM each Saturday starting with the first ski school
day. Passes are handed out at that time. If you are late you may not be in time to receive
your pass for the day. If absences or tardiness becomes a problem, the cadet may be
asked to withdraw from the program.

The Cadet Program Schedule is available from the Ullr technical training staff.
RIDING / SKIING MODEL

Ullr uses the PSIA technical manuals as the main reference for all instructional information. If
you do not have a PSIA manual, please see your director or call the PSIA-NW office (see the
white pages of your phone book under Professional Ski Instructors of America for the most
current phone number).

Here is some additional information assembled by our technical staff:


INTRODUCTION TO SKILLS - By Ed Kane

The following is a brief introduction to the basic skiing skills. This text is by no mean intended to
be a complete discussion of the subject. More extensive information on skills and how they can
be applied in teaching can be found in the PSIA ATS III manuals which can be purchased from
the PSIA - NW office.

BALANCING

DEFINITION:                   Maintaining a comfortable, stable stance over the moving skis.
ACCOMPLISHED BY:              Keeping the center of mass of the body over the base of
                              support (the feet in slower turns or inside the turn for higher
                              speed turns).
MOST COMMONLY USED:           In all phases of skiing when the skis are moving.
EXERCISES THAT CAN BE USED TO IMPROVE BALANCING:
    Skiing with eyes closed                 Wedge change-up
    Skiing with boots unbuckled             Skating & skating turns
    Traverse with sidestep uphill           Traverse with sidestep downhill
    Turns on the inside ski                 Turns on the outside ski
    Linked turns on one ski                 Linked hockey slips

ROTARY / TURNING

DEFINITION:                Controlling the change in direction of the skis while remaining
                           in the same location on the hill or while gliding down the hill.
ACCOMPLISHED BY:           Applying rotary forces to either or both skis through rotary
                           movements of specific parts of the body. The most effective
                           body parts in applying this skill are the lower body (rotary
                           movement of the legs around the hip joint) or the upper body
                           (the trunk above the hips and the hips). Us of the former is
                           encouraged in the early stages of learning since movement of
                           the legs is more efficient and does not result in overturning due
                           to the inability to control the rotary movement of the more
                           massive upper body.
MOST COMMONLY USED:        When initiating, controlling, and finishing a turn.
EXERCISES THAT CAN BE USED TO IMPROVE TURNING:
    Linked wedge turns                     Medium radius turns in fall line
    Hop turns in fall line                 Short radius turns in fall line
      Linked hockey slips                     Comb. of med. & short radius turns
      Leapers                                 Floaters
      High speed wedge turns                  Linked stepping turns
      Turns around slalom gates               Turns around giant slalom gates

PRESSURING

DEFINITION:                   Controlling the distribution of weight on the skis.
ACCOMPLISHED BY:              Moving the center of mass forward and back along the skis,
                              from ski to ski (laterally from side to side) and up and down to
                              weight or unweight the skis.
MOST COMMONLY USED:           When initiating, controlling, and finishing a turn.
EXERCISES THAT CAN BE USED TO IMPROVE PRESSURING:
    Traverse with sidestep uphill           Traverse with sidestep downhill
    Linked wedge turns                      Falling leaf sideslips
    Linked wedge christies                  Linked open parallel turns
    Hop turns in fall line                  1000 step turns
    Linked medium radius turns              Linked short radius turns
    Linked hockey slips                     Linked stepping turns

EDGING

DEFINITION:                   Controlling the angle of the ski relative to the snow.
ACCOMPLISHED BY:              Lateral movement of the ankles, knees (done by
                              rotating the upper leg through movement of the joint at the hip),
                              hips, and the upper body. Lateral movement of the ankles is
                              somewhat restricted by the ski boot (but not completely) so this
                              joint is used to “fine tune” the edge angle. For slow and
                              medium speed turns edging through ankle and knee movement
                              is usually sufficient. High speed turns however, additional
                              lateral movement of hips and upper body to avoid excessive
                              stress at the knee joint due to the high loads experienced
                              during high speed turns (say in excess of 15 to 20 mph) and to
                              obtain sufficient edge angle to avoid skidding in the turn.
MOST COMMONLY USED:           During all phases of skiing - when preparing for initiating,
                              controlling, and finishing a turn.
EXERCISES THAT CAN BE USED TO IMPROVE BALANCING:
    Sidestepping up & downhill               Traverse with sidestep uphill
    Traverse with sidestep downhill          Skating & skating turns
    Linked wedge turns                       1000 step turns
    Linked traverse sideslips                Linked hockey slips
    Linked high speed wedge turns            Medium radius turns
    Stop christies                           Short radius turns for speed control
PHASES OF SKILL DEVELOPMENT

These phases co-exist with the Skiing and Riding Model progressions in order to provide a set of
goals beyond just the ability to perform the milestone turns. The instructor can guide the student
through these phases to help improve the student’s ability to ride at any of the levels in the Skiing
or Riding Models. In fact, the instructor should demonstrate the highest skill level they can
perform (and exaggerate for emphasis) while skiing / riding any of the milestone turns and any
exercises used at any level of the Skiing or Riding Model progressions.

DEVELOP BASIC SKILLS:
    Develop ability to control balance, rotary, pressure, and edging by adopting one set of 8-
    10 exercises that teach the basic skills and improve the student’s ability to ride in control
    on all terrain and in all snow conditions.

DEVELOP ROUND TURNS:
    Concentrate on consistency and uniformity of movements of the lower legs and ski or
    board emphasizing the brushing and edging of the skis or board in combination with rotary
    movements to develop carving and the resulting round turn shapes.

