EQUAL ACCESS TO UNIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS - Huston-Tillotson

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					Huston-Tillotson University                         2006-2008




                              University Bulletin


                                  2006-2008
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                                                                     2006-2008


                                                        TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                          HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY
                                                                      2006-2008
                                                                      BULLETIN

NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY ................................................................................... 1
EQUAL ACCESS TO UNIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS.................................................. 1
DISCLOSURE OF EDUCATIONAL RECORDS .................................................................................... 1
USE OF THIS BULLETIN .......................................................................................................................... 1
ACCREDITATION ...................................................................................................................................... 2
INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS ......................................................................................................... 2
TRAINING OF VETERANS ...................................................................................................................... 2
CONTACTING THE UNIVERSITY ......................................................................................................... 3
HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY .................................................................................................... 4
ACADEMIC CALENDARS ................................................................................................................... 4 - 9
MISSION STATEMENT ............................................................................................................................10
HISTORICAL OVERVIEW ......................................................................................................................10
   TILLOTSON COLLEGE .................................................................................................................................10
   SAMUEL HUSTON COLLEGE .......................................................................................................................10
   THE MERGER .............................................................................................................................................11
   GOVERNANCE AND LEADERSHIP ................................................................................................................11
   THE PRESIDENTS ........................................................................................................................................11
BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES ...............................................................................................................13
   AGARD-LOVINGGOOD CLASSROOM AND ADMINISTRATION BUILDING ......................................................13
   KING-SEABROOK CHAPEL/JACKSON-MOODY HUMANITIES BUILDING ......................................................14
   DICKEY-LAWLESS SCIENCE BUILDING .......................................................................................................14
   DOWNS-JONES LIBRARY ............................................................................................................................14
   ALLEN-FRAZIER RESIDENCE HALL AND BEARD-BURROWES RESIDENCE HALL ........................................15
   DAVAGE-DURDEN UNION BUILDING..........................................................................................................15
   MARY E. BRANCH GYMNASIUM-AUDITORIUM ..........................................................................................15
   CONNER-WASHINGTON HALL ....................................................................................................................15
   EVANS INDUSTRIAL BUILDING ...................................................................................................................16
   OLD ADMINISTRATION BUILDING ..............................................................................................................16
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES ...................................................................................................16
MISSION STATEMENT ............................................................................................................................16
GOALS .........................................................................................................................................................16
DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS .........................................................................19

   THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ENGLISH (ENG) .................................................................19
   THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN HISTORY (HIS) ...................................................................29
   THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN MUSIC (MUS) .....................................................................35
   THE MINOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (REL) .....................................................................................42
LANGUAGES ..............................................................................................................................................45
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                                                                  2006-2008


   COURSES IN FRENCH (LFR) .................................................................................................................45
   COURSES IN SPANISH (LSP) ................................................................................................................45
   COURSES IN CHINESE (LCH) ………………………………………………………………………... 45
   COURSES IN COMMUNICATION (MED) ............................................................................................46
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES ............................................................................................. 47
   THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJP) ...............................................47
   THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC) ..............................................54
   THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR (PSY) .......................................................................................................54
   THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN SOCIOLOGY (SOC) ............................................................65
TEACHER EDUCATION (EDU) ..............................................................................................................73
   REQUIREMENTS FOR UNDERGRADUATE SEEKING TEACHER CERTIFICATION .............................................74
   CORE CURRICULUM FOR ALL TEACHER CERTIFICATION CANDIDATES .......................................................78
   TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM DEGREE AND TEACHING CERTIFICATE OFFERINGS ................................79
   COURSES IN TEACHER EDUCATION (EDU) .....................................................................................89
   COURSES IN READING (RDG)..............................................................................................................92
   COURSES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (SED) ........................................................................................93
ALTERNATIVE TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM (ATCP) ...............................................94
   COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR EC-4 GENERALIST CERTIFICATION..............................................................95
   COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR EC-12 GENERIC SPECIAL EDUCATION .........................................................97
   COURSES IN GENERIC SPECIAL EDUCATION (PRE-K – 12) .......................................................................102
   COURSES IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (GRADES 1-6) ............................................................................102
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES .........................................................................................107
   DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS VISION STATEMENT.....................................109
   DEGREE REQUIREMENTS ..........................................................................................................................110
   REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS ..............................................................................................110
   JOINT ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES AGREEMENT .........................................................................111
   BIOLOGY ...............................................................................................................................................114
   CHEMISTRY (CHE)...............................................................................................................................119
   COURSES IN PHYSICS (PHY)..............................................................................................................124
   MATHEMATICS (MTH) .......................................................................................................................125
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY…………………………………………………….. 133
DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION .........................................................................133
   DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR ...........................................................................................134
   BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MINOR AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS ....................................137
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE ……………………………………………………….. 145
BOARD OF TRUSTEES ..........................................................................................................................158
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE SERVICES .......................................................158
ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE ....................................................................................................158
INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT ....................................................................................................159
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES .................................................................................................160
FACULTY ..................................................................................................................................................162
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                         2006-2008



                           NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY

Huston-Tillotson University complies with all applicable federal and state nondiscrimination laws and does not
discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, or disability, consistent with the
Assurance of Compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Executive Order 11246 as issued and
amended; Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended; Section 202 of the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990; and Section 303 of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975.

              EQUAL ACCESS TO UNIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS
The University provides equal access to all educational programs to every qualified student without regard to
educationally-unrelated disabilities. Huston-Tillotson University will provide reasonable accommodations, academic
adjustments, and/or auxiliary aids and services determined on a case-by-case basis.

                           DISCLOSURE OF EDUCATIONAL RECORDS
Information protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 may not be made
available to any person without the written authorization of the student except in the following cases: to other school
officials, to officials of other schools in which the student intends to enroll, and other persons and agencies
identified by the statute. Under FERPA, internal employees may be given access to students’ information based
upon having a legitimate educational interest.

The release of information to the public without the consent of the student will be limited to the categories of
information that have been designated by the University as directory information. Directory information includes
information such as name, current and permanent address, telephone and e-mail listings, date and place of birth, sex,
marital status, country of citizenship, major semester hour load, classification, dates of attendance, degrees and
awards received, and eligibility for and participation in officially recognized activities. Upon request, directory
information may be released to the public unless the student makes a written request by the twelfth class day of the
semester to have directory information withheld.

                                          USE OF THIS BULLETIN

The provisions of this Bulletin do not constitute a contract, expressed or implied, between Huston-Tillotson
University and any applicant, student, student’s family, or faculty or staff members. The University reserves the
right to withdraw courses at any time, change fees, tuition, rules, calendar, curriculum, degree programs, degree
requirements, graduation procedures, and any other requirements affecting the academic progress of the students.
Changes will become effective at the time so determined, and the changes will apply to both prospective students
and those already enrolled. This Bulletin is not intended to nor does it contain all regulations that relate to students.
The University reserves the right to correct errors that may have occurred in the printing of this document. Any
comments or questions regarding the Bulletin should be directed to the University Registrar.




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                      2006-2008




                          2006                                          2008




                                             ACCREDITATION
Huston-Tillotson University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and
    Schools, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia, 30033-4097 (404.679.4501) to award baccalaureate degrees.

                           Huston-Tillotson University is listed with and recognized by:
                                          The Texas Education Agency
                                                       and
                     The Commission on Black Colleges of the University Senate of the Board
                        of Higher Education and Ministry of The United Methodist Church.




                                  INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIPS
  The University holds memberships in numerous professional organizations and societies, including the following:

                                     American College Personnel Association
                                          American Council on Education
                               Council for Advancement and Support of Education
                           Council for Higher Education of the United Church of Christ
                                         Council of Independent Colleges
                                Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities
                                  Independent Colleges and Universities of Texas
                        National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education
                     National Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers
                          National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
                                 National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
                   National Association of Schools and Colleges of the United Methodist Church
                             National Association of Student Personnel Administrators
                                    Texas United Methodist College Association
                                            United Negro College Fund



                                       TRAINING OF VETERANS
  Huston-Tillotson University is approved for the training of veterans as prescribed by the Veterans Administration
                                                        Office.



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Huston-Tillotson University                                                           2006-2008




                               CONTACTING THE UNIVERSITY
  University office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., CST, Monday through Friday. The University
  telephone number is 512.505.3000; the FAX number is 512.505.3190. Inquiries should be addressed
  to the appropriate office at Huston-Tillotson University, 900 Chicon Street, Austin, Texas 78702-
  2795.


        Office                                              Location               Telephone
         Academic and Student Affairs – Provost             AL 203                 505.3077
        Academic Support Programs – Dean’s Office           JM 232                 505.3042
        Admission                                           CW 1st Floor           505.3028
        Athletics                                           Gym                    505.3050
        Business Office                                     AL 209                 505.3061
        Campus Life and First Year Experience               DD Student Union       505.3037
        Campus Safety Office                                AF Lower Level         505.3011
        Campus Ministry                                     King-Seabrook Chapel   505.3054
        Campus Support Programs                             JM 101                 505.3046
        Career and Graduate Development                     JM 101                 505.3041
        College of Arts and Sciences – Dean’s Office        DL 106                 505.3112
        Coordinator of Academic Advising and Supplemental   AL 103                 505.3040
        Instruction
        Disability Services                                 JM 101                 505.3149
        Enrollment Management – Dean’s Office               CW 1ST Floor           505.3023
        Financial Aid                                       CW 2nd Floor           505.3031
        Human Resources                                     AL 211                 505.3015
        Institutional Advancement                           OAB 1ST Floor          505.3072/73
               Alumni Affairs                               OAB 1ST Floor          505.3074
               Public Relations                             OAB 1ST Floor          505.3006
        International Student Advising                      CW 1ST Floor           505.3024
        Library                                             DJ 2nd Floor           505.3080
        President’s Office                                  AL 216                 505.3001
        Registrar’s Office                                  AL 210                 505.3082
        Residence Life                                      BB                     505.3158
        School of Business and Technology – Dean’s Office   AL 306                 505.3131
        Student Affairs – Dean’s Office                     DD                     505.3036
        Student Accounts                                    AL 215                 505.3067
        Student Health Center                               AF 151                 505.3039




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                   2006-2008


                               HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY
                                   ACADEMIC CALENDARS
                                           2006-2007
                                   (Starting after Labor Day)


   * Fall 2006
   August 24                  Thursday     Faculty-Staff Workshop
   August 25                  Friday       Faculty Institute and Faculty Meetings
   August 26                  Saturday     Residence Halls Open: New Students
   August 26-30               Sat-Wed      Orientation: New Students
   August 27                  Sunday       Matriculation Ceremony - New Students
   August 30                  Wednesday    Testing and Advising – New Students
                                           Registration - New Students
   August 30                  Wednesday    Residence Halls Open: All Students
   Aug. 30-Sept. 1            Thu-Fri      Registration with late fee if continuing student
   August 31                  Thursday     Distance Learning Classes Begin

   September 4                Monday       Labor Day Holiday
   September 5                Tuesday      Classes Begin - Schedule Changes Allowed
   September 11               Monday       Last Day for Adding/Dropping Classes with out fee
   September 14               Thursday     Opening Convocation – President Larry Earvin
   September 20               Wednesday    Official Twelfth Class Day
   September 29               Friday       Final Date to Withdraw from University or Drop Classes
                                           With Account or Tuition Adjustment
   October 6                  Friday       Final Date for Filing for December 2006 Graduation
   October 16-19              Mon-Thu      Midterm Examinations Administered
   October 23                 Monday       Midterm Grade Rosters Due to Registrar
   October 27                 Friday       Charter Day Observance
                                           Last Day to Drop a Class with a fee
   November 13                Monday       Registration for Spring 2007 Begins
   November 17                Friday       Final Day to Withdraw from the University
   November 22                Wednesday    Holiday begins for students/faculty at 12:00 noon
                                           Thanksgiving Holiday (Begins at noon on Wednesday –
   November 22-26             Sunday
                                           Classes resume on Monday).

