Accounting Principles - Equity Distribution by qrx15172

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									                                                            Elmira College
                    Course Descriptions and Distribution Requirements
                                                                WINTER 2009
                           ACCOUNTING                                                                 ACCOUNTING

ACC2021                                                                      ACC3541
PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II                                                  INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
Offered By: John Savash                                                      Offered By: John Savash
            Kathleen Brown                                                   Prerequisites:   INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I
Prerequisites:   PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
                                                                             Description: This course is a continuation of the first semester in the
Description: This course continues the student's introduction to             study of accounting theory and concepts relating to financial accounting
financial accounting principles. Principles applicable to equity financing   and financial statement presentation of operating results, financial
will be emphasized prior to studying the Statement of Cash Flows.            position, and cash flow. Accounting for non-current liabilities and
Students will have an opportunity to analyze financial statements.           owner's equity professional literature and resource materials.
Students will study managerial and cost accounting terminology,
concepts, and uses in product costing systems and for decision analyses.     Method of Instruction:
Specific topics in managerial accounting include: cost behavior and cost-    Lecture and discussion. The student will be expected to read assigned
bolumen-profit analysis, the role of responsibility accounting and the       materials prior to class and to be prepared to take and active part in
budgeting process, performance evaluation and the use of standard            classroom discussions and in the solution of assigned problems.
costing, short-term planning, and strategic (long-term) planning (capital
budgeting).                                                                  Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             Two examinations given during the semester, a final examination,
Objectives:                                                                  quizzes, and a research/paper will be considered in determining the
A) Know the structure of the Statement of Cash Flows and its use. B)         student's final grade.
Know how to review a company's annual report and analyze the financial
information contained in an annual report. C) Know how accounting
information is used internally in business. D) Know how to use several
techniques to gather accounting data to be analyzed, perform analyses,       ACC4550
and interpret analyses.
                                                                             ADVANCED ACCOUNTING
Method of Instruction:                                                       Offered By: Kathleen Brown
Lecture, classroom discussions and problem solving.                          Prerequisites:   INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I &
                                                                                              INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
Method of Evaluation:
Quizzes and three exams.                                                     Description: This course examines advanced accounting concepts,
                                                                             including financial accounting procedures for partnerships, governmental
                                                                             accounting procedures, and the preparation and analysis of consolidated
                                                                             corporate financial statements.

                                                                             Method of Instruction:
                                                                             Lecture and discussion. The student will be expected to read assigned
                                                                             material prior to class and to be prepared to take an active part in
                                                                             classroom discussions and in the solution of assigned problems.

                                                                             Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             Two examinations given during the semester, a final comprehensive
                                                                             examination, class participation, and a paper will be considered in
                                                                             determining the student's final grade.
                         ACCOUNTING                                                       AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

ACC4740                                                                     ASL1020
AUDITING                                                                    AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II
Offered By: John Savash                                                     Offered By: Ray Parks
Prerequisites:   INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I &                                Prerequisites:   AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I
                 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II
                                                                            Description: This courses, a continuation of ASL 1010, provides
Description: This is a study, explanation, and application of GAAP          students with a review, expansion, and intensification of the vocabulary,
(Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) and GAAS (Generally              grammar, syntax and semantics of American Sign Language. Students
Accepted Auditing Standards) used by independent auditors in                will be able to communication skills will be emphasized as well as
accumulating and evaluating evidence about quantifiable information         correct sign production.
related to a specific economic entity for the purpose of determining and
reporting on the degree of correspondence between the quantifiable          Method of Instruction:
information and established criteria. Ethics and Legal Responsibility of    Demonstration, modeling, lecture and discussion.
the Auditing/Accounting Professions will also be discussed.
                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
Objectives:                                                                 Quizzes, midterm, final expressive and receptive exams.
A) Introduce philosophy, techniques, procedures, and practices. B)
Provide additional study of GAAP and introduce GAAS as an additional        Distribution Requirement :      GN
tool for accounting students. C) Intergrate auditing concepts with
practical (on-the-job) aspects of auditing. D) Strengthen research and
communiction skills by having students complete written assignments                              AMERICAN STUDIES
and oral presentations that contribute to their understanding of auditing
and which meet Elmira College general writing requirements.                 AMS2020
                                                                            INDIVIDUALISM AND COMMUNITY IN AMERICAN LIFE
Method of Instruction:
Lecture, discussions, writing assignments, and a computerized audit
                                                                            Offered By: Charles Mitchell
practice case.
                                                                            Description: The history of American culture is in many ways the
Method of Evaluation:                                                       story of the struggle to reconcile two contending forces: to construct a
Writing assignments, practice case, presentation,mid-term exam and final    society that does not smother the individual, and to nurture an
exam.                                                                       individualism that does not destroy the society. This course will
                                                                            introduce us to the terms of this struggle through texts drawn from the
                                                                            fields of fiction, poetry, drama, politics, sociology and popular culture.
Distribution Requirement :     W                                            We will consider how the meanings of "individualism" and "community"
                                                                            have changed over the course of American history and how individual
                                                                            Americans have responded to conflicting demands of these two powerful
                                                                            forces. While our focus will be on the way in which these themes have
                                                                            been developed in the past, we will, by the end of the term, recognize in
                                                                            them the background to contemporary debates about the nature -- and
                                                                            future -- of America.

                                                                            Method of Instruction:
                                                                            Directed discussion.

                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Participation, three papers, and final exam.

                                                                            Distribution Requirement :      US
                          ANTHROPOLOGY                                                                         ANTHROPOLOGY

ANT1040                                                                                ANT1600
CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY                                                                  COMPLEMENTARY HEALTH THERAPIES
Offered By: Robin O'Brian                                                              Offered By: Dennis Caso
                                                                                                   Elaine Caso
Description: This course introduces students to anthropology as the
comparative study of human cultures. Case studies are used to illustrate               Description: A study of the nature and philosophies that underlie Non
the material under discussion and to introduce students to the varieties of            Western Complementary Health Therapies. Modalities such as guided
cultural life and the strategies different societies employ for living in an           imagery, reflexology and therapeutic touch will be discussed. Issues
increasingly complex world. We will study the history, contemporary                    related to interferences with healing such as global nutrition and
forms, and methods of anthropology. Fieldwork and participant-                         individual nutrition will be included.
observation are introduced as underlying principles of anthropological
practice, and the concept of culture is explored.                                      Objectives:
                                                                                       At the completion of this course the student will:A)Demonstrate an
Objectives:                                                                            understanding of health care therapies which have evolved from Non-
To examine aspects of adaptation and survival in physical and social                   Western philosophies; B)Discuss the philosophies fundamental to
environments, to explore the organization of social life and to understand             mind/body/spirit practices; C)Explore the characteristics of selected
the dynamics of cultural change and diversity among contemporary                       modalities; D)Identify and utilize resources about modalities and
human populations.                                                                     therapies.
Method of Instruction:                                                                 Method of Instruction:
Class meetings will consist of lectures, class discussions, in-class                   Faculty and group presentations, discussions and guest lecturers and
exercises, and films.                                                                  readings.
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  Method of Evaluation:
Three exams, weekly summaries (10), attendance, participation, in-class                Class participation, papers on self-selected modalities and presentation
exercises, and book reviews (3).
                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :       NW
Distribution Requirement :           BSS


                                                                                       ANT2020
ANT1051
                                                                                       SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
                                                                                       Offered By: Robin O'Brian
Offered By: Heather Worne
                                                                                       Prerequisites:    ANT1040 (CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY) OR
Objectives:                                                                                             PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR
This course is designed to acquaint students with the anthropological study of
human biological variability over time and space. The causes of this variability are   Description: Ethnographic survey of the contemporary peoples and
considered within the theoretical framework of ecology; i.e. human variability is      cultures of sub-Saharan Africa. Particular attention will be paid to
viewed as a result of changing adaptations in keeping with changing                    interrelationships of foragers, pastoral herders and farmers; to the role of
environments. This course attempts to answer the following questions: What is          western colonialism; to tensions between rural and urban life; to Africa's
now known about human evolution? How may an examination of human origins               place in the world-system, and to social cultural change in the region.
enable us to understand human nature better? What accounts for the shift from
genetically determined adaptations (biological evolution) to learned adaptations
                                                                                       Objectives:
(cultural evolution) in human populations?
                                                                                       To acquaint the student with the range of cultures and societies in sub-
Method of Instruction:                                                                 Saharan Africa from an anthropological perspective.
Lectures, class discussions, films and labs.
                                                                                       Method of Instruction:
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  Lecture, discussions, videos, and group projects.
Participation, three exams, response papers and lab reports.
                                                                                       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Three exams (10% each), three book reviews (10% each), research paper
                                                                                       (25%), presentation (5%), course participation (10%).

                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :       NW
                        ANTHROPOLOGY                                                                                ART

ANT3450                                                                          ART1210
ECONOMIC ANTHROPOLOGY                                                            DRAWING I
Offered By: Robin O'Brian                                                        NOTE:COURSE FEE $135.00
Prerequisites:    CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY                                          Offered By: Marc Dennis

Description: Introduction to the ways in which different societies               Description: A foundation studio course in the basic technical and
satisfy their needs and wants through the related processes of production,       perceptual approaches to drawing. Students will develop an
consumption, distribution and exchange. Students will survey the                 understanding of formal issues as they relate to drawing, such as :
different theories and perspectives of economic anthropology, and                composition, perspective, volume, and value, working in a variety of
examine the economic arrangements of societies such as (but not limited          media including: pencil, charcoal, pen/brush and ink, and conte.
to): African herding peoples, Amazonian lowland peoples, New Guinea              Subjects include still-life, nature, single object descriptions, nude models,
Horticulturalists, Andean agriculturalists, and Belizean farmers.                and one's own imagination. Brief writing assignments and group
                                                                                 critiques.
Objectives:
To provide students with a range of economic arrangements in different           Method of Instruction:
human societies and the theoretical paradigms within the study of                Studio work with technical and lecture information continuous
economic anthropology.                                                           throughout class.

Method of Instruction:                                                           Method of Evaluation:
Lecture and discussion; group activities, videos and films, and student          A) One portfolio will be submitted at the end of the term. B)
presentation.                                                                    Attendance. C) Application of the correct and appropriate material
                                                                                 discussed in class - including knowledge of and ability to use the
Method of Evaluation:                                                            mediums will be assessed and evaluated regularly. D) Individual and
Three essay exams; research paper on an approved topic and course                group critiques.
participation.
                                                                                 Distribution Requirement :       CP
Distribution Requirement :       W

                                                                                 ART1220
ANT4595                                                                          PAINTING I
SENIOR SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY                                     NOTE:COURSE FEE $275.00
Offered By: Martha Easton                                                        Offered By: Marc Dennis
Prerequisites:    ANT-SOC3150 (SOCIAL THEORY) AND ANT-
                  SOC3260 (QUANTITATIVE METHODS). SENIOR                         Description: A foundation studio course in the basic technical and
                  STANDING STRONGLY RECOMMENDED                                  conceptual approaches to painting. Students will develop an
                                                                                 understanding of formal issues as they relate to painting, such as:
Description: This course provides a "capstone" experience for senior             composition, color theory, perspective, volume, and value, working in a
Anthropology and Sociology students. Students will gain experience               variety of media, including: acrylic and watercolor, with a strong
integrating their own research into the literature of their discipline and       emphasis on oil paints. Subjects include: still-life, nature, single object
area of interest, will present relevant materials from the professional          descriptions and one's own imagination. Course includes brief writing
literature to the course; will submit a draft of their paper to the course for   assignments, and group critiques.
discussion and present their final draft in a professional and/or public
setting                                                                          Method of Instruction:
                                                                                 Studio work with technical and lecture information continuous
Objectives:                                                                      throughout class.
Upon completing this course the student will be able to: A) Demonstrate
the integration and application of his or her previous coursework; B)            Method of Evaluation:
Discuss and analyze the professional literature from her or his                  Creativity, proper appropriation of lesson plan, rate of improvement,
appropriate subfield and discipline; C) Conduct independent research             motivation and amount of exploration and experimentation.
resulting in a piece of extended writing; and D) Demonstrate adequate
preparation for entry to graduate school or further professional training        Distribution Requirement :       CP

Method of Instruction:
This course will be run as a seminar

Method of Evaluation:
The class will complete individual original research papers, and will do
presentations on readings. Students will also be graded on participation
in discussions and peer reviews

Distribution Requirement :       W
                                  ART                                                                           ART

ART1230                                                                     ART1250
ILLUSTRATION I                                                              PHOTOGRAPHY I
NOTE: COURSE FEE $200.00                                                    Offered By: Jan Kather
Offered By: Marc Dennis                                                     Prerequisites: MUST PROVIDE OWN 35mm CAMERA
                                                                                           NOTE: COURSE FEE $75.00
Description: A basic studio course emphasizing the technical and
conceptual skills needed to create original illustrations. A variety of     Description: Students will learn camera operation, black and white
media will be explored including graphite, ink, colored pencil, and         film processing and printmaking procedures, critiques of class work, and
watercolor. Students will work from direct observations as well as          an overview of the history of art photography. This course will further
imagination to produce drawings serving purposes from single object         knowledge of both the technical and aesthetic aspects of photography.
scientific illustration to book illustration.
                                                                            Method of Instruction:
Method of Instruction:                                                      Lecture and demonstrations, slides and slide and tape presentations,
Lecture and demonstration of required skills.                               films, and other supportive materials will be used to clarify technical and
                                                                            aesthetic points presented in class. Weekly assignments will culminate
Method of Evaluation:                                                       in a final portfolio to be critiqued.
30% class participation, group critiques; 70% weekly projects and final
portfolio.                                                                  Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Completion of all assignments, class discussion and critiques, and on the
Distribution Requirement :      CP                                          final portfolio of ten prints.

                                                                            Distribution Requirement :        CP
ART1241
INTRO TO PRINTMAKING: SILKSCREEN
NOTE:COURSE FEE $75.00
                                                                            ART1362
                                                                            FURNITURE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION I
Offered By: Christopher Longwell
                                                                            NOTE:COURSE FEE $85.00
Description: To introduce the student to silkscreen printing                Offered By: Derek Chalfant
techniques, including paper, glue, and film stencils and tusche and glue
resist methods. Photo silkscreen is an optional technique. A basic          Description: In this course wood will be used as the primary medium,
course for both majors and non-majors. Students may take Printmaking        although the use of other materials is possible. Students will learn the
II without having taken Printmaking I. Students will work mainly in         use of hand and power tools as well as various techniques of joining,
color and will use a variety of techniques from experimental to             laminating, fabricating and carving. Emphasis is placed on originality,
traditional. Design will be stressed as well as the development of an       individual concept and design, and a high level of craft while working
effective working process. Students will complete a minimum of four         three-dimensionally. Students will be strengthening their inventiveness
multi-color finished prints, each using a different technique.              and creative thinking, which are essential to their learning experience.
                                                                            One full scale Table will be designed and produced, no larger that three
Method of Instruction:                                                      feet in any direction. Work will be discussed and reviewed in a critique.
Lecture and demonstration, slides, group and individual critiques.
                                                                            Method of Instruction:
Method of Evaluation:                                                       Studio/ slide lectures. Possibly a trip to the Wendell Castle Workshop
Attendance, participation in group critiques, individual development, and   near Rochester.
on a portfolio of completed prints.
                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
Distribution Requirement :      CP                                          Class critique/ letter grade for the project.


                                                                            Distribution Requirement :        CP
                                      ART                                                                                    ART

ART1370                                                                                ART2101
CERAMICS I                                                                             INTRO TO ART HISTORY: RENAISSANCE TO MODERN
NOTE:COURSE FEE $50.00                                                                 Offered By: Douglas Holtgrewe
Offered By: Douglas Holtgrewe
                                                                                       Objectives:
Objectives:                                                                            A survey of the history of art covering the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo,
A basic study in ceramics directed toward the beginning student. A studio course       the Nineteenth Century, and into the Twentieth Century. The major focus will be
emphasizing the technical and conceptual skills needed to produce sound three-         upon the European art of these periods, with a primary interest in painting,
dimensional forms in clay. Basic clay forming techniques will be stressed, but the     sculpture and architecture. The emphasis will be upon the art which was created
student is encouraged to experiment and build on basic knowledge.                      and the social and philosophical significance of this art.

Method of Instruction:                                                                 Method of Instruction:
Lecture and demonstrations, group evaluations. class discussions, individual           Illustrated lecture and documentation of the periods and the work being discussed.
consultation, critiques by the instructor, and class work on projects. Attendance is   Classroom discussion is always open for student participation.
mandatory.
                                                                                       Method of Evaluation:
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  A minimum of two examinations, plus some quizzes, all of which will be
A minimum of six projects will be assigned. Critiques, demonstration of working        announced. These tests will be primarily concerned with the identification,
knowledge of basic techniques, concepts and craftsmanship, motivation,                 analysis (literary, social, and philosophical) and comparisons of works of art.
involvement, and attendance.
                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :          EU
Distribution Requirement :          CP

                                                                                       ART2240
ART2000                                                                                PRINTMAKING II
VIDEO ART I                                                                            NOTE:COURSE FEE $75.00
NOTE: COURSE FEE $25.00                                                                Offered By: Christopher Longwell
Offered By: Jan Kather                                                                 Prerequisites:      INTRO PRINTMAKING: ETCHING AND RELIEF

Description: This course serves to introduce the basic techniques and                  Description: Further development of the student's ability in
strategies in the production of video art. The student will be instructed in           printmaking to carry initial ideas through the final print. Techniques of
the use of the video camera (analogue and digital), lighting, sound, the               color printing explored.
creation of a storyboard, and editing skills (analogue and digital). Video,
as creative medium, will be explored regarding its historical development              Method of Instruction:
and current status in the context of art. Each student will produce one or             Lab, demonstrations, individual and class discussions, group
more completed video projects and will present their projects to the class.            evaluations. Technical processes, procedures, and problems discussed on
                                                                                       group level with consultaion for specific problems as encountered on
Objectives:                                                                            individual basis.
To enable the student to plan, shoot, and edit a short video as art, using
both analogue and digital equipment.                                                   Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Critiques, working demonstrations of technical skills, motivation and
Method of Instruction:                                                                 involvement.
Students will develop their own video art ideas after the historical and
current directions of Video Art lectures and discussions. The class will
operate at a discursive level to share information and give progress
reports on individual projects. There will be lab time using analogue
editing devices and computer editing software. Finished projects will be
discussed and critiqued as a group. There will be at least two texts: one
will be art historical/theoretical and the other(s) will be technical
(camera, editing). The class will be shown numerous examples of
professionally developed Video Art.

Method of Evaluation:
Attendance, completion of projects and critical evaluation of completed
projects

Distribution Requirement :          CP
                                   ART                                                                            ART

ART2360                                                                     ART2370
SCULPTURE II                                                                CERAMICS II
NOTE: $85.00 COURSE FEE                                                     NOTE:COURSE FEE $50.00
Offered By: Derek Chalfant                                                  Offered By: Douglas Holtgrewe
Prerequisites:    SCULPTURE I                                               Prerequisites: Instructor's signature required

Description: The media and technical processes relevant to the              Objectives:
specific interests of each student will be further developed, using the     A studio course in intermediate ceramics. Students will be introduced to more
perceptual and technical skills acquired in Sculpture I. Individual         advanced clay working techniques and concepts.
concepts and the techniques needed to pursue them will be cultivated.
                                                                            Method of Instruction:
Emphasis will be on independent planning and production.
                                                                            Lecture and demonstrations, group evaluations, class discussions, individual
                                                                            consultation, critiques by the instructor, and class work on projects. Attendance is
Method of Instruction:                                                      mandatory.
Demonstrations and instruction. Students will keep journals and critical
discussions will be ongoing.                                                Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Critiques, demonstration of working knowledge of techniques, concepts and
Method of Evaluation:                                                       craftsmanship, motivation, involvement, and attendance.
Completion of projects, discussions and critiques and attendance.



                                                                            ART3150
ART2362                                                                     19TH CENTURY ART
BRONZE CASTING I                                                            Offered By: Douglas Holtgrewe
NOTE: COURSE FEE $100.00
Offered By: Derek Chalfant                                                  Description: A survey of European art of the 19th Century beginning
                                                                            with the Neoclassical and romantic school, through the Barbizon painters
Description: This studio course will provide a basic understanding of       and the realists, and ending with the Impressionists and Post-
"lost wax" bronze-casting. Mold-making, working with clay and wax,          Impressionist painters.
and foundry techniques (gating, investing, kiln-firing, melting and
pouring, chasing, and patina) will be explored. Students can work with      Objectives:
sculptural forms from clay or found materials or directly in wax. Thus,     To gain an understanding of the development of 19th Century art and its
finishing a bronze form.                                                    relationship to the social history of that time.

Method of Instruction:                                                      Method of Instruction:
Bronze-casting through slide lectures, mold-making, and critical analysis   Slide-lecture and discussion.
of projects.
                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
Method of Evaluation:                                                       Quizzes, mid-term, final exam, plus one or more term papers.
Attendance, projects, and participation in critical discussions.
                                                                            Distribution Requirement :          EU
Distribution Requirement :       CP

                                                                            ART3151
                                                                            IMPRESSIONISM & POST- IMPRESSIONISM
                                                                            Offered By: Lynne Diamond-Nigh

                                                                            Description: An in-depth study of painting from the latter half of the
                                                                            19th Century in France focusing primarily on Impressionism and Post-
                                                                            Impressionism. The development of Impressionism and Post-
                                                                            Impressionism will be examined, as well as the impact that these two
                                                                            movements had on subsequent artistic periods and styles in France and in
                                                                            the rest of the western world.


                                                                            Distribution Requirement :          EU
                                  ART                                                                              ART

ART3240                                                                      ART3362
PRINTMAKING III                                                              BRONZE CASTING II
NOTE:COURSE FEE $75.00                                                       Offered By: Derek Chalfant
Offered By: Christopher London                                               Prerequisites:      BRONZE CASTING I
Prerequisites:    PRINTMAKING II
                                                                             Description: This studio course will provide a more in depth
Description: An advanced studio course which explores one of                 understanding of "lost wax" bronze-casting. Mold-making, working with
several particular aspects of printmaking with emphasis on both original     clay and wax, and foundry techniques (gating, investing, kiln-
and technical facility. The development of a related body of work is         firing,melting and pouring, chasing, and patina) will be explored.
emphasized.                                                                  Students can work with sculptural forms from clay or found materials or
                                                                             directly in wax. Thus, finishing a bronze form.
Method of Instruction:
Studio approach.                                                             Method of Instruction:
                                                                             Bronze-casting through slide lectures, mold-making, and critical analysis
Method of Evaluation:                                                        of projects.
Critique, working demonstration of technical skills, motivation and
involvement. A substantial portfolio is required at the end of the course.   Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             Attendance, projects, and participation in critical discussions.

                                                                             Distribution Requirement :          CP


ART3358
METHODOLOGIES OF TEACHING: VISUAL ARTS                                       ART3370
Offered By: Martha Evans                                                     CERAMICS III
                                                                             NOTE:COURSE FEE $50.00
Prerequisites: JUNIOR CLASS STANDING AND EDU2220
               (TEACHING IN THE DIVERSE CLASSROOM),                          Offered By: Douglas Holtgrewe
               AND EDU3338 (CURRICULUM DESIGN &                              Prerequisites: Instructor's signature required
               INSTRUCTION: VISUAL ARTS)
                                                                             Objectives:
                 NOTE:COURSE FEE $25.00                                      A studio course in advanced ceramics. Students will be introduced to more
                                                                             advanced clay working techniques and concepts. Ceramic design will be
Description: A) To introduce the student to the various art media and        emphasized.
techniques and consider their application to the classroom situation. B)
                                                                             Method of Instruction:
To extend the visual awareness of the prospective teacher through direct     Lecture and demonstrations, group evaluations, class discussion, individual
art experience. C) To study the relationship of aesthetic experience and     consultation, critiques by the instructor, and class work on projects. Attendance is
other bisual experiences in the classroom (maps, diagrams, charts, etc.).    mandatory.
The course will consist of studio projects designed around the following
media: painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, computer art and the       Method of Evaluation:
use of found materials.                                                      Critiques, demonstration of working knowledge of techniques, concepts and
                                                                             craftsmanship, motivation, involvement, and attendance.
Method of Instruction:
Technical demonstrations, class participation in studio projects, slides,
videos, etc., group discussion and feedback.

Method of Evaluation:
Students will prepare two lesson plans oulining their choice of two
different art techniques. One lesson will be demonstrated to the class and
one presented to a group other than the class. Each lesson will be
documented with examples of student work and a self-evaluation by the
student. The student will keep a journal of ideas throughout the term.
Lesson number one (30%), Lesson number two (30%), class
participation (30%), and journal (10%).
                                  ART                                                                      BIOLOGY

ART4590                                                                      BIO1022
SEMINAR ART CRITICISM                                                        BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS II
Offered By: Christopher Longwell                                             NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00
Prerequisites: JUNIOR OR SENIOR STANDING IN ART                              Offered By: Daniel Kjar
                                                                                         Lynn Gillie
Description: This course will focus on understanding works of art by
means of three activities: seeing, reading, and writing. Course content
                                                                                         Michael Robson
will center on modern art and post-modernism in order to gain an             Prerequisites:    BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS I
understanding of the range of contemporary art criticism. Essays by the
most influential art critics of their day will be studied, from Baudelaire   Description: Fundamental concepts about animal diversity, structure
and Ruskin to Greenberg and Rosenberg, Kramer, Schapiro, Sontag,             and function are presented, as well as unifying themes of evolution and
Lippard, Hughes, Tompkins, Danto and others. Articles excerpted from         ecology. Labs explore diversity of animals using experimental methods
contemporary art magazines such as "Artforum" and "Art in America"           as well as some dissections and a field experience. NOTE: Enrollment
will be read and discussed. The process of thinking and writing about art    in BIO 1020, BIO 1022, CHEM 1510, and CHE 1511 is recommended
will be emphasized. Class meetings will take the form of group               only for those majoring in one of the sciences.
discussions of the assigned readings and analysis of student essays. The
writing component will be integrated into the fabric of the course through   Objectives:
weekly papers. When possible, the class will visit local museums and art     To enable the student to: A) List and explain the principal taxons
galleries to reinforce the "seeing" component of the class.                  (scientific groupings) of present-day animal life. B) To describe and
                                                                             explain the basic structure and function of the organ systems of the
Objectives:                                                                  vertebrate body. C) To understand the basic principles of environmental
To gain an understanding of art criticism with special focus on the range    interrelationships.
of contemporary viewpoints. To develop the student's ability to articulate
and to write meaningfully about works of art, both art of their own          Method of Instruction:
creation and that of other artists.                                          Lectures, demonstrations, and open-ended discussions will support the
                                                                             textual assignments. Laboratory sessions will be principally concerned
Method of Instruction:                                                       with specific details of the form and function of representative species of
Lecture and discussion, slide viewing, and field trips.                      the principal animal groups. One field trip near the conclusion of the
                                                                             course will explore and consider the circumstances under which plants,
Method of Evaluation:                                                        animal and man relate to nature.
Students will be graded on attendance, participation in class discussion,
and on a weekly series of written essays, culminating in a final critical    Method of Evaluation:
essay.                                                                       1) Two one-hour examinations (at the end of four and eight weeks) and
                                                                             one two-hour final exam. 2) Laboratory quizzes. 3) The instructor will
                                                                             consider "participation" (attendance, degree of application) as a factor in
                                                                             final grading.
Distribution Requirement :      W
                                                                             Distribution Requirement :      PLS
                             BIOLOGY                                                                         BIOLOGY

BIO1071                                                                     BIO1211
HUMAN BIOLOGY                                                               ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II
NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00                                                        NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00
Offered By: Staff                                                           Offered By: Mary Anne Perks
                                                                            Prerequisites:     ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I
Description: To expose students to the Biological processes, which
control or influence human function, activity, and response.                Objectives:
                                                                            The student will be able to identify the gross and microscopic compontents of the
Objectives:                                                                 following systems: Circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, reproductive and
The student will: A) Learn the chemical aspects of human organization       endocrine. To explain the physical and physiological (function) mechanisms of the
and the methods of obtaining information in a scientific manner. B)         above systems. To describe and explain the control of the systems. To recognize
Ascertain the cellular basis of activity and the mechanisms used in         and indicate ways in which the systems may malfunction.
metabolism. C) Learn how the various organ systems act to carry out life    Method of Instruction:
processes. D) Delineate the genetic mechanisms by which our lives are       Three hours of lecture plus three hours of laboratory per week. Laboratories will
governed and have evolved. E) How we develop and age and how                be taught using preserved mammals for dissection, slides, models, films, and
diseases affect us. F) Be able to relate to these facts and phenomena to    demonstration.
some social and emotional issues.
                                                                            Method of Evaulation:
Method of Instruction;                                                      There will be weekly laboratory quizzes, two lecture examinations and a
                                                                            comprehensive final exam.
Lectures and discussions, supplemented by demonstrations and videos;
extensive laboratory sessions to elucidate the principles of human
biology.

Method of Evaluation:                                                       BIO2015
Hourly examinations, weekly laboratory quizzes and/or lab reports and
short papers.                                                               RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY
                                                                            Offered By: Christine Bezotte
Distribution Requirement :     PLS                                                      Daniel Kjar
                                                                                        Lynn Gillie
                                                                                        Todd Egan
BIO1110
                                                                            Prerequisites: Instructor's signature required
INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY
NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00                                                        Description: The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the
Offered By: Christine Bezotte                                               practical aspects of conducting research in biology. Theoretical aspects
                                                                            of the scientific method covered in several classes will be applied to
Prerequisites:   INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY                                     practical scientific problems in contemporary science. The students will
Description: This course examines the structure and life processes of       learn how to synthesize several observations described in scientific
microbial organisms, with particular emphasis on bacteria and viruses,      literature into a series of hypotheses attempting to explain these
and their relationships to man. We will consider the role of microbes in    observations, and subsequently test these hypotheses in the laboratory or
producing human disease and the means of preventing and controlling         field and write-up the results in a paper. Results will be presented at a
these diseases.                                                             scientific meeting or as a seminar for the Division.

Objectives:                                                                 Objectives:
A) Recognize and describe different types of microbes and their common      A) Learn to use published literature to summarize present knowledge in a
and differential characteristics. B) Recognize the types of environmental   field of science. B) Develop ability to synthesize pre-existing data to
conditions under which microbes exist and flourish, and to be able to       formulate falsifiable hypotheses. C) Practice capacity to formulate
produce, or remove, these conditions. C) Recognize the means by which       experimental designs to test hypotheses. D) Acquire skill in accurate
microbes used in preventing such transmissions. D) Be able to handle        collection of precise data. E) Develop ability to draw proper conclusions
infectious material without contaminating the material, or any other        from acquired data. F) Improve skills in writing, revising and oral
person or object.                                                           presentation.