DEVELOP RHYTHMICAL MOVEMENTS:
    Practice medium and short radius turns stressing consistent rhythm from turn to turn.

TURNS:
    Linked milestone turns.
EXERCISES

Here are some drills which can be used in achieving the task, movement, or skiing goals that
have been presented throughout this manual. The exercises listed are by no means an
exhaustive list, but rather just a sampling of the types of drills that are effective in the various
situations covered. Some are specifically for skiing or snowboarding, but several work well in
either case. It is up to you, the instructor, to collect more exercises as you gain more experience
from your successes (and failures!).

WALKING / STEPPING: Here are some things to do that will help your class start to achieve
some balance in the flats. These should all be done with one foot free first. Skiers can later do
these with both skis on and using poles. First, set some target (a cone, a ski pole, your sign) and
have everyone move to it. Next, walk small, tall, fast, slow. Try turning in circles. Finally, some
sidestepping and herringbone on a slight slope.

STRAIGHT RUNNING:           On a very shallow slope the students can straight run with feet apart
or together; with weight on one foot, both feet, and moving the weight from foot to foot; with a tall
stance, with a low stance; with weight forward, with weight back.

WEDGE TURNS:               Here are some things to do to help the students explore their new
mobility. Try hopping from a narrow wedge to a wide wedge and back again. Press the tails
from a narrow wedge to a wide wedge. From a narrow wedge run through all the straight running
exercises (above).

WEDGE CHANGE-UP:              On a very shallow slope the skier starts down the fall line in a straight
run, then pushes the skis’ tails apart into a wedge, and finally pulls the skis back together again
parallel into a straight run position. This is repeated as appropriate for the slope, skier, and class
situation. This helps work the muscles used to obtain and hold a wedge as well as help the
student feel how the skis’ edges react to the straight run and wedge positions (the wedge should
be a little slower). Variations include doing the Wedge Change-Up across the fall line to help
work on the traverse, seeing who can do the most Change-Ups to work on mobility, trying the
Change-Up with knees bow-legged or knock-kneed to see how the edges work. The Wedge
Change-Up is a critical introductory exercise for the Wedge Christie.

THE FAN PROGRESSION: This exercise is more of a teaching technique than a specific
exercise. The instructor has the class practice the end of a turn (any turn!) on a shallow slope
starting across the hill from a traverse and coming to a stop by directing the skis/board up the hill.
Repeat this going the opposite direction. Make the next cycle start from a steeper traverse.
Continue to repeat each cycle taking a steeper and steeper traverse until the students are
actually beginning not with traverses but from the fall line. This technique is a great way to
introduce uphill christies and helps the student see that turns are more effective when done with
more edging and pressure and with less steering. Variations include continuing the cycle to a
steep traverse from the opposite side of the fall line. Make sure the student starts on the turning
edge. By continuing to move to a more shallow traverse the student will soon need to start on an
uphill edge and switch to the new turning edge. This technique helps ease the student into this
critical edge change movement and does it with an emphasis on making a longer radius turn with
speed control being a function of turn shape (the end of the turn). You can do this on a variety of
slopes with a variety of turns as the students skills increase.
GARLANDS:                     This exercise is more of a teaching technique than a specific exercise.
The instructor has the class practice the end of a turn (any turn!) on a shallow slope starting
across the hill from a traverse (like the Fan Progression above). However, the student should not
come to a stop, but should make the start of a new turn down the hill. Now, instead of finishing
the new turn across the fall line, the student should turn back uphill again, repeating the same
end of the turn. This sequence should be repeated several times for each traverse with the
effect that the student can practice the beginning and ending of a turn without needing to really
enter the fall line. The benefits here are that this is less stressful for the students (don’t need to
cross the fall line), they get to practice many turn entries and exits without losing a lot of the hill,
and this approach lets the students focus on a particular part of the turn (the exit or entry).
Always repeat a garland sequence both ways across the hill so that the students can practice
both sides equally.

EDGE WEDGES:               This is simply wedge turns on a steeper slope. Focus on holding the
wedge position as the students traverse between turns. This will help the skis maintain a strong
edged position with the hips turned facing more down the hill. This position will aid the entry to
each new turn as well as help the students get the feel of standing against a strongly edged ski
during a turn! Make sure no one gets lazy and lets their skis come together!

PATIENCE TURNS:              The title of this exercise reflects the approach each student must take
towards making these turns. The turn is done simply by edging and pressuring the turning edge
of the ski / board and balancing on that edge as the turn begins to take shape. Resist the urge to
rotate the ski or board to make the turn happen more quickly! The result is a turn with a long arc
and little speed control so do this on a gentle slope. The goal is to get the student to feel a turn
done with just the edge, some pressure, and little or no steering. It serves as one approach to
making carved turns. It can also be approached using a fan progression.

SIDE PULLS:                   This exercise requires the students to pair up. One student puts their
skis / board across the fall line while the other student attempts to pull them down the hill. The
goal is that the first student must resist this pull by edging the skis/board and then positioning
their body to brace against the edge. The goal is to provide each student with the feel of
standing against an edged ski/board and to position the hips, knees, and ankles properly to brace
against the edge.

HOP TURNS:                  This exercise can be done with any turn. The idea is to just make the
turn in the air as much as possible by jumping up. The goal is to let everyone find their fore-aft
and side-to-side balance (or lack of balance!) on the skis/board. It is also a great way to get the
class warmed up if they are getting cold.