   December 14                Thursday     Last Class Day
   December 15                Friday       Final Examinations begin (examinations on Saturday)
   December 19                Tuesday      Final Examinations end
   December 20                Wednesday    Residence Halls Close
   December 21                Thursday     Final Grade Rosters Due to Office of the Registrar

   * Dates and events subject to change.




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008




                               HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY
                                   ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                           2006-2007
                                   (Starting after Labor Day)


   * Spring 2007
   January 3                  Wednesday      Staff Returns
   January 9                  Tuesday        Faculty/Staff Workshop
   January 10                 Wednesday      Residence Halls Open
   January 11-12              Thursday-Fri   Testing/Registration of New, Transfer, & Readmitted Students
                                             Late Registration for Continuing Students
   January 15                 Monday         Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday
   January 16                 Tuesday        Classes Begin, Schedule Changes Allowed
   January 19                 Friday         Final Date for Adding Classes with out fee
   January 31                 Tuesday        Official Twelfth Class Day

   February 2                 Friday         Final Date to Withdraw from the University or drop Classes
                                             with Account Adjustment
   February 23                Friday         Final Date for filing for May Graduation

   March 5-8                  Monday -       Mid Term Examinations Administered
                              Thursday
   March 9                    Friday         Mid Term Grade Reports Due to the Registrar’s Office
   March 12-16                Monday-Fri     Spring Break
   March 19                   Monday         Classes Resume, Mid Term Grades Issued
   March 23                   Friday         Final Date to Drop a Class or Withdraw from the University

   April 6                    Friday         Easter Holiday
   April 9                    Monday         Classes Resume
   April 10                   Tuesday        Early Registration for Summer/Fall

   May 4                      Friday         Last Class Day
   May 7-9                    Monday -       Senior Final Examinations Administered
                              Wednesday
   May 7-10                   Monday-        Final Examinations Administered
                              Thursday
   May 11                     Friday         Honors Convocation
   May 12                     Saturday       Commencement Convocation – 9 A.M.
   May 13                     Sunday         Residence Halls Close
   May 15                     Tuesday        Instructor’s Final Grade Reports Due to The Registrar’s Office

   * Dates and events subject to change.




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                           2006-2008


                               HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY
                                   ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                         2006-2007
                                          Summer


   * Summer 2007
   May 28                     Monday       Memorial Day - Holiday
   June 1                     Friday       Summer School Registration
   June 4                     Monday       Summer School Classes Begin
                                           Schedule Changes Allowed
   June 8                     Friday       Last Day to Drop a Class
   June 18                    Monday       Last Day to Withdraw from the University
   June 19                    Tuesday      Emancipation Day –
                                           Holiday - No classes – University closed

   July 4                     Wednesday    Independence Day –
                                           Holiday - No classes - University closed
   July 16                    Monday       Last Class Day
   July 17-18                 Tuesday –    Final Examinations
                              Wednesday
   July 20                    Friday       Final Grades Due to the Registrar

   * Dates and events subject to change.




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


                               HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY
                                   ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                           2007-2008
                                   (Starting after Labor Day)

   * Fall 2007
   August 23                  Thursday     Faculty-Staff Workshop
   August 24                  Friday       Faculty Institute and Faculty Meetings
   August 25                  Saturday     Residence Halls Open: New Students
   August 25-29               Saturday-    Orientation: New Students
                              Wednesday
   August 26                  Sunday       Matriculation Ceremony – New Students
   August 29                  Wednesday    Testing and Advising – New Students;
                                           Registration – New Students
   August 29                  Wednesday    Residence Halls Open: All Students
   August 30-31               Thursday-    Registration
                              Friday
   August 30                  Thursday     Distance Learning Classes Begin

   September 3                Monday       Labor Day – Holiday
   September 4                Tuesday      Classes Begin – Schedule Changes Allowed
   September 7                Fri          Last Day for Adding/Dropping Classes
   September 13               Thu          Opening Convocation – President Larry Earvin
   September 19               Wednesday    Official Twelfth Class Day
   September 28               Friday       Final Date to Withdraw from University or Drop Classes
                                           With Account or Tuition Adjustment

   October 5                  Friday       Final Date for Filing for December 2006 Graduation
   October 15-18              Monday –     Midterm Examinations Administered
                              Thursday
   October 22                 Monday       Midterm Grade Rosters Due to Registrar
   October 26                 Friday       Charter Day Observance
                                           Last Day to Drop a Class with a fee

   November 12                Monday       Registration for Spring 2007 Begins
   November 16                Friday       Final day to Withdraw from the University
   November 21                Wednesday    Holiday begins for students/faculty at 12:00 noon
   November 21-25             Wednesday-   Thanksgiving Holiday
                              Sunday       (Begins at noon on Wednesday – Staff –
                                           Classes Resume on Monday)

   December 14                Friday       Last Class Day
   December 15                Saturday     Final Examinations begin (examinations on Saturday)
   December 19                Wednesday    Final Examinations end
   December 20                Thursday     Residence Halls Close
   December 21                Friday       Final Grade Rosters Due to Office of the Registrar

   * Dates and events subject to change.


                                             7
Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008




                               HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY
                                   ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                         2007-2008

   * Spring 2008
   January 3                  Thursday     Staff Returns
   January 8                  Tuesday      Faculty/Staff Workshop
   January 9                  Wednesday    Residence Halls Open
   January 10-11              Thursday –   Testing/Registration of New, Transfer, and Readmitted
                              Friday       Students; Late Registration for Continuing Students
   January 14                 Monday       Martin Luther King, Jr. - Holiday
   January 15                 Tuesday      Classes Begin; Schedule Changes Allowed
   January 18                 Friday       Final Date for Adding Classes
   January 30                 Wednesday    Official Twelfth Class Day

   February 1                 Friday       Final Date to Withdraw from the University or drop Classes
                                           with Account Adjustment
   February 22                Friday       Final Date for Filing for May Graduation

   March 3-7                  Monday –     Mid-Term Examinations Administered
                              Friday
   March 11                   Tuesday      Mid-Term Grade Reports Due to the Registrar’s Office
   March 17-20                Monday –     Spring Break
                              Thursday
   March 21                   Friday       Good Friday
   March 24                   Monday       Classes Resume; Mid Term Grades Issued
   March 28                   Friday       Final Date to Drop a Class or Withdraw from the University

   April 8                    Tuesday      Early Registration for Summer/Fall

   May 2                      Friday       Last Class Day
   May 5-7                    Monday –     Senior Final Examinations Administered
                              Wednesday
   May 5-8                    Monday-      Final Examinations Administered
                              Thursday
   May 9                      Friday       Honors Convocation
   May 10                     Saturday     Commencement Convocation – 9 A.M.
   May 11                     Sunday       Residence Halls Close
   May 13                     Tuesday      Instructor’s Final Grade Reports Due to The Registrar’s Office

   * Dates and events subject to change.




                                             8
Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008


                               HUSTON-TILLOTSON UNIVERSITY
                                   ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                          Summer

   * Summer 2008
   June 2                     Monday       Summer School Registration
   June 3                     Tuesday      Summer School Classes Begin 8:00 am;
                                           Schedule Changes Allowed
   June 9                     Monday       Last Day to Drop a Class
   June 19                    Thursday     Emancipation Day – Holiday
                                           No Classes – University Closed
   June 20                    Friday       Final Date for Dropping Classes
                                           Final Date to Withdraw from the University

   July 4                     Friday       Holiday – No Classes – University Closed
   July 16                    Wednesday    Last Class Day – Summer Session Ends
   July 17-18                 Thursday –   Final Examinations
                              Friday
   July 22                    Tuesday      Final Grades Due to the Registrar




                                             9
Huston-Tillotson University                                                          2006-2008




                                  MISSION STATEMENT
Huston-Tillotson University is a historically black university affiliated with The United
Methodist Church and the United Church of Christ. The mission of the University is to provide
its increasingly diverse student body with an exemplary education that is grounded in the liberal
arts and sciences, balanced with professional development, and directed to public service and
leadership. The University prepares students with the integrity and civility to thrive in a diverse
society, fosters spiritual development, preserves and promotes interest in the accomplishments
and experiences of the University’s historic constituents and evolving populations, and creates
and sustains supportive relationships which advance the Huston-Tillotson University community.


                                HISTORICAL OVERVIEW
Tillotson College
The roots of Tillotson College date back to 1875 and build upon work of the Freedmen’s Aid
Society of the American Missionary Association of the Congregational Churches (now United
Church of Christ). Chartered in 1877 as Tillotson Collegiate and Normal Institute, the school
began classes on January 17, 1881. Many of Tillotson’s first students had no prior formal
education. However, the eager students, who numbered 100 by the end of the first year,
understood that their admission to Tillotson made them among the elite of their race and placed
upon them the responsibility to enrich others through the skills they would derive from their
education.

On June 2, 1909, a new charter was issued and the school was renamed Tillotson College, a
―normal school‖ for the training of teachers for the black community. The school was
reorganized in 1925 as a junior college; in 1926 as a women’s college; and again in 1931 as a
senior, co-educational institution. Renowned for its departments of education and music, the
College received class ―A‖ accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
in 1943.