Method of Instruction:                                                      Method of Instruction:
Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab.                             Individual instruction, extensive use of the library and scientific
                                                                            literature. Lab and/or field work.
Method of Evaluation:
Bi-weekly quizzes, poster presentation and lab write-ups.                   Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Discussion with instructors (20%), research paper (40%), and seminar
                                                                            (40%).
                              BIOLOGY                                                                       BIOLOGY

BIO2050                                                                       BIO3055
GENERAL BOTANY                                                                MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00                                                          NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00
Offered By: Todd Egan                                                         Offered By: Christine Bezotte
Prerequisites:   BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS I                                        Prerequisites:    BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS I & BIOLOGICAL
                                                                                                CONCEPTS II & ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I &
Description: This course will briefly cover the protist, fungal, and                            ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
bacterial kingdoms. Major emphasis will be given to the plant kingdom.
Photosynthesis, reproduction, growth, and anatomy will be covered             Description: A detailed introduction of molecular genetics, which
under an evolutionary umbrella. Seedless nonvascular to advanced              emphasizes the experimental analysis of key processes using genetic,
plants will be surveyed. Students will gain a greater appreciation for the    biochemical, and recombinant DNA techniques. Among the topics to be
importance of plants in society and have a greater understanding of how       covered are DNA structure; the organization of DNA in prokaryotes, and
we rely on them for our survival. Laboratory will reinforce lecture and       eukaryotes; DNA replication, repair, and recombination; transposable
will develop practice skills as well as increase depth of knowledge in        elements; transcription and its regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes;
botany.                                                                       RNA processing and degradation; translation in prokaryotes and
                                                                              eukaryotes; and control of protein degradation.
Objectives:
A) To provide students with basic knowledge of the plant kingdom that         Objectives:
can be applied to more advanced plant classes at Elmira College (e.g.         A) To provide a detailed introduction to molecular genetics. B) To
Plant Physiology) and Plant Ecology or in graduate school. B) To              emphasize the experimental analysis of these processes using a variety of
provide students with general information about the protist, fungal, and      modern techniques. C) To expose students to the primary literature in
bacterial kingdoms. No other course at Elmira College provides                molecular biology. D) To provide practical experience in the use of
background information on the protist or fungal kingdoms. These groups        recombinant DNA techniques.
of organisms have broad impacts on our society and economy. C) To
provide students with the opportunity to learn about plant anatomy,           Method of Instruction:
morphology, and systematic through laboratory investigations.                 Assigned readings, lectures, class discussions of journal articles, writing
                                                                              assignments and laboratory work.
Method of Instruction:
Lecture and laboratory.                                                       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              Two exams, journal club participation and preparation of abstracts, term
Method of Evaluation:                                                         paper, and lab reports.
There will be three regular exams and one final exam during exam week
for a total of four exams. Lab notebooks will be collected and graded. A      Distribution Requirement :      W
term paper and presentation will also be incorporated into the final grade.
                                  BIOLOGY                                                                              BIOLOGY

BIO3060                                                                                  BIO3150
ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY                                                                        THE BIOLOGY OF CANCER
Offered By: Lynn Gillie                                                                  Offered By: Christine Bezotte
Prerequisites:       CHE2020 (ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I), BIO1020                              Prerequisites:    BIO1020 (BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS I), BIO1022
                    (BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS I) AND BIO1022                                                   (BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS II) AND AN UPPER
                    (BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS II)                                                              LEVEL BIO COURSE (3000 LEVEL)
                    NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00
                                                                                         Description: An in-depth look at the biological principles of cancer,
Objectives:                                                                              its development and treatment. Emphasizing clinical implications, the
Students will be able: A) To explain how the various organ systems of an organism        course will explore current research and advances in oncogenesis, basic
function. B) To explain relationships between structure and function in the organ        mechanisms of malignant cells, molecular abnormalities and treatment.
systems. C) To explain the interaction between organ systems and the control             Topics include malignant transformations, tumor genetics, cancer
systems that make a group of organs function as an organism. D) To outline or
                                                                                         growth, metastasis, pathogenesis of systemic malignancies, and the
indicate the experimental data (experiments) upon which the theories of organ
system function are based. E) To demonstrate familiarity with the set up and             molecular basis for cancer therapy.
operation of modern physiological recording equipment such as Polygraphs,
Stimulators, and Spirometers.                                                            Objectives:
                                                                                         A) To provide students with a greater understanding of the biological
Method of Instruction:                                                                   principles of cancer and the human dimensions of the disease. B) To
Three lecture hours and one three hour time block, will be used for combinations         introduce students to the molecular and clinical biology of oncogenesis
of lectures, demonstrations, laboratories, and tests. Laboratories will have             and the pathogenesis of cancer. C) To emphasize the current research
directions that may take longer than the time available. They are open ended in
                                                                                         techniques used to investigate the molecular etiology and treatment of
that the students are able to ask more questions than are contained in the
directions.                                                                              cancer. D) To expose students to the primary scientific literature and to
                                                                                         provide practical experience in the practice of writing for the biological
Method of Evaluation:                                                                    sciences.
1) Three hourly exams plus a final exam. 2) Lab reports: a) each student is to
write up reports on each experiment to be submitted by the end of the week. b)           Method of Instruction:
reports should be three to seven pages and should be in the standard scientific          Lecture, discussion groups, group exploration of clinical based problems
report form with and introduction, materials and methods section, results section        (documented cases), literature research and discussion.
with tables and figures and a discussion section. c) a bibilography must be
included, and it is expected that the student will consult sources other than the text
and lab manual in the attempt to relate the results to the common body of                Method of evaluation:
knowledge. 3) Summary of two or more papers from the current literature.                 Two major exams (30%), final literature review (25%), three clinical
                                                                                         case reports (15%), four article critiques from scholarly journals (10%),
                                                                                         and participation in class discussions (20%).

                                                                                         Distribution Requirement :      W
                              BIOLOGY                                                                     BIOLOGY

BIO4015                                                                     BIO4605
RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY                                                         EVOLUTION
Offered By: Christine Bezotte                                               Offered By: Daniel Kjar
            Daniel Kjar                                                     Prerequisites:    BIOLOGICAL CONCEPTS I & BIOLOGICAL
            Lynn Gillie                                                                       CONCEPTS II & ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II
            Todd Egan                                                       Description: Students will study recent research in molecular
Prerequisites: Instructor's signature required                              evolution, along with the classical evidence in morphology, anatomy,
                                                                            physiology, and the fossil record. Discussions will involve learning how
Description: The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the    to interpret evidence present in scientific reports. Students will be
practical aspects of conducting research in biology. Theoretical aspects    required to write two critiques of research papers from the scientific
of the scientific method covered in several classes will be applied to      literature.
practical scientific problems in contemporary science. The students will
learn how to synthesize several observations described in scientific        Objective:
literature into a series of hypotheses attempting to explain these          To synthesize the information from biology and chemistry in
observations, and subsequently test these hypotheses in the laboratory or   understanding the principles and mechanism of the evolutionary process.
field and write-up the results in a paper. Results will be presented at a
scientific meeting.                                                         Method of Instruction:
                                                                            Lectures and discussions, student presentations and discussions of
Objectives:                                                                 assigned readings, studies in current literature and classical papers in
A) Learn to use published literature to summarize present knowledge in a    evolution.
field of science. B) Develop ability to synthesize pre-existing data to
formulate falsifiable hypotheses. C) Practice capacity to formulate         Method of Evaluation:
experimental designs to test hypotheses. D) Acquire skill in accurate       Mid-term and final exam (30% each), class presentations and discussions
collection of precise data. E) Develop ability to draw proper conclusions   (20%), and two critiques (10% each).
from acquired data. F) Improve skills in writing, revising, and oral
presentation.

Method of Instruction:                                                                                  CHEMISTRY
Individual instruction, extensive use of the library and scientific
literature. Lab and/or field work.

Method of Evaluation:
Discussion with instructors (20%), research paper (40%), and seminar
(40%).
                           CHEMISTRY                                                                       CHEMISTRY

CHE1010                                                                     CHE1511
INTRODUCTORY CHEMISTRY                                                      BASIC CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II
NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00                                                        Offered By: Pierre-Yves Bouthyette
Offered By: Terence Lenhardt                                                Prerequisites:      BASIC CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES I

Description: This course in not intended for science majors. This           NOTE: Enrollment in BIO 1020, BIO 1022, CHE 1510 and CHE 1511 is
course will cover certain aspect of inorganic chemistry, organic            recommended only for those majoring in one of the sciences.
chemistry and biochemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the application
of these principles to understand the chemistry of living organisms,        Objectives:
                                                                            Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have acquired an
particularly the human body. The development of modern atomic theory,
                                                                            understanding of molecular geometries and hybridization of bonding orbitals, a
will be explored from a historical perspective. Other topics include: The   functional knowledge of solution chemistry, the ability to apply basic mathematical
development of the gas laws, acids and bases, radio chemistry and the       concepts to reactions invovling the ionization of weak acids and bases, hydrolysis
genetic code.                                                               of metal ions, ionization of sparingly soluable salts, and the formation of
                                                                            complexes as well as developed a thorough understanding of the concept of PH
Objectives:                                                                 and the action of buffers and acquired a familiarity with the thermodynamic
Upon successful completion of this course, a student will be able to:       concepts of free energy and entropy and the kinetics of chemical reactions.
recognize the chemical bases of certain physiological activities, use the
                                                                            Method of Instruction:
metric system, view chemistry in its historical context, understand the
                                                                            Lectures will be devoted to the discussion of various concepts in Chemistry.
role of experimentation, hypotheses, theory and law, recall the gas laws    Student participation is expected. The laboratory will be devoted to practical
and apply them to real system such as respiration, critically analyze a     demonstrations of these concepts. Problems will be assigned to reinforce the
certain level of science writing, recognize the components of blood and     knowledge of these concepts.
recall their functions, recognize the normal and pathological components
of urine, and to acquire sound laboratory techniques.                       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            The final grade will be based on the results of two one-hour examinations (30%),
Method of Instruction:                                                      laboratory reports (25%), and weekly mini-tests (15%), and a final examination
                                                                            (20%).
There are three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory session
per week. Each laboratory session will begin with discussion of the
theory and techniques used in the laboratory.

Method of Evaluation:
The course grade will be determined on the basis of three one-hour
examinations. Weekly quizzes, the comprehensive final examination,
two written reports and laboratory work.


Distribution Requirement :     PLS
                               CHEMISTRY                                                                              CHEMISTRY

CHE1515                                                                               CHE2150
GENERAL CHEMISTRY II                                                                  ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY
NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00                                                                  NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00
Offered By: Dale Powers                                                               Offered By: Staff
Prerequisites:      GENERAL CHEMISTRY I                                               Prerequisites:      BASIC CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES I & BASIC
                                                                                                          CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II & GENERAL
Description: The purpose of this course is to give students who                                           CHEMISTRY I & GENERAL CHEMISTRY II &
normally would normally experience difficulties in CHE 1510 extensive                                     GENERAL CHEMISTRY III
training in problem solving strategies and techniques and the opportunity
to practice these techniques extensively, in class and in the laboratory.             Description: To identify the components of the various chemical
Students will learn how to apply analytical thinking and problem solving              cycles operating in the environment, to assess the effect of stress on
techniques to areas of Chemistry including the Atomic Theory, atoms                   natural chemical systems, to identify the sources and effects of major
and compounds, the mole, stoichiometry, solution stoichiometry,                       pollutants of the air and water, to evaluate methods of combating
thermochemistry, the Periodic table and periodic trends.                              pollution, to develop proficiency in the techniques of water and air
                                                                                      quality anaysis, to develop a plan for a water quality study.
Objectives:
Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have: a)                  Method of Instruction:
demonstrated the acquisition of an understanding of molecular                         The course will consist of lecture and discussion and laboratory and field
geometries and hybridization of bonding orbitals; b) demonstrated the                 work. Each student will be expected to develop and carry out a water
acquisition of a functional knowledge of solution chemistry c)                        quality study of a river or stream.
demonstrated the acquisition of familiarity with the properties of gases
and liquids; d) demonstrated the acquisition of an understanding of the               Method of Evaluation:
kinetics of chemical reactions and the methodology involved in kinetic                Evaluation will be based in announced quizzes and the project.
studies.

Method of Instruction:
Lecture-Discussions, interactive learning and intensive in class practice
of problem solving techniques. Hands-on laboratory experience.                        CHE3020
                                                                                      PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II
Method of Evaluation:                                                                 NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00
The final grade will be based on the result of two major examinations                 Offered By: Dale Wexell
(30%), final examination (25%), laboratory reports (25%) and weekly
mini tests (20%)                                                                      Prerequisites:      BASIC CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES I & BASIC
                                                                                                          CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II & CALCULUS I &
                                                                                                          GENERAL PHYSICS I

                                                                                      Objectives:
CHE2020                                                                               This course is the second of two courses that offer a comprehensive study of the
ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II                                                                  physical principles describing chemical systems, reactions, equilibrium and
                                                                                      structures. Physical Chemistry covers the law of Thermodynamics, chemical
NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00                                                                  potential, chemical equilibrium, phase equilibrium, electro-chemical cells, and an
Offered By: Gurvinder Gill                                                            introduction to atomic structure. Lab experiments related to these topics provide
                                                                                      an introduction to Physical Chemical Methods. Appropriate maintenance of
Prerequisites:      ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I                                               records of data, analysis of data, determination of errors, and preparation of reports
                                                                                      are required.
Objectives:
This course is a continuation of CHE 2010 and with the same objectives.               Method of Instruction:
Emphasis will be on developing an understanding of structure property                 Two three-hour lecture and laboratory sessions per week.
relationships and the use of a mechanisitc approach to the prediction of reactions.
In addition, students will be expected to develop the laboratory and information      Method of Evaluation:
gathering skill needed to carry out a multi-step synthesis, to name compounds by      Homework (25%), quizzes (25%), laboratory reports (25%) and final exam (25%).
appropriate nomenclature systems, and to predict reactions of compounds
containing more than one function a group.

Method of Instruction:
Time will be divided about equally between lecture-discussion sessions and
laboratory. Problem sets will be assigned.

Method of Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on three-hour exams, a comprehensive final exam, the
laboratory reports, homework assignments and class participation.
                            CHEMISTRY                                                                     CHEMISTRY

CHE3060                                                                       CHE4005
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOENERGETICS                                                RESEARCH IN CHEMISTRY
NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00                                                          Offered By: Dale Powers
Offered By: Pierre-Yves Bouthyette                                                        Gurvinder Gill
Prerequisites:    BASIC CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES I & BASIC                                     Pierre-Yves Bouthyette
                  CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II & BIOCHEMISTRY &                     Prerequisites: Instructor's signature required
                  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I & ORGANIC
                  CHEMISTRY II                                                Description: The major goal of this course is to familiarize students
                                                                              with the tools available to the modern researcher. Theoretical aspects of
Description: The goals of this course are to: Understand the central          the Scientific Method covered in several classes will be applied to
role of ATP in the control of anabolic and catabolic pathways and its         practical scientific problems in contemporary science. The students will
crucial role in transport, the methodology involved in the study of           learn how to synthesize several observations described in scientific
electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation; understand the the          literature into a series of hypotheses attempting to explain these
importance of membranes in maintaining cellular integrity and promotion       observations, and subsequently test these hypotheses in the laboratory.
of active and passive transport and acquire the basics of molecular
biology.                                                                      Objectives:
                                                                              A) Learn to use published literature to summarize present knowledge in a
Method of Instruction:                                                        field of science. B) Develop capacity of data and synthesis into
Lectures will be devoted to the discussion of various concepts in             comprehensive hypotheses. C) Practice capacity to formulate
Biochemistry and Bioenergetics as well as topics drawn from                   experimental designs that will unequivocally prove or disprove said
contemporary scientific literature; student participation is expected. The    hypotheses. D) Acquire skill in accurate collection of precise data. E)
laboratories will be devoted to practical demonstrations of these concepts.   Develop ability to draw proper conclusions from acquired data.

Method of Evaluation:                                                         Method of Instruction:
The final grade will be based on the results of two one-hour examinations     Individual instruction with various members of the faculty in the
(30%), laboratory reports (40%), class participation (10%), and a final       Mathematics and Natural Sciences Division. Extensive use of the library
examination (20%).                                                            and scientific literature. Students will be expected to work a minimum of
                                                                              four hours a week in the laboratory.

                                                                              Method of Evaluation:
CHE3140                                                                       Final grade will be based on discussion with instructors to ascertain
                                                                              progress in various skills described under Section IIB
ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
                                                                              (20%), preparation of a research paper (40%) and a seminar describing
NOTE: FEE $50.00                                                              the student's research (40%).
Offered By: Dale Wexell
Prerequisites:    BASIC CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES II

Description: Students will acquire an understanding for the need for          CHE4591
precision and accuracy in chemical data gathering, acquire a functional
knowledge of solution chemistry, develop a thorough understanding of          SEMINAR: CHEMISTRY
the concept of pH, Gran plots and solution activity coefficients, use all     Offered By: Gurvinder Gill
the instrumentation available for chemical analysis at the College, and       Prerequisites: SENIOR STANDING IN CHEMISTRY
compare various types of instrumentation and techniques for their
respective sensitivities in the analysis of unknown samples.                  Description: To develop skills in reading and analysis current
                                                                              chemical research findings as reported in journals, to interpret the data
Method of Instruction:                                                        presented in original papers, to develop competency in presenting
Lecture and discussions, class participation, and 12 lab sessions.            scientific papers, and to use the resources of the library for information
                                                                              retrieval.
Method of Evaluation:
Lab reports (50%), quizzes, (15%), two mid-terms (20% each), and one          Method of Instruction:
final (15%).                                                                  Original papers shall be assigned and read by the entire class; discussion
                                                                              leadership will rotate, with the discussion leader being responsible for a
                                                                              written review of the literature dealing with his/her topic.

                                                                              Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              Effectiveness in presentations, content of presentation, participation in
                                                                              class discussion, attendance (mandatory) and minimum of ten page paper.

                                                                              Distribution Requirement :       W
                      CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                                  CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRJ1010                                                                        CRJ3110
INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                               CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION
Offered By: Staff                                                              Offered By: Staff
                                                                               Prerequisites:       CRJ1010 (INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL
Description: The student will be introduced to all of the criminal                                 JUSTICE)
justice process. The course will emphasize: legal definition of crimes,
sociological data about crime rates and legal and social contexts of police    Note: This course is a prerequisite for CRJ 4600, Physical Significance of
work, court work and corrections. Issues in criminal justice are seen          Bloodstain Evidence, to be offered in the spring term.
within both a philosophical and historical context concerning basic
human rights, as well as rights, which are inherent in American                This course will acquaint the student with an overview of the basic approaches
citizenship.                                                                   utilized in a criminal investigation. Students will be made aware of the roles of the
                                                                               participants in a criminal investigation, while addressing a variety of investigative
                                                                               topics centered around current issues and cases.
Objectives:
To delineate the stages of the criminal justice process and to evaluate        Method of Instruction:
administrative and policy issues involved.                                     Lecture, guest lecturers, and class discussions.

Method of Instruction:                                                         Method of Evaluation:
Lecture, discussion guided by reading questions and two-hour exams             Research paper (25%), participation and oral presentation (25%), mid-term (25%),
involving short answer and essay questions.                                    and final (25%).


Method of Evaluation:
Three exams (30% each) and participation (10%).

Distribution Requirement :      CSI                                            CRJ3225
                                                                               THE CHILD, THE FAMILY AND THE LAW
                                                                               Offered By: Carol Lenhart
CRJ2700
                                                                               Prerequisites:      INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE
PENOLOGY
Offered By: Carol Lenhart                                                      Description: An examination of the social, economic, and political
Prerequisites: CRJ1010 (INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL                               dynamics of the family as they relate to child abuse and to family
               JUSTICE) OR SOC1010 (INTRODUCTORY                               dissolution. Will examine the family and the impact of family and
               SOCIOLOGY)                                                      divorce law upon it. We address the role of the state in parent-child
                                                                               relationships using case materials and current court decisions under state
Description: A study of the sociology of the prison as institution,            and Federal law.
social system and context for interaction. We show how the punishment
response in (US) culture is reflected in students' own beliefs and attitudes   Objectives:
as well as in print and visual Mass Media and politics at local state and      To demonstrate the intercommunications between families, problems that
national levels. We demonstrate how the crisis of overcrowding in              arise in families and the law. Will examine the way in which law limits
correctional institutions is systemically related to our fear of crime,        and defines relationships within families between spouses and between
vindictiveness and a punitive desire for revenge on "criminals", who are       parents and children. The course will also examine the ways in which
predominantly male, young poor and either African American or of other         family law and child protective services laws have developed and are
minority ethnicity. Learning about liberal, Marxist, feminist and post-        used to solve serious problems which have now emerged in families.
modern interpretations of social control in post-industrial societies leads
students to think about several sociological and historical perspectives of    Method of Instruction:
this phenomenon in the United States. Students are encouraged to think         Class will be in seminar format with discussion focused on reading and
sociologically, critically, systemically and as compassionate ethical          discussion problems on specific student papers and presentations and on
human beings about those incarcerated or enmeshed in the widening net          lectures.
of social controls in communities. They also will discern continuities
between correction in formal institutions of punishment and informal           Method Evaluation:
contexts: schools, families, teams, and peers.                                 Exams, papers, presentation, and participation.
                      CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                                                        DANCE

CRJ3800                                                                        DAN1020
CRIMINAL LAW                                                                   INTRODUCTION TO DANCE II
Offered By: Staff                                                              NOTE: CP or PE
Prerequisites:    CRIMINOLOGY & INTRODUCTION TO                                Offered By: Mia Wise
                  CRIMINAL JUSTICE & STATISTICAL METHODS                       Prerequisites:   INTRODUCTION TO DANCE I
Description: A survey of the general principles of criminal law                Description: A continuation of basic dance technique, an introduction
including general assumptions, elements of a crime, defenses. Problems         to various dance styles and qualities of movement.
in the operation of criminal law are illlustrated by case examples drawn
from various states and the federal system.                                    Objectives:
                                                                               For the student to: A) Learn and appreciate the basic fundamentals of
                                                                               dance movement. B) Develop the necessary skills required of a strong
                                                                               body. C) Gain an understanding of the disciplined body as an instrument
CRJ4590                                                                        of aesthetic expressions. D) Transform conceptual ideas into a nonverbal
                                                                               communication art form.
SEMINAR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Offered By: Carol Lenhart                                                      Method of Evaluation:
Prerequisites:    CRJ1010 (INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL                            Day to day effort and work by student in the studio, evaluative
                 JUSTICE), CRJ-SOC3311 (CRIMINOLOGY),                          interviews, written critique, and written exam.
                 MAT2090 (STATISTICAL METHODS) AND
                 JUNIOR OR SENIOR STANDING

Description: This course represents the capstone of the student's
undergraduate study of the criminal justice process. Develop a synthesis       DAN3000
of various sociological approaches applied to Criminal Justice. Focus
will be on group discussion and independent research of major issues in        ORCHESIS
contemporary criminal justice. Emphasis will be on the student's ability       NOTE: CP or PE
to focus their investigation, articulate findings and defend their research.   Offered By: Mia Wise

Objectives:                                                                    Description: To transform conceptual ideas into a non-verbal
To synthesize all of the courses taken in the Social Science: Criminal         communicative art form. Also, to participate in the student production at
Justice major. To make critical analysis of key works in contemporary          the term end.
Criminal Justice and Criminology.
                                                                               Method of Instruction:
                                                                               A) Assigning group and solo projects in which the student will have the
                                                                               opportunity to create, select and organize material into an art form. B)
                                                                               Creative studies to be critiqued by the faculty and students.

                                                                               Method of Evaluation:
                                                                               Day to day effort and work by the student in the studio and the
                                                                               presentation and performance of projects.
                              ECONOMICS                                                                         ECONOMICS

ECO2020                                                                              ECO3070
PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS                                                         ECONOMETRICS
Offered By: Amarendra Sharma                                                         NOTE: MAT2090 (STATISTICAL METHODS)MUST BE C- OR
            Mariam Khawar                                                            HIGHER
                                                                                     Offered By: Amarendra Sharma
Prerequisites: COMPLETION OF MATH COMPETENCY
               REQUIREMENT                                                           Prerequisites:    PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS &
                                                                                                       PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS &
NOTE: Either ECO 2010 or ECO 2020 can be taken first.                                                  STATISTICAL METHODS
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic nature and problems   Description: Econometrics deals with the application of statistical
of our national economy. Topics to be covered will include: Gross National           methods to economics. In this course we will further develop the tools of
Product Accounting, employment, interest rates, money and its role in the
                                                                                     statistics to estimate economic relationships, test claims of economic
economy, taxes, monetary and fiscal policy. This course has the dual objective of
preparing students to take more advanced courses in economics and giving
                                                                                     theory, and forecast the behavior of economic variables. We will
students who do not desire to take further courses a sound grounding in economics    introduce the techniques of econometrics and deal with the problems and
so that they may act as informed citizens.                                           solutions to common problems in economic data. Topics include,
                                                                                     multivariate regression, probability models, lagged variables, omitted and
Method of Instruction:                                                               mixing variables, simultaneous equations bias, heteroscedasticity, and
Classes will be a combination of lecture and discussion. Students will be expected   others. A major component of the class will be a research paper where
to have read assigned materials prior to the class for which they are assigned.      each student will collect data to test his or her own hypothesis. Students
                                                                                     will have the opportunity to produce original research in economics and
                                                                                     test the validity of competing theories. Students who successfully
Distribution Requirement :         CSI                                               complete this course will have strong skills in handling data and gain a
                                                                                     significant exposure to empirical research in the field. These skills will
                                                                                     prepare a student for graduate school in Economics, Public Policy, and
ECO3030                                                                              Business Administration and make him or her more employable and
                                                                                     competitive in jobs that desire mathematical skills and the ability to
MONEY AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS                                                     analyze data.
Offered By: Naphtali Hoffman
                                                                                     Objectives:
Prerequisites:     PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS &
                                                                                     A) Solidify the understanding of basic statistical methods and appreciate
                   PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
                                                                                     how these topics apply in Economics, B) Develop an understanding of
Description: This course is designed to give students an                             more advanced topics in statistical methods that directly apply to
understanding of financial institutions and markets, and monetary theory             empirical economics, C) Appreciate the difficulties inherent in measuring
and policy in the United States. Discussion of the political economy and             the economy and articulate solutions/improvements to these problems D)
institutional change will also be discussed.                                         Formulate their own hypothesis and collect data to test it E) Effectively
                                                                                     communicate empirical findings from and limitations to their research F)
Method of Instruction:                                                               Follow empirical, academic articles published in leading economic
Lecture and discussion.                                                              journals.

Method of Evaluation:                                                                Methods of Instruction:
Tests, individual and group presentations.                                           The course will be comprised of two main components. First, we are
                                                                                     going to introduce, analyze, and discuss issues in the empirical testing of
                                                                                     economic hypothesis. This will be done primarily through introducing
                                                                                     the mathematical concepts. This work will be done in a rather standard
                                                                                     way: readings, lectures, problems sets, class discussion, etc. The second
ECO3040                                                                              component of the course is a significant empirical economics project
INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS                                                          where the students will collect and analyze data, using the knowledge
Offered By: Naphtali Hoffman                                                         gained in class, to test a hypothesis. Much of this work will be done
                                                                                     independently by the students and in one-on-one meetings with the
Prerequisites:     PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS &                                    professor.
                   PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS
                                                                                     Methods of Evaluation:
Description: This course is an extension and refinement of Principles
                                                                                     There will be problem sets, quizzes, and exams to assess student learning
of Microeconomics and is primarily theoretical in its approach, although
                                                                                     on the first major component of the course. There will be two exams
applications to the "real world" are an integral part of the course. A
                                                                                     (15% each), four quizzes (5% each), and occasional problem sets (10%
review of supply and demand concepts will be followed by a rigorous
                                                                                     in total). The project will comprise the rest of the course grade (40%).
presentation of the theory of consumer behavior, including cardinal and
                                                                                     There will intermediate data and writing assignments that will be used in
ordinal utility functions, indifference curves, Engel curves, elasticity of
                                                                                     the determination of the project grade, along with the final paper.
demand. This will be followed by a discussion of the theory of the firm
including perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly, and imperfect
competition. Finally, factor markets will be explored.
                           ECONOMICS                                                                   EDUCATION

ECO3140                                                                     EDU1010
DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS                                                       FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION
Offered By: Mariam Khawar                                                   Offered By: Julie Lenhardt
Prerequisites:   PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS &                                         Kerrita Mayfield
                 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS                                           Mary Ann Cleary
Description: This course is designed to provide an understanding of         Description: This course presents the field of education in its
the theories of economic development and the obstacles faced by             philosophical and historical context while outlining the rights,
developing countries undergoing the process of development. Topics will     responsibilities, influences, and interactions of teachers and other
include indicators of development; various theories and models of           professional staff, students, parents, community members, and school
economic development; economic growth and inequality; population            administrators. Work in this course focuses on the interrelationships of
growth and its consequences; unemployment and migration;                    these roles and how they enhance student growth and development
environmental concerns; education; trade theory and policy; international   throughout the learning process.
macroeconomic issues and the role of international organizations such as
the IMF and World Bank.                                                     Objectives:
                                                                            A) To describe the basic historical, ideological and philosophical
Objectives:                                                                 influences impacting American education. B) To explain the role of
A) To provide you with an understanding of the major obstacles              teachers in modern society. C) To identify the major societal influences
confronting developing countries in their pursuit of economic               (governmental, religious, ideological) on the American educational
development. B) To develop your understanding of the models of              system. D) To describe some of the legal and ethical influences on school
economic development that have been used to analyze economic                systems. E) To identify the process and define the terms that categorize
development. C) To encourage the development of your skills in              and educate students with special learning needs in the education system.
problem solving, rational thinking, research, and effective writing.        F) To summarize the main elements of context, instruction, and
                                                                            curriculum as they relate to each other and to learners. G) To
Method of Instruction:                                                      demonstrate a general understanding of the roles of parents,
Lecture and discussion.                                                     administrators, teachers, and community members with the education
                                                                            system.
Method of Evaluation:
Term paper, tests, several small projects and student presentations.        Method of Instruction:
                                                                            Lecture, discussion, problem-solving and student collaboration.
Distribution Requirement :      W
                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Class participation, quizzes, mid-term, essays, paper, presentations, and
ECO3200                                                                     final exam.
INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
Offered By: Kunihiko Imai
                                                                            Distribution Requirement :      CSI
            Naphtali Hoffman
Prerequisites:   PSC1020 (INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS) OR
                 ECO2010 (PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS)
                 AND ECO2020 (PRINCIPLES OF
                 MACROECONOMICS)

Description: You are expected to demonstrate your ability: A) To
identify and comprehend basic concepts and theories of international
economics. B) To interpret international economic phenomena and
issues as well as political efforts by states to address them. C) To
analyze and assess the nature of the relationship and interaction of
politics and economics in the post-World War II international realm
through a study of selected topics (such as reform of international
monetary system, politics of trade, economic development and aid,
multinational corporations, east-west economic relations, and oil and
cartel power, among others.

Method of Instruction:
At the first class, a specific plan of lectures will be announced. An
informal atmosphere will be maintained. Vigorous participation in class
discussion is expected.

Method of Evaluation:
Participation, debate and three exams.
                            EDUCATION                                                                        EDUCATION

EDU2220                                                                           EDU3355
TEACHING IN THE INCLUSIVE DIVERSE CLASSROOM                                       CURRICM, INSTRUCT & ASSMNT CHLD: MATH, SCI, TEC
Offered By: Julie Lenhardt                                                        Offered By: Megan Kennedy
Prerequisites: INTRODUCTORY FIELDWORK AND SEMINAR                                 Prerequisites: JUNIOR CLASS STANDING, EDU3335
               IN EDUCATION; SOPHOMORE STANDING                                                  (CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, AND
                                                                                                 ASSESSMENT IN CHILDHOOD EDUCATION:
Description: This course provides students with a background in the                              SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE ARTS) AND
areas of special education, bilingualism, multiculturalism, and diversity                        EDU3345 (LITERACY ACQUISITION &
and explores instructional strategies appropriate to the needs of all                            DEVELOPMENT FOR PRESCHOOL AND
students. Students will examine the challenges brought to educators as a                         ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LEARNERS)
result of federal mandates regarding the inclusion of all students in the
general educational setting and the growing sentiment that all children           Description: This course enable students to develop knowledge and
deserve a successful place of academic and social belonging in our                skills in the methods of teaching math, science, and technology to
schools. The students will explore elements of effective inclusive                elementary school children in grades 1 through 6. Students plan,
environments.                                                                     implement, and assess active, standards-based math and science lessons
                                                                                  that depend more on hands-on, inquiry experiments, and problem solving
Objectives:                                                                       strategies than on textbooks. Students integrate appropriate technology in
A) To explain the historical implications, court cases and federal                their instructional practices and improve their knowledge of both math
mandates that have influenced the way students with disabilities are              and science content and processes by applying these concepts to
educated. B) To explain the legal ramifications of special education in           teaching. Finally, students work on being enthusiastic pre-service
our society. C) To identify and discuss the prevalence and characteristics        teachers of math, science, and technology and define ways to transmit
of students with higher-incident disabilities (communication disorders,           this excitement about learning these subjects to elementary students.
learning disabilities, mental retardation, and emotional disturbance),
lower-incidence disabilities (visual impairments, hearing impairments,            Objectives:
physical disabilities, severe and multiple disabilities, and autism) and          A) Design, implement, and assess units and lessons in the subject areas
other learning needs (attention deficit disorder, attention deficit               such as math, science and technology. B) Develop lessons using an
hyperactivity disorder, gifted and talented, culturally diverse,                  interdisciplinary thematic design (e.g. math, science, and technology)
linguistically diverse, at risk). D) To describe the continuum of services        and the New York State learning standards. C) Create and align
available to students with disabilities as they relate to the least restrictive   assessment tools with performance objectives of lessons created. D)
environment. E) To examine how diversity, culture, pluralism, equality            Develop lessons that engage learners in using computer technology. E)
and social justice influence the development of a multicultural classroom.        Create lessons that incorporate activities for diverse learners. F) Create
F) To recognize the supports available to educate students who are                assessment tools and ways to adapt them for learners with special needs.
linguistically diverse. G) To plan and create an inclusive classroom              G) Present lessons. H) Review and critique lessons. I) Develop a
learning environment that will meet the needs of all learners including           classroom management plan. J) Critiques articles on effective
appropriate technology. H) To recognize the importance of effective               instructional methods used in schools across the nation and abroad.
communication and collaboration between everyone involved in the
education of students with high needs in an inclusive environment                 Method of Instruction:
(general education teacher, special education teacher, specialists,               Teaching methods include lecture, discussions, problem-solving, student
paraprofessionals, administrators, parents and students). I) To explore the       collaboration, and tutoring.
variety of assessment devices used in an inclusive classroom and the
importance of evaluating student progress in order to develop a more              Method of Evaluation:
efficient inclusive classroom.                                                    Class participation, essays and critiques, quizzes and tests, and classroom
                                                                                  unit and management plan.
Method of Instruction:
Lecture, discussion, problem-solving and student collaboration.