FALLING LEAF:                 This is a variation on basic sideslips, but is great for improving the
students’ ability to control fore-aft pressuring as well as edging. Pressure on the front of the
ski/board when the edge is released causes the student to sideslip diagonally forward down the
hill. Pressure on the tail of the ski/board causes a rearward diagonal slip. Make sure that the
edging is controlled with the knees and ankles and not with a rotational movement of the hips.

FRONT-MIDDLE-BACK: Use this exercise to let the students explore their fore-aft range of
motion and how it affects the skis/board. Forward pressure works well at the beginning of a turn,
but not very well at the end of a turn (the tail washes out). Likewise, pressure on the tail makes it
very difficult (if not impossible!) to start a turn. Variations include doing this exercise on a variety
of slopes, a variety of turns, and a variety of speeds.

TALL - SHORT:                 This exercise lets the students discover how the angles created by
their bodies affects the turn. Make turns in a very tall stance, then in a very low stance. A tall
stance will flatten the ski/board so that with a little forward pressure it will seek the fall line. A low
stance will create more angles and help put the ski/board on an edge thus help finish a turn. Try
starting turns tall and finishing low.

HOCKEY-STOPS:                This is a very challenging task to do correctly, but since it is great for
showering snow, your students will really want to master this! From a steep traverse or the
middle of a turn, the student must quickly pivot the ski/board across the fall line, then apply a
quick edge to rapidly sideslip directly down the fall line to a stop. The harder the edge
application, the quicker the stop and more snow is thrown! Variations include showing the class
that a little forward pressure causes a christie turn instead of a smooth sideslip down the fall line.
Also try setting a corridor of ski poles that will force the students to sideslip down the fall line.
Skiers watch for a rotated hip instead of legs which will leave the hip out over the skis, thus
preventing application of a quick edge and may also result in a christie turn.

X-PATTERN:                   Divide the class into two lines facing each other across the hill. From
the top of each line the students perform a task across the hill to the bottom of the other line and
then join the bottom of that line. This allows students to practice in both directions and the
pattern runs itself. Great for Christies, j-turns, stepping, garlands, side-slipping, just about
anything done across or down the hill for a short distance (students need to be able to climb back
up into line).
Teaching Model

Student Profile        + Instructor Behavior                   =    Learning Partnership
- Who are they?            Assess student needs:                    Student – Centered
- Why are they here?       - Student Profile
- How do they feel?        - Movement Analysis                      Fun!
   (right now)
- How do they learn?       Plan
                           - Assessment Results                     Safe
                           - Skiing Model / Progressions
                           Present                                  Leads to Achieving Goal
                                                                    (success!)
                            - Teaching Styles (task, command,
                           guided, problem-solving)
                            - Class Handling (safety, class         Student Ownership of New
                           arrangement, pacing)                     Skills
                           Practice
                            - Terrain Selection                     Positive and Memorable
                            - Feedback
                            - Lateral Learning
                           Check
                           - Ownership of new skills
                           - Closure (ask the students to tell
                           you what they learned)

CLASS HANDLING

The Ullr approach to class handling can be summed up by this motto:
Safety, Fun, Learning

Your first priority is safety. This includes proper assessment of the terrain for the level of the
class, snow conditions, temperature, and the attitude of the class (timid, aggressive, etc.).

Make sure that each student knows where the class meets each week, where the chaperone
room is, and where the bathrooms are.

Know the mountain. Know the best places to gather the class at the top of each lift (so your
class is not in the way of others getting off the lift), the best places to re-group to count noses on
the way down, and the best place to stop at the bottom of each lift (so you are not in the way of
others getting on the lift). Give your class a backup re-grouping plan in case anyone gets lost.
For instance, if you get lost go to the class sign, or report in to the chaperone room.

Have a plan for how you want to conduct each exercise. Will the students go one after another,
in a group, or paired up? Make sure they know where to stop. This will reduce the chance of
someone getting separated from the group. Consult the PSIA manual for more ideas.
The second priority is fun. There is a good list of fun things to do in the Skiing / Riding Model
section of this manual. Below are some ice breaker exercises that will help you pull your class
into a team that can play together and learn together.

The third priority is learning. If the students are safe and are having fun they will learn more with
less effort from you. Just set up the exercise or the right terrain for practice and watch ‘em go!

TEAM BUILDING / ICE BREAKERS

Break the Ice!

Ice breakers and other getting-acquainted exercises are important as groups come together
again each year and especially when bringing in new members. The following are some reasons
for using ice-breakers as well as some easily implemented examples.

They can be excellent devices to help people feel more comfortable with themselves and with
others and feel more “at home” in a group.

They break up the “cliques,” invite people to form random groupings, and help individuals meet
others in a non-threatening and fun way.

They can be used to set a tone for the time a group will be together, will encourage people to feel
“safe” and hopefully will evoke lots of laughter in releasing tension.

Human scavenger hunt:
  Find someone who:

   owns cross-country skis
   has been to Europe
   wears contacts

Name game
  Why or how the member got his/her name. Tell name and hobby; members try to memorize
  information

Dyads
  Members get into groups of two and find out information about each other. Possible questions
  to use:

   Who do you think is the most important person who has lived in the past 100 years?
   What is the best movie you have seen recently?
   What is the title of the last book you have read?
   If you could be any animal other than human, what would you be?
   If you could travel to any place in the world, where would you go?
   What is your favorite sport?
   One word to describe me is...