Samuel Huston College
In 1876, the Reverend George Warren Richardson, a Methodist minister from Minnesota, leased
St. Paul Methodist Episcopal Church of Dallas, Texas, as the site for a school for the colored
youth of the city. In 1878, the school was moved to Austin, Texas, and housed in what is now
Wesley United Methodist Church.

As was the case with Tillotson College, Samuel Huston underwent various configurations throughout
its developmental years. Before the end of its first year, the fledgling school had been adopted by the
West Texas Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church and renamed Andrews Normal College
in honor of a church leader. In December of 1887, however, Samuel Huston, a farmer from Marengo,
Iowa, donated property estimated to be worth $10,000, with the understanding that the school would
bear his name. Samuel Huston College was chartered in 1910 as a private educational corporation
under the laws of Texas. In 1926, it was approved as a senior college by the State of Texas


                                              10
Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008


Department of Education and in 1934 was accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and
Schools.


The Merger
Throughout the history of Samuel Huston College and Tillotson College, moral and religious
instruction undergirded the curriculum at both institutions. The schools also contributed
significantly to the social and civic life of Austin’s black citizens. Located less than one mile
apart in East Austin, the institutions enjoyed healthy competition and rivalry in athletic
programs, cooperation in student activities, and collegial relationships among the faculty, staff,
and students.

These features became distinguishing traits of the two campuses, while the corresponding
commitment to community service affirmed the institutions’ concept of the responsibilities that
befell educated persons.

However, despite periods of relative prosperity, neither college enjoyed a wealth of material or
financial resources. Consequently, and because of their mutual interests, values, and
constituencies, the trustees of Samuel Huston College and Tillotson College met jointly on
January 26, 1952, and agreed to detailed plans for merging the two institutions on the site (then
known as ―Bluebonnet Hill‖) of Tillotson College. The merger was consummated, and the new
Charter of Incorporation for Huston-Tillotson College was signed on October 24, 1952. The
merged institutions adopted ―In union, strength‖ as their motto.

 Following the merger, Huston-Tillotson College became the sole provider of higher education
for African-Americans in Central Texas until the landmark case of Brown v. Board of Education
(1954), which launched the period of desegregation. Today Huston-Tillotson continues to both
honor and foster its relationship with its founding denominations as well as its ethnic heritage. In
February 2005, under the leadership of Dr. Larry L. Earvin, Huston-Tillotson changed its name
from college to university. This change did not amend the mission of Huston-Tillotson, but
affords the institution the opportunity for growth and additional brand recognition.


Governance and Leadership
The president of the University serves as chief executive officer of the corporation and    ex-
officio member of the Board of Trustees and reports directly to the Board. The following
biographical summaries of Huston-Tillotson University presidents are indicative of the premium
which the University places on service to community and nation. The tradition exemplified by
the University’s presidents is one in which all persons affiliated with Huston-Tillotson
University can take pride and one which students and alumni are encouraged to emulate.


The Presidents
The University’s first president, Matthew S. Davage (1952-55), graduated from New Orleans
University (now Dillard University) with a degree in classics and went on to earn graduate
degrees from the University of Chicago and Columbia University. He had compiled an illustrious

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Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008


career in higher education before accepting the presidency of Huston-Tillotson College at the age
of 73. Previously, he had been president of George R. Smith College, Haven Institute, Rust
College, Samuel Huston College, and Clark University (later Clark College, now Clark Atlanta
University). A revered figure in the annals of African American Methodism, Dr. Davage served
on the board of trustees for eight colleges during his illustrious career and was director of all
Methodist colleges for African Americans in the United States. Dr. Davage was once described
as a ―mentor, sage, and elder statesman.‖ To him fell the formidable task of leading the newly
merged Huston-Tillotson through its formative years.

Dr. Davage was succeeded by John Jarvis Seabrook, who held the presidency from 1955 to
1965. Born in Savannah, Georgia, Dr. Seabrook studied at Claflin College (where he later served
as president and earned an A.B. degree at Clark College (now Clark Atlanta University); a
master’s of divinity from Gammon Theological Seminary; and a law degree at Howard
University. Dr. Seabrook’s career encompassed nearly four decades in Christian education,
including periods as chaplain at Langston University and director of the Morgan College
Christian Center. Like his predecessor, Dr. Seabrook had been associated with Samuel Huston
College before becoming president at Huston-Tillotson University, having been director of the
social science division at Samuel Huston. An active participant in civic affairs, Dr. Seabrook
provided service to numerous organizations, including the Coordinating Board of the Texas
College and University System, Austin’s first Committee on Human Relations, the United Way
Board of Directors, the Community Council of Austin and Travis County, the Austin Chamber of
Commerce, and the Brackenridge Hospital Board.

Following Dr. Seabrook’s tenure, John Quill Taylor King, Sr., became president in 1965,
served until 1988, and was named Chancellor and President Emeritus following his retirement.
Dr. King ended a distinguished military career with the rank of Major General in the United
States Army and was later appointed by the governor to the rank of Lieutenant General in the
Texas State Guard. He holds bachelor’s degrees from Fisk University and Huston-Tillotson, a
master of science from DePaul University, and the doctorate from the University of Texas at
Austin. Active throughout his life in civic affairs and the Methodist Church, Dr. King has been a
member of numerous honorary societies and fraternal and professional organizations, including
Phi Beta Kappa, the Masons and Shriners, Boy Scouts of America, the Austin Regional Advisory
Board, Texas Commerce Bank (now J.P. Morgan Chase), and the Philosophical Society of
Texas. Listed in Who’s Who in America and other biographical publications, Dr. King has also
been widely published and is president of King-Tears Mortuary, Inc.

Joseph Turner McMillan, Jr., was the University’s fourth president (1988-2000). He received
the bachelor of science in psychology and a master of arts in student personnel from Howard
University and a doctorate of education from Columbia University Teachers College. Prior to his
tenure as president, Dr. McMillan was director for 18 years of the United Church of Christ’s
ministry in church-related higher education. Active in civic, cultural, religious, and educational
organizations, Dr. McMillan has served on boards of directors of organizations throughout the
nation, Austin, and Texas. Upon Dr. McMillan’s resignation as president, the Board of Trustees
bestowed upon him the title of President Emeritus.

The University entered the 21st century under the leadership of Larry L. Earvin, who
assumed the presidency in August 2000. Dr. Earvin earned his bachelor’s degree in business


                                            12
Huston-Tillotson University                                                    2006-2008


administration at Clark College (now Clark Atlanta University), a master’s degree in urban
planning from Georgia State University, and a doctorate in American studies from Emory
University. Immediately before coming to Huston-Tillotson, Dr. Earvin was Dean of the
School of Arts and Sciences at Clark Atlanta University. He has served on several
commissions and committees on higher education and is active in national and international
higher education initiatives and organizations. ―Redeeming the Promise‖ is the President’s
vision for Huston-Tillotson for the 21st century. Dr. Earvin believes that Huston-Tillotson
University is a unique place, makes a vital contribution to its surrounding community, to the
state of Texas, and to the nation at large. He has successfully built new relationships between
the University and its stakeholders, aggressively increased fund-raising efforts in spite of the
markedly weakened economy and downturns in the stock market, and increased the percentage
of faculty members holding the doctorate degree. A centerpiece of the first two years of his
administration was the reaffirmation of the University’s accreditation by the Commission on
Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.



                              BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES
Huston-Tillotson University is located on a 23-acre, tree-lined, flourishing campus near
downtown Austin, Texas. The University also owns 12 acres of property adjacent to the campus
for future expansion and development and maintains a biological field station south of the city
used by faculty and students for environmental research.
Campus buildings are named for past presidents and other distinguished persons in testimony to
their outstanding contributions in sustaining the institution and fostering its advancement. The
hyphenation of the building names commemorates the University’s joint heritage in the United
Church of Christ and The United Methodist Church. Each name links a representative of the
former Tillotson College (and the United Church of Christ) with a representative of the former
Samuel Huston College (and The United Methodist Church).


Agard-Lovinggood Classroom and Administration Building
The ―A-L‖ Building, as it is called on campus, was completed in 1968 and has been refurbished
several times. It is named for Dr. Isaac Merrit Agard, President of Tillotson College from 1905
to 1918, and Dr. Rueben Shannon Lovinggood, President of Samuel Huston College from 1900
to 1916. The three-story building serves as the principal administrative hub. The following
operational units and personnel are housed in A-L:

President of the University


Provost and Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs


Vice President for Administration and Finance
        Business Office
        Human Resources

                                           13
Huston-Tillotson University                                                     2006-2008


        Post Office and Duplicating Center
        Information Technology
        University Switchboard

A-L also includes several classrooms, two student computer laboratories, and the Offices of the
Dean and Business Professors from the School of Business and Technology. A lecture
hall/auditorium located on the main floor is equipped with distance-learning technology and has
a seating capacity of 216.



King-Seabrook Chapel/Jackson-Moody Humanities Building
The chapel-humanities complex was completed in 1974. Named for two presidents of the merged
Huston-Tillotson College—Dr. John Q. Taylor King, Sr. (1965-1988), and Dr. John Jarvis
Seabrook (1955-1965)—the building includes a 392-seat auditorium and a stage adequate for
dramatic and other productions. The humanities portion of the building was named for E. W.
Jackson, a former trustee and generous donor, and the Moody Foundation of Galveston, Texas,
which made a substantial contribution toward the construction of the building. In this portion of
the complex are classrooms, practice rooms for music students, the Campus Support Programs,
computer laboratories and testing facilities, and faculty offices for the following departments:
Humanities and Fine Arts, Social and Behavioral Sciences, and Academic Support Programs.


Dickey-Lawless Science Building
Dickey-Lawless was completed in 1954 and renovated and modernized in 1993. It houses the
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences; Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics; the
Department of Computer Science, an auditorium, several lecture rooms, laboratories, and offices
for the faculty. The building was named in honor of Dr. James L. Dickey, a Huston-Tillotson
graduate, Central Texas physician, and former member of the Board of Trustees, and Dr.
Frederick Lawless, a Chicago physician who also served on the Board of Trustees.


Downs-Jones Library
The split-level library was completed in 1960 and is named for Dr. Karl Everett Downs,
President of Samuel Huston College from 1943-1948, and Dr. William H. Jones, President of
Tillotson College from 1944-1952. The Stack room presently houses more than 91,393 printed
volumes and is capable of housing over 4,248 additional publications. The library subscribes to
approximately 308 periodicals, is part of an interlibrary loan program, and provides access to
28,000 ebooks and numerous electronic databases. The library is also a participating member of
TexShare, a library resource sharing program, which enables students, faculty, and staff to
borrow books from other member libraries. The library’s Alma Orme Moss Computer
Laboratory offers students a variety of software, internet, and e-mail services.