Method of Evaluation:
Presentations, evaluations, case study reviews, research notebook or term
paper, philosophy paper, class participation, mid-term and final exam.
                           EDUCATION                                                                     EDUCATION

EDU3356                                                                       EDU3357
METHODOLOGIES OF TEACHING: MIDDLE CHLDHD ED                                   METHODOLOGIES OF TEACHING: ADOLESCENCE ED
Offered By: Allyson Moore                                                     Offered By: Kerrita Mayfield
Prerequisites: JUNIOR CLASS STANDING; EDU3335                                 Prerequisites: JUNIOR CLASS STANDING, EDU3337
               (CURRICULUM INSTRUCTION AND                                                   (CURRICULUM DESIGN & INSTRUCTION:
               ASSESSMENT IN CHILDHOOD EDUCATION:                                            ADOLESCENCE EDUCATION), AND EDU3347
               SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE ARTS), AND                                             (CONTENT AREA LITERACY IN THE MIDDLE
               EDU3345 (LITERACY ACQUISITION &                                               SCHOOLS)
               DEVELOPMENT FOR PRESCHOOL AND
               ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LEARNERS); OR                                Description: This course focuses on methods of instruction used in
               EDU3336 (CURRICULUM DESIGN AND                                 secondary classrooms. Emphasis is on designing, developing,
               INSTRUCTION: MIDDLE CHILDHOOD                                  implementing, and assessing lessons. Students will study and apply
               EDUCATION), AND EDU3347 (CONTENT AREA                          these instructional practices in-depth.
               LITERACY IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL); OR
               EDU3337 (CURRICULUM DESIGN AND                                 Objectives:
               INSTRUCTION: ADOLESCENCE EDUCATION),                           A) Design, implement, and assess units and lessons in the subject areas
               AND EDU3347 (CONTENT AREA LITERACY IN                          specific to secondary school teaching and learning and the New York
               THE MIDDLE SCHOOLS)                                            State learning standards. B) Create and align assessment tools with
                                                                              performance objectives of lessons created. C) Develop lessons that
Description: This course focuses on methods of instruction used in            engage learners in using computer technology. D) Create lessons that
middle school classrooms. Emphasis is on designing, developing,               incorporate activities for diverse learners. E) Create assessment tools and
implementing, and assessing lessons. Students will study and apply            ways to adapt them for learners with special needs. F) Develop a
these instructional practices in-depth.                                       classroom management plan. G) Critique articles on effective
                                                                              instructional methods used in schools across the nation and abroad.
Objectives:
A) Design, implement, and assess units and lessons in subject areas           Method of Instruction:
specific to middle school teaching and learning and the New York State        Teaching methods include lecture, discussion, problem-solving, student
Learning Standards. B) Create and align assessment tools with                 collaboration, and tutoring.
performance objectives of lessons created. C) Develop lessons that
engage learners in using computer technology. D) Create lessons that          Method of Evaluation:
incorporate activities for diverse learners. E) Create assessment tools and   Class participation, essays and critiques, quizzes and tests, and classroom
ways to adapt them for learners with special needs. F) Develop a              management plan.
classroom management plan. G) Critique articles on effective
instructional methods used in schools across the nation and abroad.

Method of Instruction:
Teaching methods include lecture, discussion, problem-solving and
student collaboration.

Method of Evaluation:
Class participation, essays and critiques, quizzes and tests, and classroom
unit and management plan.
                           EDUCATION                                                                     EDUCATION

EDU3358                                                                      EDU3365
METHODOLOGIES OF TEACHING: VISUAL ARTS                                       TEACHING LITERACY IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Offered By: Martha Evans                                                     Offered By: Kimberly Slusser
Prerequisites: JUNIOR CLASS STANDING AND EDU2220                             Prerequisites: JUNIOR CLASS STANDING, EDU3335
               (TEACHING IN THE INCLUSIVE & DIVERSE                                         (CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, AND
               CLASSROOM) AND EDU3338 (CURRICULUM                                           ASSESSMENT IN CHILDHOOD EDUCATION:
               DESIGN & INSTRUCTION: VISUAL ARTS)                                           SOCIAL STUDIES AND THE ARTS), AND
                                                                                            EDU3345 (LITERACY ACQUISITION AND
                 NOTE:COURSE FEE $25.00                                                     DEVELOPMENT FOR PRESCHOOL AND
                                                                                            ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LEARNERS).
Description: A) Design, implement, and assess units and lessons in
the visual arts specific to grades K-12 teaching and the New York State      Description: Prospective teachers examine curriculum and
learning standards. B) To introduce students to the various art media and    instructional theories of and practices in acquiring and developing
techniques and consider their application to the classroom situation. C)     literacy in grades four through six. The major focus is on assisting all
To extend the visual awareness of prospective teachers through direct art    students to use listening, speaking, reading, and writing for acquiring
experience. D) To study the relationship of aesthetic experience and         information, developing understanding, constructing literary expressions,
other visual experiences in the classroom (example maps, diagrams,           conducting critical analysis, performing evaluations, and developing
charts). The course will consist of studio projects designed around the      social interactions.
following media: painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, computer art
and the use of found materials.                                              Objectives:
                                                                             Upon successful completion of this course, pre-service teachers will be
Method of Instruction:                                                       able to: A) Use theoretical views of literacy acquisition and development
Technical demonstrations, class participation in studio projects, slides,    in planning and implementing literacy instruction for students in grades
videos, group discussion and feedback.                                       four through six. B) Plan lessons that are developmentally and
                                                                             academically supportive of the concepts, skills, and strategies essential
Method of Evaluation:                                                        for learners in grades four through six to acquire and enhance reading,
Students will prepare two lesson plans outlining their choice of two         writing, listening, and speaking. C) Assess students' literacy behaviors
different art techniques. One lesson will be demonstrated to the class and   and use the results in planning implementing, and assessing literacy
one presented to a group other then the class. Each lesson will be           instruction. D) Design literature projects that examine literature
documented with examples of student work and self-evaluation by the          categories, genres, and story elements, and devise teaching schemes that
student. The student will keep a journal of ideas throughout the tern.       cultivate multi- and trans-cultural perspectives in students in the grades
Lesson number one, Lesson number two, class participation, and journal.      four though six. E) Prepare literacy lessons that incorporate informational
                                                                             texts, reference materials, and electronic resources. F) Plan a literacy
                                                                             curriculum that integrates New York State curriculum standards and
                                                                             guidelines, and curriculum that: a) Enables students in grades four
                                                                             through six to use literacy for information and understanding. b) Enables
                                                                             students in grades four through six to connect text materials to their own
                                                                             lives, broaden their views if diversity, social, historical, and cultural
                                                                             dimensions of texts, and use productive language for self-expression ands
                                                                             artistic creation. c) Enables students in grades four through six to use
                                                                             literacy for critical analysis and evaluation. d) Enables students in grades
                                                                             four through six to use literacy for social interaction. G) Design and
                                                                             implement a literacy curriculum that supports and enhances literacy
                                                                             learning for all learners in the classroom. H) Prepare teaching strategies
                                                                             that integrate reading, writing, listening, and speaking within the grades
                                                                             four through six literacy curriculum and devise techniques that connect
                                                                             literacy learning to the content areas - math, science, social studies, art,
                                                                             and music.

                                                                             Method of Instruction:
                                                                             Lecture, discussion, demonstrations, mini-lessons, student presentations,
                                                                             and small group collaborations.

                                                                             Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             Class participation, lessons and activities, literature study, and project.
                            EDUCATION                                                                   EDUCATION

EDU3367                                                                       EDU4395
CONTENT AREA LITERACY IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS                                STUDENT TEACHING II AND SEMINAR: CHILDHOOD ED
Offered By: Jane Spohn                                                        Offered By: Linda Pratt
            Sharon Clark                                                      Prerequisites: MUST HAVE SENIOR STANDING, COMPLETION
Prerequisites: JUNIOR CLASS STANDING, EDU2220                                                OF THE NEW YORK STATE LIBERAL ARTS &
               (TEACHING IN THE INCLUSIVE AND DIVERSE                                        SCIENCES TEST, STUDENT TEACHING I AND
               CLASSROOM), AND EDU3347 (CONTENT AREA                                         SEMINAR: CHILDHOOD EDUCATION,
               LITERACY IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOLS)                                               LITERACY INTERVENTION AND ENRICHMENT:
                                                                                             CHILDHOOD EDUCATION, AN APPLICATION
Description: This course provides literacy instruction for grades 9                          FOR STUDENT TEACHING II, AND A MINIMUM
through 12 perservice teachers seeking certification by incorporating                        OVERALL 2.0 GPA, 2.7 GPA IN MAJOR OR
reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills within specific subject                     CONCENTRATION AND 2.7 GPA IN THE
areas. By interfacing with New York State Standards, pre-service                             EDUCATION PROGRAM
teachers explore methods of instruction to strengthen their students'
literacy skills in coordination with the specific subjects being learned.     Description: This course is the second of two Student Teaching
                                                                              experiences and is intended to be the "capstone" experience for
Objectives:                                                                   preservice teachers completing an approved program of study for teacher
In this course students will:                                                 certification in New York State. During this course, preservice teachers
A) Explore current definitions of literacy. B) Develop strategies to          demonstrate their acquired teaching skills as they assume the full
support and assess the literacy skills of all students, in a variety of       instructional load of their cooperating teachers and are given the
academic disciplines. C) Research the way professionals in various            responsibility to design, implement, and assess a wide range of lessons.
contexts use literacy. D) Collaborate to design integrated units of study     Whenever possible, preservice teachers will be placed in schools where
that incorporate content area knowledge, literacy skills, technology, and     they will have the opportunity to work with diverse populations across a
NYS standards of learning. E) Read and critique young adult literature        variety of development levels. Additionally, preservice teachers attend
that addresses diverse cultures and personalities. F) Write in a variety of   seminars and workshops to discuss such topics as classroom instruction
genres to explore our thinking about contemporary literacy instruction,       and management; child abduction prevention; alcohol, tobacco, and other
our literate histories, and the demands of bringing content area              drug abuse prevention; safe schools against violence in education
knowledge together with literacy skills.                                      (SAVE); safety instruction; fire and arson prevention; and child abuse
                                                                              identification and reporting. Student Teaching II is offered only during
Method of Instruction:                                                        the Fall and Winter terms.
The teaching methods will entail lecture, discussion, workshops and           Objectives:
student collaboration.                                                        A) To design, develop, and organize lessons within the specific grade
                                                                              range and within the subject areas such as social studies, language arts,
Method of Evaluation:                                                         math, science, health, physical fitness, the arts, family and consumer
Class participation, journal responses, papers, writing workshops,            services, and career development and occupational studies. B) To align
projects, and exams.                                                          New York State Learning Standards to the lessons being developed. C)
                                                                              To use knowledge of individual students' heritage, gender, cultures,
                                                                              languages, socio-economic levels, full range of disabilities, and special
                                                                              health-care needs to assess teaching and learning, to develop curriculum,
                                                                              and to implement lessons within the classroom community. D) To
                                                                              develop and teach lessons which incorporate a range of strategies and
                                                                              include both conventional and electronic materials and resources. E) To
                                                                              demonstrate a classroom management style that reflects the needs of all
                                                                              learners. F) To provide literacy instruction that addresses the needs and
                                                                              interests of all students in given subject areas. G) To implement and
                                                                              evaluate traditional and authentic assessment procedures. H) To
                                                                              communicate effectively and interact in a professional manner with the
                                                                              schools' teaching, administrative, and support staff, as well as the
                                                                              families within the community.
                                                                              Method of Instruction:
                                                                              Preservice teachers actively engage in the process of teaching and the
                                                                              accompanying duties under the supervision of both the cooperating
                                                                              teachers and college supervisors. Additionally, college students will
                                                                              participate in workshops and weekly seminars with their professors and
                                                                              supervisors.
                                                                              Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              Overall performance in the assigned schools; professional attributes;
                                                                              performance specific to lessons taught; participation in seminars and
                                                                              workshops; portfolios and other assignments; midterm and final
                                                                              assessments, and compliance with "The Elmira College Student Teaching
                                                                              Handbook" requirements.
                            EDUCATION                                                                      EDUCATION

EDU4397                                                                        EDU4398
STUDENT TEACHING II AND SEMINAR: ADOLESCENCE ED                                STUDENT TEACHING II AND SEMINAR: VISUAL ARTS
Offered By: Linda Pratt                                                        Offered By: Linda Pratt
Prerequisites: MUST HAVE SENIOR STANDING, COMPLETION                           Prerequisites: MUST HAVE SENIOR STANDING, COMPLETION
               OF THE NEW YORK STATE LIBERAL ARTS &                                           OF THE NEW YORK STATE LIBERAL ARTS &
               SCIENCES TEST, STUDENT TEACHING I AND                                          SCIENCES TEST, STUDENT TEACHING I AND
               SEMINAR: ADOLESCENCE EDUCATION, AN                                             SEMINAR: VISUAL ARTS, AN APPLICATION
               APPLICATION FOR STUDENT TEACHING II,                                           FOR STUDENT TEACHING II, AND A MINIMUM
               AND A MINIMUM OVERALL 2.0 GPA, 2.7 GPA IN                                      OVERALL 2.0 GPA, 2.7 GPA IN MAJOR AND 2.7
               MAJOR AND 2.7 GPA IN THE EDUCATION                                             GPA IN THE EDUCATION PROGRAM
               PROGRAM
                                                                               Description: This course is the second of the two Student Teaching
Description: This course is the second of two Student Teaching                 experiences and is intended to be the "capstone" experience for
experiences and is intended to be the "capstone" experience for                preservice teachers completing an approved program of study for teacher
preservice teachers completing an approved program of study for teacher        certification in New York State. During this course, preservice teachers
certification in New York State. Preservice teachers demonstrate their         demonstrate their acquired teaching skills as they assume the full
acquired teaching skills as they assume the full instructional load of their   instructional load of their cooperating teachers and are given the
cooperating teachers and are given the responsibility to design,               responsibility to design, implement, and assess a wide range of lessons.
implement and assess a wide range of lessons. Whenever possible,               Whenever possible, preservice teachers will be placed in schools where
preservice teachers will be placed in schools where they will have the         they will have the opportunity to work with diverse populations across a
opportunity to work with diverse populations across a variety of               variety of development levels. Additionally, preservice teachers attend
development levels. Preservice teachers attend seminars and workshops          seminars and workshops to discuss such topics as classroom instruction
to discuss such topics as classroom instruction and management; child          and management; child abduction prevention; alcohol, tobacco, and other
abduction prevention; alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse prevention;       drug abuse prevention; safety instruction; fire and arson prevention; child
safety instruction; fire and arson prevention; child abuse identification      abuse identification and reporting; and safe schools against violence in
and reporting; and safe schools against violence in education (SAVE).          education (SAVE). Student Teaching II is offered only during the Fall
Student Teaching II is offered only during the Fall and Winter terms.          and Winter terms.

Objectives:                                                                    Objectives:
A) To design, develop, and organize lessons within the specific grade          A) To design, develop, and organize lessons for students of all needs and
range and within the subject area. B) To align New York State Learning         abilities within the specific grade range and within the subject area of art.
Standards to the lessons being developed. C) To use knowledge of               B) To align New York State Learning Standards to the lessons being
individual students' heritage, gender, cultures, languages, socio-economic     developed. C) To use knowledge of individual students' heritage, gender,
levels, full range of disabilities, and special health-care needs to assess    cultures, languages, socio-economic levels, full range of disabilities, and
teaching and learning, to develop curriculum, and to implement lessons         special health-care needs to assess teaching and learning, to develop
within the classroom community. D) To develop and teach lessons which          curriculum, and to implement lessons within the classroom community.
incorporate a range of strategies and include both conventional and            D) To develop and teach lessons which incorporate a range of strategies
electronic materials and resources. E) To demonstrate a classroom              and include both conventional and electronic materials and resources. E)
management style that reflects the needs of all learners. F) To provide        To demonstrate a classroom management style that reflects the needs of
literacy instruction that addresses the needs and interests of all students    all learners. F) To provide literacy instruction that addresses the needs
in given subject areas. G) To implement and evaluate traditional and           and interests of all students in given subject areas. G) To implement and
authentic assessment procedures. H) To communicate effectively and             evaluate traditional and authentic assessment procedures. H) To
interact in a professional manner with the schools' teaching,                  communicate effectively and interact in a professional manner with the
administrative, and support staff, as well as the families within the          schools' teaching, administrative, and support staff, as well as the
community.                                                                     families within the community.

Method of Instruction:                                                         Method of Instruction:
Preservice teachers actively engage in the process of teaching and the         Preservice teachers actively engage in the process of teaching and the
accompanying duties under the supervision of both the cooperating              accompanying duties under the supervision of both the cooperating
teachers and college supervisors. Additionally, college students will          teachers and college supervisors. Additionally, college students will
participate in workshops and weekly seminars with their professors and         participate in weekly workshops and seminars with their professors and
supervisors.                                                                   supervisors.

Method of Evaluation:                                                          Method of Evaluation:
Overall performance in the assigned schools; professional attributes;          Overall performance in the assigned schools; professional attributes;
performance specific to lessons taught; participation in seminars and          performance specific to lessons taught; participation in seminars and
workshops; portfolios and other assignments; midterm and final                 workshops; portfolios and other assignments; midterm and final
assessments; and compliance with "The Elmira College Student Teaching          assessments; and compliance with "The Elmira College Student Teaching
Handbook" requirements.                                                        Handbook" requirements.
                               ENGLISH                                                                        ENGLISH

ENG1075                                                                         ENG1100
INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE                                                      FOUNDATIONS LITERATURE: KING ARTHUR
                                                                                Offered By: Peter Schwartz
Offered By: Gary LaPointe
                                                                                Description: Although King Arthur's legend is over 1,000 years old, it
                                                                                both directly and indirectly influences literature today. In this course, we
Description: This course offers all students, majors and non-majors             shall begin by reading some of the very early Arthur stories: Selections
alike, an introduction to a broad range of types of literature (poetry,         from the Welsh Mabarogian, the Merlin-Arthur segments of Geoffrey of
fiction, drama, and their various sub-types) as well as to a variety of         Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain, Chretian de Troyes'
technical concepts and skills of literary study.                                Lancelot and Percival, the stanzaic LeMorte Arthur. Baines' rendition of
                                                                                Malory's King Arthur and modern version of the legend: Stewart's The
Objectives:                                                                     Day of Destiny, and Sutcliff's The Sword at Sunset.
The course hopes to teach students how to read literature better and enjoy
it more; hence the emphasis throughout is on the development of                 Objectives:
practical skills of literary analysis and criticism: Reading, interpretation,   To introduce students to college-level study of literature. To learn
and discussion of specific literary works as well as the writing of brief,      various techniques of literary analysis. To read the basic texts of
precise critical essays about them. We will read plays, short stories, and      Arthurian literature, to see how these stories evolved into a legend which
poems as we seek to accumulate a useful critical vocabulary and seek to         is a "foundation" of western culture, and to examine how modern writers
understand better the subtlety and sophistication of serious literature and     are using the legend.
its application to our lives.
                                                                                Method of Instruction:
Method of Instruction:                                                          Class discussion (participation is expected and attendance required) and
Reading, lecture, and class discussion of both literary concepts and            some lecture.
literary texts. Each student will be expected to complete all reading
assignments in advance of class sessions so that class time can be most         Method of Evaluation:
profitably used.                                                                In and out of class, Essay type quizzes.

Method of Evaluation:                                                           Distribution Requirement :      EU
Reading, short critical essays, a mid-term exam and a final exam.
Attendance and participation are required.
                                                                                ENG1600
Distribution Requirement :       GN                                             WRITING SEMINAR
                                                                                Offered By: Staff
                                                                                Prerequisites:   WRT 1030 (CRITICAL & ANALYTICAL
                                                                                                 THINKING) OR IT'S EQUIVALENT

                                                                                Description: This course is designed to teach students to write
                                                                                English prose with clarity, coherence, and style. It is a skills course, not
                                                                                a facts course; and the emphasis throughout is on constant practice in
                                                                                writing and revision. The specific materials of the course are English
                                                                                words, sentences, and paragraphs-their uses, complexities, and beauties.
                                                                                The premise from which this course proceeds is that competent writing is
                                                                                more than a useful skill, like typing; it is also one of the principal bases
                                                                                of liberal education itself.

                                                                                Method of Instruction:
                                                                                Diction followed by analysis of and practice with sentence and paragraph
                                                                                construction. Discussion of the essay is ongoing, written weekly essays,
                                                                                student writing is examined and revised in class and group exercises.

                                                                                Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                Essays constitute the major final grade, attendance, and class
                                                                                commentary, research project and final.

                                                                                Distribution Requirement :      W
                              ENGLISH                                                                       ENGLISH

ENG2010                                                                       ENG2022
THE CRAFT OF WRITING FICTION                                                  MAJOR ENGLISH AUTHORS III: VICTORIAN & MODERN
Offered By: MaryJo Mahoney                                                    Offered By: Mitchell Lewis
Prerequisites:    ANY ONE OF ENG 1075 (INTRO TO LIT), ENG                     Prerequisites:   ANY OF THE FOLLOWING: ENG 1075 (INTRO
                 1100 (FOUND OF LIT: KING ARTHUR), ENG 1101                                    TO LIT), ENG 1100 (FOUND OF LIT: KING
                 (FOUND OF LIT: THE HERO), ENG 1102 (FOUND                                     ARTHUR), ENG 1101 (FOUND OF LIT: THE
                 OF LIT: AM SHORT STORY) OR ITS                                                HERO), ENG 1102 (FOUND OF LIT: AM SHORT
                 EQUIVALENT OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR                                        STORY) OR ITS EQUIVALENT OR PERMISSION
                                                                                               OF INSTRUCTOR.
Description: This course is a workshop that will provide both an
examination of the structure and art of fiction and an introduction to the    Description: The course will focus on the contrast between two ways
writing of fiction. Students will study the short stories of contemporary     of looking at the world: the Victorian perspective, which saw progress in
writers while participating in creative writing exercises which will          the rapid development of science, technology, social reform, and
develop the uses of structure and technique in their own fiction writing.     universal education; and the modern perspective, which saw in the First
Also, each student will workshop at least two short stories and participate   World War the failure of Victorian ideals and looked away from "public"
in discussions about revision.                                                issues to seek individual values. Most of the literature studied will be
                                                                              poetry and novels, though some attention may be paid to drama and
Method of Instruction:                                                        prose essay.
Discussion, workshop, and writing exercises.
                                                                              Objectives:
Method of Evaluation:                                                         To provide a general background in British literature of the later
Grades will be based on the student's story writing and revision, writing     Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries. The literature will be studied
exercises, workshop criticism, and attendance.                                against historical, political, philosophical, and social backgrounds.

Distribution Requirement :      CP                                            Method of Instruction:
                                                                              Lecture and discussion of assigned readings.

                                                                              Method of Evaluation:
ENG2020                                                                       Two essay exams (20%), two critical essays (20%), each five to six
MAJOR ENGLISH AUTHORS I:MEDIEVIL& RENASANCE                                   pages total, and reading quizzes (20%).
Offered By: Gary LaPointe
Prerequisites:    ANY ONE OF ENG 1075 (INTRO TO LIT), ENG                     Distribution Requirement :      EU
                 1100 (FOUND OF LIT: KING ARTHUR), ENG 1101
                 (FOUND OF LIT: THE HERO), ENG 1102 (FOUND
                 OF LIT: AM SHORT STORY) OR ITS
                 EQUIVALENT OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR

Description: This course will provide a general background of
English literature from the Old English period to the 17th century and
will demonstrate to the student that many of the ideas and concerns of
today were also issues to writers 500 and 1,000 years ago. Also, it will
examine many of the different attitudes, beliefs and world views held by
pre-modern writers. It is hoped that the student will recognize that every
historical age has its dignity and that even though he or she may not
accept some of the attitudes or beliefs of the past, the student can
understand their importance.

Objectives:
Readings (Beowulf, Chaucer, The Pearl Poet, Spenser, Marlowe,
Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Milton, and Marvell, among others) will
cover the philosophical, political, religious, and social factors which may
have influenced literary work.

Method of Instruction:
Informal lecture and discussion.

Method of Evaluation:
Quizzes (20%), 2 exams (40%), 2 papers (40%)

Distribution Requirement :      EU
                               ENGLISH                                                                      ENGLISH

ENG2025                                                                       ENG2044
THE CRAFT OF CREATIVE NON-FICTION                                             AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1945 TO PRESENT
Offered By: MaryJo Mahoney                                                    Offered By: Michael Kiskis
Prerequisites:    ANY ONE OF ENG 1075 (INTRO TO LIT), ENG                     Prerequisites:    ANY ONE OF ENG 1075 (INTRO TO LIT), ENG
                 1100 (FOUND OF LIT: KING ARTHUR), ENG 1101                                    1100 (FOUND OF LIT: KING ARTHUR), ENG 1101
                 (FOUND OF LIT: THE HERO), ENG 1102 (FOUND                                     (FOUND OF LIT: THE HERO), ENG 1102 (FOUND
                 OF LIT: AM SHORT STORY) OR ITS                                                OF LIT: AM SHORT STORY) OR ITS
                 EQUIVALENT OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR                                        EQUIVALENT OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR

Description: Primarily, this course is an introductory workshop in            Description: This survey of American literature focuses on the period
writing creative non-fiction. We will read current essays to identify non-    stretching from 1945 to the present. We will consider how writers
fiction sub-genres: the profile, the freestyle-theme, the biography and the   explored and explore notions of community and justice within an
autobiography. We will workshop our own essays in these sub-genres,           increasingly diverse population and collection of cultures. We will focus
exploring the possibilities of convention and form. We will study the         on readings from the contemporary period and consider how writers from
design and language of what we read so that we begin to identify writerly     a variety of perspectives and movements contribute to the chorus that
concerns and postures, to compare and contrast style and aesthetics, to       shapes American literature. We will explore whether, in the end, there is
develop awareness about voice and language, and to understand the essay       a definable, singular, and national literary tradition.
as an art. We will read and discuss recent, published work in this field.
We will examine both the writer's craft and our reading experiences as        Objectives:
we consider what is creative in the writing of these particular types of      Students will read from a broad selection of American literary texts and
essays                                                                        learn to interpret and analyze those texts both as individual literary works
                                                                              and as representative of a cultural/historical period. Students will gain
Objectives:                                                                   experience in writing about literature and culture.
To explore, develop and refine essays in this genre, focusing on
organization, voice, writing-as-discovery, the descriptive, and the           Method of Instruction:
personal narrative.                                                           Discussion; some lecture.

Method of Instruction:                                                        Method of Evaluation:
Discussion and workshop.                                                      There are three major writing assignments: two papers, and a final
                                                                              examination.
Method of Evaluation:
Assigned essays, attendance, and workshop participation.

Distribution Requirement :      CP                                            Distribution Requirement :      US



ENG2039
LITERATURE INTO FILM
Offered By: Peter Schwartz

Description: Will investigate how fiction (dramas, novels, short
stories, and even poetry) is made into films. The focus will be on the
study of the fiction and then determine how effective the cinematic
representations of them are (including what changes are made in the
transition from literature to film--what is gained and what is lost).

Objectives:
Read short stories, novels and dramas selected from American writers
and study their work from a structural perspective (plot,characterization,
themes, point of view, atmosphere and setting), also study the cinematic
representations of these works. Ultimate goal is to appreciate both
fiction and films and determine their effectiveness.

Method of Instruction:
Lectures, discussion, films.

Method of Evaluation:
In and out of class essay-type quizzes and critical reviews of the films.

Distribution Requirement :      3US
                              ENGLISH                                                                      ENGLISH

ENG2260                                                                     ENG2300
SHAKESPEARE AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES                                          AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: SURVEY
Offered By: Peter Schwartz                                                  Offered By: Michael Kiskis
Prerequisites:   ANY 2000 LEVEL ENG COURSE                                  Prerequisites:    COLLEGE COMPOSITION II

Description: Will study selected plays of Shakespeare and his               Description: This survey of African-American literature spans the
contemporaries to investigate the theme of human aspirations as they        period from the early Colonial era to the present. Reading will begin
conflicted with laws of God and man. Renaissance man sought to break        with the early personal narrative of Olaudah Equiano and chart the
through the limitations imposed by God and man; for some, appetites         evolution of a distinct African-American literary tradition giving special
were to be gratified at any cost and unbridled ambition or lust energized   attention to 19th century slave narratives and abolitionist narratives, late
men's thoughts and actions.                                                 19th and early 20th century narrative and poetry that explore the question
                                                                            of identity, and mid 20th century narratives that lead to and run through
Objectives:                                                                 the Civil Rights movement. Along with the writings of Equiano, we will
In this course, depending upon availability, we shall be reading four       cover the narratives and poetry of a variety of writers, such as Frederick
Elizabethan Revenge tragedies: Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus and           Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Charles Chesnutt, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston
Hamlet, Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy, and Ford's 'Tis Pity She's a Whore;      Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Gwendolyn
Shakespeare's The Tempest, and two tragedies by Marlowe: Dr. Faustus        Brooks, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison.
and Edward II.
                                                                            Objectives:
Method of Instruction:                                                      Students will: a) understand and be able to demonstrate strategies for
Lectures and discussion.                                                    close reading of individual texts; b) be able to identify major writers
                                                                            within specific historical and social contexts; c) be able to discuss views
Method of Evaluation:                                                       of alternative literary traditions; d) be able to trace the evolution of a
Seven essay exams and quizzes.                                              particular literary tradition across epochs and within genres.

Distribution Requirement :      EU                                          Method of Instruction:
                                                                            Discussion; some lecture.

                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Students will write three 5 page papers during the term; there will
                                                                            opportunities to rewrite papers.



                                                                            Distribution Requirement :      US



                                                                            ENG3021
                                                                            20th CENTURY AMERICA: SINCE 1950
                                                                            Offered By: MaryJo Mahoney
                                                                            Prerequisites:    ANY OF ENG 2020 (MAJ ENG AUTHRS I:
                                                                                             MED&RENASSNCE), ENG 2021 ((MAJ ENG
                                                                                             AUTHRS II:NEO&ROMANTIC), ENG 2022 ((MAJ
                                                                                             ENG AUTHRS III: VICT&MODRN), ENG 2042
                                                                                             (AM LIT: BEGNINGS CIVIL WAR), ENG 2043 (AM
                                                                                             LIT: CIVIL WAR-1945) OR ENG 2044 (AM LIT:
                                                                                             1945 TO PRESNT)

                                                                            Description: This course will examine post World War II literature of
                                                                            the 50's and 60's. Will consider how the literature treats such themes and
                                                                            issues as isolation, alienation, the 50's fulfillment of the American dream,
                                                                            and the uncertainty of America's future.

                                                                            Method of Instruction:
                                                                            Some lecture, but mostly class discussion and student presentations.
                                                                            Attendance is mandatory and frequent participation is expected.