Mascot
  Classes create their own mascot or identity by gathering information about themselves and
  then coming up with an image that identifies them as a group. Information can include
  Hobbies, Pets, Favorite sports teams, Favorite emotion, Favorite subject in school, Common
  skiing/riding goal

Forced Choice
  Ask students to stand in the middle of the class area and have them move to either side to
  indicate their choice:

   More like a Cadillac or a Volkswagen?
   More of a saver or a spender?
   More thinker or doer?
   More listener or talker?
   More like a tortoise or a hare?
   More like a gourmet restaurant or a McDonald’s?

PERSONAL BEST
  We use this as a great way to discover and share the true diversity and worth of the
  individuals that make up your group. Individuals share their proudest achievements with
  another group member, who then reports what they have learned to the rest of the group.
  By allowing people to share what matters, and by creating a situation where everyone’s
  accomplishment is recognized, the group learns more about each other and what the group
  has already achieved.

Grab Bag:
  Pull out an object from a bag and explain how you are similar to it.
M&Ms:
  Pass around a bag of M&M candies and have everyone take some. Each person must tell
  one thing about him or herself for each piece of candy taken
Shepherd and Sheep
  The shepherd, who can see, leads blindfolded “sheep” (students) to an imaginary pen without
  touching them - i.e., only using verbal communication. Use ski poles, skis, boards, or students
  in the class to form the path the shepherd must direct their sheep down.

TRUTH OR PRETEND?
  Have each person tell one thing about themselves that is true and one thing that is false,
  without revealing which is which. Then have all participants try and guess which one is the
  truth.

PURPLE PANDA BEAR
  Have each person tell what animal best fits their personality as a description and why.

DREAM VACATION
  Have each person tell were they would most like to visit on a dream vacation and why.
GAMES

RED-LIGHT / GREEN-LIGHT: The instructor lines the students across the hill so they may all
ski /ride down the hill without obstructing each other. The instructor goes down the hill far
enough that the students can make several turns yet close enough so that they can hear
instructions. At the command “green light!” the students make the designated turn and at the
command “red light!” the students must use the designated maneuver to stop (e.g. uphill christie,
hockey stop, quick pivot, etc.). Those still moving after the red light must hike back up a few
yards or sit out the next round.

THE SNAKE:            The students follow the instructor in a line doing as he/she does (essentially
“follow the leader”). Instructor can rotate the students so that all have a chance to follow directly
behind. Variations include having a designated student lead or splitting the class up into sections
or pairs with the students sharing the leader role. This can lead to simple synchronized skiing or
riding.

ROTATION:            The instructor lines the students down the hill with the instructor at the top of
the class. The goal is to have each student make turns appropriate for the terrain or the current
maneuver past the class and stop in order below the class. The instructor leads off to show how
the turn or maneuver is done. This can continue as each student (and the instructor) “rotates”
past the class over and over. Make sure the class spreads out far enough that everyone gets
several turns in during their “rotation”. This is great for everyone to see everyone else and the
instructor to make a good model over and over. Variations can include the instructor giving each
student small comments each time, rotating the groups over different slopes and terrain, or even
using the edge of a trail to force the students to ski/ride in a corridor (make sure the group has
the proper turn and speed control for this one!). Use this approach instead of the “human
slalom”.

SIMON SAYS:         When the instructor yells “right leg”, the students must touch their right legs.
Those that do not do as “Simon” says, must become “Simon”. This is great for checking
students’ understanding of terminology, ski/board parts, etc. Variations include have Simon
command everyone to make certain turns, travel only a specific distance, stand on a certain foot,
hold hands, hop up and down, etc.

TRAFFIC COP:          The instructor (the traffic cop) stands down the hill from the class and each
student (driver) skis/rides down with their turns directed by the “cop” who points right or left with
the pole or arm. Each driver must be quick to react to each new direction command. Let the
students take turns being the “cop” (and the instructor must take a turn being a “driver” too!).
This can be played on any slope with any level class. A fun variation on an easy slope with an
upper-level class can have the whole class going at once in a form of synchronized skiing since
everyone should turn at the same time in response to the cop.

TOE THE LINE:          The instructor asks the students to line themselves up as quickly as possible
based on some criteria like parka color or ski length or birthdate. Have students take turns
picking out what to use for the next lineup. This is a great ice-breaker (since the students must
all interact to sort themselves out) and can be done on any slope and with any level class.
PARTNERS:           Pair everyone up into 2-person teams. The challenge is for one person to be
making one shape of turn, the other person another shape of turn at the same time. For
instance, for each medium-sized turn one person makes, the partner must make three short
radius turns. The partners can ski side by side or one can follow the other. Check to see if they
were successful. Switch partners. Make the turns appropriate to the terrain and the students’
abilities.

BAMBOO SAFARI: The instructor sets up a maze of bamboo poles and instructs the class to ski
or “safari” (or “surfari” for you riders) through the poles in different ways. turn around 4 poles;
enter next to a red pole and exit next to a blue pole; go through backwards; and follow another
person. Variations can have the students set up their own “jungle”.

TRACTOR TURNS: For making wedge turns fun, this is a great game. Have the students place
the tips of their poles into the space between the binding toe piece and the boot. Now their poles
are tractor “control levers”! To start each turn, the students push the appropriate “lever” (left for a
turn to the right - right for a turn to the left), thus moving their weight to the correct turning ski and
also turning their body into the direction of the turn. Adding tractor sounds (Vrooom, Vrooom)
brings things alive!
Final Thoughts

Remember Safety, Fun, Learning? Let’s close the discussion on class handling by going back to
our first point: Safety.

   •   Keep the class together. Nothing can ruin a good class session like losing a student and
       then spending the rest of the class period tracking him/her down.