Located on the main floor are the general reading room, the computer laboratory, the main
stacks, the processing department, and staff offices. A curriculum library for the use of the
Teacher Education Program is located on the ground floor and houses a state adopted textbook


                                             14
Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008


collection. The lower level also includes the Media Services Area that acquires, manages, and
circulates all non-print resources, such as audio-visual equipment, VHS tapes, DVDs, and CDs; a
multipurpose room; viewing areas; and a faculty/staff development area with a computer
laboratory. Situated on the main floor near the circulation desk is the State Hermitage Museum
Kiosk (a virtual online touch-screen museum).


Allen-Frazier Residence Hall and Beard-Burrowes Residence Hall
Located at the north end of campus, Allen-Frazier (female students) and Beard-Burrowes (male
students) Residence Halls were occupied for the first time in 1956. Additions and renovations
were made in 1965, 1977,1988 and 1999. The halls offer a choice of traditional dormitory-style
communal living or suites for four students sharing a common living-study area and bath. Each
hall provides telephone service, cable television, laundry facilities, wireless internet connection,
computer room, central heat and air conditioning, community kitchen, and a lounge area.

The residence halls take their names from former buildings on the previous two campuses. Allen
Hall was the first building on the Tillotson College campus; Frazier Hall was part of Samuel
Huston College and named for Mr. J. W. Frazier, one of the first Samuel Huston professors.
Beard Hall was a former Tillotson College women’s dormitory, named for Reverend A. F.
Beard, Corresponding Secretary of the American Missionary Association from 1902 to 1912; and
Burrowes Hall was the first building on the Samuel Huston campus, named for Mr. Edward T.
Burrowes, a generous donor.


Davage-Durden Union Building
The University Union building, constructed in 1963, houses the dining facilities, a snack bar,
President’s Dining Room, lounge areas, the campus giftshop, and the offices of the Dean of
Student Affairs; Director of Campus Life and First Year Experience; and Student Government
Association. The building was named for Dr. Matthew S. Davage, President of Samuel Huston
College from 1917-1920 and of Huston-Tillotson College from 1952-1955, and for Mrs. Mattie
Ella Holman Durden, a Tillotson College graduate who served as Secretary of the Board of
Trustees.


Mary E. Branch Gymnasium-Auditorium
Constructed in 1952, this building houses the Intercollegiate Athletic Department and offices for
the coaches and athletic trainer. Classrooms and training areas are on the lower level. The
gymnasium on the upper level is used for indoor athletic and sports events and for special events.
The building is named for Miss Mary E. Branch, the only woman to serve as president of either
Sam Huston or Tillotson College.


Conner-Washington Hall
The two-story, wooden frame building located at the center of the campus was constructed in
1938 and served initially as the offices of the institution’s home economics program. It later
served as the residence of Dr. John Jarvis Seabrook, President of Huston-Tillotson from 1955 to

                                             15
Huston-Tillotson University                                                       2006-2008


1965. The building was renovated in 1995 and named in honor of Dr. B. E. Connor and Dr. M. J.
Washington, two distinguished physicians who served students enrolled at Tillotson College and
Samuel Huston College prior to the merger of the institutions in 1952. Enrollment Management
now occupies the building.


Evans Industrial Building
Evans Industrial Building is one of two historical structures on the campus. Constructed in 1911-
1912 by Tillotson College students, it was completely restored in 1984 and designated as a Texas
Historical Site. The building currently houses offices of Kinesiology instructors, teacher
education faculty offices, the Teaching Resource Center, the Human Performance Laboratory,
and a Distance Learning Laboratory. Originally known as Evans Industrial Hall, the building is
named for Major Ira H. Evans, a transplanted New Englander who served on the Tillotson
College Board of Trustees and who provided funds for the building’s construction.



Old Administration Building
Tillotson College students built the Old Administration Building in 1913-1914. It was entered in
the National Register of Historic Places in 1993 and is currently scheduled to have restoration of
the second and third floors completed by August of 2006. The first floor was fully restored in
2005 and currently houses the office of Institutional Advancement.

When fully restored, the building will house the small Business Resource Center and the African
American Heritage center on the first floor. The Institutional Advancement Office will move to
the second floor. The third floor will serve to house the Board of Trustees Conference Room and
the President’s suite. The restoration of the first floor was funded by a grant from the Department
of the Interior’s National Park Service. Restoration of the second and third floor with
modifications to the first floor is funded by a grant from the Department of Commerce’s
Economic Development Administration.

                              COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

                                    MISSION STATEMENT

Committed to excellence in teaching, academic achievement, and service, the College of Arts
and Sciences provides a supportive learning environment such that students will experience rich
opportunities for leadership, interaction, discovery, and cooperative learning. The College
promotes critical thinking, scholarly research, and effective communication skills through
innovative and cross-disciplinary teaching and learning strategies.

Goals

    To support individual as well as collaborative research and creative activity by faculty and
    students


                                            16
Huston-Tillotson University                                                          2006-2008


    To offer challenging undergraduate programs in the arts and sciences that prepare students
    for careers and encourage lifelong learning

    To provide opportunities for faculty and students to explore interdisciplinary connections
    through teaching, research, and intellectual discourse

    To establish partnerships with private and public organizations that advance the University’s
    service mission and benefit the local and regional community

    To develop students' ability to think critically and to communicate clearly and professionally

    To expand opportunities regionally and internationally for students and faculty to enrich their
    understanding of human diversity and global issues

    To    help    students    grow   into   responsible   leaders   and   socially   aware   citizens




                                              17
Huston-Tillotson University                                                   2006-2008




                                   College of Arts & Sciences

    The College of Arts and Sciences consists of the following departments:
    Department of Humanities and Fine Arts
            English (ENG)
            Religious Studies (REL)
            Music (MUS)
            History (HIS)

    Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences
            Criminal Justice (CJP)
            Political Science (PSC)
            Psychology (PSY)
            Sociology (SOC)

    Department of Teacher Education/Kinesiology
            Teacher Education (EDU)
            Alternative Teacher Education Certification Program (ATCP)
            Kinesiology (KIN)

    Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics
            Biology (BIO)
            Chemistry (CHE)
            Courses in Physics (PHY)
            Mathematics (MTH)




                                           18
Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008




                DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS


                  THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN ENGLISH (ENG)

The English program is a fundamental component of the University’s core curriculum. All
students take two semesters of first-year composition and one semester of sophomore literature.
English also offers courses that meet the core curriculum writing intensive and diversity course
requirements. It is the goal of the English program to help students develop the reading, writing,
speaking, research, and critical thinking skills necessary for their professional, civic, and
personal success.

The English major is designed to prepare students for graduate school and/or for professional
careers in areas where critical thinking and effective communication are valued. The required
courses lay the foundation for the successful pursuit of graduate degrees in the humanities, law,
communications, Education, creative writing, etc., as well as for careers in such fields as
teaching, journalism, and publishing. Students wishing to pursue careers as professional writers
(in technical, journalistic, or creative fields) may also elect to take courses in these areas.

Beginning in Fall 2007, students in the English major can choose either the Literary Arts track or
a new Communications/Journalism track. The two tracks share a common set of major course
requirements, and each track includes a set of courses that focus on developing skills and
knowledge in the chosen track. Students in the English Literary Arts track can also choose to
complete degree requirements for secondary education certification.

English majors seeking teacher certification should see the degree program for certification in
the English Language Arts/Reading in the Teacher Education section of this Bulletin.

The English program also offers two minors: a Minor in English and a Minor in Professional
Writing. The Minor in English provides students with a foundation in English language,
literature and writing studies. The Minor in Professional Writing is interdisciplinary and
designed to complement a wide variety of majors, including Business, Political Science,
Sociology, and History.

Requirements for a Major in English

Students in the English major must complete the English and Public Speaking (MED 100) core
curriculum courses with at least a ―B.‖ The required English core curriculum courses for
English majors include ENG 113, 123 and two sophomore literature courses selected from ENG
213, 223, and 233.


The English major requires 36 semester hours of courses in addition to the English core courses.
      I. Literary Arts              II. Communications/Journalism

Requirements for the English Major (both tracks)

                                            19
Huston-Tillotson University                                                   2006-2008


3 hours ENG 303 Language and Culture
3 hours ENG 353 Advanced Composition
3 hours ENG 473 African American Literature
3 hours ENG 493 Senior Seminar in English Language, Literature, and Culture
12 hours

I. Requirements for the English Major: Literary Arts
3 hours ENG 283 Modern Critical Theory
3 hours ENG 313A-E Topics in U.S. Literature
3 hours ENG 383A-E Topics in World Literature
3 hours ENG 343A-E Topics in British Literature
3 hours ENG 373A-E Topics in Writing
9 hours Approved electives
24 hours + 12 hours major core = 36 hours

II. Requirements for the English Major: Communications/Journalism
3 hours ENG 283J Introduction to Communications Theory and Practice
3 hours ENG 313J Professional Writing Technologies
3 hours ENG 323J Layout and Design
3 hours ENG 333A-E Topics in Journalism Writing and Editing
3 hours ENG 363 Advanced Rhetoric and Argumentation
3 hours ENG 403J Media Analysis
6 hours Approved electives
24 hours + 12 hours major core = 36 hours

Approved Electives:
ENG 393 Technical Writing
ENG 443 Children and Adolescent Literature (required for English/secondary education)
ENG 453A/B Special Topics in English Language, Literature, and Culture (as service practicum
for internship)
ENG 323 Teaching Writing
Any English Topics course, different topic
Any course from the other track

    1. Students must complete a comprehensive essay examination in the second semester of the
       senior year. In order to be eligible to take the TExES examination in English, students
       must score within an acceptable range on the comprehensive departmental examination.
       Students should see their English advisor to learn the minimal acceptable score.
    2. Students in the English Major who are not pursuing teacher certification are strongly
       advised to complete a minor. English Majors may also complete the Professional Writing
       Minor, but the same courses may not be used to meet both major and the minor
       requirements. Depending on their career interests, English majors might consider a
       minor in Pre-Law, Religious Studies, Spanish, Psychology, Sociology, Criminal Justice,
       Political Science, Business, Computer Science, or Music, etc.

    3. Students in the English Major Communications/Journalism track are strongly advised to
       acquire supervised internships in fields related to their career interests.

                                           20
Huston-Tillotson University                                                   2006-2008




Requirements for a Minor in English

Students pursuing a Minor in English must complete at least 18 semester hours of coursework.