                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Short presentation , a mid-term, and a seminar paper.
                             ENGLISH                                                                    ENGLISH

ENG3191                                                                   ENG3319
19TH CENTURY AMERICA: REALISM AND NATURALISM                              HISTORY OF LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY
Offered By: Michael Kiskis                                                Offered By: Mitchell Lewis
Prerequisites:    ANY OF ENG 2020 (MAJ ENG AUTHRS I:                      Prerequisites:    ANY OF ENG 2020 (MAJ ENG AUTHRS I:
                 MED&RENASSNCE), ENG 2021 ((MAJ ENG                                        MED&RENASSNCE), ENG 2021 ((MAJ ENG
                 AUTHRS II:NEO&ROMANTIC), ENG 2022 ((MAJ                                   AUTHRS II:NEO&ROMANTIC), ENG 2022 ((MAJ
                 ENG AUTHRS III: VICT&MODRN), ENG 2042                                     ENG AUTHRS III: VICT&MODRN), ENG 2042
                 (AM LIT: BEGNINGS CIVIL WAR), ENG 2043 (AM                                (AM LIT: BEGNINGS CIVIL WAR), ENG 2043 (AM
                 LIT: CIVIL WAR-1945) OR ENG 2044 (AM LIT:                                 LIT: CIVIL WAR-1945) OR ENG 2044 (AM LIT:
                 1945 TO PRESNT)                                                           1945 TO PRESNT)

Description: Students will be introduced to the works of American
writers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries such as Mark Twain,
Wm. Dean Howells, Charles Chesnutt, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Frank
Norris.                                                                   Description: This course introduces students to the history of literary
                                                                          theory and criticism and focuses especially on the evolution of theories
Objectives:                                                               of literature from early emphasis on aesthetics to contemporary concerns
We will explore the specific ways these writers rejected the literary     with literary canons and literary politics. We will begin our exploration
conventions and attitudes of American romanticism and follow the          with the classical approaches of Plato, Aristotle, Horace, and Longinus
evolution of Literary Realism and Naturalism as both a reaction against   and will move through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance on our way
optimism and an action toward the use of fiction to revise established    to the 18th and 19th centuries. We will focus a good deal of attention on
notions of morality.                                                      the 20th century and contemporary theoretical approaches to reading and
                                                                          writing. Our introduction to modern literary theory will include several
Method of Instruction:                                                    of the more influential approaches to reading and thinking about
Lecture and discussion; students must have read the assigned material     literature; for example, New Criticism, Marxism, Feminism, Reader
and prepared for discussion.                                              Response, and Gender Studies.

Method of Evaluation:                                                     Objectives:
Student written and oral performance, three papers required, and class    Students will read primary texts in literary criticism and theory and learn
participation.                                                            to analyze those texts in both cultural and aesthetic frames. They will
                                                                          gain experience interpreting individual texts and historical trends and
                                                                          will improve their analytical and writing abilities.

                                                                          Method of Instruction:
                                                                          Discussion; some lecture.

                                                                          Method of Evaluation:
                                                                          Three major papers; class presentations.
                             FINANCE                                                                          FINE ARTS

FIN3010                                                                     FAR2613
CORPORATION FINANCE                                                         CLASSIC HORROR FILMS
Offered By: Kathleen Brown                                                  Offered By: George de Falussy
Prerequisites:    ACC 2010 (PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I)
                 AND ACC2021 ( PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING                     Description: A study of the development of the motion picture
                 II) AND ONE COURSE IN BUSINESS                             medium through various themes and genres.
                 MANAGEMENT
                                                                            Objectives:
Description: To study the financial aspects of a business enterprise,       A) To investigate and acquire knowledge of one of the more important
including initial financial structure, the function of different types of   genres in the motion picture medium--The Horror Film, and B) An
financial securities, sources of permanent and temporary funds, financial   exploration of the basic craft elements that were used by master directors
administration, and financial limitations of a business enterprise.         in the making of suspenseful and nerve-wracking thrillers.

Method of Instruction:                                                      Method of Instruction:
Lecture and discussion. The student will be expected to read assigned       A full-length classic horror film is presented with discussion on style,
materials prior to class and to be prepared to take an active part in       craft elements, artistic contributions, and historical perspective.
classroom discussions and in the solution of assigned problems.
                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
Method of Evaluation:                                                       Three movie reviews, two critical essays, and a theoretical essay
Three exams, quizzes, and a stock project.                                  (graded), attendance, and participation in discussion (graded).

                                                                            Distribution Requirement :           US


FIN3030                                                                                                        FRENCH
MONEY AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS
Offered By: Naphtali Hoffman                                                FRE1020
Prerequisites:   PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS &                             FIRST YEAR FRENCH II
                 PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS                               NOTE: STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE LOWER LEVEL FOREIGN
                                                                            LANGUAGES COURSES IF THEY HAVE HAD ONE YEAR OR
Description: This course is designed to give students an                    MORE OF STUDY OF THAT LANGUAGE AT THE SECONDARY
understanding of financial institutions and markets, and monetary theory    OR COLLEGE LEVEL WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE
and policy in the United States. Discussion of the political economy and    INSTRUCTOR.
institutional change will also be discussed.                                Offered By: Mihai Miroiu
Method of Instruction:                                                      Prerequisites:      FIRST YEAR FRENCH I
Lecture and discussion.
                                                                            Objectives:
                                                                            A) To enable the student to understand French when spoken at a normal rate by the
Method of Evaluation:                                                       instructor and native speakers, using the language for a variety of simpler
Tests, individual and group presentations.                                  situations. B) To enable the student to speak the language, with increasing
                                                                            accuracy of pronunciation, intonation and grammatical correctness, as imitation of
                                                                            dialogues, simpler responses to statements and questions, and directed comments.
                                                                            C) To enable the student to progress in reading ability with a minimum of
                                                                            translation. D) To enable the student to gain insight into selected French customs
                                                                            and ways of life.

                                                                            Method of Instruction:
                                                                            A) Class sessions are held three hours weekly for a variety of drills and practice,
                                                                            both oral and written, in pronunciation, intonation, grammar, comprehension,
                                                                            directed conversation, and reading. B) An additional practice hour in GT library
                                                                            will reinforce class drills and practice. C) Basic concepts for particular lessons will
                                                                            be previewed in class; it is expected that the students will study the material out of
                                                                            class and be prepared to use class sessions for drill and practice. D) Regular
                                                                            attendance at all sessions.

                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Final grade will consider the following factors on an equal basis: 1) Shorter
                                                                            quizzes, oral, written or both. 2) Longer tests, oral, written or both. 3) Responses
                                                                            to oral-aural drills and practice in class. 4) Responses to reading and writing
                                                                            drills. 5) Final examination. All work is due on the date assigned.


                                                                            Distribution Requirement :           EU
                                   FRENCH                                                                                  FRENCH

FRE2020                                                                                  FRE3290
SECOND YEAR FRENCH II                                                                    GREAT HISPANIC & FRENCH POETRY-19TH & 20TH CENTRY
Offered By: Mihai Miroiu                                                                 Offered By: Lynne Diamond-Nigh
Prerequisites:      SECOND YEAR FRENCH I                                                 Prerequisites:    FRENCH CONVERSATION

Objective:                                                                               Description: A) To study major representative 19th and 20th century
A) To provide the student with a review, expansion, and intensification of matters       French and Hispanic poets. B) To understand these poets as part of the
of pronunciation, intonation, and grammatical principles. B) Students will               literary movements with which they are associated. C) To understand
understand French when spoken at a normal rate by the instructor and native              these poets as part of a larger cultural context which will include the
speakers, using the language for a variety of everyday situations. C) Students will
                                                                                         study of other artistic movements of those times. D) To learn how to
speak the language, with increasing correctness, as responses to statements and
questions, directed comments, short oral reports, and free conversation. D)              analyze poetry. E) To comprehend the differences between prose and
Students will read standard prose in French, with a minimum of translation, and to       poetry, by focusing specifically on prose poetry.
react to it orally.
                                                                                         Method of Instruction:
Method of Instruction:                                                                   Discussion, lecture and slides.
A) Most of the class sessions will be conducted in French. B) Class sessions are
held three hours weekly for a variety of drills and practice, both oral and written.     Method of Evaluation:
C) Material for classes will often be previewed; it is then expected that the student
                                                                                         Essay exams (70%) and class participation (30%).
will study the material out-of-class and be prepared to use a following session for
drill and practice. D) An additional practice hour in the library will intensify class
coverage. Regular attendance at all sessions and regular application and study are
essential for progress and are expected.
                                                                                                                FRESHMAN CORE
Method of Evaluation:
Final grades will consider the following factors on an approximately equal basis:
1) Short weekly quizzes, oral, written, or both. 2) Longer tests, oral, written, or
both. 3) Responses to oral-aural drills and practice in class and active participation
therein. 4) Responses to reading and writing drills. 5) Final examination. All
work is due on the date assigned.


Distribution Requirement :           EU



FRE3020
FRENCH CONVERSATION
Offered By: Lynne Diamond-Nigh
Prerequisites:      ADVANCED SKILLS I

Description: Students will: A) develop and practice skills in the
pronunciation of French words; B) Students will develop and practice
skills in conversing in French in a variety of real-life situations; C)
Students will expand and make use of French vocabulary; D) Students
will improve and refine their knowledge of complex grammatical and
linguistic structures in French.

Method of Instruction:
In this class the instructor is primarily a facilitator and guide for the
students to practice and improve their ability to speak and understand the
spoken word. Students view a different film each week and, with the aid
of the text, use it as a jumping-off point for practice in French
conversation. Films, instruction and class discussions are in French.

Method of Evaluation:
In this class the instructor is primarily a facilitator and guide for the
students to practice and improve their ability to speak and understand the
spoken word. Students view a different film each week and, with the aid
of the text, use it as a jumping-off point for practice in French
conversation. Films, instruction and class discussions are in French.

Distribution Requirement :           EU
                       FRESHMAN CORE                                                      FRESHMAN WRITING PROGRAM

FRS1020                                                                        WRT1010
ORDER AND CHAOS                                                                COLLEGE COMPOSITION I
Offered By: Benjamin Lovett                                                    Offered By: Staff
            Charles Mitchell
                                                                               Description: This course is required of all first-time, full-time
            Derek Chalfant                                                     students, and enrollment is dependent upon the student's performance on
            Jan Kather                                                         the writing sample completed during the Summer Registration programs.
            Jerome Przybylski                                                  Based on clear, concise, and logical prose; and successful completion of
                                                                               a library research assignment.
            Jesse Ozog
            John Kelly                                                         Method of Instruction:
            Joseph Lemak                                                       In addition to the classroom meetings, each student will meet with his or
                                                                               her instructor for at least one half-hour conference per week.
            Maureen Donohue-Smith
            Michael Pratt                                                      Method of Evaluation:
            Mitchell Lewis                                                     Since competent writing is achieved only by practice and discipline,
            Pierre-Yves Bouthyette                                             regularity in performance and attendance at both classes and conferences
                                                                               is essential. Attendance is mandatory. Students will be evaluated in the
            Rafiuddin Ahmed                                                    following areas: acutal writing (70%), effort, attendance, and class work
            Ted Johnson                                                        (30%).

Description: This course examines the human quest to find order in
the sometimes-chaotic array of sensations that surround us: How does the
world work? Why do people behave the way they do? We will study
the interplay of order and chaos within three interrelated quests: the quest
to understand how the world works (ideas about nature), the quest to
understand individual human behavior (ideas about justice, spirituality,
gender, free will, and motivation), and the quest to understand human
social behavior (ideas about social and political organizations.)

Objectives:
Upon completing this course students will be able to describe: A)
Various ways that human beings come to know the world and
themselves, and the various ways in which they express that knowledge;
B) Connections and conflicts among and between different intellectual
and cultural traditions in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas; and C)
The major historical transitions and paradigm shifts that have
characterized human civilization.
In addition, students will demonstrate skills in the following areas: A)
Analyzing, evaluating, and synthesizing complex ideas; B) Using
information resources effectively; C) Communicating effectively in
speaking and discussions; and D) Communicating effectively in writing.

Method of Instruction:
A mixture of lecture and discussion.

Method of Evaluation:
In general, a student's grade in this course will be based on the following
criteria: regular attendance, which is expected, preparation and
participation in the activities of one's section, papers and quizzes, and
examinations.
           FRESHMAN WRITING PROGRAM                                                                        GERMAN

WRT1020                                                                      GER1020
COLLEGE COMPOSITION II                                                       FIRST YEAR GERMAN II
Offered By: Christina Crossgrove                                             NOTE: STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE LOWER LEVEL FOREIGN
            Donna Howell                                                     LANGUAGES COURSES IF THEY HAVE HAD ONE YEAR OR
                                                                             MORE OF STUDY OF THAT LANGUAGE AT THE SECONDARY
            Elektra Gaebelein                                                OR COLLEGE LEVEL WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE
            John LoVecchio                                                   INSTRUCTOR.
            Jurgen Kerber                                                    Offered By: Carrie Hooper
            Karen Rathke                                                     Prerequisites:   FIRST YEAR GERMAN I
            Kelly Withee
                                                                             Description: A) To introduce the students to German culture and
            Sophie Henry                                                     customs by learning the language. B) To lay the basis for the continued
            Staff                                                            study of German.
            Tom Marples
                                                                             Method of Instruction:
Description: Recognizing that thinking, reading and writing go hand          A) Class attendance and participation is required. B) In place of the
                                                                             language labortaory and to assure lively instruction, German songs,
in hand, this course is designed to improve the student's abilities in all
                                                                             poems, dances will be learned, scenes from German daily life will be
three areas. Analytical thinking and reading are defined as the active
                                                                             enacted, German films (with English subtitles,) slides and records will be
attempt to determine the total message and experience being conveyed by
                                                                             used. C) Equal emphasis will be given to the practice of reading, writing
a communication, whether written or spoken. Critical thinking and
                                                                             and simple conversation such as needed when traveling in Germany.
reading are defined as the active attempt to determine the total message
                                                                             Graded readers enhance the use of the textbook.
and experience being conveyed by a communication, whether written or
spoken. This course will provide the student with the necessary skills in
                                                                             Method of Instruction:
reasoning, reading, and writing to succeed in college courses in a wide
                                                                             Class participation, brief biweekly quizzes and final examination.
variety of disciplines. Such skills are, of course, also necessary for
informed participation.
                                                                             Distribution Requirement :      EU
Objectives:
A) To understand the ways language makes appeals to the reason and to
the emotions and to distinguish between these appeals; this involves         GER2020
distinguishing between statements of fact and statements of opinion, and     SECOND YEAR GERMAN II
identifying the implicit and explicit assumptions. B) To discover
arguments in a communication (for example, in a piece of legal               Offered By: Carrie Hooper
reasoning, in a moral discussion, in a public policy debate), and to         Prerequisites:   SECOND YEAR GERMAN I
recognize and formulate one's own: this involves abstracting general
principles from the sets of information and identifying situations in        Description: To continue the work for a solid basis for advanced
which there is insufficient data to warrant particular conclusions, in       study of German; to acquire reading facility and to learn to converse with
others' communications as well as in one's own.                              native speakers on subjects of everyday life and to acquaint students with
                                                                             the culture and customs of German-speaking countries.
Method of Instruction:
Work with materials to improve ability to comprehend and make                Method of Instruction:
judgments about complex reading and to write effectively about them;         Except for grammatical explanations, German will be spoken.
class lectures, discussions, problem-solving techniques; a required,         Conversation, slides, tapes, films, and literature are to bring German
weekly, 30-minute, one-on-one tutorial.                                      alive in the classroom.

Method of Evaluation:                                                        Method of Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated on the basis on the performance on quizzes,       Based on class participation, short written compositions and a diary.
out-of-class writing assignments, participation in discussions and
performance on in-class exercises. Attendance is required. Formal            Distribution Requirement :      EU
writing assignments include four papers (three of four to five pages
each), including one research paper (six to ten pages). Quizzes and
possibly a final exam.
                                GREEK                                                                    HISTORY

GRK1020                                                                    HIS1401
INTRODUCTORY GREEK II                                                      UNITED STATES HISTORY II - 1865 TO PRESENT
Offered By: Heidi Dierckx                                                  Offered By: Myra Glenn
Prerequisites:    INTRO GREEK I
                                                                           Description: This course is an introductory survey of the major
Description:     This course is a continuation of Introduction Greek I.    economic, political, social, and cultural developments in the United
                                                                           States from 1865 to the 1990s. The following topics will receive
Objectives:                                                                particular attention: the development of an industrial economy; major
A) To gain a fundamental understanding of the Greek mind through the       political reform movements such as Progressivism and the New Deal; the
study of Greek language. B) To gain personal competence in reading         development of a multi-ethnic and multi-racial society; foreign affairs
and writing ancient Greek. At the end of the second term (GRK 1020), a     and global conflict.
student can continue with the dialogues of Plato. C) To discover the
large element of ancient Greek in the English language, particularly in    Objectives:
the concepts and vocabulary of philosophy and the natural sciences.        A) To introduce students to the major issues and topics that have shaped
                                                                           American history from 1865 to contemporary times. B) To develop
Method of Instruction:                                                     students' analytical abilities, especially through written assignments and
Daily assignments and practice in reading and writing. This practice       critical readings of required texts.
leads to gradual mastery of original Greek of increasing complexity.
                                                                           Method of Instruction:
Method of Evaluation:                                                      Mixture of lectures and student discussion.
The following criteria will apply: 1) Quizzes on vocabulary and
derivatives. 2) Quizzes on forms, grammar and reading (comprehension       Method of Evaluation:
and translation). 3) Comprehensive term examination.                       Grades will be determined by a student's performance on the following:
                                                                           essays based on assigned readings, two or three exams, class
Distribution Requirement :                                                 participation and occasional quizzes.
                                EU



GRK1050                                                                    Distribution Requirement :      US
INTRODUCTORY MODERN GREEK
Offered By: Heidi Dierckx
                                                                           HIS1501
Description: This course is an introduction to the modern Greek
                                                                           EUROPEAN HISTORY II
language, concentrating on basic reading and conversation skills using
everyday scenarios, such as at restaurants, traveling, etc.. This course   Offered By: Robert Shephard
will be an elective for students planning to participate in the Spring
Travel Course to Greece and Turkey.                                        Description: This course is a survey of European history from the late
                                                                           1600's to the present day, covering the major political, social, economic,
Objectives:                                                                cultural, and intellectual developments. Major topics include: the
The course is designed to be an introduction to Modern Greek. The          Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; the French Revolution and
primary objectives are:                                                    Napoleon; the Industrial Revolution; nationalism; Darwinian theory;
A) Learn the Greek alphabet and be able to read it. B) Learn the           imperialism; modernism in the arts; the Russian Revolution; fascism;
everyday language of the Greeks and be able to use it in everyday          Europe's uneasy position between the capitalist and Communist
situations. C) Provide basic reading and conversation skills.              superpowers after World War II; and the new future now opening up for
D) Provide some basic grammar.                                             Europe.

Method of Instruction:                                                     Objectives:
Lecture, conversation, and workbook exercises.                             A) To provide students with a basic framework for understanding
                                                                           historical change in modern Europe and its impact on the world. B) To
Method of Evaluation:                                                      improve writing skills.
Quizzes, assignments (20%), two tests (40%), oral examination (40%)
                                                                           Method of Instruction:
                                                                           Lectures, class discussion, and occasional videos.

                                                                           Method of Evaluation:
                                                                           Class attendance and participation, quizzes, three exams (two midterms
                                                                           and a final) and a four-page paper on the assigned reading.


                                                                           Distribution Requirement :      EU
                             HISTORY                                                                     HISTORY

HIS1601                                                                    HIS2400
ASIAN HISTORY II                                                           HISTORY OF COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA
Offered By: Rafiuddin Ahmed                                                Offered By: Mark Harrison

Description: An introduction to modern Asia, focusing particularly on      Description: A study of the formative years of American history from
the interaction between Asian and Western civilizations, the rise of       the earliest settlements to the adoption of the Constitution, with special
nation-states, and the problems of modernization in India, China, and      emphasis on such topics as Puritanism, the rise of American nationalism,
Japan.                                                                     race relations, the role of women in colonial economics, the American
                                                                           Revolution, and the formation of the national government.
Objectives:
To provide a background in modern Asian history and culture.               Objectives:
                                                                           To explore the colonial and revolutionary eras in America; to develop a
Method of Instruction:                                                     student's writing and reading skills.
Lectures, discussions, and videos.
                                                                           Method of Instruction:
Method of Evaluation:                                                      Mixture of lectures and class discussions, with emphasis on the latter.
Two short tests, one long paper, final exam, and in-class assignment.
                                                                           Method of Evaluation:
                                                                           Two essay exams, several papers based on assigned readings, and class
                                                                           discussion.
Distribution Requirement :     NW
                                                                           Distribution Requirement :      US

HIS2100
ANCIENT NEAR EAST                                                          HIS2503
Offered By: Heidi Dierckx                                                  HISTORY OF ENGLAND TO 1688
                                                                           Offered By: Robert Shephard
Description: An overview of the principal political and cultural
achievements of the peoples of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Anatolia, Persia        Description: This course covers English history from the earliest
and their neighbors from the fourth millennium to the fifth century B.C.   times to the "Glorious" Revolution of 1688, by which time England was
The Sumerian, Babylonian, Egyptian, Hebrew, and Persian civilizations      colonizing the New World and becoming a major world power. All
will be examined with emphasis on the reading of primary sources of the    aspects of English life will receive our attention, from the economy and
time period.                                                               politics to the culture, and from the kings and queens to ordinary people.
                                                                           Major topics include: Pre-Roman Britain; the Anglo-Saxon period; the
Objectives:                                                                Norman Conquest; Society, Politics, and the Church in Medieval
A) To gain a comprehensive understanding of life among the peoples of      England; the English Reformation; the English Renaissance; and the
ancient Near East. B) To determine the major cultural and political        English Revolution.
achievements of the peoples of the ancient Near East and their
contribution to later Ages.                                                Objectives:
                                                                           A) To familiarize students with the basic developments in English history
Method of Instruction:                                                     during this period; B) To recognize the special features of English history
Lectures, discussions based on readings of primary sources, and slide      in the context of broader historical developments; and C) To improve
presentations.                                                             writing and research skills.

Method of Evaluation:                                                      Method of Instruction:
Writing assignments, midterm and final exams, and one research report.     Class discussions, including lectures, and videotapes.

Distribution Requirement :     NW                                          Method of Evaluation:
                                                                           Class attendance and participation, quizzes, two exams (a midterm and a
                                                                           final), 6-8 page research paper.

                                                                           Distribution Requirement :      EU
                               HISTORY                                                                             HISTORY

HIS2603                                                                         HIS3412
HISTORY OF JAPAN                                                                THE TRANSFORMATION OF AMERICAN CULTURE, 1870S-191
Offered By: Rafiuddin Ahmed                                                     Offered By: Myra Glenn
                                                                                Prerequisites: NONE. RECOMMENDED HIS1401 (UNITED
Description: This course will analyze Japanese civilization from the                           STATES HISTORY II - 1865 TO PRESENT.
earliest times to the present. The identification of themes in the Japanese                    NOTE: US-W
historical experience and their relevance to modern Japan's religious,
cultural, and economic institutions will receive attention.                     Description: This course will explore the various cultural changes
                                                                                that transformed American society, making it a modern nation. We will
Objectives:                                                                     discuss the impact of Darwinism on American culture, the emergence of
To give students a framework for understanding the ancient and modern           new ways of thinking in economics, law, and psychology; the efforts of
elements in Japanese civilization.                                              women and African Americans to make American society more
                                                                                democratic.
Method of Evaluation:
Two short tests, two papers, classwork, and final exam.                         Objectives:
                                                                                A) To explore major intellectual developments in the United States
Distribution Requirement :       NW                                             during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. B) To develop a
                                                                                student's analytical skills, especially through written assignments and
                                                                                critical reading of required texts.
HIS2902
                                                                                Method of Instruction:
HISTORY OF RECENT AMERICA                                                       Mixture of class discussion and lectures, with emphasis on the former.
Offered By: Myra Glenn
                                                                                Method of Evaluation:
Description: This course will explore the major domestic and foreign            Students will be evaluated on the following basis: Class discussion,
policy developments in United States history from the early 1960s to            three papers based on assigned readings or research paper based on
present times. We will discuss the development and end of the Cold War          primary sources,mid-term, and final exam or take-home essay.
and its role in creating a vast national security state at home and major
commitments abroad. We will also discuss how the challenges of
globalization have shaped both the American economy and foreign
policy during the last three decades. In discussing these topics we will
examine the United States' current battle against different groups of
                                                                                HIS3612
Islamic extremists, the so-called "war on terror." Other topics that will       MODERN MIDDLE EAST
warrant attention include: the struggles for racial justice, gender equality,   Offered By: Rafiuddin Ahmed
and homosexual rights; the increasing diversity of American society; and
the growing ecological crisis. While examining the last topic we will           Objectives:
explore how this nation's growing dependency on oil shapes its foreign          Focusing on the crescent comprising Turkey through Egypt, and including Iran, we
policy, especially in the Middle East.                                          will examine the changing role and nature of Islam (including the present Islamic
                                                                                revival), relations with the West (including colonialism and decolonization), the
Objectives:                                                                     challenge of modernization, the evolving culture and society of the region's
                                                                                peoples, and the origins of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Special stress will be placed
A) To explore major themes and topics in 20th century American history
                                                                                on an understanding of the forces of causation.
with particular emphasis on the period since the early 1960's. B) To
develop students' analytical skills, especially through class discussion        Method of Instruction:
and written assignments.                                                        Lecture, discussion, films, and slides.

Method of Instruction:                                                          Method of Evaluation:
Mixture of lectures and class discussions.                                      Two short tests (40%), research paper (20%), class worlk (20%), and final exam
                                                                                (20%).
Method of Evaluation:
Two papers based on assigned readings, class discussion of readings and
occasional documentaries, and final exam.




Distribution Requirement :       US
                               HISTORY                                                                HUMAN SERVICES

HIS4590                                                                        HMS1000
SENIOR SEMINAR                                                                 HUMAN SERVICES IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICA
Offered By: Robert Shephard                                                    Offered By: Joyce Hyatt
Prerequisites: JUNIOR OR SENIOR HISTORY MAJOR                                              Maureen Donohue-Smith
Description: This course will introduce students to research methods           Description: The course will examine community responses to
in the field of history and to basic theoretical issues regarding historical   selected social problems. Areas to be surveyed include: poverty and
knowledge. Students will devote the greater part of their energies to          public welfare services; emotional problems and counseling; child
researching and writing a 20-25 page paper based on primary                    abuse/neglect and protective services; racism and sexism and strategies
documents. The class will meet to discuss readings in historiography, to       for achieving equal rights; crime and correctional services; physical and
share common research problems, and to report on individual research           mental disabilities, rehabilitation; drug use and drug abuse treatment, and
projects.                                                                      gerontological services. A brief historical review will be presented. The
                                                                               role of individual and societal values in policy formation and
Objectives:                                                                    implementation will be considered.
A) To develop students' analytical and research skills. B) To introduce
students to historical methods. C) To introduce students to recent             Objectives:
historical scholarship.                                                        A) To examine selected contemporary social problems and the programs
                                                                               designed to address these problems. B) To survey the implementation of
Method of Instruction:                                                         social policy in the United States today. C) To provide a brief historical
This course will be run as a seminar.                                          review of the development of the human services field. D) To examine
                                                                               selected controversial issues in the human services and encourage
Method of Evaluation:                                                          students to examine their own attitudes and values.
Research project and class participation.
                                                                               Method of Instruction:
Distribution Requirement :       W                                             Lecture, discussion, individual and group activities and AV materials.

                                                                               Method of Evaluation:
HIS5010                                                                        Quizzes, case study, and internet project.

ERA AMER REVOLUTION
Offered By: Mark Harrison                                                      Distribution Requirement :         CSI

Description:
                                                                               HMS1207
                                                                               PROGRAMS FOR ADOLESCENTS
                                                                               NOTE:REFER TO SCHEDULE FOR SPECIFIC DATES
                                                                               Offered By: Joan Ostrander

                                                                               Description: This workshop will examine programs for adolescents
                                                                               who are having difficulties with their families, with the schools, and/or
                                                                               with the law. Alternatives to family living, such as foster care and group
                                                                               homes, and dispositional alternatives, such as home bound detention, will
                                                                               be considered.

                                                                               Method of Instruction:
                                                                               Lectures, films, and discussion.

                                                                               Method of Evaluation:
                                                                               Two exams, three quizzes, project, short research paper and presentation.
                      HUMAN SERVICES                                                                HUMAN SERVICES

HMS1212                                                                      HMS2025
VICTIM ABUSE PROGRAMS                                                        DEATH AND DYING
NOTE:REFER TO SCHEDULE FOR SPECIFIC DATES                                    Offered By: Stacey Mc Mail - Jerzak
Offered By: Marie Woodford
                                                                             Description: A survey of various aspects of this controversial topic.
Description: This workshop will examine programs for those who are           The course deals with cognitive and experiential components of death
the victims of abuse, particularly battered women, abused and neglected      and dying.
children, and victims of sexual abuse.
                                                                             Method of Instruction:
Method of Instruction:                                                       Class participation is essential to the value of the course; therefore,
Lectures, films, and discussion.                                             attendance is required and graded.

Method of Evaluation:                                                        Method of Evaluation:
Attendance is mandatory.                                                     1) One book of five articles (three to five pages typewritten) from major
                                                                             journals (30%) on the subject of choice from the subject list (on a subject
                                                                             other than the one chosen for the oral project). 2) Oral project (30%): A
                                                                             major oral report (12-15 min.). 3) An interview (5%) with one person of
                                                                             your choice investigating and reflecting that person's view of dying,
HMS1213                                                                      death, and grief with emphasis on family patterns, traditions and
PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL NEEDS CHILDREN                                          preferences. 4) "My Own Death", a four to six pages typewritten
NOTE:REFER TO SCHEDULE FOR SPECIFIC DATES                                    presenting your own concepts, ideas, images, feelings and experiences
Offered By: Edward Lukomski                                                  about your death-style. 5) Mid-term exam (15%). 6) Final exam (25%).

Description: Programs for abused children, for gifted children, and
for bilingual/biocultural preschool children are presented. Issues such as
mainstreaming vs. segregated programs, types of curricula, and staff
training are discussed.                                                      HMS2515
                                                                             PRACTICUM IN HUMAN SERVICES
                                                                             Offered By: Maureen Donohue-Smith
                                                                             Prerequisites: Instructor's signature required
HMS2020                                                                      Description: The Human Services Practicum is a 240 hour supervised
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES                                                       field experience in an approved human service agency or program. To
Offered By: Maureen Donohue-Smith                                            enroll in HMS 2515, students must meet with and have the written
                                                                             approval of a human services faculty member. This practicum is
Description: This course will provide students with an overview of           designed for students who are pursuing a terminal Associate's Degree
various mental health programs. The history of the community mental          and must be taken prior to reaching upper division standing.
health system, as well as present day treatment models, will be
examined. The application of current therapeutic interventions will be
covered including individual, group and family therapies as well as the
role of psychotropic medication. Programs and treatments will be
examined for a variety of sub-populations including the dually
diagnosed, children and the elderly.

Method of Instruction:
Lectures, audio-visuals, and small group exercises.

Method of Evaluation:
Exams, class research project and presentation.