   •   Prevent student / student collisions. Student riders often do not know how far apart they
       need to be to avoid hitting each other while the class moving down the mountain. One
       student will jump off a little bump on the side of the trail and their buddy right behind thinks
       that looks like fun. The problem is the first rider falls and the second rider hits them.
       Remind them to spread out.

   •   Don’t just lead your group, follow sometimes. You can’t see what the class is doing from
       in front. Pick a destination and a leader in the group. Then go last so you can see how
       well they follow directions, avoid each other, and other riders on the mountain. You can
       then see who needs to be reminded of how to be safe.


Tactics for Class Problems
Your supervisor or program director is always your best resource, but if they are not available,
here are some options:

   •   Slow / Fast Student(s)
          o Check with a fellow instructor who has a class at the same level in the same area to
              see if they also have some slow or fast students. You are free to re-arrange the
              fast and slow students between the two of you temporarily. If the split works well,
              the both of you should discuss making the changes permanent with your supervisor
              at the end of the day.
          o One or two fast students can be kept busy by using them for demonstration models
              for the other students.
          o You can get yourself some extra time to work one-on-one with a slow student by
              directing the rest of the class to practice using a self-managing drill such as the X-
              Pattern that can be used at any level (pg. 13). Once the other students get going
              with the other drill, spend a minute or two to chat with the slow student about what
              they are not grasping and then a few more minutes on one or two tips to get them
              back on track. If it looks like the problem is more serious, see the first tip above.

   •   Unruly Student
          o Explain that they are disrupting the class and that it is not fun for the other students.
          o If the behavior continues, explain that this is an official school outing and that
             continued mis-behavior will be reported and may go on their school record.
          o If the behavior continues, take the class to the Bellevue Chaperones Room and
             drop the student off there at the Safety Desk for the remainder of the class. Explain
what happened to the chaperone on duty at the Safety Desk. Determine if you will
allow the student back into class later in the day.
RACES

These can take many forms depending on the skill level of the group, however, in all cases try to
reduce the competitive nature of each challenge by timing each student against him or herself
(that is, check each time against a previous attempt), teaming the students together in pairs,
small groups, or with inter-class races. Races can be done on flat terrain to improve mobility
(walking, hiking, skating), or on easy slopes to improve ski/board use, turn shape, or speed
control. Never race on steeper slopes. Use simple terrain features (dips, rolls, banks) or ask a
supervisor to provide some props (bamboo, cones, old ski poles). Make each course or
challenge short so everyone can make several attempts. Remember, the value is in the process,
not the outcome of the actual race. Timing is just for everyone to have a benchmark for
improvement. Here are some sample races, but be creative!

RELAY:
    This involves moving something (a glove, hat, scarf) from one place to another. One
    student takes the item to the end point and the next student brings it back or each student
    carries it part of the total distance. This is a good group challenge.

TIMED:
     This is the traditional race with each student timed over a specific course. Make these
     short so each student can make several attempts to improve their personal time. Keep
     speed down and interest up by selecting easy terrain with many bumps and rolls (but stay
     out of the trees) and directing the course uphill at times. A jar of powdered paint will let
     you “set” the course just about anywhere on the hill. Check with your supervisor a week
     ahead of time to get some paint.

OBSTACLE:
    This need not be timed for just getting through it is the biggest thrill of all! Work with other
    instructors and your supervisor to build the course ahead of time.
ULLR PROFICIENCY RATING DESCRIPTIONS

Alpine Skiing Proficiency Rating Descriptions

Level 1      Introduction
             The skiing environment, safety, equipment, walking, gliding, climbing, gliding (in a
             traverse, straight-run, and wedge), and can fall and get up.

Level 2      Gliding / Braking Wedge Turns                      “GREEN”
             Braking and gliding edge control movements with wedge change-ups, turning &
             pressuring movements for emergency turning and stopping.

Level 3      Linked Wedge Turn Variations                          “GREEN”
             Wedge turns where the skis skid parallel some of the time and turn shapes and
             sizes can be varied for speed control.

Level 4      Beginning Wedge Christy                                   “GREEN / BLUE”
             Less skidding as skis come parallel just after the fall line. Confidence grows as
             runs start & end in a controlled traverse.

Level 5      Advanced Wedge Christy                               “BLUE”
             Pole use is integrated with balancing movements, timing, matching of skis before
             the fall line and use of terrain.

Level 6      Beginning Parallel                                 “BLUE”
             Reduced wedge through use of wide stance, pole plant and small bumps to build
             confidence and integrated basic skills.

Level 7      Carved Parallel                                        “BLUE / BLACK”
             The pole is used consistently and effectively. Large and medium radius
             turns are carved with minimum skidding. Skier can make controlled no-fall runs on
             the steep slopes of the big chairs and can articulate Your Responsibility Code.

Level 8      Dynamic Parallel                                         “BLACK”
             The skier has developed control of movement intensity and can develop tactics &
             integrate basic skiing skills to vary the size and shape of turns and speed in a
             variety of conditions.

Level 9      All Conditions & Slopes                                 “DOUBLE-BLACK”
             The skier can perform dynamic parallel turns on steep terrain, moguls, powder, and
             crud and has developed the versatility for selecting the correct tactics for any
             terrain, speed, and snow.



Snowboarding Proficiency Rating Descriptions

Level 1      Introduction
          The riding environment, safety, equipment, walking, gliding, climbing, and gliding (in
          a traverse and straight-run). The student can fall and get up.

Level 2   Simple garlands and basic turns to both sides.       “GREEN”
          Sideslip and gliding edge control movements on both toe and heel side, turning &
          pressuring movements for emergency turning and stopping.

