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					REPORT
Planning Application No: 45/2010/10461
7 Day Notice: YES

1.       Site Description
1.1     The site is located within a group of existing farm buildings and a farmhouse
        (Browns Farmhouse which is Grade II Listed Building) at the southern end of Cold
        Cotes. The building is a traditional barn of vernacular characteristics that currently
        has no roof and has walls that are in poor condition in terms of leaning and bulging.
        A shippon was built to the western elevation although there is little of this left. There
        is a dairy building constructed in block work with sheet roof attached to the northern
        gable. There are two modern livestock buildings located to the south of the barn.
1.2      The site is accessed by an existing access to Browns Farm. This branches off a
         single track unclassified road which traverses Cold Cotes Common and which joins
         the A65 (T) approximately 1 km to the south. This lane is predominately used to
         access the hamlet of Cold Cotes.
1.3      The site is located outside of development limits within the open countryside
2.       Proposal
2.1      To convert the barn into a live work unit, change of use of land to domestic curtilage
         and to build a garage complex to the south of the barn incorporating swimming
         pool, garage, workshop and bunk barn.
3.       Planning History
3.1      45/2008/8489 (12/5/08) Permission granted for conversion of traditional barn to
         form workspace with ancillary living accommodation
3.2      45/2007/7603 Conversion of barn to agricultural workers dwelling. Withdrawn
         25.01.08.
3.3      45/2002/1821: Conversion of former agricultural barn into workspace with ancillary
         living accommodation. Approved April 2002.
3.4      5/45/577: Planning permission to erect agricultural building as livestock housing
         granted October 1995.
4.       Planning Policy Background
4.1      PPS4 “Planning for Sustainable Economic Growth”
4.2      PPS5 “Planning for the Historic Environment”
4.3      Saved Policy EMP9 'Conversion of Buildings to Employment Generating Uses with
         Ancillary Residential Accommodation‟ of the Craven District (Outside the Yorkshire
         Dales National Park) Local Plan
4.4      SPG – „The Conversion of Rural Buildings to Live/Work Units within Craven‟. The
         document was adopted as a material planning consideration by Craven District
         Council in October 2009.
5.       Parish Council Comments
5.1      Ingleton Parish Council have no comments to make on the application
6.       Consultations
6.1      United Utilities do not consider that the development would have any impact on the
         electricity distribution system
6.2   Craven District Council‟s building control department have state that full building
      regulations would be required for the conversion and have also commented briefly
      on the condition of the structure.
7.    Representations
7.1   One letter of representation has been received with 10 signatories stating that they
      object to the development as it may generate traffic on the narrow access to Cold
      Cotes village. There is also irritation that no notification of planning has been
      displayed at the access to the property preventing villagers from objecting to the
      plans sooner.
7.2   Officer‟s note: The statutory requirements were met for notification through
      neighbour letter notification
8.    Summary of Principal Planning Issues
8.1   Whether the application meets the requirements of PPS4 “Planning for Sustainable
      Economic Growth” and Saved Policy EMP9 of the Craven District (Outside the
      Yorkshire Dales National Park) Local Plan
8.2   Impact of the development on protected species
8.3   Impact of the development on the amenity of neighbouring properties
8.4   Impact of the development on the Listed building
9.    Analysis
9.1   Policy EC12 of PPS4 “Planning for Sustainable Economic Growth” sets a number of
      guidelines for determining planning applications for economic development in rural
      areas. This guidance suggests that planning applications for economic
      development in rural areas should be supported where they provide the most
      sustainable option in locations that are remote to local service centres. The
      guidance suggests that planning applications should be approved for the
      conversion of existing buildings where the benefits outweigh the harm in terms of
      the impact on the countryside, landscapes, and wildlife, local economic needs,
      settlement patterns and accessibility to services, the desirability of conserving
      heritage assets and the suitability of the building for reuse.
9.2   Saved policy EMP9 sets a number of criteria for the conversion of barns to live work
      units. The council have also produced an SPG “The conversion of Rural Buildings
      to Live/Work Units within Craven” which provides a more detailed explanation of
      Saved Policy EMP9. The following examines the proposal against the criteria of
      policy EMP9 and refers to the SPG advice where appropriate.
9.3   The first criteria of policy EMP9 states that developments should be well related to
      the existing road network with direct access off a public road.