Distribution Requirement :         CSI
                       HUMAN SERVICES                                                                 HUMAN SERVICES

HMS3010                                                                        HMS3300
HUMAN SERVICES AGENCIES                                                        BASIC COUNSELING TECHNIQUES
Offered By: Edward Lukomski                                                    Offered By: Anne Bizub
Prerequisites:    COURSES IN HUMN SERVICES, CRIMINAL                           Prerequisites:   PSY1010 (INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY),
                 JUSTICE OR SOCIAL & BEHAVIOR SCIENCES,                                         PSY2030 (PERSONALITY) AND JUNIOR OR
                 JUNIOR OR SENIOR STATUS                                                        SENIOR CLASS STATUS OR PERMISSION OF
                                                                                                THE INSTRUCTOR.
Description: This course examines the structure and function of
human service organizations. Issues addressed include: power and               Description: This course will assist students to acquire basic skills or
authority, leadership, communications, decision-making, organizational         techniques used in one-on-one counseling sessions by professional
roles, stress and burnout, resource allocation, staff-client and board-staff   counselors. Students will first become familiar with the role(s) of the
relationships, organizational linkages and environments, and                   professional helper and the ethical considerations of the helping
organizational change. Case examples will be selected from public and          relationship. They will then learn a model for change and practice
private human service organizations.                                           appropriate interventions in simulated situations. Multicultural issues and
                                                                               work with various populations will also be addressed. The course is
Objectives:                                                                    required for Human Services majors and is an elective for Criminal
A) To study the organizational behavior of human service organizations.        Justice Majors. It is especially appropriate for those who intend to enter a
B) To survey and apply to human service agencies selected theories of          helping field.
organizational behavior. C) To compare human service agencies, and
investigate interactions between organizations and their environments.         Objectives:
D) To prepare a case study of human service agency of the student's            Students will have the ability to do the following: A) Describe the
choice.                                                                        relationship between professional counselor and client; B) Identify the
                                                                               role(s) of the professional counselor; C) Identify basic ethical principles
Method of Instruction:                                                         governing counseling; D) Demonstrate some of the basic professional
Lecture, group discussions, exercises, and assignments.                        counseling skills, including rapport building, active listening, providing
                                                                               empathy, and using appropriate question probes; E) Describe the impact
Method of Evaluation:                                                          of culture, language, gender, social class on the counseling process; F)
Mid-term, final exam, papers, and class participation.                         Describe the basic process of crisis intervention.

                                                                               Method of Instruction:
                                                                               Classroom lecture/discussions, in-class skill building exercises via role
                                                                               plays and group analysis of case vignettes.
HMS3140
SOCIAL GROUP WORK                                                              Method of Evaluation:
Offered By: Staff                                                              Midterm and Final Examinations, written exercises from workbooks,
                                                                               research paper, audiotaped/videotaped mock counseling sessions.
Prerequisites:    INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING

Description: Examination of social group work as a method of social
work for meeting human needs and interests. An analysis of the
dynamics of the group process and the forces that influence group
decisions.

Method of Evaluation:
1) One 12 page paper, typewritten and organized according to the basic
standards of the College research paper. 2) A mid-term and final essay
examination will be given. The term paper will be due at the class prior
to the final examination. 3) The student will be responsible for assigned
chapters from the text, Groups: Process and Practice, Corey and Corey.
                      HUMAN SERVICES                                                                 HUMANITIES

HMS4000                                                                   HUM1200
PROGRAM PLANNING AND EVALUATION                                           CIVILITY, PROFESSIONAL PROTOCOL AND ETIQUETTE
Offered By: Maureen Donohue-Smith                                         Offered By: Lynne Diamond-Nigh
Prerequisites:   SENIOR-LEVEL STANDING OR INSTRUCTOR'S
                 SIGNATURE REQUIRED                                       Description: This course focused on civility, etiquette and protocol
                                                                          and their importance in 21st century life, not as a social adjunct but as an
Description: This course examines both the theory and applied             integral part of a person's and society's development and fulfillment. It
techniques for planning and evaluating human service programs. Topics     seeks to understand and teach gender, age and cultural (US) expectations
covered include: planning theory, planning in human service agencies,     and issues in regards to professional interactions, with the goal of
components of plans, needs assessment, funding, grant writing, and        learning how to epitomize appropriate professional behavior and to
evaluation research design. Each student will prepare a proposal for a    maximize contacts with others,.
hypothetical program of their own design. In addition to human service    Using the framework of the" Other and the Self" in terms of ethics and
majors, students with an interest in management of not-for-profit         social development, we will seek to understand the fraught issues in
organizations may benefit from this course.                               terms of philosophy, psychology, language and cultural contingencies.
                                                                          We will also take a more pragmatic turn, with an emphasis on the self,
Objectives:                                                               such as in the development of personal charisma, "dressing for success,"
A) To become acquainted with planning theory and its application to       and color profiling by season, as well as relations with others, including
human service planning. B) To become acquainted with evaluation           introductions, overcoming conversational barriers, ethics, and seating
research and its application to evaluating human service programs. C)To   arrangements in a variety of business settings. Although this course
develop skills in needs assessment, writing goals and objectives,         mainly stresses what is universal in etiquette and protocol, differences in
selecting strategies for human service interventions, finding and         other parts of the world will also be explored. A Japanese tea ceremony
budgeting funds, evaluating human service programs and writing and        will be one of the ways this will be done, as well as student presentations
evaluating proposals. D) To prepare a proposal for a hypothetical human   which will be focused on etiquette and protocol in foreign cultures.
service program designed by the student.
                                                                          Objectives:
Method of Instruction:                                                    A)Understand the importance of civility, protocol and etiquette in our
Lectures and discussions, group and individual assignments.               times. B) Find out how we can give more than lip service to the idea of
                                                                          cultural diversity. C) Understand major developments of the relations of
Method of Evaluation:                                                     the Self with the Other, mostly in the 20th century, in terms of
Mid-term and final examinations, proposal, drafts, and homework           philosophy, ethics, psychology, and cultural factors. D) Explore the
assignments.                                                              constitution of identity in relation to the Other. E) See the Other as
                                                                          minorities of all types: gender, race, age, geography, etc., both in the US
Distribution Requirement :                                                and around the world and the consequences of this view on our practical
                               W
                                                                          life. F) Learn how professional etiquette and protocol has evolved in the
                                                                          US G) Explore the movements that have changed US laws as they relate
                                                                          to equality in the workplace H) Attain a better understanding of
HMS4515                                                                   generation expectations, gender differences and culture-related
PRACTICUM IN HUMAN SERVICES                                               influences on business. I) Learn how to surmount barriers relating to (6)
Offered By: Maureen Donohue-Smith                                         when interacting with those that have different expectations J) Learn how
                                                                          to overcome conversation dilemmas from small talk to "sealing-the-deal"
Prerequisites: Instructor's signature required                            negotiations K) Learn which rule of etiquette to use in a variety of
                                                                          professional social situations L) Learn the rules of deference M) Learn
Description: The Human Services Practicum is a 240 hour supervised
                                                                          how to handle difficult people and situations N) Explore the ethical
field experience in an approved human service agency or program. To
                                                                          dilemmas inherent in many professional situations O) Handle profession-
enroll in HMS 4515, students must meet with and have the written
                                                                          related social events and meals with class and finesse
approval of a human services faculty member. Students must have upper
division standing and have completed or be close to completing the
                                                                          Methods of instruction:
requirements for the bachelor's degree in Human Services. Please see
                                                                          Readings, discussions, power point presentations, lectures, video, guest
FAQS on the Human Service Intranet site for additional information
                                                                          presenters, tutorials
(under Courses and Projects).
                                                                          Methods of evaluation:
                                                                          Student presentations (40%), exams (50%), Class participation (including
                                                                          attendance, courtesy, class interaction) (10%)


                                                                          Distribution Requirement :       GN
                          HUMANITIES                                                                        ITALIAN

HUM1903                                                                      ITA1020
EARLY IRELAND TO 1850                                                        FIRST YEAR ITALIAN II
Offered By: Gary LaPointe                                                    NOTE: STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE LOWER LEVEL FOREIGN
                                                                             LANGUAGES COURSES IF THEY HAVE HAD ONE YEAR OR
Description: This course offers an unsentimental study of the Irish          MORE OF STUDY OF THAT LANGUAGE AT THE SECONDARY
that has nothing to do with leprechauns, green beer, Notre Dame football,    OR COLLEGE LEVEL WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE
"Danny Boy", or St. Patrick's Day parades. What is offered is a multi-       INSTRUCTOR.
dimensional survey of Irish history (pre-history to 1850), Celtic            Offered By: Carrie Hooper
mythology (the Ulster and Fernian cycles), Irish and Anglo-Irish
                                                                             Prerequisites:    FIRST YEAR ITALIAN I
literature (antiquity to 1850), traditional Irish music and Irish art. The
course proceeds in 5 segments, each delineating a historical and cultural    Description: A) To enable the student to understand Italian when
period and centering around an important historical or cultural event or     spoken at a normal rate by the instructor and native speakers, using the
movement: A) Gaelic Ireland (pre-history to 1014): Celtic settlement, art,   language for a variety of simpler situations. B) To enable the student to
and mythology; Christian monasteries, monastic poetry, art, and              speak the language with increasing accuracy of pronunciation,
manuscript illumination; and the Viking invasions. B) Medieval Ireland       intonation, and grammatical correctness, as imitations of dialogues,
(1015 to 1550): the clan wars, Strongbow and the Norman Conquest,            simpler responses to statements and questions, and directed comments.
Gaelic lyrical poetry, and the Fitzgerald rebellions. C) Tudor and Stuart    C) To enable the student to progress in reading ability with a minimum
Ireland Gaelic Lyric Poetry; traditional Irish music. D) Penal times and     of translation. D) To enable the student to progress in ability to write. E)
'98 (1690 to 1800): the Penal Laws, "Underground Ireland," Grattan,          To enable the student to gain insight into selected Italian customs and
Wolfe Tone, the 1798 Rising, and Emmett's Rebellion.                         ways of life.
Method of Instruction:                                                       Method of Instruction:
Informal lectures and class discussion of text and materials. Responsible    A) Class sessions are held three hours weekly for a variety of drills and
reading in advance of class is crucial. Audio-visual materials will be       practice, both oral and written. B) Dialogue materials and grammatical
used in class, including tapes and slides.                                   concepts will be previewed in class; it is then expected that the stdent
                                                                             will study the material out of class and be prepared to use following class
Method of Evaluation:                                                        sessions for drill and practice. C) Regular attendance at all sessions and
Reading quizzes (33%), mid-term (33%), and a final exam (33%).               regular application and study are essential for progress and are expected.
                                                                             Three is the maximum allowable number of absences. D) Class sessions
Distribution Requirement :     EU                                            are supplemented by tapes available in the library.

                                                                             Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             Final grade will consider the following factors on an approximately equal
                                                                             basis: 1) Short quizzes, oral, written, or both. 2) Longer tests, oral,
                                                                             written or both. 3) Responses in class to oral-written drills and practice
                                                                             in class. 4) Responses to reading and writing drills. 5) Final
                                                                             examinations. All work is due on date assigned.

                                                                             Distribution Requirement :       EU
                                 JAPANESE                                                           LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

JPN1020                                                                                LAL1010
FIRST YEAR JAPANESE II                                                                 CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY
NOTE: STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE LOWER LEVEL FOREIGN                                        Offered By: Heidi Dierckx
LANGUAGES COURSES IF THEY HAVE HAD ONE YEAR OR
MORE OF STUDY OF THAT LANGUAGE AT THE SECONDARY                                        Description: A study of classical myths of creation, transformation
OR COLLEGE LEVEL WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE                                             and heroic exploits. Parallel myths in other cultures will also be
INSTRUCTOR.                                                                            examined. The mythology of Greece and Rome has had a profound
Offered By: Yuki Yanagi                                                                influence on the religions, history and the arts in Western Civilization
                                                                                       and we will study the myths not only for their intrinsic values and the
Prerequisites:      FIRST YEAR JAPANESE I
                                                                                       pleasures to be derived from them, but also an eye on their influence,
Comments: Certain foreign languages are not widely known in America;
                                                                                       especially in the arts, during the past several thousand years.
nevertheless, several of them are critical to an understanding of other cultures,
such as those of Asia, Africa, and the Soviet Union. To meet this need, Elmira         Method of Instruction:
College has established a Critical Language Program to assist interested students in   Lectures, discussions and some audio-visual materials.
learning these languages. Anyone who takes this course must have a great deal of
self-discipline in order to learn a language on his or her own.                        Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Two exams, two developed papers discussing myths and legends on art
Objectives:
                                                                                       works and periodic quizzes on current work.
To master the basic grammar, vocabulary, and practical syntax of a language, with
emphasis on its spoken equivalent to the first year level of college instruction.
Students concentrate on speaking and listening in Japanese.
                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :      EU
Method of Instruction:
In addition to the class lessons three times per week, the students are required to
study with an assigned textbook, a cassette tape-recorder, and accompanying taped
lessons to learn the language. CAUTION: Each student must spend as much time
on this course as he or she would for other courses.

Method of Evaluation:
Besides a series of testing situations offered during a term, a midterm exam and a
final exam are given.


Distribution Requirement :          NW



JPN2020
SECOND YEAR JAPANESE II
Offered By: Yuki Yanagi
Prerequisites:      SECOND YEAR JAPANESE I

Comments: Certain foreign languages are not widely known in America;
nevertheless, several of them are critical to an understanding of other cultures,
such as those of Asia, Africa, and the Soviet Union. To meet this need, Elmira
College has established a Critical Language Program to assist interested students in
learning these languages. Anyone who takes this course must have a great deal of
self-discipline in order to learn a language on his or her own.

Objectives:
To master the basic grammar, vocabulary, and practical syntax of a language, with
emphasis on its spoken equivalent to the first year level of college instruction.
Students concentrate on speaking and listening in Japanese.

Method of Instruction:
In addition to the class lessons three times per week, the students are required to
study with an assigned textbook, a cassette tape-recorder, and accompanying taped
lessons to learn the language. CAUTION: Each student must spend as much time
on this course as he or she would for other courses.

Method of Evaluation:
Besides a series of testing situations offered during a term, a midterm exam and a
final exam are given.


Distribution Requirement :          NW
             LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE                                                                              LATIN

LAL3319                                                                       LAT1020
HISTORY OF LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY                                      INTRODUCTORY LATIN II
Offered By: Mitchell Lewis                                                    NOTE: STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE LOWER LEVEL FOREIGN
                                                                              LANGUAGES COURSES IF THEY HAVE HAD ONE YEAR OR
Prerequisites:    ANY OF ENG 2020 (MAJ ENG AUTHRS I:
                                                                              MORE OF STUDY OF THAT LANGUAGE AT THE SECONDARY
                 MED&RENASSNCE), ENG 2021 ((MAJ ENG
                                                                              OR COLLEGE LEVEL WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE
                 AUTHRS II:NEO&ROMANTIC), ENG 2022 ((MAJ
                                                                              INSTRUCTOR.
                 ENG AUTHRS III: VICT&MODRN), ENG 2042
                 (AM LIT: BEGNINGS CIVIL WAR), ENG 2043 (AM                   Offered By: Joseph Lemak
                 LIT: CIVIL WAR-1945) OR ENG 2044 (AM LIT:                    Prerequisites:     INTRODUCTORY LATIN I
                 1945 TO PRESNT)
                                                                              Objectives:
                                                                              A) To enable the student to read original Latin literature, as written by
                                                                              acknowledged masters. B)To extend and improve the student's understanding of
                                                                              English, through study of the Latin origins of much English vocabulary. C) To
Description: This course introduces students to the history of literary       discover features of ancient Roman life significant for their influence upon
criticism and focuses especially on the evolution of theories of literature   European and American social and political ideals.
from early emphasis on aesthetics to contemporary concerns with literary      Method of Instruction:
canons and literary politics. We will begin our exploration with the          Considerable preparation and practice is expected of each student before each class
classical approaches of Plato, Aristotle, Horace, and Longinus and will       meeting. Classes are devoted to the learning and reinforcement of new vocabulary,
move through the Renaissance on our way to the 18th and 19th                  forms, grammatical structure and increased reading proficiency. There is periodic
centuries. We will focus a good deal of attention on the 19th century         study of derivatives and frequent discussion of aspects of Roman life.
movements that prepare the way for literary modernism and the 20th
century theoretical approaches to reading and writing. Our introduction       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              1) Quizzes on vocabulary and derivatives. 2) Quizzes on forms, grammar and
to modern literary theory will include several of the more influential
                                                                              reading (comprehension and translation). 3) A comprehensive term exam.
approaches to reading and thinking about literature; for example, New
Criticism, Marxism, Feminism, Reader Response, and Gender Studies.
We will also discuss the implications of Multiculturalism and the value       Distribution Requirement :         EU
of specific and exclusive literary canons.

Objectives:                                                                   LAT2020
Students will read primary texts in literary criticism and theory and learn
to analyze those texts in both cultural and aesthetic frames. They will       INTERMEDIATE LATIN II
gain experience interpreting individual texts and historical trends and       Offered By: Joseph Lemak
will improve their analytical and writing abilities.                          Prerequisites: THREE YEARS OF SECONDARY LATIN AND
                                                                                             LAT2010 (INTERMEDIATE LATIN I)
Method of Instruction:
Discussion; some lecture.                                                     Description: Open to freshmen. This course has particular value for
                                                                              students of literature and history and for pre-law and pre-medical
Method of Evaluation:                                                         students.
Three major papers; class presentations.
                                                                              Objectives:
                                                                              A) To read and interpret important selections from Virgil's epic poem,
                                                                              The Aeneid. B) To gain a comprehensive understanding and
                                                                              appreciation of Virgil's debt to Greek literature, his central position in the
                                                                              expression of Roman ideals and his lasting influence on later writers.

                                                                              Method of Objectives:
                                                                              A) Regular practice in reading the dactylic hexameter line. B)
                                                                              Translation from Latin into accurate English. C) Discussion of historical
                                                                              background, the authors' personality, and literary trends of Augustan
                                                                              Rome.

                                                                              Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              The following criteria will apply: 1) Evidence of careful reading and
                                                                              daily preparation. 2) Regular attendance and preparation. 3) Periodic
                                                                              tests and a term examination.

                                                                              Distribution Requirement :         EU
                            MANAGEMENT                                                                          MANAGEMENT

MGT2010                                                                                MGT2240
BUSINESS LAW I                                                                         PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT
Offered By: Staff                                                                      Offered By: Morris Samit
Prerequisites: PARTS I AND II MUST BE TAKEN IN SEQUENCE
                                                                                       Description: This course is designed to serve as an introduction to
Objectives:                                                                            and overview of the practical concepts used for organizational
Through a study of relevant sources of law, such as cases and statutes, students       management. We will cover the four primary functions of management,
learn to understand, analyze and apply legal principles and rules regarding criminal   which include planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. As part of
versus civil law, regulation of business by anti-trust statutes, the workings of       this process you will learn about the science of management by analyzing
lawsuit, Tort Law, Administrative Law, Consumer Law, and Contract Law.                 research in regard to relevant topics such as strategic management,
                                                                                       decision-making, organizational behavior, human resource management,
Method of Instruction:
Lecture, discussions and problem solving.
                                                                                       and leadership. We will also examine the art of management by studying
                                                                                       the inherent challenges in applying theory in today's dynamic
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  organizational environments. At the conclusion of the course the student
In-class exams given at the end of each unit of study. The unit exams will be short    will have a firm understanding of the role of a manager within an
answer and essay type questions. Attendance and class participation is considered.     organization.

                                                                                       Method of Instruction:
                                                                                       Lecture, discussion, case analyses, and group projects.

MGT2020                                                                                Method of Evaluation:
BUSINESS LAW II                                                                        Homework, quizzes, exams, and a group project.
Offered By: Staff
Prerequisites:      BUSINESS LAW I

Description: Through a study of relevant sources of law, such as                       MGT3410
cases and statutes, students learn to understand analyze and apply legal               OPERATIONS PLANNING AND CONTROL
principles and rules regarding everyday transactions in commericial
                                                                                       Offered By: James Mullen
paper, banking, sales, bailments, creditors' rights, secured transactions,
bankruptcy, agency, partnership, and corporation law.                                  Prerequisites: MAT2090 (STATISTICAL METHODS) AND
                                                                                                      MGT2240 (PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT)
Method of Instruction:
Lecture, discussions and problem solving.                                              Description: This is an upper level management course that builds
                                                                                       upon the four primary functions or principles of management that
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  includes planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. The focus on
Grades will be based on in-class examinations given at the end of each                 this course is to learn about and practice the business processes that
section of study. The unit exams will be short answer and essay type                   contemporary managers use to plan, guide, and control the operations
questions. Each exam will have equal weight. Attendance and class                      function in their organization. The course will cover major business
participation will be considered for the final grade.                                  planning processes such as demand forecasting, sales and operations
                                                                                       planning, material requirements planning, and inventory management
                                                                                       policy. Integrated planning processes like supply chain management
                                                                                       and information technologies for planning will also be covered. Business
                                                                                       control processes including process measurement and analysis, quality
                                                                                       management, statistical quality control, and project management
                                                                                       methodologies are key components of this course. Finally, we will
                                                                                       examine the human side of operations management and how effective
                                                                                       people management can enhance organizational effectiveness. At the
                                                                                       conclusion of the course the student will have a firm understanding of the
                                                                                       role of an operations manager within an organization.

                                                                                       Method of Instruction:
                                                                                       Lecture and class discussion, with examples worked in class.

                                                                                       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Grades are based on tests, homework, and a group operations simulator
                                                                                       project.
                         MANAGEMENT                                                                     MANAGEMENT

MGT3710                                                                       MGT3720
ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR                                                       HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
NOTE: COMPLETION OF PSY1010 INTRODUCTORY                                      Offered By: James Mullen
PSYCHOLOGY RECOMMENDED
                                                                              Prerequisites:    MGT 2240 (PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT)
Offered By: Morris Samit
                  PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT                                    Description: This course provides an overview and survey of human
Prerequisites:
                                                                              resource management and employment relations in organizations.
Description: This course focuses on individual and group behavior in          Course topics include the following human resource management
organizations. Both classic and contemporary topics are examined to           decisions, selection, compensation & benefits, performance management,
broaden and diversify students' exposure to core readings and issues in       training & development and strategic HRM. This course will also cover
the field. Comprises in depth examination of the relevant theory in the       the ethical, legal, and social considerations of human resource
literature, and the analyses, interpretation, and application. A major        management.
component of the course will be the students' preparation of a paper          This course will challenge students to function as the owner or chief
researching and analyzing a current topic in organization behavior.           executive officer in a variety of general management business cases. The
                                                                              overall importance of strategic decisions is defined by the fact that they
Objectives:                                                                   determine the future direction and competitive position of an enterprise
The student will:A) Attain an in-depth understanding of both previous         for a long time. The stakes are high because they affect not only
and current research on organizational behavior and its application; B)       employee lives but also the organization’s very survival. The student’s
Develop an analytical and integrative way of thinking about OB to             task is to make strategic decisions and to justify these decisions through
enable the student to critically evaluate organizational behavior practices   oral and written communication. In addition, the students must
from both a conceptual and methodological perspective;                        demonstrate how their strategic decisions could be successfully
C) Discuss philosophical, theoretical, methodological, ethical and            implemented. Students will need to integrate knowledge acquired in
professional issues important to the field of organizational behavior; D)     previous business administration courses with the concepts and
Produce analytical work in the field of organizational behavior in a          techniques presented in the strategic management text.
concise and coherent manner, through writing and presenting a paper on
a relevant topic in the field of organization behavior.                       Objectives:
                                                                              A.) Understand the concepts and techniques of strategic management;
Method of Instruction:                                                        B.)     Gain experience in using the tools of strategic analysis in order to
Reading of selected articles, class lectures and discussions, synthesis of    formulate, implement, and control strategic plans; C.) Sharpen analytical
concepts identified by the readings.                                          skills, enhance judgment-making capacity, and polish communication
                                                                              abilities; D.) Apply and integrate the learning from previous functional
Method of Evaluation:                                                         business courses.
Summaries and analyses of Organizational Behavior readings(6)(30%);
Research project/paper (30%); Class participation (attendance,                Method of Instruction:
preparation, relevant contributions to discussions)(15%); Final exam          This course will rely heavily on in class case study analysis and
(25%).                                                                        discussion. Core concepts of strategic management will be discussed
                                                                              both through lecture format and discussion of reading assignments.
                                                                              Each assigned case study will be discussed in class. A group project will
                                                                              provide students with the opportunity to research and gain an in depth
                                                                              understanding of a contemporary topic in strategic management.

                                                                              Method of Evaluation;
                                                                              Written case study assignments, mid-term and final exams, and a project
                                                                              assignment.
                         MANAGEMENT                                                                  MANAGEMENT

MGT4005                                                                     MGT4011
SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS                                           STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT
Offered By: Morris Samit                                                    Offered By: James Mullen
Prerequisites:   ALL INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS                                 Prerequisites:   SENIOR STANDING AND COMPLETION OF ALL
                 SPECIALIZATION COURSES OTHER THAN                                           BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CORE COURSES.
                 SEMINAR IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
                                                                            Description: This course will challenge students to function as the
Description: This capstone course is a vehicle for consolidating the        owner or chief executive officer in a variety of general management
many facets and relationships of basic business administration,             business cases. The overall importance of strategic decisions is defined
International Studies, International Economics and International            by the fact that they determine the future direction and competitive
Marketing to which students have been exposed during their build-up         position of an enterprise for a long time. The stakes are high because
towards achieving a Specialization in International Business. The course    they affect not only employee lives but also the organization's very
will be divided into two parts: A) A review of the theory and practice of   survival. The student's task is to make strategic decisions and to justify
international business, with emphasis on cultural, economic, financial,     these decisions through oral and written communication. In addition,
political, marketing, business policy and ethical factors affecting         the students must demonstrate how their strategic decisions could be
international business and multi-national corporations, US and foreign.     successfully implemented. Students will need to integrate knowledge
B) Discussion of special situations in the field of study, by means of      acquired in previous business administration courses with the concepts
cases, readings, and consideration of major current and historical          and techniques presented in the strategic management text.
developments in the field. Key aspects of doing business internationally
will thereby be brought into focus, as will strategies affecting            Objectives:
management, marketing, organization, production, personnel, and             A.) Understand the concepts and techniques of strategic management; B.)
government relations.                                                       Gain experience in using the tools of strategic analysis in order to
                                                                            formulate, implement, and control strategic plans; C.) Sharpen analytical
Objectives:                                                                 skills, enhance judgment-making capacity, and polish communication
The course will provide the opportunity for students to relate prior and    abilities; D.) Apply and integrate the learning from previous functional
current formal course studies to the real life situations represented by    business courses.
topical events, their own personal experience, and important milestones
in the development of international business in recent years.               Method of Instruction:
                                                                            This course will rely heavily on in class case study analysis and
Method of Instruction:                                                      discussion. Core concepts of strategic management will be discussed
Lecture, discussions, International Business guest speakers, readings,      both through lecture format and discussion of reading assignments.
review of key developments in the field of study as represented by          Each assigned case study will be discussed in class. A group project will
selected magazine and journal articles and current events, films, case      provide students with the opportunity to research and gain an in depth
studies, and term projects.                                                 understanding of a contemporary topic in strategic management.

Method of Evaluation:                                                       Method of Evaluation;
Exams, term research project(s), participation and case studies.            Written case study assignments, mid-term and final exams, and a project
                                                                            assignment.


                                                                            Distribution Requirement :      W
     MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS                                                                    MARKETING

MIS3010                                                                    MKT2250
INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM                              PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
Offered By: Michael Pratt                                                  Offered By: Alison Wolfe
Prerequisites:    ACC2010 (PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I), OR                             Philip Hurdle
                 MGT2240 (PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT), OR
                 MKT2250 (PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING), AND                    Description: A study of functions involved in the movement of goods
                 JUNIOR STANDING. OTHERS NEED                              and services from producer to consumer or industrial user. Including
                 PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR.                             formulation of the marketing mix and adjusting the marketing strategy as
                                                                           it relates to product, promotion, price and place.
Description: This course provides an introduction to computer-based
information systems used by management. It surveys the hardware,           Objectives:
software, and systems used to facilitate business processes, solve         A) To become familiar with the various principles and practices related
business-related problems, take advantage of business opportunities, and   to the marketing of products in the U.S. B) To incorporate basic
make effective decisions.                                                  principles into the probelm solving approach. C) To acquaint the student
                                                                           with the various functions existing within the marketing framework as an
Objectives:                                                                insight to managing the overall marketing plan.
A) To understand the role and importance of information systems in all
facets of business and electronic commerce. B) To demonstrate an           Method of Instruction:
understanding and use of the hardware and software used by information     Lectures, video case studies, class discussion, and assigned readings.
systems. C) To recognize, appreciate, and respond to the social
implications of using information technology.                              Method of Evaluation:
                                                                           Quizzes, exams, video assignments, journal assignment, and term
Methods of Instruction:                                                    project.
Lectures, readings, discussions, and group project.

Method of Evaluation:
Quizzes, in-class exercises, assignments, case study, exams, and term
project.                                                                   MKT3010
                                                                           SERVICE MARKETING
                                                                           Offered By: Philip Hurdle
                                                                           Prerequisites:    PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

                                                                           Description: This course covers the challenges and opportunities
                                                                           facing managers as they market and produce services and develop
                                                                           strategies and tactics to attract new customers, satisfy and retain current
                                                                           purchasers, and create sustainable competitive advantages. Emphasis is
                                                                           on how service marketing is different from goods marketing in that
                                                                           services are intangible, they cannot be inventoried, supply and demand
                                                                           are difficult to synchronize, and quality control cannot be exercised
                                                                           during production.

                                                                           Objectives:
                                                                           A) To appreciate the increased importance that service industries have on
                                                                           the U.S. and world economics and their economic significance to
                                                                           American businesses. B) To identify and address the special challenges
                                                                           presented by the marketing of services. C) To understand the differences
                                                                           between the marketing of products and services, including intangibility,
                                                                           heterogeneity, inseparability, and perishability. D) To become fully
                                                                           aware of customers' behavior, expectations and perceptions.

                                                                           Method of Instruction:
                                                                           Lectures, case materials, readings, class discussions, and projects.

                                                                           Method of Evaluation:
                                                                           Quizzes (20%), assignments, projects, and cases (20%), journal
                                                                           (collected 3 times) (15%), midterm exam (20%) and final exam (25%).
                              MARKETING                                                                           MARKETING

MKT3250                                                                             MKT4000
CONSUMER BEHAVIOR                                                                   MARKETING PLANNING
Offered By: Philip Hurdle                                                           Offered By: Alison Wolfe
Prerequisites:     PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING                                          Prerequisites:     MKT3810 (MARKETING RESEARCH) AND
                                                                                                       SENIOR CLASS STANDING.
Description: A large and expanding field of research has emerged                                       NOTE: COURSE FEE $200.00.
focusing on consumer behavior. This is because all of us are buyers and
consumers, and much that we do in this area is critical to our lifestyle and
sense of well being. The study of consumer behavior is concerned with
understanding consumer attitudes, feeling and behavior involved in                  Description: To incorporate all facets of marketing studies into one
obtaining, consuming, and disposing of products and services.                       comprehensive course dealing with the "Marketing Plan".

Objectives:                                                                         Method of Instruction:
A.) Understand how internal and external influences affect consumers’               Lecture, assigned reading, student research, case/project examination
self-concept and lifestyles, which in turn affect needs and desires and             with class discussion.
lead to specific behaviors and expectations;
B.) Understand how principles of consumer behavior affect the                       Method of Evaluation:
formulation and implementation of marketing plans; C.) Collaborate with             Midterm, final, quizzes, case/class assignments, and final "Marketing
classmates to complete in-class assignments and projects; D.)                       Plan" project.
Communicate orally and in writing as individuals and in group settings.


Method of Instruction:                                                                                          MATHEMATICS
Lecture, discussion, and in-class discussion.
                                                                                    MAT1000
Method of Evaluation:                                                               ESSENTIAL MATH SKILLS I (IN WATSON 303)
Two exams, quizzes and term project.
                                                                                    Offered By: Coleen Jacobson
Distribution Requirement :         W                                                Prerequisites: BASED ON MATH SKILLS INVENTORY.
                                                                                                   OTHERS NEED INSTRUCTOR'S APPROVAL.


MKT3270
BUSINESS TO BUSINESS MARKETING                                                      NOTE: Students should go to the Math Lab in Watson Hall, room 303, on the first
                                                                                    day of classes for assignment to a regular section.
Offered By: Steven Sands
Prerequisites:     PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING                                          Objectives:
                                                                                    To provide an opportunity for students to gain confidence and competence in basic
Objectives:                                                                         mathematical skills. The course includes both pre-algebra and elementary algebra.
To familiarize the student with the application of marketing principles in the
commercial, institutional, and industrial environment. This course will provide a   Method of Instuction:
foundation for the student seeking employment in this area and will reinforce the   A modified tutorial program. Students meet in small groups with an instructor and
skills of the student already employed in this capacity.                            tutor. Most of the work is self-paced, and help is always available.