Level 3   Turns to Side Slip and To Stop                      “GREEN”
          Linked turns where the board skids between traverses and turn shapes and sizes
          can be varied for speed control.

Level 4   Linked Turns with Speed Control and Flexion            “GREEN / BLUE”
          Less skidding as the board crosses the fall line. Confidence grows as runs start &
          end in a controlled traverse.

Level 5   Linked Turns with Speed Control and Rhythm         “BLUE”
          Upper body movement is reduced as turning emphasizes pressure on the inside
          edge. Balancing movements, timing, pressuring, and edging skills become
          increasingly integrated.

Level 6   Beginning Carved Turns                               “BLUE”
          The rider can make long and medium radius carved turns on groomed easy slopes
          without falling and has been introduced to moguls and crud.

Level 7   Advanced Carved Turns                                   “BLUE / BLACK”
          The rider can make medium and short radius carved turns that are round and
          rhythmical with speed controlled by varying the turn radius. The rider can make
          controlled no-fall runs on the steep slopes of the big chairs and can articulate the
          Skiers Responsibility Code.

Level 8   Advanced Varied Terrain                                  “BLACK”
          The rider has developed control of movement intensity and can develop tactics &
          integrate basic riding skills to vary the size and shape of turns and speed in a
          variety of conditions.

Level 9   Dynamic Turns in All Terrain & Conditions               “DOUBLE-BLACK”
          The rider is proficient in using short, medium, and long radius turns on a variety of
          terrain, moguls, powder, and crud and has developed the versatility for selecting the
          correct tactics for any terrain, speed, and snow.
ULLR POLICIES

These policies have been established in order to maintain a professional image and attitude. As
instructors we all have a responsibility to set an example for our students and the skiing public.


Teaching Assignment Policy (updated 12-5-06)

Instructors are assigned to classes based on their record of participation in the following
activities:

1. How many pre-season clinics have been attended and their performance scores in those
   clinics.
2. How many scheduled sessions can be committed to for their prospective classes.
3. Current PSIA membership (applies to all instructors with at least 1 year of experience).
4. Have access to the lifts for the area they are teaching at (see Lift Access Policy).


Attendance Policy (updated 12-5-06)

In order to maintain their teaching assignment, instructors:

1. Must be on time for their program’s daily Instructor Meeting to pick up their class cards. If
   absent or late, classes will be re-assigned. Repeated unexcused occurances will result in
   loss of teaching assignment and can result in termination of employment.
2. Must notify their supervisor or director as soon as possible if an unforeseen event prevents
   them from being at the mountain for classes. If this is in the morning of a ski school day call
   your supervisor or director as soon as possible and leave a message if necessary.
3. Should attend clinics scheduled for their program in order to maintain and improve their
   teaching and skiing skills (see the Teaching Assignment Policy above). Ullr is committed to
   providing the very best instructional staff to our customers.


Lift Access Policy (updated 2-4-03)

In order to ride the area lifts to teach classes:

1. Instructors are responsible for obtaining a daily lift ticket or season lift pass from the area.
2. Ullr may make available to each instructor or cadet a way of obtaining a lift ticket or season
   pass outright or at reduced rates. However, a pass or ticket obtained through Ullr is
   considered the property of Ullr and Ullr grants use of it only as long as the instructor follows all
   other guidelines and policies for its use.
3. If the ticket or pass is lost, the instructor must replace it following ski area procedures.
4. Instructors must not fraudulently obtain a pass or ticket for themselves or anyone else or
   violate any ski area policies or procedures involving lift access.
5. Failure to follow this policy is grounds for dismissal from the school.
Uniform Policy (updated 12-8-06)

1. All instructors assigned at least one class will be required to wear an Ullr parka during all
   teaching assignments (part of the concession agreement with the ski area).
2. Ski pants will be black or match the current parka color and be clean and in good repair.
3. Ullr provides all instructors with name tags. All instructors will wear their name tags during all
   teaching assignments. The name tag should stay on the parka assigned to the instructor.
4. All instructors will report to their teaching assignments well-groomed, physically, and mentally
   prepared to teach.


Compensation Policy (updated 12-8-06)

1. The Ullr Compensation Rates are updated and provided to every employee annually.
2. Ullr processes payroll on the 7th/15th of the following month.
3. Ullr will reimburse up to one half the exam fee those instructors that successfully complete the
   Level 2 and 100% for completing Level 3 certification.


Training Policy (updated 12-4-06)

1. All instructors are expected to improve their teaching and riding skills in order to best compete
   for teaching positions each season. This includes obtaining professional teaching credentials
   through passing PSIA exams. Ullr provides clinics free of charge in order to help each
   instructor be as prepared as possible for classes and/or exams. Ullr instructors are advised
   to take advantage of these clinics both before and during the season.
2. All staff should attend a training clinic on the day they teach (if a clinic is scheduled) in order
   to ensure their readiness for their teaching assignment (see the Teaching Assignment Policy).
3. Only Level 3 and Level 2 certified instructors are eligible to lead instructor clinics. However,
   instructors training for Level 2 certification may from time to time teach instructor clinics
   supervised by a Level 2 or Level 3 instructor.
4. Level 2 Certified instructors may tryout each fall to qualify for teaching pre-season Instructor
   Candidate training clinics.
Chair Lift Policy (updated 12-4-06)

The following guidelines describe the activities and expectations around chairlift use for both Ullr
staff and customers. In the text, the terms “skis” and “skiing” are used to refer to any snow sports
equipment sanctioned for use at the ski area and the people using that equipment at the ski area.