3 hours English 303 Language and Culture
3 hours English 473 African American Literature
3 hours English 493 Senior Seminar in English Language, Literature, and Culture
3 hours upper-division writing courses:
                    English 353 Advanced Composition or
                    English 373A-E Topics in Writing or
                    English 393 Technical Writing
6 hours upper-division literature courses:
                    English 343A-E Topics in British Literature or
                    English 313A-E Topics in U.S. Literature or
                    English 383A-E Topics in World Literature

Requirements for a Minor in Professional Writing

Students pursuing a Minor in Professional Writing must complete at least 18
semester hours of coursework.

3 hours BUS 241 Business Communications
3 hours ENG 353 Advanced Composition (or approved substitute for English majors)
3 hours ENG 393 Technical Writing or ENG 373A-E Topics in Writing
       or ENG 333A-E Topics in Journalism Writing and Editing
9 hours approved electives:
                   ENG 373A-E Topics in Writing, different topic if already taken
                   CSC 163 Web Site Design and Maintenance
                   ENG 453A/B when special topic is in Writing (requires approval of the
                   English advisor)
                   ENG 283J Communications Theory and Practice
                   ENG 313J Professional Writing Technologies
                   ENG 323 Teaching Writing
                   ENG 333A-E Topics in Journalism Writing and Editing, different topic if
                   already taken
                   ENG 363 Advanced Rhetoric and Argumentation




                                           21
 Huston-Tillotson University                                                                 2006-2008




              A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE ENGLISH MAJOR
                               LITERARY ARTS

     Year 1 Fall                                                Spring
              ENG 113 Intro. to College Comp.               3
              MTH 143 College Algebra                      3    ENG 123 College Rhetoric & Comp.         3
              PSY 102 College 101                          2    MED 233 Public Speaking                  3
              Fine Arts Core                               3    KIN 113 Health and Wellness              1
              KIN 101, 111 Personal Fitness, Sport         1    CSC 103 Intro to Computers               3
              Language I                                   3    Language II                              3
              Total Hours                                  15   Total Hours                              13


     Year 2 Fall                                                Spring
              ENG 213, 223, or 233 Literature              3    ENG 213, 223, or 233 Literature          3
              HIS 213 or 223 U.S History I or II           3    Elective or Minor                        3
              Behavioral Science Core                      3    PSC 113 or 123 U.S. or Texas Govt.       3
              Science I                                    4    Science II                               4
              ENG 283 Modern Critical Theory               3    Ethics Core                              3
              Total Hours                                  16   Total Hours                              16


     Year 3 Fall                                                Spring
              ENG 383 Topics in World Literature           3    ENG 313 Topics in U.S. Literature        3
              ENG 303 Language and Culture                 3    ENG 373 Topics in Writing                3
          *   ENG 353 Advanced Composition                 3    English Elective                         3
              Elective or Minor                            3    Elective or Minor                        3
              Elective or Minor                            3    Elective or Minor                        3
              Total Hours                                  15   Total Hours                              15


     Year 4 Fall                                                Spring
              ENG Topics (elective)                        3    ENG 493 Senior Seminar                   3
              ENG 443 Children & Adolescent Lit.           3
                          or other English elective             ENG 343 Topics in British Literature     3
          *   ENG 473 African American Lit.                3    Elective or Minor                        3
              Elective or Minor                            3    Elective or Minor                        3
              Elective or Minor                            3    Elective or Minor                        3
              Total Hours                                  15   Total Hours                              15

 All students are required to take 6 hours of diversity-focused courses and 15 hours of substantial
 writing component courses. English majors are required to take 6 hours of sophomore literature
 (English 213, 223, or 233).

* ENG 353, ENG 383, and ENG 473 are offered annually. All other upper-level English courses
  may be offered every other year. Students should take those courses when offered to ensure
  timely progress through the program.

                                                      22
Huston-Tillotson University                                                               2006-2008



            A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE ENGLISH MAJOR
                                   COMMUNICATIONS/JOURNALISM

    Year 1 Fall                                               Spring
             ENG 113 Intro. to College Comp.             3
             MTH 143 College Algebra                     3    ENG 123 College Rhetoric & Comp.        3
             PSY 102 College 101                         2    MED 233 Public Speaking                 3
             Fine Arts Core                              3    KIN 113 Health and Wellness             1
             KIN 101, 111 Personal Fitness, Sport        1    CSC 103 Intro to Computers              3
             Language I                                  3    Language II                             3
             Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                             13


    Year 2 Fall                                               Spring
             ENG 213, 223, or 233 Literature             3    ENG 213, 223, or 233 Literature         3
             HIS 213 or 223 U.S History I or II          3    ENG 313J Prof. Writing Technologies     3
             Behavioral Science Core                     3    PSC 113 or 123 U.S. or Texas Govt.      3
             Science I                                   4    Science II                              4
             ENG 283J Intro. to C. Theory & Practice     3    Ethics Core                             3
             Total Hours                                 16   Total Hours                             16


    Year 3 Fall                                               Spring
             ENG 323J Layout and Design                  3    ENG 333A-E Topics Journalism W & Ed.    3
             ENG 353 Advanced Composition                3    ENG 363 Adv Rhetoric & Argumentation    3
             ENG 303 Language and Culture                3    ENGJ Approved Elective for Major        3
             Elective or Minor                           3    Elective or Minor                       3
             Elective or Minor                           3    Elective or Minor                       3
             Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                             15


    Year 4 Fall                                               Spring
             ENG 403J Media Analysis                     3    ENG 493 Senior Seminar                  3
             ENG 473 African American Lit.               3    ENGJ Approved Elective for Major        3
             ENG 453A Special Topics (Internship)        3    ENG 453B Special Topics (Internship)    3
             Elective or Minor                           3    Elective or Minor                       3
             Elective or Minor                           3    Elective or Minor                       3
             Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                             15




                                                    23
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                  2006-2008


                                    COURSES IN ENGLISH (ENG)

ENG 003 Foundations of College Writing                                               3 Credit Hours
This course provides students with instruction in the basics of acceptable academic writing, with special
focus on preparing them to succeed in the writing demanded in the Huston-Tillotson University first-year
composition sequence. The course helps students address writing problems with work in such areas as
the composing process, organization, cohesion, paragraphing, syntax, and use of evidence. The course
also helps students (on an individual basis within the context of their own writing) with their particular
problems in grammar, usage, punctuation, and spelling. A student must earn a grade of at least a ―C‖ to
progress to ENG 113.
The course does not count for degree credit.
Prerequisite: None                                                  Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

ENG 013 Foundations of College Reading                                               3 Credit Hours
This is a course in reading, study skills and vocabulary development. It offers intensive practice in
paragraph structure and analysis while encouraging critical thinking and problem solving. It includes
instruction for second-language students. To pass, students are required to make a grade of ―C‖ or better
and to perform acceptably on an exit test.
The course does not count for degree credit.
Prerequisite: None                                                  Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

ENG 023 Intensive English                                                            3 Credit Hours
This is a course for international students who score between 400 and 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL) and who have been admitted to the University conditionally. Beginning with the fluency
model or whole-language-acquisition approach and routinely using computers, students rapidly proceed to
grammatical refinement; English listening, speaking, and note-taking skills; reading comprehension; and
vocabulary building. Thus they strengthen their foundation for University-level academic studies.
The course does not count for degree credit.
Prerequisite: None                                                                      Offered: Fall


ENG 111 Writing Center Review                                                         1 Credit Hour
This course is designed to reinforce writing skills taught in ENG 003 and ENG 113.
Prerequisite: None                                                             Offered: Spring

ENG 113 Introduction to College Composition                                          3 Credit Hours
English 113, the first course in the college composition sequence, helps students develop critical reading skills
and a clear and effective writing style appropriate for academic contexts. The course familiarizes students with
academic audiences, situations, purposes, genres, and primary conventions of those genres, and introduces
students to incorporating sources into their writing. Students develop planning, organizing, and revising skills.
This course reviews standard American grammar and usage in the context of student writing and fosters
vocabulary acquisition.       Major assignments might include personal experience, comparison/contrast,
analytical and persuasive essays. Students must earn at least a ―C‖ to progress to ENG 123.
Prerequisite: Acceptable writing placement test score or                 Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly
               successful completion of ENG 003 with a “C” or better.




                                                  24
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                           2006-2008


ENG 123 College Rhetoric and Composition                                                     3 Credit Hours
The second course in the college composition sequence, English 123 develops students’ ability to read analytically
and to write clear, logical, rhetorically astute, substantiated arguments appropriate for academic and public
discourse. Students learn to use library and information technologies to locate, evaluate and select relevant and
authoritative evidence. Effectively incorporating and appropriately documenting sources and understanding the
ethics of academic discourse is emphasized. This course helps students further develop an expressive, grammatical
and coherent writing style. Major assignments might include definitional, evaluative, ethical, narrative and proposal
arguments. Students must pass the writing portion of the THEA while enrolled in this course, unless they have
already passed it.
Prerequisite: ENG 113 with a “C” or better.                               Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

ENG 133 Introduction to the Arts                                                             3 Credit Hours
This is an introductory study of the visual, literary, dramatic, and musical arts, which includes approaches
to understanding the arts and consideration of the roles of artistic expression in human cultures. It
includes attendance at live performances, gallery presentations, or other cultural events.
Prerequisites: None                                                              Offered: As needed

ENG 213 World Literature through the 18th Century                                            3 Credit Hours
Study in ENG 213 begins with the oldest surviving texts of the ancient world, including those that came
from oral traditions, and may extend through the 18th century. Students consider how different global
cultures have interacted over time; to engage a range of genres and enduring human themes; and to relate
those themes to their own time and place. Attention is given to aesthetics, and to cultural and historical
context, including the effects of translation, inscription, and dissemination in the creation and meanings of
texts. Study may include comparison of literary texts with other forms of cultural expression.
Assignments encourage students to develop analytical, communication, vocabulary, and research skills.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 with a “C” or better. Offered: Rotational basis with ENG 223 & 233

ENG 223 World Literature from the 18th Century to the Present                                3 Credit Hours
Students in ENG 223 study a variety of literary works from the 18th century to the present, including works of
relevance to the ethnic groups represented in our classes. Students learn to appreciate the ways in which literature
has reflected and often helped to shape our modern world, and to consider how different works relate to their own
time and place. In addition to studying literary aesthetics, students learn to examine texts in their cultural, historical,
social and political contexts. Assignments encourage students to develop analytical, communication, vocabulary,
and research skills.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 with a “C” or better. Offered: Rotational basis with ENG 213 & 233

