The types of wood - PowerPoint P by pengtt

VIEWS: 24 PAGES: 14

									Name: White Ash (Fraxinus Americana)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as American ash, Biltmore ash, and cane ash.
Sources: Grows in United States and Canada.
Appearance: Generally straight grained with a coarse texture. Pale-brown
heartwood and almost white sapwood.
Physical Props: Moderately heavy, hard, strong, and tough with moderately
high shock resistance, good dimensional stability, and poor decay resistance.
Steam-bends very well and is quite elastic.
Working Props: Machines fairly well with machine tools although turning
and mortising properties are marginal. Glues, screws, and nails satisfactorily.
Stains and finishes well, although filling may be required.
Uses: Used for furniture, cooperage, baseball bats, boat oars, ladders, chairs,
food containers, agricultural implements, tool handles, plywood, and decorative
veneer.
Name: European Beech (Fagus sylvatica)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as English beech, Carpathian beech,
Danish beech, and others according to country of origin.
Sources: Grows in Europe and southeast Asia.
Appearance: Generally straight grained with broad rays, and fine,
even texture. Pale cream to pinkish brown heartwood that darkens to
a pale reddish brown.
Physical Props: Possibly the most popular general purpose
furniture wood. Also ideal for food containers, baskets, utensils, and
bread/butcher boards because it does not impart taste or odor to
food. Also used for chairs, handles, flooring, turned articles,
cooperage, musical instruments, clothes pins, workbench tops, tool
handles, novelties, core stock and decorative veneers.
Working Props: Machines well but can be difficult to work by
hand. Tends to split - pre-drilling recommended for screws and nails.
Stains and finishes well. Exceptionally good for steam bending.
Uses: Hard and heavy, with high bending and crushing strength
and moderately high stiffness and shock resistance. Poor
dimensional stability and decay resistance.
Name: African Ebony (Diospyrus spp.)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Includes varieties from Nigeria, Ghana,
Cameroon, Kribi, Gaboon, Madagascar, and Zaire.
Sources: Used for piano keys, musical instruments, turnery,
inlay, novelties, billiard cues, brush backs, and cutlery handles.
Appearance : Very fine texture with an indistinct grain and
metallic luster. Uniformly black heartwood and yellowish white
sapwood.
Physical Props: Very heavy, hard, strong, and stiff with high
shock and decay resistance. Steam-bends reasonably well.
Requires pre-drilling to nail or screw.
Working Props: Works with some difficulty - tends to chip and
quickly dulls cutting edges. Turns well. Finishes to a naturally
dark polished surface.
Uses: Grows primarily in central to southern Africa
  Also there is another kind of the Ebony its name is:




Name: East Indian Ebony (Diospyrus spp.)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as Indian ebony, camagon, golden ebony, and other names such as
Macassar ebony according to origin.
Sources: Grows in Sri Lanka and southern India.
Appearance: Straight to irregular grain with a fine, even texture and metallic luster. Heartwood
color varies from medium brown to jet black to gray depending on species. Light gray sapwood.
Physical Props: Very heavy, hard, strong, and stiff with high shock and decay resistance. Steam-
bends reasonably well but wood is brittle.
Working Props: Works with difficulty due to hardness. - heartwood has severe blunting effect on
cutting edges. Requires pre-drilling to nail or screw. Glues satisfactorily and takes an excellent
finish.
Uses: Used for luxury furniture, carving, and various turned items including knife and tool
handles, billiard cues, and brush backs. Also used for combs, piano keys and other musical
instrument parts, inlay, and decorative veneer.
Name: American Elm (Ulmus americana)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as white elm, water elm, soft elm and
gray elm
Sources : Grows in eastern half of United States and southern
Canada.
Appearance : Used for boxes, baskets, cooperage stays, sporting
goods, agricultural implements, furniture (bent parts especially),
plywood veneers, flooring, and miscellaneous woodenware.
Physical Props: Moderately heavy and hard, tough, elastic,
difficult to split, and wear resistant. Steam-bends very well. Low
decay resistance and moderate dimensional stability.
Working Props: Works with some difficulty - tends to dull
cutting edges and often produces fuzzy surfaces. Glues, screws and
nails satisfactorily. Does not polish easily but otherwise finishes
well.
Uses : Straight or interlocked grain with a coarse texture. Light
brown to brown heartwood, usually with a reddish tinge, and light-
colored sapwood.
Also there are three another kind of the Elm and its name is:




       Name: European Elm (Ulmus spp.)
       Type: Hardwood.
       Other Names: Includes English elm, smooth-leaved (French or Flemish)
       elm, Dutch elm and wych or Scotch elm
       Sources : Occurs in temperate regions of Europe and western Asia.
       Appearance: Typically cross grained with dull brown heartwood (often with
       reddish tinge) and pale sapwood.
       Physical Props: Moderately heavy and hard with low stiffness, shock
       resistance and bending strength. Steam-bends very well. Low decay
       resistance and medium movement in use.
       Working Props: Can be difficult to work in that wild grain can tear or cause
       binding. Glues, screws, nails and finishes satisfactorily.
       Uses : Used for flooring, farm implements, chair seats, bent parts, ship
       building, sports equipment, turned items, cabinets, caskets, decorative
       veneers, paneling and chopping blocks.
Name: Rock Elm (Ulmus thomasi)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as hard elm, cork elm and hickory elm.
Sources: Grows in eastern half of United States and southern Canada.
Appearance: Straight or interlocked grain with a coarse texture. Light brown to brown
heartwood, usually with a reddish tinge, and light brown to brown sapwood.
Physical Props: Heavy, hard, tough, difficult to split, wear and shock resistant. Low decay
resistance and moderate dimensional stability. Steam-bends very well.
Working Props: Works with some difficulty - hardness tends to dull cutting edges. Finishes
reasonably well. Glues, screws and nails satisfactorily.
Uses: Uses are similar to those of American and slippery elm but it is better suited to
applications requiring hardness and greater strength. This includes farm vehicles, machinery
parts, skids, cooperage, wheels and millwork.
Name: Slippery Elm (Ulmus rubra)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as red elm, gray elm, soft elm and moose elm.
Sources: Grows in eastern half of United States and southern Canada.
Appearance: Straight or interlocked grain with a coarse texture. Dark reddish brown
heartwood, frequently with red shades, and grayish white to light brown sapwood.
Physical Props: Moderately heavy, hard, tough, difficult to split shock and wear resistant.
Steam-bends very well.
Working Props: Works with some difficulty - dulls cutting edges, often produces fuzzy
surfaces, and wild grain presents problems when planing. Finishes reasonably well.
Uses: Uses include wheel hubs, railroad ties, ship-building, fenceposts, sills, boxes, crates,
pallets, cooperage, decorative plywood and veneer, farm vehicles, food containers, baskets,
and interior trim. Often sold with American elm as one species.
Name: African Mahogany (Khaya spp.)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as akuk, bandoro, benin mahogany,
degema, lagos wood, acajou, khaya, Nigerian mahogany, Ivory Coast
mahogany, and Gold Coast mahogany.
Sources: Grows throughout West Africa.
Appearance: Interlocked or straight grain, often with a ribbon figure,
and a moderately coarse texture. Creamy-white sapwood and reddish
brown heartwood, often with a purple cast.
Physical Props: Moderately heavy and hard with medium bending
and crushing strength, low stiffness and shock resistance, moderate
decay resistance, and good stability in use. Poor steam bending rating.
Generally cheaper and more abundant than American mahogany.
Working Props: Works fairly easily although interlocked, woolly
grain can be troublesome. Glues, nails, and screws satisfactorily.
Stains and polishes to an excellent finish.
Uses: Used for furniture, cabinetry, high class joinery, interior trim,
boat building, vehicle bodies, paneling, plywood, and decorative veneers.
Comments: Generally cheaper and more abundant than American
mahogany
Also there is another kind of the Mahogany its name is:




Name: American Mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as Honduras mahogany, true mahogany, genuine mahogany,
bigleaf mahogany, cao, caoba, cobano, acajou, and aguano.
Sources: Grows from southern Mexico to Brazil
Appearance: Generally straight grained, but sometimes roey, wavy, or curly, with a fine to
coarse, uniform texture. Pale pink to dark reddish brown heartwood and yellowish white
sapwood.
Physical Props: Variable, but generally moderate weight, hardness, and strength. Low
stiffness and shock resistance. Very good stability and decay resistance. Moderate steam
bending rating.
Working Props: Excellent working properties, including cutting, turning, shaping, sanding,
and gluing. Finishes easily with a variety of finishes, although filling may be required for
ultimate smoothness.
Uses: Renowned for high-class cabinetry and furniture. Also used for paneling, turnery,
carving, patterns, dies, model making, veneers, flooring, boat building, and musical
instruments.
Name: Teak (Tectona grandis)
Type: Hardwood.
Other Names: Also known as Burma teak, Rangoon teak, moulmein
teak, gia thi, jati sak, kyun, mai sak, rosawa, and many other local names.
Sources: Grows in Indonesia, India, and Central America.
Appearance: Generally straight grained with a coarse, uneven texture,
medium luster and an oily feel. Yellow brown to dark golden brown
heartwood and grayish or white sapwood.
Physical Props: Moderately hard and heavy, with low stiffness and shock
resistance, moderate bending strength, moderate steam bending, and
excellent decay resistance and dimensional stability. Good acid resistance.
Working Props: Works reasonbly well with hand or machine tools but
silica in wood is tough on cutting edges and machine dust can be an irritant.
Good turning and carving properties. Gluing best done on freshly cut
surfaces due to oily nature. Pre-drilling recommended for screwing and
nailing. Stains and finishes well although natural oils can cause adhesion
difficulties.
Uses: Has numerous uses including ship building (especially decks), indoor
or outdoor furniture, high class joinery, flooring, paneling, plywood,
decorative veneers, turnery, carving, chemical tanks and vats.
And I am going to present some pattern from all the types I
had wrote about them:




     This is example outdoors about the harmony between the
     wood and the glass with some shoring from the layout of
     the wall
Also outdoors, it suggest the stately of the wood and
the effect of the color, the mahogany color with
tactile of the Paige color.
the insertion of stainless steal
between the parts of the wood, it
suggest the majesty of this peace

								
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