9.4   The SPG states that the rural buildings should be accessed directly from a
      classified road due to the requirement of employment units to be close to the road
      network. The road running through Cold Cotes is not a classified road and as such
      the property would be located a substantial distance from such a route. However
      the barn is close to the village centre and would be located a short distance from
      the main road through the village along an already formed access track. As such
      the unit is considered to be in an acceptable location in terms of its accessibility to
      the road network.
9.5   The second criteria states that the conversion should be of a scale and type that
      are appropriate to the surrounding area and do not adversely alter the appearance
      or character of the surrounding area. The third criteria of the policy relates to the
      design of the unit and states that it should be of a good standard of design that
       blends into the surroundings in terms of its design, landscaping and materials. The
       SPG states that it is “essential that when rural buildings are converted the design of
       the conversion respects the historic character and appearance of the building (and
       surrounding area).”
9.6    The proposed conversion includes a balcony at first floor level which is not
       considered to be an acceptable feature within a barn conversion. These
       conversions should be built using the creation of minimal openings and features
       that are typical of barns in order to maintain the original character of the barn and
       minimise the overall visual impact. Balconies are not found within traditional barns
       and other such domestic features should not be found within live work unit
       conversions.
9.7    Barn conversions should involve the creation of minimal new openings to the unit to
       preserve the barn like appearance of the building. The addition of patio doors to a
       barn conversion is generally considered unacceptable. These types of doors are
       domestic features that are out of place within the elevations of a traditional barn.
       However large glazing elements were previously approved in a scheme on the
       application site but weight must be given to the advice within the SPG that was
       adopted after previous approvals. This guidance suggests that additional glazing
       areas should be minimal. Advice within the SPG also states that large cart openings
       can be glazed to form integral parts of the building but should be designed so that
       curtains or blinds would not need to be used by, for example, incorporating the
       feature into the entrance hall of the unit. The proposed scheme would include the
       cart opening to the front elevation of the property as a window to the sitting room
       which may require screening of the window which would be visually unacceptable.
       The introduction of a largely glazed feature, the sunspace, to the south east
       elevation is considered an unacceptable addition to the traditional barn on a
       prominent elevation. Window openings to the other elevations on the building are
       considered acceptable. Conservation area rooflights are proposed to the main
       building and the number and coverage of this glazing is considered to be
       acceptable.
9.8    The use of aluminium clad timber windows is considered to be acceptable in that
       the windows would maintain the chunky traditional appearance of timber windows
       with a powder coated paint to the aluminium finish providing a suitable finish.
       However further details would be conditioned to be submitted prior to any consent.
9.9    The re use of the old stone slates is considered appropriate and the use of a
       suitable artificial stone slate, subject to a site inspection would be acceptable.
       Traditional barns are converted to allow their preservation and contribution to the
       surrounding area to be maintained. The farm buildings have been altered by
       previous users for agricultural uses and the application structure did have a profile
       asbestos roof. The use of a steel profile roofing material to the development is not
       considered to be acceptable for the barn and it is considered that a more traditional
       material should be used for any roofing.
9.10   The existing slurry pit and water tank would require extension and conversion to the
       new proposed use. Further walls would need to be constructed along with the
       addition of roofs to the currently open structures. The slurry pit and water tank
       would have had an agricultural appearance and their conversion to a bunker style
       development is not considered to be visually appropriate in relation to the traditional
       barn. The walls of the slurry pit would be faced in local stone with windows of the
       same materials as the main barn building and a turf roof. Included within the
       scheme is an area to be used for a bunk barn however this space is not considered
       to provide a good standard of visitor accommodation due to the room‟s location
       next to the workshop and its partially underground nature. It is considered that the
       proposed garage complex would not be appropriate in terms of its bunker design
       and would have a detrimental impact on the character and appearance of both the
       surrounding area and the original property.
9.11   In summary it is considered that the proposed development would introduce
       inappropriate features to the design and would involve the use of unacceptable
       materials. As such the development is not considered to accord with criteria 2 and 3
       of Saved Policy EMP9 of the Craven District (Outside the Yorkshire Dales National
       Park) Local Plan.
9.12   Criterion 4 of EMP9 states that the proposal should concern a building that is of
       some architectural merit, adds to the local character and is structurally sound and
       capable of reuse without rebuilding.