Method of Instruction:                                                              Method of Evaluation:
Lecture, discussion, case examination, and assigned readings.                       The course is offered on a pass/fail basis with passing grades assigned to students
                                                                                    who attend class regularly and demostrate progress. Specifically, a student must
Method of Evaluation:                                                               attend at least 30 hours (for one credit) and satisfactorily complete a amount of
Tests, written/oral case evaluations, and homework assignments.                     material agreed on by student and instructor at the beginning of the course.
                         MATHEMATICS                                                                  MATHEMATICS

MAT1001                                                                      MAT1090
ESSENTIAL MATH SKILLS II (IN WATSON 303)                                     PRE-CALCULUS
Offered By: Coleen Jacobson                                                  Offered By: Joseph Kolacinski
Prerequisites: COURSE IS RECOMMENDED FOR SOME                                Prerequisites:   COLLEGE ALGEBRA
               FRESHMEN, BASED ON MATH SKILLS
                                                                             Description: This course is designed to prepare students for Calculus
Description: To provide an opportunity for students to gain                  courses. Topics include analytic geometry, polynomials and rational
confidence and competence in basic mathematical skills. The course           functions, trigonometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic
includes both pre-algebra and elementary algebra.                            sections, graphs and problem solving. Course includes computer lab.
                                                                             The computer lab exercises are designed to help students master the
Method of Instruction:                                                       material and increase their facility at mathematical calculations and
A modified tutorial program. Students meet in small groups with an           problem solving. Assignments will often be done in groups to provide
instructor and tutor. Most of the work is self-paced, but help is            additional support to the students as they work on mastering the material.
available. There are three hours of class time scheduled each week, but
no work is required outside of class.                                        Method of Instruction:
                                                                             Lecture, discussion, and group computer labs
Method of Evaluation:
The course is offered on a pass/fail basis with passing grades assigned to   Method of Discussion:
students who attend class regularly and demonstrate progress.                Grades will be based upon group computer assignments, and individual
Specifically, a student must attend at least 30 hours (for one credit) and   exams.
satisfactorily complete an amount of material agreed on by student and
instructor at the beginning of the course. STUDENTS ENROLLED IN
ESSENTIAL MATH SKILLS SHOULD GO TO WATSON HALL,
ROOM 303, ON THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES FOR ASSIGNMENT
TO A REGULAR SECTION.
                                                                             MAT2009
                                                                             MATHEMATICAL HISTORY: RENAISSANCE TO MODERN
MAT1030                                                                      Offered By: Joanne Redden
COLLEGE ALGEBRA                                                              Prerequisites:   PRE-CALCULUS
Offered By: Joanne Redden                                                    Description: This course will consist of an historical survey of key
            Joseph Kolacinski                                                developments in the history of mathematics since 1500 A.D., and of the
            Josiah Meyer                                                     application of many of those developments to aspects of human
                                                                             civilization. Mathematical techniques that are suitably elementary will
Prerequisites: KNOWLEDGE OF BASIC MATHEMATICS AT                             be developed and used in class, so that students may gain a feeling for
               THE INTERMEDIATE ALEGEBRA LEVEL                               how mathematical abstractions relate to the real world. Areas of
                                                                             application may include astronomy, biology, music, physics, social
Description: In addition to satisfying the College's mathematics
                                                                             sciences, and the visual arts.
competency requirement, this course will provide students with a solid
basis in the art of formulating and solving quantitative problems. The       Method of Instruction:
course also provides the necessary background for other quantitative         Lecture-discussion, group problem-solving.
courses including MAT 1090 (Pre-Calculus) and MAT 2090 (Statistical
Methods). Specific topics will include a review of the fundamental           Method of Evaluation:
operations of the real number system, exponents, polynomial operations,      Mid-term and final examinations, plus a paper of modest length.
solutions of linear and quadratic equations, and solution of systems of
linear equations and inequalities. Realistic problems will be examined
after each topic is introduced.                                              Distribution Requirement :      GN


Method of Instruction:
Lectures, discussions and problem solving.

Method of Evaluation:
Grades will be based on class examinations, take-home assignments and
a comprehensive final.

Distribution Requirement :      MAT
                         MATHEMATICS                                                                    MATHEMATICS

MAT2020                                                                       MAT3020
CALCULUS II                                                                   ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS
Offered By: Charlie Jacobson                                                  Offered By: Jerome Przybylski
Prerequisites:    CALCULUS I                                                  Prerequisites:   CALCULUS III

Description: This is the second course in a unified sequence of               Description: This is an introduction to the principles of solving
courses on the calculus of functions of one variable. Topics will include     ordinary differential equations (ODE), which provide the basis for much
antiderivatives, definite integrals and their applications, the calculus of   of the quantitative analysis in both the physical and social sciences.
transcendental functions, techniques of integration and an introduction to    Methods of solving differential equations using analytic, numerical and
numerical integration.                                                        graphical techniques as well as pertinent theory will be discussed. The
                                                                              computer lab is designed to familiarize students with software that is
Method of Instruction:                                                        currently available to solve ODE's.
Lecture, discussion, problem-solving and computer work.
                                                                              Method of Instruction:
Method of Evaluation:                                                         Lecture, discussion, and computer labs with problem solving.
Grades will be based on hand-in computer assignments, in-class
examinations and a comprehensive final exam.                                  Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              In-class and take home exams, pencil and paper assignments and
                                                                              computer assignments.



MAT2090
STATISTICAL METHODS                                                           MAT3200
Offered By: Coleen Jacobson                                                   OPERATIONS ANALYSIS AND MODELING
            Jerome Przybylski                                                 Offered By: Coleen Jacobson
            Josiah Meyer                                                      Prerequisites:   MAT2090 (STATISTICAL METHODS) OR
                                                                                               EQUIVALENT
Prerequisites:    COLLEGE ALGEBRA
                                                                              Description: In this course, we develop and apply mathematical and
Description: This course is a (one-term) survey of the principle means
                                                                              analysis techniques that enable one to structure and solve important
of analyzing and evaluating quantitative data. The course will include an     decision problems of business, industry and government. The principal
introduction to the statistical package MINITAB. Students will use            mathematical model will be the linear programming model, but we will
MINITAB to complete a series of laboratory assignments paralleling the        also investigate other models. We will make use of "packaged"
development of topics in the lecture sessions. Topics will include: The       computer programs as part of our problem-solving.
Design of Statistical Studies (Sampling), Descriptive Statistics,
Probability and Probability Distributions, Estimation and Hypothesis          Method of Instruction:
Testing, Correlation and Regression.                                          Lecture and discussion.
Method of Instruction:                                                        Method of Evaluation:
Four hours of lecture and discussion each week, supplemented by student       Homework, projects, and exams.
work on MINITAB assignments outside of the regular class time.

Method of Evaluation:
Grades will be based on the evaluation of examinations, written
assignments and MINITAB assignments.
                         MATHEMATICS                                                                    MATHEMATICS

MAT3260                                                                     MAT4610
INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL AND MODERN GEOMETRY                               REAL ANALYSIS
Offered By: Charlie Jacobson                                                Offered By: Joseph Kolacinski
Prerequisites:   MAT2100 (DISCRETE MATHEMATICS) OR                          Prerequisites:     CALCULUS III
                 MAT2020 (CALCULUS II)
                                                                            Description: This course examines the concepts of the calculus at a
Description: This course will consist of a rigorous axiomatic               rigorous theoretical level. Typically, these concepts are presented
development of Euclidean and Non-Eulidean geometries. Beginning             intuitively in an introductory calculus (this time without applications)
with Euclid's geometry, we will discuss the historical arguments            from the point of view of a unified theory of limits (Moore-Smith
surrounding the fifth postulate, and develop hyperbolic and elliptic        Limits). The Riemann integral will be carefully defined and a basic
geometry in the manner of Saccheri, Bolyai, and Lobachevsky.                existence theorem will be established. Additional topics include
Historically, the development of Non-Euclidean geometry was                 sequences of functions (convergence and uniform convergence) and an
accompanied by a growing awareness of the need for a rigorous               introduction to metric spaces.
development of geometry based upon an axiomatic system; we will
illustrate this development, culminating in the study of projective         Method of Instruction:
geometry. Current problems in geometry range from packing problems          Lecture/descussion sessions.
to the shape of the universe; we will weave into the fabric of the course
as well.                                                                    Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Graded homework and exams.
Method of Instruction:
Lecture, discussion, and demonstration. Computer and drawing lab
work.
                                                                                                               MUSIC
Method of Evaluation:
Midterm and final exams, homework, and lab reports.                         MUS1002
                                                                            BEGINNING PRIVATE FLUTE
                                                                            NOTE: FEE $100.00 AND INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED
                                                                            Offered By: Mark Spicer
MAT4590
MATHEMATICS SEMINAR                                                         Description: To facilitate technical command, interpretive insight,
Offered By: Charlie Jacobson                                                and understanding of pedagogical procedures.

Description: A capstone experience for senior mathematics stuents           Method of Instruction:
requiring an extension of their mathematical knowledge into more            One, one-half hour lesson per week. Musical and technical assignments
advanced areas of study.                                                    to be made by instructor.

Method of Instruction:                                                      Method of Evaluation:
Instructor will work individually with the students to create oral and      Regular attendance, progressive development in musical and technical
written presentations.                                                      capabilities; demonstration of practice outside the private lesson.

Method of Evaluation:                                                       Distribution Requirement :         CP
Based on quality and accuracy of oral and written work.

Distribution Requirement :      W                                           MUS1003
                                                                            BEGINNING PRIVATE GUITAR
                                                                            NOTE: FEE $100.00
                                                                            Offered By: Peter Haskell

                                                                            Objectives:
                                                                            To facilitate technical command, interpretive insight and understanding of
                                                                            pedagogical procedures.

                                                                            Method of Instruction:
                                                                            One, one-half hour lesson per week. Musical technical assignments to be made by
                                                                            instructor.

                                                                            Method of Evaluation:
                                                                            Regular attendance, progressive development in musical and technical capabilities;
                                                                            demonstration of practice outside the private lesson.


                                                                            Distribution Requirement :         CP
                                      MUSIC                                                                        MUSIC

MUS1009                                                                             MUS1016
BEGINNING PRIVATE VIOLIN                                                            BEGINNING PRIVATE CLARINET & SAXOPHONE
NOTE: FEE $100.00                                                                   NOTE: FEE $100.00
Offered By: Staff                                                                   Offered By: Lou Coccagnia

Description: To facilitate technical command, interpretative insight,               Description: To facilitate technical command, interpretative insight,
and understanding of pedagogical procedures.                                        and understanding of pedagogical procedures.

Method of Instruction:                                                              Method of Instruction:
One, one-half hour lesson per week. Musical and technical assignments               One, one-half hour lesson per week. Musical and technical assignments
to be made by instructor.                                                           to be made by instructor.

Method of Evaluation:                                                               Method of Evaluation:
Regular attendance, progressive development in musical and technical                Regular attendance, progressive development in musical and technical
capabilities, demonstration of practice outside the private lesson.                 capabilities, demonstration of practice outside the private lesson.

Distribution Requirement :            CP                                            Distribution Requirement :     CP



MUS1011                                                                             MUS1017
CLASS PIANO LESSONS I                                                               CHAMBER SINGERS
Offered By: Mark Spicer                                                             Offered By: Joseph Cook
                                                                                    Prerequisites: PRIOR ENSEMBLE SINGING EXPERIENCE.
Description: Only for beginning students with little or no previous                                INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED
background in piano. Basics of note-reading and keyboard technique
will be stressed. Enrollment is limited to six students per section. Meets          Description: To work with and prepare for performance a variety of
once per week on a regularly scheduled basis.                                       chamber literature from all periods, to challenge members towards a high
                                                                                    degree of ensemble and musical refinement and gain a working
                                                                                    knowledge of the music appropriate to this type of group.
Distribution Requirement :            CP
                                                                                    Method of Instruction:
                                                                                    Rehearsals for three hours per week.
MUS1015
                                                                                    Method of Evaluation :
INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE                                                               Regular attendance, musical growth, and personal contribution.
Offered By: Elizabeth Wavle
            Scott Kelley                                                            Distribution Requirement :     CP
Prerequisites: PREVIOUS INSTRUMENTAL SOLO AND
               ENSEMBLE AND/OR BAND EXPERIENCE.
                                                                                    MUS1020
Objectives:                                                                         BEGINNING PRIVATE VOICE
A) To prepare for performances of the Concert Band during the term. B)To work
with a variety of concert band literature. C) To gain a working knowledge of the    NOTE: FEE $100.00 AND INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED
music appropriate to this type of group. D) To challenge members towards a high     Offered By: Joseph Cook
degree of ensemble and musical refinement. E) To develop instrumental skills and
techniques. F) To increase music reading ability.                                               Kasey Stewart

Method of Instruction:                                                              Description: For beginning students with previous background in
Rehearsal for three hours per week.                                                 singing. Meets once a week on an individually arranged basis.

Method of Evaluation:                                                               Method of Instruction:
Regular attendance at rehearsals, attendance at performances, musical growth, and
                                                                                    One, one-half hour lesson per week. Musical and technical assignments
personal contributions.
                                                                                    to be made by instructor.

                                                                                    Method of Evaluation:
Distribution Requirement :            CP                                            Regular attendance, progressive development in musical and technical
                                                                                    capabilities, demonstration of practice outside the private lesson.

                                                                                    Distribution Requirement :     CP
                                MUSIC                                                                          MUSIC

MUS1021                                                                        MUS1101
BEGINNING PRIVATE PIANO                                                        MUSIC APPRECIATON
FEE $100.00 AND INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED.                               Offered By: Joseph Cook
Offered By: Daniel LaBar
                                                                               Description: To form an appreciation and understanding of the great
            Mark Spicer
                                                                               musical forms, styles, genres, and their composers from the period circa
                  FEE $100.00 AND INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE                       850 to the present.
                  REQUIRED.
                                                                               Method of Instruction:
Description: Only for intermediate or advanced students with                   Lectures, discussion, and listening analysis. The student will be asked to
previous background in piano. Enrollment is limited to 12 students per         listen to specific compositions for the purpose of learning various
section. Meets once a week on an individually scheduled basis.                 stylistic traits which may be applied to other compositions of a composer
Instructor approval necessary.                                                 or historical period.
Method of Instruction:                                                         Method of Evaluation:
One, one-half hour lesson per week. Musical and technical assignments          Based on attendance, written and aural tests, and a comprehensive final
to be made by instructor.                                                      examination.
Method of Evaluation:
                                                                               Distribution Requirement :      EU
Regular attendance, progressive development in musical and technical
capabilities, demonstration of practice outside the private lesson.

Distribution Requirement :      CP
                                                                               MUS1120
                                                                               MUSIC THEORY II
                                                                               Offered By: Mark Spicer
MUS1025                                                                        Prerequisites: MUS1110 (MUSIC THEORY I) OR EVIDENCE OF
CLASS PIANO LESSONS II                                                                        EQUIVALENT PROFICIENCY
Offered By: Mark Spicer
Prerequisites:    MUS1011 (CLASS PIANO LESSONS I) OR                           Description: A continuation of Music Theory I. A study of the
                 INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED.                              compositional practices of the great 17th, 18th and 19th Century
                                                                               composers in historical-analytical context. After a review of diatonic
Description: A continuation of MUS 1011, but students with                     part-writing skills, this course will examine works of the great 17th, 18th
sufficient background (i.e. those who can already read piano music) may        and 19th century composers to study elementary modulation, secondary
enroll with permission of the instructor. Basic technical exercises (scales,   dominant function chords, and elementary form. Students will gain an
arpeggios and chord patterns) and elementary piano literature will be          understanding of these compositional practices through compositional
studied.                                                                       exercises and analysis of music. The evolution of compositional
                                                                               practices and appropriate theories on harmony and form will be discussed.
Objectives:
To facilitate technical command, interpretive insight and understanding        Method of Instruction:
of pedagogical procedures.                                                     Lecture and discussion.
Method of Instruction:                                                         Method of Evaluation:
Meets once a week for an hour and a half for 1.5 hours at a regularly          Grading of daily written work, three to four exams and a creative project.
scheduled time. Musical and technical assignments to be followed
according to the syllabus.
                                                                               Distribution Requirement :      EU
Method of Evaluation:
Regular attendance, development in musical and technical capabilities,
demonstration of practice outside of the class lesson.

Distribution Requirement :      CP
                                MUSIC                                                                     NURSING

MUS1121                                                                      NSG1600
AURAL SKILLS II                                                              COMPLEMENTARY HEALTH THERAPIES
Offered By: Mark Spicer                                                      NOTE: LAS
Prerequisites:   MUS1111 (AURAL SKILLS I) OR INSTRUCTOR'S                    Offered By: Dennis Caso
                 SIGNATURE REQUIRED.                                                     Elaine Caso
Description: A continuation of Aural Skills I. Development of ear-           Description: A study of the nature and philosophies that underlie Non
training and sight singing skills compatible with Music Theory II. This      Western Complementary Health Therapies. Modalities such as guided
course will apply techniques of sight singing and ear-training to music      imagery, reflexology and therapeutic touch will be discussed. Issues
that includes elementary modulations. The melodic, rhythmic and              related to interferences with healing such as global nutrition and
harmonic materials will roughly parallel the musical materials of Music      individual nutrition will be included.
Theory II. Students will learn to sight sing modulating melodies with the
solfege system and notate rhythms, melodies and harmonic progressions        Objectives:
that are dictated.                                                           At the completion of this course the student will:A)Demonstrate an
                                                                             understanding of health care therapies which have evolved from Non-
Method of Instruction:                                                       Western philosophies; B)Discuss the philosophies fundamental to
Weekly meetings to discuss ear-training and sight singing techniques and     mind/body/spirit practices; C)Explore the characteristics of selected
to conduct dictated, and sight singing drills. Out-of-class listening to     modalities; D)Identify and utilize resources about modalities and
tapes in the library.                                                        therapies.
Method of Evaluation:                                                        Method of Instruction:
Grading out-of-class tape assignments and sight singing and ear-training     Faculty and group presentations, discussions and guest lecturers and
quizzes to determine aural skill attainment.                                 readings.

                                                                             Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             Class participation, papers on self-selected modalities and presentation
MUS3020
ADVANCE PRIVATE VOICE                                                        Distribution Requirement :      NW
FEE $100.00 AND INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED.
Offered By: Joseph Cook
                 FEE $100.00 AND INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE
                 REQUIRED.

Description: Advanced technical exercises and practice techniques
will be assigned to facilitate command of all areas of performance
including tone production, emotion projection and motor-skill dexterity.
Studying advanced repertoire from different styles and historical periods,
the student will develop an understanding of proper interpretation of
musical scores.

Objectives:
Attention to musical nuances will be emphasized so that the student can
become an expressive performer.

Method of Instruction:
Meets once a week for one half-hour. Musical and technical assignments
are evaluated.

Method of Evaluation:
Attendance, development in musical and technical capabilities, and
demonstration of practice outside of private lessons.

Distribution Requirement :      CP
                             NURSING                                                                       NURSING

NSG2010                                                                      NSG2510
INTRODUCTION TO NURSING SCIENCE                                              NURSING PRACTICUM I
NOTE: THIS COURSE IS NOT OPEN TO REGISTERED NURSES                           NOTE: WHEN ON CAMPUS WILL MEET 8:00 - 11:00AM
Offered By: Marybeth Gillis                                                  PREREQ: NSG2010 (INTRODUCTION TO NURSING SCIENCE) OR
                                                                             INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED.
Description: This foundational nursing course focuses on theories and        Offered By: Marybeth Gillis
concepts of professional nursing practice within the health care system.                 Staff
Principles of nursing practice will be introduced, and particular emphasis
will be placed on the relevance of nursing theory as implemented through     Description: This practicum is for beginning nursing students and
use of the nursing process. Special attention will be directed toward        provides an introduction to the hospital environment and hospitalized
written communication and the theories underlying the framework fro the      clients. Prior to, and concurrent with the hours of hands-on experience in
curriculum. Students will focus on self-assessment and the internal and      the hospital setting, students will be given instruction in basic nursing
external factors which have an effect upon the role of student nurse and     skills including essential physical care procedures, basic communication
the transition to professional practice. This course is not open to          principles, and establishment and maintenance of the nurse-client
Registered Nurses.                                                           relationship.

                                                                             Method of Instruction:
Objectives:                                                                  Basic skills essential to client care will be taught by means of lectures
At the completion of the course the student will be able to: A) Discuss      and demonstrations, completion of learning modules and instructor
the major theories and concepts basic to professional nursing within the     feedback regarding their performance. Students will spend a minimum
health care system; B)Identify the conceptual framework of the Elmira        of 60 hours in the local hospital.
College Nurse Education Program; C)Examine the components of the
nursing process; D)Identify the nature of changes, which occur during        Method of Evaluation:
the transition to a professional role; E)Identify one's own method of        Quizzes and examinations, clinical assignments, clinical performance
coping with change; F)Identify the internal and external factors that have   evaluations, service learning, as well as mastering of specific required
an effect upon the nurse system in meeting health care needs;                skills.
G)Establish positive alliances with colleagues for the promotion of one's
own learning; H)Examine the concept of nursing leadership and its
potential for effecting comprehensive health care services; I)Identify the
legal and ethical responsibilities of professional nursing practice.

Method of Instruction:
Teaching/learning strategies may include: interactive lecture, discussion,
demonstration, self directed learning modules, written assignments, oral
presentations, technological assisted learning with course base
management system (ANGEL), and service learning.

Method of Evaluation:
Papers, exams, group presentation, service learning

Distribution Requirement :      CSI/W
                             NURSING                                                                        NURSING

NSG3000                                                                       NSG3115
PERSPECTIVES OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING CARE                                     HEALTH ASSESSMENT WITHIN THE NURSING PROCESS
Offered By: Lois Schoener                                                     Offered By: Deborah Woglom
Prerequisites: REGISTERED NURSE STATUS                                        Prerequisites:    REGISTERED NURSE STATUS, NSG2010
                                                                                               (INTRODUCTION TO NURSING SCIENCE) OR
Description: This course focuses on the study of nursing as a process.                         INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED.
Theories, processes, and concepts selected from nursing and other
relevant fields of the sciences and arts are studied in relation to the       Description: This laboratory course will focus on the Nursing
professional self-system of the student. Emphasis is placed on the            Process, emphasizing data collection and nursing diagnosis. Laboratory
assessment of internal and external factors, which impinge upon the roles     activities will provide the student with an opportunity to increase his/her
of the student who is in the process of transition towards professional       skill in conducting the health care interview and the physical assessment
practice. Written communication skills are emphasized in this course.         across the lifespan. Emphasis will be placed on student participation in
                                                                              both class and laboratory exercises.
Objectives:
A)Discuss the theories and concepts relevant to the conceptual                Objectives:
framework of the Nursing Program; B) Demonstrate the ability to               A)Examine the specific components of the health care interview as a data-
develop a statement of one's own personal philosophy of professional          gathering tool for the initial stages of the nursing process; B)Demonstrate
practice; C)Identify one's own method of coping with changes that are         an understanding of the role of psychosocial wee-being as it relates to
experienced in the transition process; D)Review the specific components       physical health and health behaviors; C)Demonstrate both theoretical and
of the nursing process; E)Examine research within the context of nursing;     applied understanding of the technique of therapeutic communication;
F)Identify the impact of internal and external discontinuities that have an   D)Develop a framework for evaluation of psychosocial stress and/or
effect upon the nurse system in meeting health care needs; G)Establish        functional impairment; E)Demonstrate and ability to communicate with
positive alliances with colleagues for the promotion of one's own             colleagues those findings or impressions derived from the literature and
learning: H)Examine the concept of nursing leadership and its potential       the oral interview F)Identify the role of the health history in the nursing
for effecting comprehensive health care services; I)Examine the actual or     process; G)Identify the role of the physical examination in the nursing
potential need for changes in one's own health care behaviors;                process; H)Demonstrate proficiency in performing the psychomotor
J)Articulate areas of responsibility and accountability for the individual    skills in the assessment of the physical systems; I)Distinguish normal
nursing practice and for continued professional and personal growth.          from pathological conditions, both in the assessment of the physical
                                                                              systems and patterns of psychosocial adjustment and coping; J)Develop
Method of Instruction:                                                        sensitivity to ways in which one's own personal style influences the
Teaching/learning strategies may include: interactive lecture, class          interview process; K)Adapt health assessment techniques for the
discussion, case studies, written assignments, oral presentations,            pregnant, neonatal, pediatric and elderly client; L)Identify culturally
technological assisted learning with course base management system            influenced variables that should be considered during a health assessment.
(ANGEL), video/films and group work
                                                                              Method of Instruction:
Method of Evaluation:                                                         Teaching/learning strategies may include: interactive lecture, class
Papers, presentation and discussion board                                     discussion, case studies, written assignments, oral presentations,
                                                                              technological assisted learning with course base management system
Distribution Requirement :      W                                             (ANGEL), video/films, group work and return demonstrations.

                                                                              Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              Health history, quizzes, class participation and return demonstrations.
                               NURSING                                                                        NURSING

NSG3130                                                                          NSG4120
INDIVIDUAL NURSING CARE II                                                       COMMUNITY HEALTH DYNAMICS & NURSING CARE
Offered By: Denise Talenti                                                       Offered By: Margaret Hopkins
            Milissa Volino                                                       Prerequisites: EVENING CLASS FOR REGISTERED NURSE
Prerequisites:    NURSING PRACTICUM II                                                          STATUS. NSG4110 (NURSING CARE OF THE
                                                                                                CONTEMPORARY FAMILY)
Description: A clinical nursing course which uses the nursing process
to study the range of disruptions in the normal physiology of the                Description: A clinical course which studies the community system's
individual client. The maternity cycle, as a normal pattern of change for        adaptive abilities in health promotion, health maintenance, and health
the individual and critical illness as a serious and debilitating change,        restoration. Particular emphasis is placed on a study of the role of the
will be addressed. Clinical placement will involve six weeks in the              nurse as collaborator, change agent, and client advocate. The student will
critical care setting, and a six week experience working with individuals        have the opportunity to assess internal and external discontinuities of a
experiencing the maternity cycle. Classroom and clinical experiences             selected community and provide intervention. Case management within
will continue to expand knowledge skills necessary for care of individual        official agencies, as well as other community-based health programs, is
clients as systems and the transitional process in health and illness.           introduced. The nursing process addresses the community as client.

Objectives:                                                                      Course Objectives:
A) Apply appropriate theories and concepts from nursing and related              a) Apply appropriate theories from nursing and other fields as a basis for
fields as a basis for nursing practice relevant to the self and the individual   clinical practice within the community; b) Utilize the nursing process to
client systems. B) Examine the position on the health-illness continuum          promote, maintain, and/or restore optimum health to the community and
of critically ill adults and individuals in the emerging family                  its people; c) Assess environmental, biophysical, and/or psychosocial
experiencing the maternity cycle. C) Utilize the nursing process to              strains - such as pollution, epidemics, and disasters that influence the
assess health status and to plan, prioritize, and implement activities for       health status of individuals, families, and the community; d) Organize the
the preservation, restoration, and/or maintenance of optimum of client           collection of meaningful data from within the chosen community and
systems. D) Analyze research, relevant to the care of the individual             analyze these findings in relation to potential community health research;
client system, as a part of the nursing process.                                 e) Analyze the impact of internal and external discontinuities - such as
                                                                                 legal, economical, and political factors, which impinge upon health care
Method of Instruction:                                                           behaviors of the community and its people; f) Examine effective
Lecture, discussion, audiovisuals, demonstrations, laboratory and clinical       emerging roles in community health nursing that promote the health and
practice.                                                                        welfare of the community; g) Analyze ethical and legal issues pertinent
                                                                                 to the community health environment; h) Demonstrate leadership in
Method of Evaluation:                                                            health promotion with the community i) Collaborate with consumers and
Quizzes and examinations, nursing process papers, clinical performance           colleagues to promote health with clients in the community setting; j)
evaluation, grading system as found in the Elmira College Bulletin.                 Demonstrate proficiency in the skills necessary to provide nursing care
                                                                                 within the community health care setting.

                                                                                 Method of Instruction:
                                                                                 Lecture, discussion, audiovisual materials, field trips, and guest
                                                                                 speakers. Weekly clinical assignments in a variety of community
                                                                                 settings.

                                                                                 Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                 Exams (1 @ 10%; 1 @20%[take home test], Final @ 20%)( 50%) ,
                                                                                 Community Assessment/Health Promotion Project (30%), Oral review of
                                                                                 project (power point) (10%), "Bug of the Week" ( 5%), Average of
                                                                                 1st Clinical Quizzes (total of 6 quizzes) ( 5%), Clinical Practicum (to
                                                                                 include Case Load, Leadership Experience, lessons plans) P/F,
                                                                                   Service Learning (P/F), Clinical Quizzes (P/F)

                                                                                 Distribution Requirement :      W
                              NURSING                                                           PHILOSOPHY & RELIGION

NSG4210                                                                       PHR1005
CRITICAL THINKING & CLINICAL DECISION MAKING IN NU                            LOGIC
NOTE: Prerequisite NSG 4110                                                   Offered By: Corey McCall
Offered By: Lois Schoener
                                                                              Objectives:
Description: This course synthesizes concepts from the biological,            The course concentrates on the analysis and evaluation of arguments using the
                                                                              techniques provided by informal and formal (basic deductive) logic. The course
psychological, social and nursing sciences as a foundation for enhancing
                                                                              will focus on the application of these techniques to arguments in law, philosophy,
the student's ability to solve complex clinical problems. Emphasis will be    and social policy.
placed on clinical problem solving and decision making in a wide range
of health and illness related concepts as they apply to individuals,          Method of Instruction:
families, groups and populations. Meta-cognitive theory and use of meta-      Lecture and discussion.
cognitive strategies will be stressed as key to improving critical thinking
and clinical decision making in nursing.                                      Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              Final evaluation will be based on homework assignments, tests, and examinations.
                                                                              Attendance is required.
Objectives:
The student will develop the ability to: A) Examine cognitive processes
that influence critical thinking and effective clinical decision making. B)   Distribution Requirement :          BSS
Use meta-cognitive strategies to improve critical thinking and effective
clinical decision making and use of human resources. C) Use critical
thinking to apply theoretical principles from sciences foundational to        PHR2025
nursing practice to effectively solve complex clinical problems.
D) Apply the nursing process as a framework for clinical problem              HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY III
solving.                                                                      Offered By: Corey McCall
                                                                              Prerequisites:     HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY I & HISTORY OF
Method of Instruction:
                                                                                                 PHILOSOPHY II
Lecture, discussion, case studies and clinical scenarios, student
presentations, role playing                                                   Description: This course will look at philosophical issues arising in
                                                                              Europe and the United States from the beginning of the 19th Century to
Method of Evaluation:                                                         the mid 20th Century.
Case studies (20%), Self Assessment (20%), Examinations (60%)
                                                                              Objectives:
                                                                              A) To introduce students to central philosophical figures and their works
                                                                              from the period to be covered, and B) To develop a student's analytical
                                                                              skills through written assignments and critical reading of philosophical
                                                                              works.

                                                                              Method of Instruction:
                                                                              Lecture and discussion.

                                                                              Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              Papers, exams, class participation.