   1) SKI AREA REGULATIONS – Ullr staff and customers will abide by all Ski Area regulations
      governing the use of lifts, Ski Area trails and other facilities. This includes, but is not limited to, all
      posted signs and warnings.

   2) STATE REGULATIONS - All Ullr staff and customers will follow the Skiers Responsibility Code
      and understand the penalties that apply under Washington State law (CHAPTER 70.117RCW).
      Washington State Law prohibits: Leaving the scene of a skiing accident without obtaining assistance
      or notifying authorities; Skiing or snowboarding in a closed area, riding a closed lift, or skiing or
      snowboarding outside ski are boundaries, interfering with the safe operation of a lift; Loading or
      unloading a lift at other that designated crossing; Throwing or dropping of any object from a lift
      including littering; Failing to follow verbal or written instructions for lift use.

   3) EXPECTATIONS ABOUT RIDING CHAIRLIFTS – Ullr staff and customers will be riding the
      chairlift with the skiing public. Staff and customers can expect to ride the chairlift in a variety of
      conditions and circumstances.

      •   Skiers may be riding the lift alone or with others (up to the capacity of the specific lift).

      •   Chairlifts will run at a variety of speeds, from a dead stop to the appropriate speed for the
          specific lift. Riders should be aware that the chairlift will change speeds without warning and
          conduct themselves in a manner to remain safely seated in those events.

      •   Skiers will be riding the chairlift in a wide range of weather conditions ranging from dry and
          sunny to wet, cold, and dim (in the case of precipitation or night skiing). When conditions are
          wet and cold, the chair seat will be slippery. Riders should conduct themselves in a manner to
          remain safely seated under those conditions.

      •   Chairlift lines are crowded. Skiers should respect the people around them and conduct
          themselves in a courteous manner.

      •   Chairlift loading and unloading ramps can be uneven and slippery due to poor weather
          conditions. Riders should expect uneven and slippery conditions and take utmost care when
          loading and unloading the chairlift.
ULLR PROCEDURES


Safety

As instructors you must create awareness in your students of the risks (and pleasures)
associated with skiing. Remember there are not only snow sports skills but also attitudes.

Much of your responsibility is common sense if you have the benefit of experience. However, our
students may not appreciate the dynamic environment of skiing. This is why you should integrate
the concepts of the rider’s responsibility into every action you perform upon the slopes. Knowing
the risks and following safe, responsible snow sports practices can make all the differences
between an enjoyable and a miserable experience.

Your Responsibility Code
                  YOUR RESPONSIBILITY CODE
      (Ullr Common Sense + Washington State Law)

1. Ski / Ride under control and in such a manner that you can stop or avoid other skiers or
   objects. Do not ski / ride near buildings, towers, equipment, vehicles, and other obstacles.

2. When skiing / riding downhill or overtaking another skier / rider avoid the skier / rider below
   you.

3. Do not stop where you obstruct a trail or are not visible from above.

4. When entering a run or starting downhill, yield to other skiers / riders.

5. All skiers / riders shall use devices (straps or ski brakes) to prevent runaway skis / boards.

6. Stay off closed trials and posted areas and obey all signs. Know your own “Skill Level
   Number” and the “Ski Run/Trail symbols” for all skill levels and ski / ride within your skill level.
   Ski / Ride only on “Designated Runs” (see Area Trail maps) which are patrolled.

7. Prior to using any lift, you must have the knowledge and ability to load, ride, and unload
   safely.

8. Do not leave the scene of an accident without obtaining assistance, notifying authorities or
   clearly identifying yourself.
Responsibility is an integral part of each lesson plan you formulate. Be constantly on the lookout
for opportunities to expand your students’ responsibility awareness. The examples below should
help get you started. Keep in mind that each snow sports situation is different and provides
many chances to discuss this important topic with your students.

             Equipment                                Clothing
             Student Attitude                         Fear/Anxiety
             Age and Physical Condition               Physical Handicaps
             Getting into the Lift Line               Getting off the Lift
             Trail/Area Signs & Out of Bounds         Grooming Machines
             Man-Made Obstacles                       Other Skiers
             Snow Conditions                          Bright Light / Flat Light
             Blizzard / Rain / Fog                    Cold Temperatures / Frostbite
             Sun and Wind                             Eye / Skin Protection
             Warm-up Exercises                        Teaching / Skiing / Riding Terrain
             Rules for Race Courses                   Others???
Ski School Incident Management

The Ski Patrol has the basic responsibility for taking care of an injured rider. The instructor’s
primary contribution is immediate care, getting the Ski Patrol, setting a good example, and in the
prevention of incidents. Accordingly, the following outline identifies some important elements of
incident prevention, what to do if an incident occurs, student incident reporting and student
behavior reporting.


Procedure for Preventing Ski School Incidents

1. AT THE MEETING AREA:

•   Check equipment:
    Skis on correct feet, snowboard bindings set for forward foot and angle preference, length of
    board, skis, and poles, ski brakes functional, snowboards have safety straps, and equipment
    is complete (poles have baskets & straps, etc.).
•   Check clothing:
    Hat, gloves, goggles, parka, pants, scarf or neck gaiter (if very cold/windy), UV protection
    glasses if sunny.
•   Check Ability:
    Ask where they like to ski, what turns they make. Ensure that everyone is capable of handling
    the slope you are going to.
•   Area Orientation:
    Explain where the class is going and where it will meet in case a student gets separated. Set
    up a buddy system to prevent single strays.
•   Warm Up:
    Do some stretching while waiting for latecomers to class.