ENG 233 American Literature                                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course is a comparative study of American literature in a world context, focusing on diverse U.S. texts
and their relationship with world literature. Students will be encouraged to investigate the definition of
―American,‖ and to situate that definition in a world context, exploring literary and cultural heritages, as well
as varied and shared experiences. Study might include such comparisons as African American literature and
the literature of Africa and other African diasporas, or Chicano/a literature and Hispanic Caribbean, Spanish,
indigenous American and Latin American literature. Focused on American pluralism as manifested in
multicultural, multilingual, multiethnic, and transnational literature, this course fosters respect for cultural
diversity and understanding of international relations as it develops analytical, communication, critical writing
and research skills.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 with a “C” or better. Offered: Rotational Basis with ENG 213 & 223




                                                       25
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                      2006-2008


ENG 283 Modern Critical Theory                                                           3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of modern critical terms and approaches literary scholars employ to analyze texts,
including aesthetic, structural and post-structural, genre, feminist, historicist, critical cultural, and
audience response theories. It considers the role of history and political ideologies in the formation of
literary texts and canons.
Prerequisite: Completion of the English core curriculum courses.
Offered: Fall (May be offered every other year)


ENG 283J Introduction to Communications Theory and Practice                              3 Credit Hours
In this course, students study a broad range of critical media theories and perspectives as they explore the
cultural production and reception of print and electronic media in communication systems. The study
includes the social, historical, economic, legal, and ethical dimensions of communications in global and
multi-cultural contexts.
Prerequisite ENG 123                                                                  Offered: Fall

ENG 303 Language and Culture                                                             3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the history of the English language, which includes study of the historical, social,
cultural, technological, and political factors that have influenced the development of the English language; the
diversity of the English language; the basics of linguistics and socio-linguistics; and social and political
language issues.
Prerequisite: Completion of the English core curriculum courses.
Offered: Fall (May be offered every other year)


ENG 313 A-E Topics in U.S. Literature                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on genres, historic periods, or schools of U.S. Literature. Topics vary but may include
Hispanic-American Literature, U.S. Women’s Literature, Native American Literature, Literature of the U.S. to
the Civil War, Twentieth-century U.S. Literature, the U.S. novel, U.S. poetry, etc.
May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
Prerequisite: Completion of the English core curriculum courses.
Offered: Spring (May be offered every other year)

ENG 313J Professional Writing Technologies                                               3 Credit Hours
In this course students develop proficiency with technologies of technical and professional writing
including digital environments and software applications.
Prerequisite ENG 123                                                       Offered: Spring

ENG 323 Teaching Writing                                                                 3 Credit Hours
In this writing intensive course, students explore theories, research, and approaches to the teaching of writing.
The study considers writing for diverse audiences, purposes and communities, writing processes, writing in
collaboration, peer tutoring, and the role of learning differences in the development of writing skills. (This
writing intensive course especially serves Education, all levels.)
Prerequisite: Completion of English core curriculum courses.                      Offered: As needed


ENG 323J Layout and Design                                                               3 Credit Hours
This production laboratory includes study of visual rhetoric and principles of design, including the use of
form, line and color. Students will work with advanced publication technologies.
Prerequisite: ENG 283J and ENG 313J                                                 Offered: Fall


                                                     26
Huston-Tillotson University                                                               2006-2008


ENG 333A-E Topics in Journalism Writing and Editing                               3 Credit Hours
Topics vary, but may include Writing for the Media, Writing for Newspapers, Writing for Magazines, and
Writing for Digital Environments. As they write for publications, students learn about journalistic
rhetoric and style, as well as journalistic practices, including interviewing, news gathering, editing, and
writing under the pressure of deadlines.
May be repeated when topics vary.
Prerequisite ENG 283J                                                             Offered: Spring

ENG 343 A-E Topics in British Literature                                          3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on a region, genre, or historical period of British literature. Topics vary, but may
include Postcolonial Literatures in English, Early British Literature (Old English-Restoration), British
Drama, Black British Authors, etc.
May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
Prerequisite: Completion of English core curriculum courses.
Offered: Spring (May be offered every other year)

ENG 353 Advanced Composition                                                      3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced writing course combining theory and practice of modern research with an examination of
modern standard American English that stresses rhetorical and pragmatic approaches to the use of writing
conventions and appropriate grammar and usage. Students learn to use the tools of revision, rhetoric, and
technology. The difference between first draft writing and writing for publication is stressed.
Prerequisite: ENG 123                                                                Offered: Fall /Yearly

ENG 363 Advanced Rhetoric and Argumentation                                       3 Credit Hours
This course offers a survey of the history of rhetoric from classical to contemporary and the analysis of
significant argumentation, particularly law and politics. The study is sensitive to the historical and
cultural contexts in which arguments are produced and received and considers how rhetorical theory and
practice change over time.
Prerequisite: ENG 123; Recommended: ENG 353                                     Offered: Spring

ENG 373 A-E Topics in Writing                                                     3 Credit Hours
This is an intensive course in writing and research in academic and professional fields. Topics vary, but may
include Writing for the Media, Writing in the Humanities, Creative Writing, Writing for the Legal
Profession, and The Essay. This course may be offered in other disciplines and cross-listed with English to
fulfill the English major requirement.
May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
Prerequisite: Completion of the English core curriculum courses.                    Offered: Spring

ENG 383 A-E Topics in World Literature                                            3 Credit Hours
This is a course focusing on areas such as The Modern African Novel, Caribbean Literature, Literature of
the Ancient World, World Folklore, and Literature of Latin America.
May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or its equivalent and ENG 213 or 223.                  Offered: Yearly

ENG 393 Introduction to Technical Writing                                         3 Credit Hours
This course helps students gain understanding, experience, and skill in scientific, technical, and business
communication. They learn basic theories of scientific and technical writing and explore how to use logic,
arrangement, and style in writing for various scientific and technical audiences. Major writing assignments,
class discussions, and other coursework introduce students to principles and contexts of specific types of
scientific, technical, and professional documents. Genres might include research proposals, research reports,


                                                 27
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                 2006-2008


lab reports, professional resumes, and job application letters. Assignments model real-world scientific and
professional writing and include team projects and oral presentations. The course reinforces general
principles of good writing. Students will assess, revise, and edit their own writing. By the end of the course,
students should have the ability to write clearly and succinctly on technical subjects.
Prerequisite: Completion of the English core curriculum courses;                     Offered: Yearly
               recommended completion of Advanced Composition.

ENG 403J Media Analysis                                                            3 Credit Hours
This course is an in-depth study of textual, social, aesthetic, and cultural analysis of print, television, and
new media. The study includes production analysis, and sociological, critical and ideological analysis of
media form and contents.
Prerequisite: ENG 283J                                                                 Offered: Fall


ENG 443 Literature for Children and Adolescents                                     3 Credit Hours
This course is a survey of literature appropriate for younger readers, designed to prepare prospective
educators. Assignments encourage an appreciation of the importance of creative writing for children and
adolescents.
Prerequisite: Completion of English core curriculum courses.               Offered: As needed
              recommended completion of Advanced Composition

ENG 453 A/B Special Topics in Language, Literature, and Culture                     3 Credit Hours
This course serves to cover special topics or as a practicum in the area of English, and topics may vary
from one semester to the next. Topics will focus not only on literature or language issues, but also cover
the collection, documentation, editing, analysis, and presentation of familial and community artifacts and
documents. When offered as a practicum, students must complete 60 clock hours of service learning at an
approved site.
May be repeated when topics vary.
Prerequisite: Course Instructor and Advisor Approval                          Offered: As Needed

ENG 473 African American Literature                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of important essays, plays, poetry, and novels written and published by African
Americans in the United States and the African Diaspora. Students will explore the depictions and
experiences of African American characters in fiction, drama, poetry, and folklore. Students will analyze
essays written by and about African Americans for their contribution toward understanding of the African
American experiences.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing and completion                     Offered: Fall/Yearly
               of English core curriculum courses.

ENG 493 Senior Seminar in English Literature, Language and Culture 3 Credit Hrs
A capstone course in English literature and language in which students will write and defend a thesis that
allows them to demonstrate knowledge and analytic skills gained over the course of study in the English
program and provides them with a polished writing sample for graduate school or job applications. Three
faculty readers, one of whom is the primary advisor, will read the senior thesis, which will culminate in
an oral presentation delivered to the faculty readers and open to the University community.
Prerequisite: Senior standing within the English program. Offered: As needed




                                                  28
Huston-Tillotson University                                                     2006-2008




                  THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN HISTORY (HIS)

The study of History is an important part of the journey for intellectual development and human
understanding. Through History we are able to break out of our own isolated worlds and begin
to cultivate and develop an understanding of the great varieties of human experience. In
addition, through History students develop analytical skills that enable them to interpret and
understand both the past and the present as well as identify trends and explore human existence.
Ultimately, History helps students to appreciate both the limits and the possibilities of our own
age.

The History program at Huston-Tillotson University provides students with a global perspective
and a solid grounding in the methods and fields of History. The History program prepares
students to find patterns, ideologies, experiences, and narratives that can serve as connecting
points for our diverse communities and societies. With their knowledge of the past and their
historical perspective, History students go on to careers in all levels of education, government,
and law, as well as social service, communications, museum and archival work, and business.

History majors seeking teacher certification should see the degree program for certification in
History in the Teacher Education section of this Bulletin.

Degree Requirements for a Major in History
The major requires 39 credit hours of course work that includes 6 credit hours of history
electives and 3 credit hours of either an upper division social science or humanities course.
History Courses:
HIS 113 – World Cultures and Civilizations I
HIS 123 – World Cultures and Civilizations II
HIS 213 – United States History I
HIS 223 – United States History II
HIS 323 – Latin American History
HIS 343 – Social Studies and History for Secondary Teachers
HIS 373 – African American History I
HIS 383 – African American History II or HIS 443 Race Relations in the Americas
HIS 413 – Early Modern Europe or HIS 423 – Modern Europe
HIS 498 – Historical Methods or HIS 499 – History Seminar
Electives:
HIS Non-Western History Elective
HIS History elective
Elective: Upper Division Social Science or Humanities course

Requirements for a Minor in History


                                           29
Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008


Students pursuing a minor in History must complete at least 18 semester hours. HIS 113 and 123
are required. In addition, students must select one course from each of the following three areas:

United States History
HIS 353 Twentieth Century United States History
HIS 453 Texas History in the Borderlands
HIS 483 Special Topics in History (when the topic relates to U.S. History)

African and African American History
HIS 373 African American History I
HIS 383 African American History II
HIS 393 African History
HIS 443 Race Relations in the Americas
HIS 483 Special Topics in History (when the topic relates to African American History)

World History
HIS 333 Asian and East Asian History
HIS 413 Early Modern European History
HIS 423 Modern European History
HIS 433 Middle Eastern History
HIS 483 Special Topics in History (when the topic relates to World History)

Students also must take an additional three credit hours of History. Students must maintain a 2.5
GPA in the minor and not receive any grades of ―D‖ or lower. Students minoring in History are
strongly encouraged to complete an internship for academic credit.