9.13   The building has been altered over the years with the addition of a small block
       section to the northern elevation and a shippon to the west. However from the
       photographs supplied the original building had some architectural merit as a barn
       and was in a prominent location within the village. The barn was therefore
       considered to be worthy of retention due to its character and appearance subject to
       the improvement or removal of newer features to the unit.
9.14   A structural appraisal has been supplied with the application although this does not
       seem to resemble what was found on site during the officer‟s site visit. At the end of
       the report the appraisal also refers to the conversion scheme previously approved
       not the plans subject to this application. Craven District Council‟s Building Control
       have also viewed the site and made comments on the structural stability of the
       property.
9.15   The structural appraisal states that, regarding the main part of the building, “there is
       no roof felt and there are large areas of the roof with missing slates” and also states
       that it is assumed that new battens, rafters, ridge beans and wall plates would be
       required for reroofing the property. At the time of the officer‟s visit there was no roof
       at all on the main section of the building. The building would need entirely re roofing
       including the newer elements attached to the main barn.
9.16   The structural appraisal states that “generally the masonry needs repointing and
       holes filled in”. The report also states that the north west wall has “some bowing
       inwards and outwards” however the design and access statement states that this
       wall is of poor quality and would require rebuilding. At the time of the officer‟s visit
       very little of this wall remained and this entire elevation would clearly require
       rebuilding.
9.17   The appraisal also states that the north east wall is plumb with a vertical/diagonal
       crack in the masonry. From the pictures and onsite inspection it is clear that this
       wall leans significantly and would require rebuilding to some extent.
9.18   The large internal wall to the north west is also in poor condition having partially
       collapsed and bulging in other areas.
9.19   In terms of the conversion of the slurry pit and water tank to ancillary
       accommodation to the main dwelling the block construction of the building and its
       design have little or no architectural merit and were clearly constructed to serve a
       function. This function is no longer required and the modern agricultural feature is
       not worthy of conversion.
9.20   It is therefore considered that the application property is not “structurally sound” and
       is not capable of conversion without significant rebuilding. In the building‟s current
       state any further development would be considered to involve substantial rebuilding
       and any previous approvals for the conversion of the property are not considered to
       be valid. In terms of architectural merit the main building may have once been
       worthy of saving however in its present condition could not be converted without
       substantial rebuilding. The slurry pit and the water tank have no architectural merit
       and are not considered suitable for converting. As such the development would not
       meet the guidelines of Criterion 4 of Saved policy EMP9 of the Craven District
       (Outside the Yorkshire Dales National Park) Local Plan.
9.21   Criterion 5 of Saved Policy EMP9 states that proposals should show a domestic
       curtilage that is minimal.
9.22   The application site has an area of 0.8 hectares and includes a very large area of
       open fields to the west of the buildings. Rural buildings are usually surrounded by
       agricultural land and surrounding a converted barn with large areas of garden and
       domestic spaces could detract from the character of the original building. The
       curtilage slopes down to the south and as such an area of this size would be very
       difficult to screen adequately. Due to the large size of the proposed domestic
       curtilage it is considered that the proposed development does not meet the
       requirements of this criterion of the Saved Policy.
9.23   Criterion 6 states that the development should relate to an employment use that is
       designed so that it can be used independently of the dwelling.
9.24   Little explanation has been provided within the application as to the layout of the
       dwelling however it is assumed that the areas designated as workspace and,
       separately, office are the work elements to the live work unit.
9.25   Between the foyer (f on the Ground Floor plan) and the dining room (d) there is a
       large opening between the sections showing a relationship that would not be
       considered acceptable under the guidance of the SPG which state that internal
       access would only be permitted where they maintain a degree of separation
       between the employment premises and ancillary living accommodation. The
       application includes separate bathrooms to the living accommodation and
       workspace would be at ground floor level only as per the SPG guidance. However
       the creation of split workspace surrounding the ancillary living accommodation is
       not considered acceptable as it would have an inappropriate relationship with the
       living area.
9.26   Criterion 7 states that a building should be of sufficient size to accommodate a
       genuine business use and any residential accommodation would be ancillary to
       that.
9.27   The application states that the workspace provided would be approximately 80m 2
       which is just over 30% of the total floor space of 258m2. The provision of the granny
       flat is considered to be ancillary to the main use of the dwelling but the floor space
       provided by this facility should be included as part of the domestic accommodation
       within the main building. Measuring of the supplied plans showed that the overall
       floor plan of the development including first floor accommodation would be
       approximately 294m2 with the workspace providing approximately 78m2 of this total.