                                                                              Distribution Requirement :          EU
                 PHILOSOPHY & RELIGION                                                         PHILOSOPHY & RELIGION

PHR2030                                                                       PHR3319
BIBLICAL RELIGION I: OLD TESTAMENT                                            HISTORY OF LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY
Offered By: Staff                                                             Offered By: Mitchell Lewis
                                                                              Prerequisites:    ANY OF ENG 2020 (MAJ ENG AUTHRS I:
Description: A study of the origins of Judaism in the interpretation of                        MED&RENASSNCE), ENG 2021 ((MAJ ENG
the history of the Hebrew people as the election and providence of God,                        AUTHRS II:NEO&ROMANTIC), ENG 2022 ((MAJ
not only creating a special people but revealing a new understanding of                        ENG AUTHRS III: VICT&MODRN), ENG 2042
God as ethical monotheism.                                                                     (AM LIT: BEGNINGS CIVIL WAR), ENG 2043 (AM
                                                                                               LIT: CIVIL WAR-1945) OR ENG 2044 (AM LIT:
Objectives:                                                                                    1945 TO PRESNT)
A) To acquire a knowledge of the history of the Jews in the 2000 years
of biblical history and its relation to the other cultures in Egypt, Cannan
and Mesopotamia. B) To understand the formative power of the
experience of the Exodus as the paradigm of God's creative dealing with
Israel and the manifestation of the qualities that belong to deity.           Description: This course introduces students to the history of literary
                                                                              criticism and focuses especially on the evolution of theories of literature
Method of Instruction:                                                        from early emphasis on aesthetics to contemporary concerns with literary
Refer to syllabus.                                                            canons and literary politics. We will begin our exploration with the
                                                                              classical approaches of Plato, Aristotle, Horace, and Longinus and will
Method of Evaluation:                                                         move through the Renaissance on our way to the 18th and 19th
Refer to syllabus.                                                            centuries. We will focus a good deal of attention on the 19th century
                                                                              movements that prepare the way for literary modernism and the 20th
Distribution Requirement :       GN                                           century theoretical approaches to reading and writing. Our introduction
                                                                              to modern literary theory will include several of the more influential
                                                                              approaches to reading and thinking about literature; for example, New
PHR2140                                                                       Criticism, Marxism, Feminism, Reader Response, and Gender Studies.
                                                                              We will also discuss the implications of Multiculturalism and the value
WORLD RELIGIONS II: CHINESE AND ISLAM                                         of specific and exclusive literary canons.
Offered By: Staff
                                                                              Objectives:
Description: In this course we will study Islam as a historical               Students will read primary texts in literary criticism and theory and learn
movement, paying attention to art, law, politics, and philosophy as well      to analyze those texts in both cultural and aesthetic frames. They will
as to theology. We will trace its rise in the seventh century Arabia and      gain experience interpreting individual texts and historical trends and
its spread throughout the world. In our study of China we will                will improve their analytical and writing abilities.
concentrate on the high-culture philosophical schools in the late Chou
dynasty (Confusianism, Taoism, Legalism, etc.) and their later                Method of Instruction:
interaction with Buddhism.                                                    Discussion; some lecture.

Method of Instruction:                                                        Method of Evaluation:
Lectures and discussion.                                                      Three major papers; class presentations.

Method of Evaluation:
Three papers, including a research pape, mid-term and final.

Distribution Requirement :       NW



PHR3070
PHILOSOPHY OF NATIONAL & SOCIAL SCIENCE
Offered By: Corey McCall
Prerequisites:    AT LEAST ONE COURSE IN PHILOSOPHY OR
                  PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR

Description: A consideration of the nature of scientific theories, the
possibility of objectivity, the dynamics of scientific change, the moral
limitations on scientific inquiry; treatment of classic and historical case
studies.
                     PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                                                   PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PED1002                                                                                PED1012
BADMINTON SKILLS                                                                       BEGINNING YOGA I
Offered By: Preston Chapman                                                            Offered By: Bonnie Raniewicz
                                                                                                   Colleen Harris-Ladelia
Objectives:
To be able to demonstrate all of the basic skills necessary in the playing of                      Lauren Shaw
badminton in a game situation and be able to supervise the playing of the game.
The student will be able to perform: Racquet grips, center position, ready position,   Description: This course will explore the ways in which Yoga affects
footwork, serve, placement areas, overhead clear, drop shot, smash, drives,            the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual centers of human beings.
backhand clear, and recognize and discuss common problems in these skills.             Students will learn the fundamental way to relax and energize through
                                                                                       stretching and posing of yoga masters.
Method of Instruction:
Lecture and discussion of rules and strategy.
                                                                                       Objectives:
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  A) To demonstrate breath awareness techniques. B) To help students
Attendance and participation. 90% for accuracy and 85% on all skills, and written      appreciate the benefits of Yoga stretching and breathing. C) To
exam.                                                                                  demonstrate correct poses. D) To help develop posture and proper
                                                                                       alignment. E) To increase physical strength.
Distribution Requirement :          PE
                                                                                       Method of Instruction:
                                                                                       Specific skills, core body strengthening, demonstrations, observations,
                                                                                       video teaching, and discussion of techniques.
PED1004
BASKETBALL SKILLS                                                                      Method of Evaluation:
Offered By: Randie Torgalski                                                           Class attendance and participation in skills (80%), written test based on
                                                                                       readings from text and skills from class (10%), and a Yoga journal (10%).
Description: The development of basic techniques in shooting,
passing, dribbling, and defensive and offensive movement.                              Distribution Requirement :      PE

Distribution Requirement :          PE
                                                                                       PED1013
                                                                                       BEGINNING YOGA II
PED1007                                                                                Offered By: Lauren Shaw
INTRODUCTORY BOWLING
                                                                                       Prerequisites:    PED 1012 ( BEGINNING YOGA I)
NOTE: COURSE FEE $80.00
Offered By: Dean Jackson                                                               Description: This course ia a continuation of Beginning Yoga I
                                                                                       (PED1012) The course will introduce additional beginning yoga
            Kathryn Augustine
                                                                                       practices. The course will include postures, breathing techniques, diet,
                                                                                       relaxation, and other related practices. The course will introduce the
Description: To develop an understanding of the basic skills and
                                                                                       fundamental way to relax and energize though mind, body, and breath.
fundmentals of the three, four or five-step approach as well as proper
techniques for picking up splits. The rules of scoring will also be
                                                                                       Objectives:
covered.
                                                                                       The students should be able to: A) Trace the historical background and
                                                                                       modern development of Yoga, B} identify and perform basic Yoga
Method of Instruction:
                                                                                       postures, including warm-up, C) outline the general, personal and health
A) Lane instruction including terms, rules and regulations. B) Etiquette,
                                                                                       benefits of Yoga, D) identify and proctice appropriate
footwork, hand-eye ball corrdination and the Board Adjustment Spare
                                                                                       modifications/accommodations to be utilized in a variety of situations
System (B.A.S.S.).
                                                                                       during yoga workouts, E) demonstrate through journaling how a Yoga
                                                                                       practice can be incorporated into any lifestyle, F) determine how Yoga
Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       affects the basic anatomy of the body and why correct postural alignment
Class attendance, participation and daily improvements. Check skills as
                                                                                       is important.
student progress in class. Written quizzes for terminology and scoring
methods.
                                                                                       Methods of Instruction:
                                                                                       Interactive lecture, videos, silent and verbal demonstration of postures,
                                                                                       practical experience.
Distribution Requirement :          PE
                                                                                       Methods of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Attendance and Participation ( 55%), Yoga Journal (10%), Practical Test
                                                                                       (25%), Written Test (10%)

                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :      PE
                   PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                                                PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PED1025                                                                        PED1039
ICE SKATING SKILLS                                                             RACQUETBALL SKILLS
Offered By: Gregory Fargo                                                      Offered By: Philip Levkanich

Description: To teach and improve proper skating skills from the               Objectives:
basic stance through various starts and stops. Emphasis will be on             To develop the skill and understanding of the game of racquetball including: A
forward stride, backward stride, different turns and stops. Proper             history of the game from its origin to the present, types of courts, basic rules and
technique will be stressed for the beginner to the very advanced               scoring, etiquette and safety, warming up exercises and equipment. The student
                                                                               will be able to perform the following: A) Forehand and backhand drives (wall and
individual.
                                                                               cross-courts shots). B) Drive serves, lob and garbage serves (with an illustration of
                                                                               more advanced serves). C) Backwall shots (forehand and backhand). D) Straight
Methof of Instruction:                                                         and pinch kills (forehand and backhand).
Discussion and practical applications on the ice of the different skills and
their progressions.                                                            Method of Instruction:
                                                                               Discussion and on-court lectures in the following: History, rules, scoring, etiquette
Method of Evaluation:                                                          and terms. On-court demonstration of the basic skills above. Each student will be
On the ice participation, testing skills learned.                              given practical experience by participating in drills and playing situations in class.

                                                                               Method of Evaluation:
Distribution Requirement :       PE                                            Class attendance and participation, a written test, and a skills test.



PED1030                                                                        Distribution Requirement :            PE
PILATES
Offered By: Colleen Harris-Ladelia
                                                                               PED1040
Description: Pilates is a non-impact, total body workout designed for          TABLE TENNIS
all fitness levels. Through slow concentrated core body movements, the
                                                                               Offered By: Philip Levkanich
body is worked through a full range of motion while improving strength
and flexibility. Pilates can reduce stress, build muscle strength, and
                                                                               Description: To acquire knowledge and understanding of table
improve posture and balance.
                                                                               tennis. Develop basic table tennis skills and tactics. To use accurately
                                                                               specific terms, rules, scoring basic to the game in a playing situation.
Objectives:
                                                                               Demonstrate in a testing situation correct; footwork, paddle work and
Student will be able to: A) trace the historical background and
                                                                               stroking technique basic to playing a game.
development of the Pilates movement, B) define the fundamental
terminology utilized in Pilates, C) describe the six principles of Pilates
                                                                               Method of Instruction:
and how they are incorporated into the movement. D) outline the general
                                                                               Instruction incorporating brief history, specific terms, rules, regulations,
and personal health benefits of Pilates. E) demonstrate knowledge of
                                                                               scoring, equipment. Emphasis on etiquette, footwork, agility, eye-hand
basic anatomy and how it relates to Pilates movements. F) identify and
                                                                               coordination and stroke production.
practice appropriate modifications/accommodations to be utilized in a
variety of situations during a Pilates work out. G) dialogue in a journal
                                                                               Method of Evaluation:
the Pilates experience and the connection between mind, body, and
                                                                               Class participation, skill tests, playing situations applying basis rules,
breath. H) regularly engage in the practice of Pilates
                                                                               scoring and terms of the game.
Methods of Instruction:
Lecture, demonstration, active participation and videos.                       Distribution Requirement :            PE

Methods of Evaluation:
Attendance and Participation (55%), Practical Skills Test (25%), journal
(10%), written test (10%)


Distribution Requirement :       PE
                     PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                                                     PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PED1044                                                                                PED1135
PHYSICAL CONDITIONING                                                                  AMERICAN RED CROSS LIFEGUARD TRAINING
Offered By: Preston Chapman                                                            NOTE: COURSE FEE $15.00
                                                                                       Offered By: Rhonda Faunce
Objectives:
Terminal: To gain insight into the physiological, psychological aspects of             Description: This course will provide students with knowledge and
conditioning; to study the energy systems, cardiovascular, and respiratory
                                                                                       skills designed to save their own life or the lives of others in a
conditioning systems; weight training, stretching, and overall conditioning
programs will be developed for the individual.                                         rescue/emergency situation. This is a lifeguard course.
Specific: To study the aerobic, anaerobic, and lactic energy systems; master the
skills involved in: A) Isometrics, B) Isotonic, and C) Isokinetics training.           Objectives:
Passive, static, and ballistic stretching will be analyzed.                            To provide the individual with knowledge and skills in preventive life
                                                                                       guarding, emergencies, water rescues, and special situations as
Method of Instruction:                                                                 prescribed by the American Red Cross Lifeguarding/Lifesaving course.
Classroom lecturing utilizing hand-outs and visual aids; actual participation in the   Persons receiving grade of "B" or better will receive a life guarding card
training and conditioning programs.
                                                                                       from the American Red Cross.
Method of Evaluation:
Attendance, classroom participation, quizzes, mid-term or final exam, practical test   Method of Instruction:
covering the different exercise groups.                                                Specific skills, endurance swimming, demonstrations, observations, film
                                                                                       analysis of nine lifesaving films. Reading, discussion of text and
                                                                                       techniques, problem solving, individual and group skills.
Distribution Requirement :          PE
                                                                                       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Class attendance, participation in water. Written and practical test.
PED1112                                                                                Evaluation must be made on the strengths and skills possessed and
CPR, FIRST AID & PROFESSIONAL RESCUER                                                  problem solving at the scene of rescue.
NOTE: COURSE FEE $15.00
Offered By: Rhonda Faunce
                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :           PE
Description:       Attendance is mandatory.

The course is intended to acquaint students with the knowledge and skills              PED1140
necessary to render effective first aid care to accident or illness victims            OPEN WATER SCUBA
whose ailments may range from very minor to life threatening                           NOTE: COURSE FEE $155.00, SEE INSTR ADD FEES.
conditions. It is hoped that all students will meet the minimum standards              PREREQ:PHYSICIAN "OK", EXECUTED FORM, SWIM 4 LAPS OF
established by the American Red Cross to become certified in First Aid,                POOL, TREAD WATER 3 MINS & DRAWN PROOF 3 MINS
Adult CPR, Infant and Child, CPR, and Professional Rescuer. Support
                                                                                       Offered By: Pamela Crandall
for the professional rescuer.
                                                                                       Objectives:
Method of Instruction:
                                                                                       A) To develop, in the pool, the basic skills needed to use a self-contained breathing
Readings, lectures, videos, skills practice and testing, guest speakers, and           apparatus SAFELY. B) To learn about the function, care and maintenance of the
field trips.                                                                           equipment and apparatus. C) To understand the physiology and physics of
                                                                                       respiration and gases as they pertain to SCUBA activities. D) To know and
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  demonstrate the safety skills, procedures and knowledge that pertain to scuba
Four written tests (110 points), one written and oral review of emergency              activities. E) To demonstrate an acceptable level of achievement of the above
care television show (110 points).                                                     principles in a series of three or four "open-water" dives and be certified as a basic
                                                                                       scuba diver.

                                                                                       Method of Instruction:
                                                                                       Lectures, films, discussions, pool demonstration, and open water performance.

                                                                                       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Quizzes, final exam, pool performance, and open water performance.


                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :           PE
                     PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                                                  PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PED1142                                                                               PED3051
SKIN DIVING                                                                           SPORTS, STATISTICS, SCORING AND RECORDS
NOTE: COURSE FEE $20.00                                                               Offered By: Shannon Howley
Offered By: Pamela Crandall
                                                                                      Description: This course covers the compiling of statistics, the
Objectives:                                                                           scoring of games, and the essentials of record keeping, as all three relate
The purpose of this course is to provide the skills and certification for students    to intercollegiate varsity sports.
who will be working in the ocean in San Salvador, Bahamas. A) Students will be
able to pick out a proper mask, snorkel, fins and buoyancy compensator to             Objectives:
purchase or rent for use in San Salvador. B) Students will understand the hazards     To become familiar with the required books and forms necessary for
and the safeguards in skin diving. C) Students will demonstrate the basic skills of   score-keeping, compiling statistics, record keeping, and reporting to the
skin diving: Mask clearing, snorkel clearing, fin use, entries, surface dives, and
use of compensator. D) Students will develop stamina in the water using the
                                                                                      media and to the athletic conferences with which a school is affiliated.
equipment.                                                                            To learn how to score contests correctly, how to compile essential
                                                                                      statistics, and how to keep accurate records.
Method of Instruction:
Lecture, demonstrations, and pool work.                                               Method of Instruction:
                                                                                      Class demonstrations, practices, lectures, scoring and record-keeping at
Method Evaluation:                                                                    various intercollegiate athletic contests. Class attendance and actual
Quizzes, proficiency demonstration of techniques, and test.
                                                                                      game experience will be required.

Distribution Requirement :          PE                                                Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                      Student should be able to demonstrate the successful accomplishment of
                                                                                      the course objectives by completing the required forms, such as score
                                                                                      books from actual contests, preparing the statistical forms required by the
PED1162
                                                                                      NCAA and the ECAC, collecting records for filing, and preparing
PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE CLASSROOM TEACHER                                          releases for the media.
Offered By: Rhonda Faunce

Description: The course introduces students to concepts of physical
education that can be incorporated into a curriculum that helps students              PED3110
to understand that regular lifelong physical activity is a foundation for a
healthy, productive, and fulfilling life. Pre-service teachers will actively          CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC INJURIES
participate in physical education activities that demonstrate their                   NOTE: COURSE FEE $15.00
understandings of key concepts learned.                                               Offered By: David Tomkalski
Objectives:                                                                           Description: Students will learn what Sports Medicine is and what
By the completion of this course students are able to: A) Demonstrate                 professions are included in the field of Sports Medicine. There will be
competency in many movement forms and a proficiency in a few                          an ongoing review of basic human anatomy; various types of injuries
movement forms; B) Apply movement concepts and principles to                          such as sprains, strains, contusions, open wounds, and fractures will be
learning and developing motor skills; C) Demonstrate an understanding                 discussed along with the appropriate care for each; general injury
of and respect for differences among people in physical activity settings;            assessment procedures will be learned and applied; injury prevention will
and D) Demonstrate knowledge that physical activity provides                          be discussed; students will become proficient in methods of supportive
opportunities for enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social                   taping and wrapping and basic follow-up treatment and rehabilitation
interaction.                                                                          techniques will be examined.

Methods of Instructions:                                                              Objectives:
In class- teaching, demonstrations and active participation in physical               This course is intended to acquaint students with the allied health area
education activities and games.                                                       known as Sports Medicine. Through lectures, readings and practical
                                                                                      experience, students will develop a basic ability to prevent, recognize,
Methods of Evaluation:                                                                evaluate, classify, treat, and rehabilitate most common athletic injuries.
Demonstration of concepts learned through physical education activities,
participation in class, class attendance, and written exam.                           Method of Instruction:
                                                                                      Lectures, discussions, field trips, guest speakers, videos, hands-on
Distribution Requirement :          PE                                                practical experience, and readings.

                                                                                      Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                      Two written tests (40%), practical test (20%), research project (20%),
                                                                                      attendance and participation (20%).
                   PHYSICAL EDUCATION                                                                 POLITICAL SCIENCE

PED3115                                                                       PSC1020
THEORY AND TECHNIQUES OF COACHING                                             INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Offered By: Rhonda Faunce                                                     Offered By: Kunihiko Imai

Description: This course is intended to acquaint students with the            Objectives:
knowledge and skills necessary to become a certified coach as required        This course is designed to help you achieve the following: A) To acquire basic
by the state of New York. A classroom phase will cover rules,                 knowledge of conceptual schemes for analyzing international relations. B) To
regulations and policies; teaching methods; performance skills;               learn the basic components, factors, and actors of international politics. C) To
                                                                              describe and interpret the patterns and the processes of interactions among the
conditioning and training of athletes in specific sports; care of
                                                                              actors in the changing international system. D) To apply and analyze the above
equipment; officiating methods and safety precautions. It is hoped that       knowledge in continuous, weekly simulations.
all students will gain practical experience by performing a required field
experience under the mentorship of a coach or athletic director.              Method of Instruction:
                                                                              Lecture, debate, discussion, and simulations. Weekly simulations will be held on
Objectives:                                                                   Monday evenings.
It is hoped that all students will gain practical experience by performing
a required field experience under the mentorship of a coach or athletic       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              Participation, debate, and three exams.
director.

Method of Instruction:                                                        Distribution Requirement :          CSI
Lectures, videos, guest speakers, handouts plus a 30 hr. field experience.

Method of Evaluation:                                                         PSC2010
Mandatory attendance, class discussions, projects, three written tests and
a coaching notebook.                                                          AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
                                                                              Offered By: Jim Twombly
                                                                              Prerequisites:      INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS
                               PHYSICS                                        Description: The objectives of this course is to study the government
                                                                              and political life in America from the perspective of power - using the
PHY2010                                                                       question "Who Rules?" as a focus for analysis. The idea of power and
PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS II                                                      rule will be analyzed and the results applied to the institutions of
Offered By: David Verdonck                                                    American politics. The operation of the governmental structure as well as
                                                                              the extra-governmental political process will be analyzed. Most
Prerequisites:    PHY2000 (PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICS I) AND TWO                   significantly, the aim of this course is to give the student an
                 TERMS OF CALCULUS IS RECOMMENDED                             understanding of the structure of political institutions and the
                 BEFORE TAKING PHY 2010 (PRINCIPLES OF                        relationships between them especially in the context of American culture.
                 PHYSICS II) NOTE: COREQUISITE- MAT 2020
                 (CALCULUS II)                                                Objectives:
                 NOTE: LAB FEE $50.00                                         Students should, upon completion of the course, be able to answer the
                                                                              following questions: Why did the Constitution create three separate
Description: An introductory course in physics using calculus that
                                                                              branches of government? What rights does the Constitution bestow on
covers the topics of electricity, magnetism, optics, and selected topics of
                                                                              American citizens? Do the news media determine what we think about
modern physics. Basic concepts are developed in lecture and
                                                                              politics? Why are special interests so prominent in American politics?
demonstrated in the laboratory
                                                                              What is the role of political parties in American politics? Why do
                                                                              Congress and the president always seem mired in legislative gridlock?
Method of Instruction:
                                                                              What as citizens can we do about any of the answers?
There will be three hours of lecture and problem solving analysis
sessions and one three-hour laboratory session per week. Problem sets
                                                                              Method of Instruction:
will be assigned and lecture demonstrations where appropriate.
                                                                              Lecture and discussion.
Method of Evaluation:
                                                                              Method of Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based upon quizzes, homework, mid-term, final exam,
                                                                              There will be a mid-term exam and a final exam, as well as a term paper
and laboratory work.
                                                                              in which each student analyzes the power processes in one of the major
                                                                              institutional complexes of American political life.
Distribution Requirement :      PLS
                                                                              Distribution Requirement :          US
                      POLITICAL SCIENCE                                                                 POLITICAL SCIENCE

PSC2410                                                                         PSC3040
PUBLIC POLICY                                                                   LAW AND COURTS IN AMERICAN POLITICS
Offered By: Jim Twombly                                                         NOTE: PREREQ OR SIGNATURE OF INSTRUCTOR
Prerequisites:    INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS                                      Offered By: Jim Twombly
                                                                                Prerequisites:      INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS & POWER IN
Description: A study of American politics from the perspective of
                                                                                                    AMERICA
public policy-making. How and why are public policies adopted, and
what are their consequences? Topics include the stages of the policy            Objectives:
process, important groups and institutions in policy formation, and the         A) Understand the nature of law and its functions as a social instrument; B)
socio-economic context of policy.                                               Become familiar with the resources and limitations of the law; C) Understand the
                                                                                structure and functions of the judicial system; D) Understand the relations among
Objectives:                                                                     law, legal institutions and the political system; E) Develop a critical perspective on
For students to understand the process by which government policies are         law and society.
developed and implemented, both in terms of the legal process and the
                                                                                Method of Instruction:
political aspect of the process.                                                Lectures and class discussions.

Method of Instruction:                                                          Method of Evaluation:
Lectures and class discussion.                                                  Two exams (mid-term and final), and a term paper.

Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                Distribution Requirement :           W
Class participation, exams, quizzes, and one or more papers.


                                                                                PSC3200
PSC3012                                                                         INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS
RESEARCH METHODS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE                                           Offered By: Kunihiko Imai
NOTE:INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED                                                        Naphtali Hoffman
Offered By: Kunihiko Imai
                                                                                Description: You are expected to demonstrate your ability; A) To
                                                                                identity and comprehend basic concepts and theories of international
Description: This course is designed to help you acquire skills to
                                                                                economics, B) To interpret international economic phenomena and issues
critically evaluate various - i.e., economic, social, and political - aspects
                                                                                as well as political efforts by states to address them, and C) To analyze
of life in a scientific manner. We are experiencing an explosion of
                                                                                and assess the nature of the relationship and interaction of politics and
information through such media as the Internet. Accordingly, it is
                                                                                economics in the post-World II international realm through a study of
becoming increasingly more important for us to be able to separate facts
                                                                                selected topics (such as reform of international monetary system, politics
from conjectures and tell what is relevant, and what is not, so that we can
                                                                                of trade, economic development and aid, multinational corporations, east-
make better judgements on various important issues in life. This course
                                                                                west economic relations, and oil and cartel power, among others).
teaches you some of the techniques to "test" the validity of "conjectures,"
"hypothesis," or "speculations." By reading and discussing scholarly
                                                                                Method of Instruction:
works, you would familiarize yourselves with the proper procedure to
                                                                                Lectures and class participation. An informal atmosphere will be
carry out empirical research. Further, by using empirical data, you
                                                                                maintained. Vigorous participation in class discussion is expected.
would actually test your own hypothesis on one aspect/issue of life that is
of interest to you.
                                                                                Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                Participation, debate and two exams.
Objectives:
A) To help learn the proper techniques to test a hypothesis. B) To
provide an opportunity to conduct an empirical research.

Method of Instruction:
A mixture of lecture, discussion of scholarly works, and field research
collecting data through library materials and the internet to test one's own
hypothesis.

Method of Evaluation:
Participation in class discussion (20%), mid-term exam (25%), research
paper (30%), and final exam (25%).

Distribution Requirement :       W
                          PSYCHOLOGY                                                                   PSYCHOLOGY

PSY1010                                                                      PSY2060
INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY                                                      CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY
Offered By: Benjamin Lovett                                                  Offered By: Andrea Rosati
            Heather Grinnell                                                 Prerequisites:   INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

Description: This course provides an introductory overview of the            Description: This course explores the processes of human
scientific study of behavior and mental processes. During the course,        development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Although
students become familiar with research methods used by psychologists,        basic physical development will be covered, emphasis will be on
as well as various theoretical approaches to understanding behavior.         cognitive, emotional and social development.
Specific information is covered on such topics as: The biological bases of
behavior, perception, language and thinking, human development,              Objectives:
learning and memory, stress and coping, personality, behavior problems,      A) The transactional contributions of biological and environmental
and psychotherapy.                                                           features, including culture, to the development of children and the
                                                                             learning process; B) Universals, group differences, and individual
Method of Instruction:                                                       differences in development and the factors that account for each of these;
Primarily lecture, supplemented with films and discussion.                   C) Major theoretical models that summarize and organize our
                                                                             understanding of the course of child development and the differing
Method of Evaluation:                                                        contributions of these models.
Exams, quizzes, assignments, and/or participation in projects.
                                                                             Method of Instruction:
Distribution Requirement :     BSS
                                                                             Lectures, films and class discussions will supplement assigned readings.
                                                                             The readings will include a textbook on developmental psychology.

                                                                             Additional Information:
PSY2030                                                                      It is strongly recommended that all students complete this course before
PERSONALITY                                                                  enrolling in PSY 3000; psychology majors must take this course first.
Offered By: Anne Bizub
                                                                             Method of Evaluation:
Prerequisites:   INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY                                     Exams, short assignments, research paper, and class participation.
Description: "Personality" is the unique pattern of thoughts, feelings,
and behaviors typically displayed by an individual. This course acquaints
students with the different ways in which psychologists have described,
measured, and explained personality. Research evidence on biological         PSY2602
and social influences on personality is reviewed. Against this               QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY
background, various theoretical approaches to personality are examined
and compared.
                                                                             Offered By: Diane Maluso
                                                                             Prerequisites:    PSY1010 (INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY)
Objectives:                                                                                   AND MAT1030 (COLLEGE ALGEBRA).
Some topics to be covered are genetic influences on personality, parental                     INTENDED FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS.
and other social influences on personality, personality change and
development, personality testing, and psychoanalytic, humanistic, and        Description: This course will begin with a brief introduction to data
behavioral and dispositional theories of personality.                        and descriptive statistics as they apply to psychological data. We will
                                                                             then focus on the statistical techniques necessary for hypothesis testing
Method of Instruction:                                                       and on the inferential statistics used to analyze questions about group
Lecture, supplemented by class discussion and class reports.                 differences, and non-experimental hypotheses regarding the relationships
                                                                             among variables. Students will learn to use both hand-held calculators
Method of Evaluation:                                                        and computers for statistical analyses.
Grading will be based on exams and a writing project.
                                                                             Method of Instruction:
                                                                             Lecture and discussion.

                                                                             Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             In-class exams which will include problem solving and short answer.
                           PSYCHOLOGY                                                                     PSYCHOLOGY

PSY3080                                                                        PSY3140
EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY                                                        ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
Offered By: Diane Maluso                                                       Offered By: Anne Bizub
Prerequisites:    QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY                           Prerequisites:    INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY

Description: Upon completion of the course, the student should be              Description: Using an approach that stresses an integrative,
able to design and implement psychological experiments. The course is a        biopsychological-environmental model, this course surveys the major
follow-up to PSY2602, Quantitative Methods in Psychology. You will             categories of psychiatric disorders/disabilities, including affective
use the information covered in that course to begin to conduct                 disorders (i.e., anxiety, disorders), mood disorders (i.e, major depression,
experiments and to learn to write research reports in APA format.              bipolar) schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, personality disorders,
                                                                               sexual/gender disorders, cognitive disorders, developmental disorders,
Method of Instruction:                                                         and drug addiction. In addition, it examines the treatment of psychiatric
Lectures, discussion, and class experiments.                                   disorders. Particular emphasis is given to what it means to live with a
                                                                               psychiatric illness.
Method of Evaluation:
Grades will be based upon scores on exams, completion of experimental          Objectives:
research project and quality of research reports.                              This course introduces the field of psychopathology through an overview
                                                                               of psychological disorders, the major theoretical perspectives which
Distribution Requirement :       W                                             determine the way cause is attributed and treatment proposed, the current
                                                                               diagnostic methods of the DSM IV-TR, and various issues and
                                                                               controversies within the helping professions.
PSY3110                                                                        Method of Instruction:
TESTS & MEASURMNTS                                                             Lectures, films, and class discussions will supplement assigned text and
Offered By: Benjamin Lovett                                                    written memoirs.
Prerequisites:    INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY &                                    Method of Evaluation:
                  PERSONALITY & QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN                        Exams and short papers.
                  PSYCHOLOGY

Description: This course is designed to acquaint students of
psychology and education with the principles involved in test
construction and use in a variety of settings. You will examine such
issues and test validity, reliability, standardization, scoring, problems of
administration, etc. Consideration will be given to both theoretical and
pratical aspects of tests and measurements by evaluating various
instruments directly and assessing the values and limitations when used
under varying conditions.

Method of Instruction:
Lecture and discussion combined with hands-on examination of various
instruments using specimen sets. Case problems will be presented to
illustrate procedures.

Method of Evaluation:
Grades will be based on exams and a test construction project. Class
participation and discussion are also very important.
                           PSYCHOLOGY                                                                        PSYCHOLOGY

PSY3300                                                                        PSY4590
BASIC COUNSELING TECHNIQUE                                                     ADVANCED SEMINAR
Offered By: Anne Bizub                                                         Offered By: Diane Maluso
Prerequisites:   PSY1010 (INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY),                         Prerequisites: UPPERCLASS STANDING IN PSYCHOLOGY OR
                 PSY 2030 (PERSONALITY), AND JUNIOR OR                                        INSTRUCTOR'S SIGNATURE REQUIRED
                 SENIOR STATUS.
                                                                               Description: A detailed study of an advanced topic in psychology
Description: This course will assist students to acquire basic skills or       pursued in the seminar format. The emphasis is on independent scholarly
techniques used in one-on-one counseling sessions by professional              activity by the student, including seminar leader-ship. Topics vary, but
counselors. Students will first become familiar with the role(s) of the        typically represent a synthesis of differing viewing points and strategies
professional helper and the ethical considerations of the helping              to accommodate the interests and strengths of individual students and the
relationship. They will then learn a model for change and practice             instructor. This course is designed primarily as a capstone experience for
appropriate interventions in simulated situations. Multicultural issues and    advanced psychology majors.
work with various populations will also be addressed. The course is
required for Human Services majors and is an elective for Criminal             Please see instructor for specific details pertaining to the course.
Justice Majors. It is especially appropriate for those who intend to enter a
helping field.