                                            30
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                     2006-2008


           A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE HISTORY MAJOR

 Year 1 Fall                                                    Spring
         PSY     102      College 101                       2   MTH     143      College Algebra                   3
         ENG     113      Intro to College Composition      3   ENG     123      College Rhetoric & Comp.          3
         KIN     113      Health and Wellness               3   MED     233      Public Speaking                   3
         CSC     103      Introduction to Computers         3   PSC     123      Amer. Government State Local      3
         KIN     101,     Personal Fitness, Team Sports     1   LSP,    123      Language II                       3
                 111                                            LFR
         LSP,    113 Language I                             3
         LFR
         Total Hours                                       15   Total Hours                                        15
Year 2 Fall                                                     Spring
       HIS       213      US History I                      3   HIS     223      US History II                     3
       HIS       113      World Culture and Civ. I          3   HIS     123      World Culture and Civ. II         3
       -------   ------   Minor or Elective                 3   ------- ------   Minor or Elective                 3
       PSC       113      American Government Federal       3   ------ ----      Fine Arts Core                    3
       -------   ------   Science I                         4   ------- ------   Science II                        4


         Total Hours                                       16   Total Hours                                        16
Year 3    Fall                                                  Spring
         -----   -----     Ethics, Religion Core            3   HIS 383          Afr Amer Hist II or            3
         HIS     323       Latin American History           3   HIS 443          Race Relations in the Americas
         HIS     -----     History Elective                 3   Upper            Social Sci or Humanities Elec  3
                                                                Division
         HIS     373       African Amer. Hist I (divrs)     3   HIS 463          Hist Methods or                   3
                                                                HIS 473          Hist Seminar
         ------- -----     Minor or Elective                3   ENG 213          World Literature , 18th century   3
                                                                ------ -----     Minor or Elective                 3


          Total Hours                                      15   Total Hours                                        15
 Year 4 Fall                                                    Spring
        -----   -----      Behavioral Science Core         3    HIS ----- Non-Western Hist. Elective               3
       HIS 413             Early Eur. History or           3    ------ ------ Minor or Elective                    3
               423         Modern Eur. History
       HIS 343             Soc. Studies, Hist. Methods      3    ------- ------ Minor or Elective                  3
       ------- ------      Minor or Elective                3    ------- ------ Minor or Elective                  3
       ------- ------      Minor or Elective                3    ------- ------ Minor or Elective                  3
       Total Hours                                         15    Total Hours                                       15




                                                      31
Huston-Tillotson University                                                         2006-2008


                                 COURSES IN HISTORY (HIS)

HIS 113 World Cultures and Civilizations I                                   3 Credit Hours
A broad survey of Asian, Middle Eastern, Greek, Roman, European, African, and American
cultures with an emphasis on the classical and medieval civilizations of the East and West.
Prerequisite: None                                                      Offered: Fall/Yearly

HIS 123 World Cultures and Civilizations II                                  3 Credit Hours
A broad survey of Asian, Middle Eastern, Greek, Roman, European, African, and American cultures with
an emphasis on the interaction among these civilizations from 1400 to the present.
Prerequisite: None                                                       Offered: Spring/Yearly

HIS 133 Introduction to the African American Experience                      3 Credit Hours
An interdisciplinary course that studies African Americans in the United States. The course includes
a survey of ancient Africa, slavery in the United States, the Civil War, Reconstruction, s egregation,
the Harlem Renaissance, and the civil rights movement.
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

HIS 213 United States History I                                              3 Credit Hours
An introduction to United States history from the pre-colonial period through Reconstruction. It
is required of all teacher certification candidates.
Prerequisite: ENG 113 or Instructor Approval                  Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

HIS 223 United States History II                                             3 Credit Hours
An introduction to United States history from Reconstruction to the present. It is required of all
teacher certification candidates.
Prerequisite: ENG 113 or Instructor Approval                 Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

HIS 323 Latin American History                                               3 Credit Hours
A survey of Latin American History. Special emphasis is placed on contact, colonization, and
independence.
Prerequisite: HIS 113 or 123 or Instructor Approval Offered: Fall/Every Three Years

HIS 333 Asian and East Asian History                                         3 Credit Hours
An examination of the peoples and cultures of Asia and the impact that contact with the West has
had on both Asia and the world.
Prerequisite: HIS 113 or 123 or Instructor Approval       Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

HIS 343 Social Studies and History for Secondary Teachers                    3 Credit Hours
An exploration of the history and social studies curriculum taught in Texas middle and high schools.
Although topics include government, geography, and economics, the primary focus is history. The
course includes both classroom discussions as well as field work.
Prerequisite: HIS 213 and 223                              Offered: Spring/Every Three Years

HIS 353 Twentieth Century United States History                              3 Credit Hours
An examination of both the changing role of the United States in global affairs as well as the
changing nature of United States’ society and culture during the 20 th century.
Prerequisite: HIS 213 or 223 or Instructor Approval                       Offered: As Needed




                                             32
Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


HIS 373 African American History I                                               3 Credit Hours
Commencing with the West African origins, this course examines the history of African American people
and their search for freedom from the era of the Atlantic slave trade through the period of the Civil War.
Prerequisite: HIS 213 or 223 or Instructor Approval                           Offered: Fall Yearly

HIS 383 African American History II                                              3 Credit Hours
An examination of historical trends, ideological issues, key personalities, and major events
that have characterized the African American experience from the Reconstruction period to
the present.
Prerequisite: HIS 213 or 223 or Instructor Approval            Offered: Spring Yearly

HIS 393 African History                                                          3 Credit Hours
A survey of African history from prehistoric times to the present.
Prerequisite: HIS113 or 123 or Instructor Approval         Offered: Spring/Every Three Years

HIS 413 Early Modern Europe                                                      3 Credit Hours
A survey of the history of Europe from about 1400 to 1800. Topics will include the Renaissance and
Reformation; transitions from feudal to capitalist and colonial economies; health and epidemic diseases;
women’s experiences, sexuality and family life; the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment; absolutism
and the development of modern nation states.
Prerequisite: HIS 113 or 123 or Instructor Approval             Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

HIS 423 Modern Europe                                                            3 Credit Hours
A survey history of Europe from the French Revolution of 1789 to the present, emphasizing the
development of new political traditions and social structures, the establishment of new forms of
international organizations, the transformation of work, changes in the lived environment, and the
evolution of understandings of self.
Prerequisite: HIS 113 or 123 or Instructor Approval        Offered: Fall/Every Three Years

HIS 433 Middle Eastern History                                                   3 Credit Hours
A survey of Middle Eastern history, with emphasis on the region’s relationship with the West, the
rise of nationalism, and the conflict between traditionalism and modernization.
Prerequisite: HIS 113 or 123 or Instructor Approval       Offered: Spring/Every Three Years

HIS 443 Race Relations in the Americas                                           3 Credit Hours
A comparative study of the interactions of Europeans, Africans, Asians, Latinos, and
Amerindians in the Western Hemisphere from the colonial period to the present.
Prerequisite: HIS 213 or 223 or Instructor Approval Offered: Spring/Every Other Years

HIS 453 Texas History in the Borderlands                                         3 Credit Hours
An examination of southwestern history with a special emphasis on Texas history. This course takes a
chronological/thematic approach beginning with the earliest exploration of New Spain in the 16th century and
culminating in an analysis of contemporary challenges and concerns in the Borderlands.
Prerequisite: HIS 213 or 223 or Instructor Approval           Offered: Spring/Every Other Year




                                                33
Huston-Tillotson University                                                            2006-2008


HIS 483 A/B Special Topics                                                      3 Credit Hours
Topics vary according to current interests of the department and/or students. May be repeated
once for credit when the topic varies.
Prerequisite: None                                     Offered: Spring/Every Other Year

HIS 493 Internship in History                                                   3 Credit Hours
An internship experience for History students. Students work as interns with three options:
        HIS 493A              Archives and History Collections
        HIS 493B              Museums and Cultural Centers
        HIS 493C              Historical Research Assistant
Prerequisite: 12 semester hours in history, including                 Offered: By Arrangement
              9 upper level hours, and department approval.

HIS 498 Historical Methods                                                      3 Credit Hours
An examination and application of various techniques of historical research and writing, such as the use
of primary source materials and comparative analysis. The course will explore historical schools of
thought as reflections of the history writer, the context, and the time frame.
Prerequisite: None                                                       Offered: Every Other Year


HIS 499 History Seminar                                                         3 Credit Hours
A course covering topics such as original research, data collection, and history writing. Students will
explore aspects of the history profession and career opportunities within the field. Students will also
acquire technology literacy in the field of history through e-portfolio or
e-publishing assignments.
Prerequisite: None                                                  Offered: Every Other Year




                                                34
Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008


                    THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN MUSIC (MUS)

The Music Program plays a vital role in the life of the University and the community. The
training environment it provides continues to produce musicians of distinction for careers in a
variety of professional fields including performance and music education. The faculty is
comprised of dedicated professional musicians who are active in both performance and teaching.

                              Admission Requirements to the Music Program

All Students are required to apply for admission and readmission to the University through the
office of Enrollment Management.
    1. In addition to the general admission requirements of the University, a student must pass
        an audition conducted by the music faculty.
    2. New students and transfer students must also complete a written diagnostic examination
       in music theory and a piano or other keyboard proficiency examination. Students who
       show deficiencies must enroll in MUS 130 for zero credit hours and students with no
       experience on the piano must enroll in class piano.

Degrees Offered
The Music Program        offers two degree programs. Students seeking a broad education with an
emphasis in the arts     should follow the Bachelor of Arts in Music program. Students seeking
certification to teach   music in the public schools of Texas should pursue the Bachelor of Music
Education program.       Both of these degree programs require the student to begin the program in
the freshman year.

Degree Requirements for a Major in Music
      1. 6 hours of French (voice majors)
      2. English 473 (required of voice majors)
      3. 12 hours of Music Performance
           a. 8 hours of applied principal, Junior Recital prepared and performed during the
               junior year, Senior Recital prepared and performed during the senior year.
           b. Piano Proficiency Requirement: 8 hours of Class Piano (MUS 112p, 122p,
               212p, 222p). Students must take the piano proficiency exam at the end of
               MUS 222p. Students who do not pass the exam are required to register for
               applied lessons until they pass. Passing the piano performance exam is a
               music graduation requirement. Piano majors will enroll in a secondary applied
               lesson in lieu of class piano.
           c. Additionally, Music Seminar must be taken each semester the student is
               enrolled in a music degree program.
      4. 30 hours of Music Theory and Music Literature. MUS 113, 123, 213, 223, 353, 363,
         373, 383, 393, 413.
      5. 8 hours of Music Ensemble
Degree Requirements for a Major in Music Education
      1. 16 credit hours of Music Performance
             a. 8 credit hours of applied principle including Senior Recital.