1. DURING CLASS:

•   Select terrain carefully:
    Consider student desire and ability, slope, traffic, snow conditions, starting place, and
    gathering place. Stay out from under chairlift and stop classes to the side of ski runs and
    trails.
•   Lift Use:
    Explain use of the lift if needed and show the class where to gather at the top of the lift well
    away from the unloading area.
•   Set the track:
    On unfamiliar or difficult terrain, always go first and provide a line for the students to follow
    using turns and a turn shape that is within the class’ ability.
•   Follow the Code:
    Always provide a good model of Your Responsibility Code.
•   Weather issues:
    Look for frostbite (white blotch on exposed skin), or complaints of cold in feet, hands, or just
    general shivers. Keeping the class moving, loosening boots that are too tight, or putting on
    hats can help, but if not, go in immediately. If anyone has signs of frostbite, warm
    immediately with warm skin contact, but do not rub! Then go to the Ski Patrol or chaperone
    room. For sunny weather carry 30+ SPF lotion and lip protection (if you share it, ask first for
    sensitivity or any allergies to your product).
•   Potential injuries / bumps and bruises / “I don’t feel good”:
    This is a gray area that takes some experience. IF THERE IS ANY DOUBT ABOUT
    WHETHER THE STUDENT IS INJURED OR NOT, CALL THE SKI PATROL. They are
    prepared to make the best assessment. Short of that, you must rely on the student
    describing how they feel. If they can ski / ride, but want to sit down for a bit, take the class to
    the chaperone room and take the student inside. Make arrangements for the student to rejoin
    the class or to just meet the class next week as normal. HS or MS students can go to the
    chaperone room on their own, but ensure they know exactly where to go. For all situations
    like this, always note the time and place and if the student left the class on your class card.


1. AT THE END OF CLASS:

    If the students are free to ride on their own after class, recommend runs for the students to
    ride and point out any special hazards or snow conditions that may be encountered. Make
    sure they know the location of the Ski Patrol facility, the restrooms, and the chaperone room.
    Finally, recommend some exercises that will help the students prepare for the next lesson.

2. STUDENT CONDUCT:

    Disruptive or prohibited behavior is tough on the instructor, tough on the class, and should not
    be tolerated. Instructors are requested to assist in fact finding and reporting violations of
    student conduct rules by speaking with the student, recording witnesses, and reporting to their
    supervisor or director any of the following behaviors:
       Absence from class                         Stealing
       Gambling                                   Willful disobedience
       Use of tobacco                             Vulgarity or profanity
       Cutting in lift line                       Leaving the Ski Area
       Carrying a deadly weapon
       Possession, use or sharing of alcohol, drugs, or drug paraphernalia
Procedure for Handling a Ski School Incident
1. Do not remove equipment or move injured student unless absolutely necessary. Make
    student as comfortable as possible. Reassure the injured student that help (Ski Patrol) is on
    its way. Keep the injured student warm. Cross your skis or place your board uphill of
    accident scene. If the injured student’s skis did release, make sure they are out of the way of
    other skiers and riders.
2. Summon Ski Patrol and give the following information:
    • Name of run or trail.
    • Exact location on trail.
    • Any unusual conditions regarding the injured student.
    • Send this information by messenger to the bottom of the nearest lift. Messengers can be
         your two best students, if appropriate, and if no other means is readily available and time
         is critical. Beginners and young children must remain with the instructor at all times!
3. DO NOT SPECULATE - MAKE NO COMMENT CONCERNING THE INCIDENT!
4. Move your class to a safe place to wait at the side of the trail away from the injured student.
5. Wait for the Ski Patrol with the injured student. Obtain names, addresses, and phone
    numbers of witnesses other than class members. Have witnesses come to the Ski School
    office and write their account of the incident in their own words.
6. After the Ski Patrol assumes responsibility for the injured student, the instructor should take
    the class to the Ski School office, make arrangements for the class, and then check on the
    injured student at the Ski Patrol facility.
7. Notify the snow sports school Director or Supervisor immediately.
8. Fill out an incident report form on the day of the incident with ALL requested information.
9. Report facts only. Comments should be restricted to the sequence of events only. DO NOT
    INCLUDE CONJECTURE, SUPPOSITION, ASSUMPTIONS OR PERSONAL JUDGEMENTS
    AND CONCLUSIONS. After the incident, restrict comments to others to the FACTS ONLY.
10. If the injured student is in the Bellevue Ski School:
    • The Ski Council Safety Desk will handle the injured student after they arrive at the Ski
         Patrol facility. They will arrange for continued care, transportation down the mountain, and
         family contact if necessary.
    • The Director will follow with phone call to Ski Council Vice-President in charge of the
         program the injured student is in. The Ski Council Vice-President will have contacted the
         injured student and their family to perform humanitarian and reporting functions.
11. If the injured student is in Ullr Snow Sports:
    • The instructor and/or Supervisor/Director should visit the student at the Ski Patrol facility to
         check on their condition and demonstrate care and interest for their welfare.
    • The instructor and/or Supervisor/Director can offer to help the injured student to their car
         or bus if appropriate and needed.
    • The Director should follow with phone call to the injured student to offer concern and
         assess extent of injury for humanitarian and reporting purposes. The instructor may make
         a similar call if the Director deems it appropriate.
    • Document all of these follow up calls and conversations.
    • Repeat inquires if necessary and appropriate until situation is stabilized.
12. Again - DO NOT SPECULATE WITH STUDENT OR PARENTS ON HOW THE INCIDENT
    COULD HAVE BEEN PREVENTED OR MAKE JUDGEMENTS CONCERNING
    CONTRIBUTING CIRCUMSTANCES.

								
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