Objectives:                                                                                                       RUSSIAN
Students will have the ability to do the following: A) Describe the
relationship between professional counselor and client; B) Identify the        RUS1020
role(s) of the professional counselor; C) Identify basic ethical principles    FIRST YEAR RUSSIAN II
governing counseling; D) Demonstrate some of the basic professional
                                                                               Offered By: Yelena Abramova
counseling skills, including rapport building, active listening, providing
empathy, and using appropriate question probes; E) Describe the impact         Prerequisites:      RUS1010
of culture, language, gender, social class on the counseling process; F)
Describe the basic process of crisis intervention.                             Comments: Certain foreign languages are not widely known in America;
                                                                               nevertheless, several of them are critical to an understanding of other cultures,
                                                                               such as those of Asia, Africa, and the Soviet Union. To meet this need, Elmira
Method of Instruction:
                                                                               College has established a Critical Language Program to assist interested students in
Classroom lecture/discussions, in-class skill building exercises via role      learning these languages. There are no prerequisites, but students must see Dr.
plays and group analysis of case vignettes.                                    Diamond-Nigh before registering. Anyone who takes this course must have a
                                                                               great deal of self-discipline in order to learn a language on his or her own.
Method of Evaluation:                                                          Whether any of the above languages will be offered is contingent upon the
Midterm and Final Examinations, written exercises from workbooks,              availability of proper native speaker(s) tutor(s).
research paper, audiotaped/videotaped mock counseling sessions.
                                                                               Objectives:
                                                                               To master the basic grammar, vocabulary, and practical syntax of a language, with
                                                                               emphasis on its spoken equivalent to the first year level of college instruction.
                                                                               Students concentrate on speaking in Russian.
PSY4031
                                                                               Method of Instruction:
CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS                                                          Each student studies his language at the pace agreed upon with the director. The
Offered By: Heather Grinnell                                                   student uses an assigned textbook, a cassette tape-recorder, and accompanying
                                                                               taped lessons to learn the language, and meets with a designated native speaker
Prerequisites: INTRO PSY, CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSY OR                            weekly to test his progress. CAUTION: Each student must spend as much time on
               PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN                                             this course as he or she would for other courses. The native speaker does not teach.

Description: A variety of current topics and issues in psychology              Method of Evaluation:
which are not included in other courses. Usually, one particular topic is      Besides a series of individual testing situations offered during a term, at the end of
studied at an advanced level. Prerequisites: Upperclass standing and           the term, a final examination is given by an outside examiner in the respective
multiple Psychology courses. Specific topics vary each term                    language.


Method of Instruction:                                                         Distribution Requirement :           NW
Discussions, films, discussions of readings, and field work.

Method of Evaluation:
Book review, several short writing assignments, midterm and final or a
research project.
                                   RUSSIAN                                                                     SOCIAL SCIENCE

RUS2020                                                                                SSC2502
SECOND YEAR RUSSIAN II                                                                 EVALUATING SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH
Offered By: Yelena Abramova                                                            Offered By: David Sorbello
Prerequisites: NEED SIGNATURE OF DR. L. DIAMOND-NIGH                                   Prerequisites: PSY1010 (INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY) OR
                                                                                                      INTRO COURSE SOCIAL SCIENCE, HEALTH
Comments: Certain foreign languages are not widely known in America;                                  SCIENCE, EDUCATION OR CRIMINAL JUSTICE
nevertheless, several of them are critical to an understanding of other cultures,                     NOTE: W-BSS
such as those of Asia, Africa, and the Soviet Union. To meet this need, Elmira
College has established a Critical Language Program to assist interested students in   Description: This course teaches students how to evaluate social
learning these languages. There are no prerequisites, but students must see Dr.
                                                                                       science research reports appearing in both professional and
Diamond-Nigh before registering. Anyone who takes this course must have a
great deal of self-discipline in order to learn a language on his or her own.          nonprofessional publications. During the course, students learn how to
Whether any of the above languages will be offered is contingent upon the              distinguish invalid studies from valid ones. They develop the ability to
availability of proper native speaker(s) tutor(s).                                     see through misleading presentations of data and unjustified conclusions.
                                                                                       The course also covers the knowledge required for integrating numerous
Objectives:                                                                            sources of evidence, for critically examining the importance of a study,
To master the basic grammar, vocabulary, and practical syntax of a language, with      and for evaluating ethical issues. An underlying general objective of the
emphasis on its spoken equivalent to the first year level of college instruction. In   course is the development of skills in both writing and critical thinking.
Russian, students concentrate on speaking.

Method of Instuction:                                                                  Method of Instruction:
Each student studies his language at the pace agreed upon with the director. The       Lecture and demonstration.
student uses an assigned textbook, a cassette tape-recorder, and a accompanying
taped lessons to learn the language, and meets with a designated native speaker        Method of Evaluation:
weekly to test his progress. CAUTION: Each student must spend as much time on          Grades will be based on exams, evaluation papers and short assignments.
this course as he or she would for other courses. The native speaker does not teach.

Method of Evaluation:
Besides a series of individualized testing situations offered during a term, at the                                 SOCIOLOGY
end of the term, a final examination is given by an outside examiner in the
respective language.
                                                                                       SOC1010
                                                                                       INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY
Distribution Requirement :           3NW
                                                                                       Offered By: David Sorbello
                                                                                                   Staff

                                                                                       Description: This course provides an overview of sociological work
                                                                                       and thought. Sociology studies and analyzes people collectively and
                                                                                       since human beings are social species, it is both practical and interesting.
                                                                                       Here we will consider the kinds of questions sociologists ask, the
                                                                                       methods used to answer them and the theories generated to explain
                                                                                       various aspects of social relationships and society.

                                                                                       Objectives:
                                                                                       A) Students will be able to understand why social change occurs, in
                                                                                       particular in response to particular environments of constraint and
                                                                                       opportunity B) Students will be able to assess different models of
                                                                                       explaining social movement behavior C) Students will learn in depth
                                                                                       about one major social movement D) Students will be able to identify
                                                                                       how discourse and culture play a role in social change

                                                                                       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Exams, discussion, research essay, and article & documentary reviews.

                                                                                       Method of Instruction:
                                                                                       Lecture, discussion, group projects, film/DVD

                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :       BSS
                           SOCIOLOGY                                                                     SOCIOLOGY

SOC2220                                                                      SOC2230
GLOBALIZATION                                                                POWER, INSTITUTIONS, AND SOCIAL REPRODUCTION
Offered By: Martha Easton                                                    Offered By: Martha Easton
Prerequisites:   SOC1010 (INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY )                        Prerequisites:   SOC1010 (INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY) OR
                 OR ANT1040 (CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY)                                           ANT1040 (CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY)

Description: This course will look at the process of globalization and       Description: How are central components of society transmitted over
how it shapes our world. We will examine both conflict and functionalist     time? This course examines the process of social reproduction. We will
theories of globalization, e.g. Wallerstein, Meyer, Castells, and            look at how families socialize children, how schools teach a "hidden"
Robertson. And we will debate the results and consequences of                curriculum of social normalization, and how religion, science, the law,
globalization, while assessing the so-called winners and losers of the       and the media all contribute to social reproduction.
process. Students will have the opportunity to study a production-
consumption chain, and analyze the role of globalization in their own        Objectives:
lives.                                                                       Students will be able to: A) articulate what social reproduction is and
                                                                             how it works, B) analyze the role of major social institutions in the
Objectives:                                                                  process of social reproduction, C) assess in depth the micro-processes of
Students will be able: A) to describe what globalization is and how it       social reproduction in one major social institution, D) competently
operates; B) to explain the conflicting theories and controversies           compare the contributions of different social institutions to the process of
surrounding the issue of globalization; C) increase their understanding of   social reproduction.
how globalization impacts their own lives; D) to use a sociological
context for assessing the results of globalization.                          Method of Instruction:
                                                                             Lecture, discussion, case study observations, film and TV
Method of Instruction:
Lecture, discussion, group projects, analytical projects, videos,/DVDs,      Method of Evaluation:
commercials and advertising material.                                        1) 5 case study observations with analytical papers (50%); 2) midterm
                                                                             (10%); 3) 1 final paper (20%); 4) class participation (20%) measured
Method of Evaluation:                                                        by unannounced short writing assignments in class
1) 2-3 short analytical papers (20%), 2) 4-5 quizzes (25%) , 3) 1 group
presentation (15%), 4) 1 consumption/production analysis project (20%),
5)1 final paper (20%).
                                                                             Distribution Requirement :      CSI
                             SOCIOLOGY                                                                              SPANISH

SOC4595                                                                          SPA1020
SENIOR SEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY                                     FIRST YEAR SPANISH II
Offered By: Martha Easton                                                        NOTE: STUDENTS MAY NOT TAKE LOWER LEVEL FOREIGN
                                                                                 LANGUAGES COURSES IF THEY HAVE HAD ONE YEAR OR
Prerequisites:    ANT-SOC3150 (SOCIAL THEORY) AND ANT-
                                                                                 MORE OF STUDY OF THAT LANGUAGE AT THE SECONDARY
                  SOC3260 (QUANTITATIVE METHODS). SENIOR
                                                                                 OR COLLEGE LEVEL WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE
                  STANDING STRONGLY RECOMMENDED
                                                                                 INSTRUCTOR.
Description: This course provides a "capstone" experience for senior             Offered By: Lauren Shaw
Anthropology and Sociology students. Students will gain experience               Prerequisites:      FIRST YEAR SPANISH I
integrating their own research into the literature of their discipline and
area of interest, will present relevant materials from the professional          Objectives:
literature to the course; will submit a draft of their paper to the course for   A)To enable the student to understand Spanish when spoken at a normal rate by
discussion and present their final draft in a professional and/or public         the instructor and native speakers, using the language for a variety of simpler
setting                                                                          situations. B) To enable the student to speak the language, with increasing
                                                                                 accuracy of pronunciation, intonation, and grammatical correctness, as imitation of
Objectives:                                                                      dialogues, simpler responses to statements and questions, and directed comments.
                                                                                 C) To enable the student to progress in reading ability with a minimum of
Upon completing this course the student will be able to: A) Demonstrate          translation. D) To enable the student to gain insight into selected Hispanic customs
the integration and application of his or her previous coursework; B)            and ways of life.
Discuss and analyze the professional literature from her or his
appropriate subfield and discipline; C) Conduct independent research             Method of Instruction:
resulting in a piece of extended writing; and D) Demonstrate adequate            A) Class sessions are held three hours weekly for a variety of drills and practice,
preparation for entry to graduate school or further professional training        both oral and written, in pronunciation, intonation, grammar, comprehension,
                                                                                 directed conversation, and reading. B) Basic concepts for particular lessons will be
                                                                                 previewed in class; it is then expected that the student will study the material out of
Method of Instruction:
                                                                                 class and be prepared to use class sessions for drill and practice. C) Regular
This course will be run as a seminar                                             attendance at all sessions and regular application and study are essential for
                                                                                 progress.
Method of Evaluation:
The class will complete individual original research papers, and will do         Method of Evaluation:
presentations on readings. Students will also be graded on participation         Final grade will consider the following factors: 1) weekly quizzes on grammatical
in discussions and peer reviews                                                  structures, vocabulary, culture and geography; 2) final examination ; 3) class
                                                                                 participation.

Distribution Requirement :       W
                                                                                 Distribution Requirement :           EU
                                  SPANISH                                                                               SPANISH

SPA2020                                                                                 SPA3190
SECOND YEAR SPANISH II                                                                  20TH CENTURY PENINSULAR LITERATURE
Offered By: Staff                                                                       Offered By: Lauren Shaw
Prerequisites:      SECOND YEAR SPANISH I                                               Prerequisites:    SPANISH CONVERSATION

Objectives:                                                                             Description: The generation of 1898 to present-day literary trends,
A) To provide the student with a review, expansion, and intensification of matters      including major authors, ideas, and influences in poetry, the novel, the
of pronunciation, intonation, and grammatical principles. B) To enable the student      drama, and the essay.
to understand Spanish when spoken at a normal rate by the instructor and native
speakers, using the language for a variety of everyday situations. C) To enable the
                                                                                        Method of Instruction:
student to speak the language, with increasing correctness, as responses to
statements and questions, directed comments, short oral reports, and free               Discussion, film, and lecture
conversation. D) To enable the student to read standard prose in Spanish, with a
minimum of translation, and to react to it orally.                                      Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                        Essays tests, vocabulary tests, and class participation.
Method of Instruction:
A) Most of the class sessions will be conducted in Spanish. B) Class sessions are
held three hours weekly for a variety of drills and practice, both oral and written.
C) Material for particular classes will often be previewed; it is then expected that
the student will study the material out-of-class and be prepared to use a following     SPA3290
session for drill and practice. Regular atttendance at all sessions and regular
                                                                                        GREAT HISPANIC & FRENCH POETRY-19TH & 20TH CENTRY
application and study are essential for progress and are expected. Three is the
maximum number of allowable absences.                                                   Offered By: Lynne Diamond-Nigh
                                                                                        Prerequisites:    FRENCH CONVERSATION
Method of Evaluation:
Final grades will consider the following factors on a approximately equal basis: 1)
                                                                                        Description: A) To study major representative 19th and 20th century
Short weekly quizzes, oral, written, or both. 2)Longer tests, oral, written, or both.
3) Responses to oral-aural drills and practice in class and active participation        French and Hispanic poets. B) To understand these poets as part of the
therein. 4)Responses to reading and writing drills. 5) Final examination. All work      literary movements with which they are associated. C) To understand
is due on date assigned.                                                                these poets as part of a larger cultural context which will include the
                                                                                        study of other artistic movements of those times. D) To learn how to
                                                                                        analyze poetry. E) To comprehend the differences between prose and
Distribution Requirement :          EU
                                                                                        poetry, by focusing specifically on prose poetry.

                                                                                        Method of Instruction:
SPA3020                                                                                 Discussion, lecture and slides.
SPANISH CONVERSATION
Offered By: Lauren Shaw                                                                 Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                        Essay exams (70%) and class participation (30%).
Prerequisites:      SPA3010 OR PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR

Description: Course emphasizing the development of speaking and
listening skills.

Objectives:
Students will: A) develop and practice skills in the pronunciation of
Spanish words; B) develop and practice skills in conversing in Spanish in
a variety of real-life situations; C) expand and make use of Spanish
vocabulary; D) improve and refine their knowledge of complex
grammatical and linguistic structures in Spanish.

Methods of instruction:
In this class the instructor is primarily a facilitator and guide for the
students to practice and improve their ability to speak and understand the
spoken word. Instruction and class discussions are in Spanish.

Methods of evaluation:
Class discussions, student presentations, tests and quizzes, and class
participation.

Distribution Requirement :          EU
                     SPEECH AND HEARING                                                                  SPEECH AND HEARING

SPH2150                                                                             SPH2600
ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY FOR SPEECH & LANGUAGE                                          HEARING DISORDERS AND ASSESSMENT
Offered By: Cathy Thornton                                                          Offered By: Ted Johnson
                                                                                    Prerequisites:     AUDIOLOGY I & HEARING SCIENCE &
Description: This course provides an introduction and overview to
                                                                                                       INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATIVE
the anatomy and physiology of the systems of communication.
                                                                                                       DISORDERS
Objectives:                                                                         Description: This course provides an introduction to methods of
Students will: A) Name and describe specific structures, muscles, and               hearing screening, threshold measurement, tympanometry, and disorders
function of the respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, and the central and           of the auditory systems and pathways.
peripheral mervous systems; B) name and describe the primary
structures, muscles and function of the speech mechanism as related to              Objectives:
normal speech production; C) describe the relationship between deviate              Students will: A) Demonstrate proficiency in pure-tone audiometry
structures and processes and various speech and language disorders.                 screening (ASHA KASA standard, III-G); B) Interpret audiogram
                                                                                    findings (ASHA KASA standard III-B); C) Perform a basic speech
Method of Instruction:                                                              audiometry screening procedures (ASHA KASA standard III-G); D)
Lectures will constitute the primary method of istruction. Visual aides             Perform basic tympanometry screening (ASHA KASA standard III-D);
will be used to supplement lectures.                                                E) Perform diagnostic pure-tone air and bone conduction audiometry to
                                                                                    differentiate between conductive and sensorineural hearing loss for the
Method of Evaluation:                                                               purpose of recognizing when to refer clients for further evaluation
Quizzes, mid-term, and final exam.                                                  (ASHA KASA standard III-D); F) Explain selected disorders of the
                                                                                    peripheral auditory systems.

                                                                                    Method of Instruction:
SPH2250                                                                             The primary method of instruction is lecture, organized and summarized
                                                                                    in PowerPoint presentations and submitted to the student prior to class.
LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
                                                                                    Role play and clinical practice in the audiology suite will augment the
Offered By: Phyllis Holtgrewe                                                       lecture material.

Objectives:
Students will be able to: A) Explain various theories of language acquisition. B)
Demonstrate understanding of the interrelationships between language, cognitive
and motor skills development. C) Describe the development of language to
include phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics, and pragmatics. D)                SPH3590
Demonstrate understanding of language variations associated with different ethnic
and language groups.
                                                                                    ARTICULATION AND PHONOLOGY DISORDERS
                                                                                    Offered By: Phyllis Holtgrewe
Method of Instruction:
The course will be taught primarily through lectures and class discussion.          Prerequisites:     INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATIVE
                                                                                                       DISORDERS & LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT &
Method of Evaluation:                                                                                  PRINCIPLES OF PHONETICS & SPEECH AND
Four examinations and two papers.                                                                      HEARING ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

                                                                                    Objectives:
                                                                                    Students will be able to: A) Explain the development of phonology. B) Describe
                                                                                    disordered articulation and phonology resulting from organic and functional
                                                                                    causes. C) Employ assessment procedures and interpret results. D) Describe the
                                                                                    major approaches to remediation and apply them to hypothetical clients.

                                                                                    Method of Instruction:
                                                                                    The course will be taught primarily through lectures and class discussions. Videos
                                                                                    may be used to enhance the student's ability to recognize and identify various
                                                                                    disorders of articulation and phonology and to understand various therapeutic
                                                                                    techniques.

                                                                                    Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                    Three exams, , short reference paper and case study.
                     SPEECH AND HEARING                                                                     SPEECH AND HEARING

SPH3595                                                                                SPH3751
AURAL REHABILITATION                                                                   CLINICAL PRACTICE: SPEECH PATHOLOGY
Offered By: Ted Johnson                                                                Offered By: Phyllis Holtgrewe
Prerequisites:      AUDIOLOGY I & AUDIOLOGY II &                                       Prerequisites:      SPH2100 (INTRODUCTION TO
                    INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATIVE                                                         COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS), SPH2150
                    DISORDERS & LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT &                                                    (SPEECH AND HEARING ANATOMY AND
                    PRINCIPLES OF PHONETICS & SPEECH AND                                                  PHYSIOLOGY), SPH2250 (LANGUAGE
                    HEARING ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY                                                        DEVELOPMENT), SPH2320 (PRINCIPLES OF
                                                                                                          PHONETICS), COMPLETION OF OBSERVATION
Objectives:                                                                                               REQUIREMENT AND INSTRUCTOR'S
Students will be expected to: A) recognize various auditory deficits and resultant                        SIGNATURE REQUIRED.
communicative impairments, B) demonstrate understanding of the various
approaches to aural rehabilitation from infancy through adulthood, C) demonstrate      Objectives:
understanding of the various amplification systems available, D) demonstrate           Students will develop and administer therapy programs for assigned clients,
understanding of the various controversies regarding oral/aural education vs.          establish appropriate goals and procedures, write daily lesson plans and end of the
manual education, and E) demonstrate understanding of the psychological,               term progress reports, video and analyze therapy sessions, and meet regularly with
emotional, educational and vocational problems associated with hearing                 supervisors to discuss client progress and performance.
impairments throughout the life span.
                                                                                       Method of Instruction:
Method of Instruction:                                                                 Students are assigned clients based on available clinic caseload and individual
The course wil be taught primarily through lecture and class discussion. Videos        interests. Students enrolled for the first time will also attend class where
will be used to supplement lectures and assigned readings, and guest speakers may      information about basic clinical skills and procedures will be discussed.
be invited.
                                                                                       Method of Evaluation:
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  Students will be evaluated on their clinical performance in the following areas:
Quizzes, mid-term exam, class discussion and participation, 2 or 3 short reaction      Dependability, preparation, professionalism, report writing, and technique
papers, and case study.                                                                application.




SPH3750                                                                                SPH4515
CLINICAL PRACTICE: AUDIOLOGY                                                           STUDENT TCHNG&SEMINAR IN SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHO
Offered By: Ted Johnson                                                                Offered By: Karen Wheaton
Prerequisites:     SPH2300 (AUDIOLOGY I) , SPH2300 (HEARING                            Prerequisites: PLEASE SEE ELMIRA COLLEGE BULLETIN
                   SCIENCE) , SPH 2600 (HEARING DISORDER AND
                   ASSESSMENT) AND INSTRUCTOR'S                                        Description: Students will be placed in local educational settings
                   SIGNATURE REQUIRED.                                                 under the supervision of cooperating N.Y.S. certified speech therapists.
                                                                                       An orientation meeting will be held before the beginning of the term. The
Objectives:                                                                            supervising faculty member will meet with the cooperating therapist on
Students will apply the theoretical knowledge and clinical techniques acquired in      at least three occasions and with the student teacher on at least three
their study of audiometry and hearing disorders. Students will exhibit a               occasions. Interested students must have filed an application indicating
professional attitude and be responsible for the management and testing of clients
assigned.
                                                                                       intent to student teach at the end of Term I of the Junior year. Decisions
                                                                                       regarding admission to student teaching are made by the Speech and
Method of Instruction:                                                                 Hearing faculty at the beginning of Term II of the student's junior year.
Students will be assigned individual time slots in which they will be responsible
for audiometric evaluations throughout the term. Students will meet once a week,       NOTE: Satisfactory completion of all non-elective requirements for the
in addition to their assigned times for a general discussion of procedures and         major and approval by the members of the Speech and Hearing faculty
clinical cases.                                                                        are also required.
Method of Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated on their clinical performance which includes reliability,
preparation, professionalism, report writing, responsibility, and technique
application.
                     SPEECH AND HEARING                                                              SPEECH COMMUNICATIONS

SPH4591                                                                                SPC4590
SEMINAR IN SPEECH PATH: MENTAL RETARDATION                                             SEMINAR
Offered By: Karen Wheaton                                                              Offered By: Michael Clark
Prerequisites:      SPH 2100 (INTRODUCTION TO
                   COMMUNICATION DISORDERS), SPH 2150                                  Description: An examination of communication phenomena through
                   (SPEECH AND HEARING ANATOMY AND                                     the investigation of specific topics and through participation in various
                   PHYSIOLOGY), SPH 2250 ( LANGUAGE                                    activities.
                   DEVELOPMENT), AND SPH 3591 (DISORDERS
                   OF LANGUAGE).                                                       Objectives:
                                                                                       Provide students with a context for an analysis and presentation of
Objectives:                                                                            human communication in their desired area of communication expertise;
To provide students: A) A basic understanding of the theories of intelligence and      aims at a higher development of presentational skills in multi-media (e.g.
historical trends in the field of mental retardation. B) An understanding of the       computer power point presentational program, slides, overhead, video,
etiological and syndrome classification. C) An understanding of the theoretical        and audio) and public presentational forms.
approaches to mental retardation. D) An awareness of the speech, language, and
medical problems associated with mental retardation. E) A knowledge of                 Method of Instruction:
diagnostic techniques and therapeutic procedures involved with this problem.
                                                                                       Lectures, lab practice of multi-media skill development, and critical
Method of Instruction:                                                                 evaluation and discussion of presentational methods.
The course will be taught primarily through lectures, films, audio and visual
materials will be used to enhance the student's understanding of mental retardation.   Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Critical evaluation of presentational skills, demonstrated competence in
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  computer aided presentational skills, interactions and participation in
1) Short referenced papers. 2) Mid-term examination. 3) Final examination. 4)          class discussion and critical analysis of others.
Participation and contribution to class discussions.



                                                                                                                    THEATRE
                SPEECH COMMUNICATIONS
                                                                                       THE1001
SPC2020                                                                                THEATRE PRACTICUM: PERFORMANCE
PUBLIC SPEAKING                                                                        NOTE: 1 CREDIT COURSE
Offered By: Michael Clark                                                              Offered By: Staff
Description: The course develops the traditional public speaking                       Description: Faculty supervised performance work on Gibson Theatre
skills through theoretical examination and exercises in informative and                and Watson Arena productions. (May be repeated for credit)
persuasive speaking. During the course each student will select, organize,
and present appropriate speech materials in standard oral and written                  Objectives:
form.                                                                                  Theatre practica are designed to provide students the opportunity to learn
                                                                                       about the preparation of theatre arts presentations in hands-on, supervised
Method of Instruction:                                                                 settings. Performance practicum concerns acting, singing, dancing, etc. in
Lecture, discussion and exercises.                                                     Elmira College Theatre Program productions. Upon completion of the
                                                                                       course students will be able to: A) Apply concepts of performance in
Method of Evaluation:                                                                  production; B) Complete the tasks required to create a performance; C)
A mid-term and final examinations will be given. Class speeches and                    Create an analysis of character; D) Use the body to create character
critical evaluations will be required. Attendance and participation in class           (basic level); E) Use the voice to create character (basic level); F) Use
is required.                                                                           the mind to create character (basic level).

Distribution Requirement :          CP                                                 Method of Instruction:
                                                                                       Hands-on experiential learning under the supervision of full-time theatre
                                                                                       faculty in Theatre Program production(s).

                                                                                       Method of Evaluation:
                                                                                       Evaluation is Pass-Fail and is dependent upon number of work hours
                                                                                       successfully completed.


                                                                                       Distribution Requirement :      CP
                             THEATRE                                                                       THEATRE

THE1002                                                                       THE2012
THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION                                                 STAGECRAFT I
NOTE: 1 CREDIT COURSE                                                         Offered By: George de Falussy
Offered By: Staff
                                                                              Description: The underlying purpose of this course is to provide a
Description: Faculty supervised techmical work on Gibson Theatre              rigorous introduction to the technical process of the theater. Students
and Watson Arena productions. May include scenery, costumes,                  will be expected to successfully complete one crew in order to pass the
properties, lighting, etc. (May be repeated for credit)                       course.

Objectives:                                                                   Method of Instruction:
Theatre practica are designed to provide students the opportunity to learn    Lecture and demonstration, discussions, construction, and painting
about the preparation of theatre arts presentations in hands-on, supervised   projects.
settings. Production practicum concerns sets, lights, sound, propertiers in
Elmira College Theatre Program production(s). Upon completion of the          Method of Evaluation:
course students will be able to: A) Apply concepts of technical theatre in    Students will be evaluated on class projects and two exams. Due to the
production; B) Employ theatre methods of construction/work; C) Use            interrelated nature of the projects, all work must be presented on time.
tools employed in theatre safely: D) Complete technical and design tasls      No late assignments will be accepted.
as assigned.

Methods of Instruction:
Hands-on experiential learning under the supervision of full-time theatre     THE2015
faculty.
                                                                              DIRECTING I
Method of evaluation:                                                         NOTE:THE1010 (INTRODUCTIN TO THEATRE), THE2013 (
Evaluation is Pass/Fail and is dependent upon number of work hours            ACTING I), THE2113 (ACTING II) OR THE1000 (THESIS
successfully completed.                                                       PRACTICUM)
                                                                              Offered By: John Kelly
Distribution Requirement :      CP
                                                                              Description: Acquisition and application of the steps whereby the
                                                                              director translates his concept of a play into theatrical presentation.
                                                                              Among the topics to be covered: Choice of script, analysis of script; the
THE1003
                                                                              ground plan; casting; the production book; various problems at different
THEATRE PRACTICUM:ARTS MANAGEMENT                                             phases of the rehearsal period; performance.
NOTE: 1 CREDIT COURSE
Offered By: Staff                                                             Method of Instruction:
                                                                              This is a workshop experience. The student will present his assignments
Description: Faculty supervised management work on Gibson                     in class, and the instructor and class members will provide feedback.
Theatre and Watson Arena productions. Assignments may include                 Through discussions and demonstrations, the instructor will assist each
promotions, PR, etc. (May be repeated for credit)                             student-director to improve the production solutions, and gain directorial
                                                                              insight.
Objectives:
Theatre practica are designed to provide students the opportunity to learn    Method of Evaluation:
about the preparation of theatre arts presentations in hands-on, supervised   The instructor will grade each assignment and average them to determine
settings. Arts Management practicum concerns public relations, staff          the final grade for the course.
supervision, budgeting, etc.
                                                                              Distribution Requirement :      3CP
Method of Instruction:
Hands-on experiential learning under the supervision of full time theatre
faculty.

Method of Evaluation:
Evaluation is Pass-Fail and is dependent upon number of work hours
successfully completed.

Distribution Requirement :      CP
                             THEATRE                                                                      THEATRE

THE2070                                                                      THE3011
STAGE COSTUME AND MAKEUP                                                     THEATRE HISTORY II
Offered By: George de Falussy                                                Offered By: Michael Clark

Description: An in-depth study, both theoretical and applied, of the         Description: Enable the theatre major to acquire knowledge of the
basic principles of Costume and Makeup for the stage. Students are           development of theatre in the western world from the English Restoration
expected to complete one Costume or Makeup crew in order to pass this        to the present, together with concomitant development of methods and
course.                                                                      styles of staging, production, and acting; develop research skills, develop
                                                                             critical thinking skills.
Objectives:
Students will acquire an understanding of: Color theory, Costume             Method of Instruction:
terminology, Makeup terminology, sewing, pattern cutting, fabric             Lecture, discussion and written research project.
selection, makeup techniques and application.
                                                                             Method of Evaluation:
Method of Instruction:                                                       Three examinations will be given. A well written research paper is
Lecture and discussion, demonstration and class projects. Class projects     required. Attendance and participation in discussion is required.
will consist of a specific Costume and Makeup problem, which the
student will solve by applying Costume and Makeup techniques in class.
There will be two extensive final projects to be presented in class.
                                                                                                   WOMEN'S STUDIES
Method of Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated on class projects, on exams and final projects.   WMS1000
                                                                             WOMEN AND SOCIETY
                                                                             Offered By: Andrea Rosati
Distribution Requirement :      CP
                                                                                         Charles Mitchell

                                                                             Description: This course, which is broadly interdisciplinary and cross-
                                                                             cultural in scope, examines the ways in which various societies define
THE2113                                                                      and limit human beings on the basis of gender. It will examine images,
ACTING II                                                                    power relationships, and cultural and historical sources of female roles
Offered By: John Kelly                                                       and status, and will explore how the social construction of femaleness
                                                                             occurs in our contemporary world.
Prerequisites:   ACTING I

Description: The application, through exercises and the playing of           Objectives:
                                                                             A) To identify ways in which social institutions define human beings and
scenes, of the skills and techniques acquired in Acting I (THE 2013).
                                                                             constrain their actions on the basis of gender. B) To trace the formative
Will also help develop increased competency in performance through the
                                                                             influence of earlier cultural, historical, and religious ideas on the
analysis, rehearsal, presentation, and critique of scenes.
                                                                             contemporary image and definition of femaleness. C) To introduce the
                                                                             concepts of oppression, domination, and subordination-- not only as they
Method of Instruction:
                                                                             apply to women, but to other groups as well. D) To present an overview
This is a workshop experience. Through discussions and demonstrations,
                                                                             of the global struggle for women's rights and examine the interplay of
the instructor will assist each performer to improve and grow.
                                                                             social, economic, and cultural forces.
Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             Method of Instruction:
The class members will provide critical reactions to each performance
                                                                             A combination of lectures, readings, films, and small group discussions.
and the instructor will offer his own feedback. Scenes and exercises will
                                                                             There may be guest speakers from various academic disciplines at the
be graded by the instructor. The grades will then be averaged for the
                                                                             College. In addition, we may plan a field trip to the Women's Rights
final grade of the course.
                                                                             National Historical Park in Seneca Falls.

                                                                             Method of Evaluation:
                                                                             Papers, a midterm and final examination, regular class attendance, and
                                                                             participation in class discussions.

                                                                             Distribution Requirement :      GN
                      WOMEN'S STUDIES

WMS4590
FEMINIST ISSUES AND THEORY
Offered By: Martha Easton
Prerequisites: Instructor's signature required

Description: This capstone course will explore contemporary feminist
and gender-related theories that provide the groundwork for feminist
investigation in sexuality studies, anthropology, psychology and other
social sciences. We will read both classic and modern works, attempting
to provide a historical framework. We will also identify important issues
facing young women and men today and explore how the theories might
contribute to a better understanding of these issues. Required for all
Junior and Senior WMS majors.

Objectives:
A) To acquaint students with various feminist theoretical models. B) To
deepen awareness of the issues facing women in the modern world. C)
To integrate the knowledge gained from previous Women's Studies
courses. D) To develop research skills regarding issues related to
Women's Studies.

Method of Instruction:
Class discussion, occasional lectures and guest speakers, readings, films,
and research.

Method of Evaluation:
Class participation (30%), research (20%), reading response papers
(50%).

								
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