       This would equate to approximately 26.5% of the total floor space which would fall
       short of the requirements of the advice within the SPG and Saved Policy EMP9.
9.28   Included within the scheme is the creation of a garage complex based upon the
       slurry pit and water tank currently on the site. This would create another 120m2 of
       domestic accommodation with an ancillary bunk barn. Guidance within the SPG
       states that it is sometimes possible to construct small buildings within the area
       around the barn providing that they are not overly large or domestic in nature. This
       additional complex is considered to be overly large and when taken with domestic
       accommodation in the barn would allow the residential use of the site to dominate
       contrary to guidance within the SPG.
9.29   Impact of the development on protected species
9.30   A bat and barn owl survey was supplied with the application and, given that Natural
       England and NYCC are unable to look at smaller consultations, the onus is on the
       Council to determine the suitability of the bat survey with a limited level of advice
       from Natural England.
9.31   A bat and barn owl survey was submitted with the application which is compliant
       with the guidance issued by Natural England. The survey found no trace of bats or
       barn owls on the site. Mitigation measures in the form of an appropriate set of
       guidelines for contractors should bats be found on the site have been suggested by
       the surveyor and it is considered that this would be sufficient to avoid any
       unnecessary harm to any protected species found on the site.
9.32   Impact of the development on the amenity of neighbouring properties
9.33   The proposed development would have no close neighbouring dwellings to the
       north, west and south. The nearest neighbouring property is Browns Farmhouse to
       the east. It is considered that due to the separation distance and design of the
       development the proposed scheme would not impact on the residential amenities of
       this property.
9.34   Impact of the development on the Listed building
10.    Policy HE7 in PPS5 sets out that in considering the impact of a proposal on any
       heritage asset, Local Planning Authorities should take into account the particular
       nature or the significance of the heritage asset and the value that it holds for this
       and future generations. Policy HE9 sets out that in considering proposals, Local
       Planning Authorities should take into account the relative significance of the
       element affected and its contribution to the significance of the Conservation area as
       a whole.
10.1   The proposed development would be located close to a Grade II listed building and
       would share an access with this property. The sensitive development of the
       traditional barn has previously been approved on this site however the proposed
       scheme is not considered to be appropriate for a development that would be viewed
       in close proximity to the listed building. The scheme is considered by virtue of its
       design and scale to have a detrimental impact on the heritage asset and as such is
       considered unacceptable under advice within PPS5 “Planning for the Historic
       Environment”.
11.    Recommendation
11.1   Refusal
12.    Summary of conditions
12.1   N/a
13.    Reasons for refusal
13.1   The proposed development is not considered to be of a good standard of design or
       materials for the conversion of a traditional stone built barn. As such the
       development is considered to have a detrimental impact on the character and
       appearance of the surrounding area contrary to guidance within PPS4 “Planning for
       Sustainable Economic Growth” and Saved Policy EMP9 of the Craven District
       (Outside the Yorkshire Dales National Park) Local Plan.
13.2   The building is not considered to be structurally sound and would therefore not be
       capable of conversion without major rebuilding. The development would therefore
       not meet this requirement of Saved Policy EMP9 of the Craven District (Outside the
       Yorkshire Dales National Park) Local Plan.
13.3   The proposed conversion would include an overly large domestic curtilage that is
       not considered to be minimal, unobtrusive or capable of being screened. As such
       the proposed development would not meet this requirement of Saved Policy EMP9
       of the Craven District (Outside the Yorkshire Dales National Park) Local Plan.
13.4   The proposed workspace within the barn building is split and is not considered to be
       of an adequate degree of separation from the residential section of the building.
       The proposed development would therefore not meet the requirements of Saved
       Policy EMP9 in terms of this requirement.
13.5   The floorspace designated as workspace within the property falls short of the level
       required by the Supplementary Planning guidance to EMP9 and also includes the
       creation of a large curtilage building to provide additional domestic accommodation.
       As such the proposed development would not meet the requirement of Saved
       Policy EMP9 to demonstrate that the building is of a sufficient size to accommodate
       a genuine business trade and that residential accommodation would be ancillary to
       the business use.
13.6   The proposed scheme by virtue of its design and scale would have an
       unacceptable impact on the nearby Listed Building. The proposed development
       would therefore not meet the requirements of PPS5 “Planning for the Historic
       Environment”.

				
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