                                               35
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                 2006-2008


                 b. Piano Proficiency Requirement: 8 credit hours of Class Piano         (MUS
                     112p, 122p, 212p, 222p)
                 c. Additionally, Music Seminar must be taken each semester the student is
                     enrolled in a music degree program.
        2.   24 credit hours in Music Theory and Music Literature. MUS 113, 123, 213, 223, 363,
             383, 393, 413.
        3.   7 credit hours of Music Ensemble
        4.   19 credit hours of Music Education; MUS 242, 252, 283, 333, 343, 372, 373, or 323,
             481.
        5.   20 credit hours of professional development courses as determined by the Department
             of Teacher Education.

Requirements for a Minor in Music
Students pursuing a minor in Music must complete at least 18 credit hours.
        1. MUS 133 as prescribed, MUS 113, 123, 213.
        2. Remaining hours selected from MUS 242, 333, 353, 383, 393, Applied Piano, Class
           Piano, Applied Voice, Class Voice.
        3. Enrollment in Concert Choir and/or Instrumental Ensemble is required for three
           semesters (a total of 3 credit hours).
        4. Additionally, enrollment in Music Seminar is required each semester a student is
           enrolled in any other music course.

Piano Proficiency Requirement: Students will take the piano proficiency examination at the end
of MUS 222p (Class Piano IV). Students who fail the exam will be required to register for an
applied lesson until they pass. Passing the Piano Proficiency examination is a graduation
requirement.

Upper Division Standing must be obtained before a student majoring in Music Education may
be admitted to the MUS 300 and 400 level courses.
Students pursuing the Music Education degree may not apply for admission to Upper Division
Standing in Music Education until they have completed the equivalent of 45 credit hours. All
upper division Music Education courses must be taken at Huston-Tillotson University in
sequence. Admission to Upper Division Standing in Music Education is based on:
    (a) Cumulative overall grade point average of 2.5;
    (b) Cumulative Applied Music grade point average (principal instrument/voice) of 3.0;
    (c) Cumulative Music Ensemble grade point average of 3.0;
    (d) Cumulative academic music courses (any course with the MUS prefix) grade point
         average of 2.5;
    (e) Passing the THEA test or an approved alternative.
No student will be accepted into the Department of Teacher Education unless he or she receives
written authorization from the Director of Music Education.
             A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE MUSIC MAJOR
    Year 1 Fall                                              Spring
             Music Ensemble                              1   Music Ensemble                               1
             Class Piano I or applied secondary        1-2   Class Piano II or applied secondary        1-2


                                                  36
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                      2006-2008


             MUS 11s-81s Music Seminar                      1     MUS 11s-81s Music Seminar                   1
             Applied principal instrument or voice          1     Applied principal instrument or voice       1
             MUS 133 Basic Musicianship                     3     KIN 113 Health & Wellness                   3
             PSY 102 College 101                            2     CSC 103 Intro. To Computers                 3
             ENG 113 Intro. To College                      3     ENG 123 College Rhetoric &                   3
             Composition                                          Composition
             MTH 143 College Algebra                         3    Religion/Philosophy                         3
             Physical Education                              1
             Total Hours                                  16-17   Total Hours                             16-17


    Year 2 Fall                                                    Spring
             Music Ensemble                                   1   Music Ensemble                             1
             Class Piano III or applied secondary          1-2    Class Piano IV or applied secondary      1-2
             MUS 11s-81s Music Seminar                        1   MUS 11s-81s Music Seminar                  1
             Applied principal instrument or voice            1   Applied principal instrument or voice      1
             MUS 113 Music Theory I                          3    MUS 123 Music Theory II                    3
             Science I                                       4    Science II                                 4
             Literature I                                    3    Literature II                              3
             Total Hours                                  14-15   Total Hours                             14-15


    Year 3 Fall                                                    Spring
             Music Ensemble                                 1     Music Ensemble                               1
             MUS 11s-81s Music Seminar                      1     MUS 11s-81s Music Seminar                    1
             Applied principal instrument or voice          1     MUS 61R Junior Recital                       1
             MUS 213 Music Theory III                       3     MUS 223 Music Theory IV                     3
             MUS 383 Music History I                        3     MUS 393 Music History II                    3
             History I or II                                3     US or Texas Government                      3
             Language I                                     3     Language II                                 3
             Total Hours                                   15     Total Hours                                15


    Year 4 Fall                                                   Spring
             Music Ensemble                                  1    Music Ensemble                               1
             MUS 11s-81s Music Seminar                      1     MUS 11s-81s Music Seminar                    1
             Applied principal instrument or voice          1     MUS 81R Junior Recital                       1
             Piano or Vocal Pedagogy                        3     MUS 353 Counterpoint                        3
             MUS 363 Form and Analysis                      3     MUS 413 Instrumentation/Orchestration       3
             MUS 372 Conducting                             3     Behavioral Science                          3
             Public Speaking                                3     Elective                                    3
             Elective                                       3
             Total Hours                                   15     Total Hours                                15
                                      COURSES IN MUSIC (MUS)

MUS 10-81s Music Seminar                                                           0 or 1 Credit Hours
Emphasis on elements of performance and professionalism. Open to all students.
Prerequisite: None                                              Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly


                                                     37
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                 2006-2008




MUS 133          Basic Musicianship                                                 3 Credit Hours
A course in the rudiments of music. The study of notation, elements of melody, harmony and rhythm,
elementary aural skills, analysis, and composition of music.
Prerequisite: None                                                      Offered: Fall/Yearly

MUS 111V         Class Voice                                                         1 Credit Hour
Techniques of solo and ensemble singing through the study of vocal literature for non music majors and
music majors desiring to study a secondary instrument. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: MUS 130 or 101p                                   Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 102p Beginning Class Piano for Non-music Majors                                 2 Credit Hours
An introduction to the piano for students who have had no prior experience at the piano.
Prerequisite: None                                              Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 112p-122p Class Piano I, II                                                     2 Credit Hours
This course is designed for the University music major who must demonstrate a variety of skills at the keyboard,
including repertoire, technique, sight reading, transposition, harmonization, and improvisation.
Prerequisites: Music major                                                 Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 113-123 Music Theory I, II                                                      3 Credit Hours
The study of tonal harmony through analysis, composition sight singing, ear training, and keyboard skills.
Emphasis will be placed on the music of the seventeenth century through 1900, including compositional
practices related to scales, intervals, chord structure, and part-writing.
Prerequisite: MUS 133.                                                  Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 143       Introduction to the Arts                                              3 Credit Hours
An introductory study of the visual, literary, dramatic, and musical arts, which includes approaches to
understanding the arts and consideration of the roles of artistic expression in human cultures. It includes
attendance at live performances, gallery presentations, or other cultural events. Same as ENG 133.
Prerequisite: None                                                    Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 212p-222p Class Piano III, IV                                                   2 Credit Hours
A continuation of MUS 121p. University music majors who must pass the Piano Proficiency Examination
will take the examination at the end of MUS 221p.
Prerequisite: MUS 121p                                        Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 213 – 223        Music Theory III, IV                                           3 Credit Hours
Advanced study of harmony with increased emphasis on chromaticism through identification and
analysis of secondary functions, modulation, the Neapolitan chord, and augmented sixth chords.
Advanced training in sight singing and ear training will include harmonic dictation. MUS 22 3
includes an introduction to the techniques of twentieth century composers.
Prerequisite: MUS 123                                             Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 233        Music Business Management                                            3 Credit Hours
This course is an integrated approach to music business management. It combines the traditional management
process with the more contemporary systems. Specific attention is devoted to organization, ethics, professional
memberships, leadership and managerial skills and an introduction to technology, production, marketing, and
cost-control functions of the music business world.
Prerequisite: None                                            Offered: Spring/Every Other Year


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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                  2006-2008




MUS 242 Instrumental Techniques and Materials: Strings and Woodwinds 2 Credit Hours
This course reviews the basic techniques of playing each instrument of the String and Woodwind families
and the study of teaching methods, books, and materials for beginning students.
Prerequisite: None                                           Offered: Spring/Every Other Year

MUS 252 Instrumental Techniques and Materials: Brass and Percussion                  2 Credit Hours
This course reviews the basic techniques of playing each instrument of the Brass and Percussion families
and the study of teaching methods, books, and materials for beginning students.
Prerequisite: None                                             Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

MUS 283 The Music of Black Americans and other World Cultures                        3 Credit Hours
This course involves an in-depth study of the many genres and styles which define African- American
music from Africa up to the present as well as multicultural children’s literature, songs, and games.
Prerequisite: None                                              Offered: Fall/Every Three Years

MUS 323 Piano Pedagogy                                                               3 Credit Hours
This course explores the art of piano teaching, particularly at the pre-college level. The course will survey
the various piano teaching materials and repertoire available for beginning, intermediate, and advanced
piano students. The business aspects of starting and operating a private piano teaching studio will also be
presented. Students enrolled in piano pedagogy will teach one private piano student arranged by the
instructor.
Prerequisite: MUS 112p                                          Offered: Spring/Every Other Year

MUS 333 Music Concepts: Elementary General Music                                     3 Credit Hours
This class will explore the relationship between music learning and the cognitive, emotional, social and
psychomotor development of young children. The emphasis will be on concepts, materials, and literature
appropriate for children. 20 hours of field observation is required.
Prerequisite: MUS 133                                                     Offered: Fall/Yearly

MUS 343 Advanced Concepts: Secondary General Music                                   3 Credit Hours
This course reviews the organization of instrumental music departments in middle and high schools and gives
attention to feeder programs and classes for bands (marching, concert and jazz) and orchestras. 20 hours of field
observation is required
Prerequisite: Upper division standing.                                       Offered: Spring/Yearly

MUS 353 Counterpoint                                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course is the study of contrapuntal skills from the late seventeenth century to the twentieth century
that includes the fugue and canon.
Prerequisite: MUS 223                                                       Offered: Fall/Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


MUS 363 Form and Analysis                                                        3 Credit Hours
This course is a detailed investigation of the tonal and post-tonal structure of instrumental and choral
compositions. Consideration will also be given to musical style and general development of selected
works accompanied by assigned readings, listening, and analytical projects.
Prerequisite: MUS 223                                                       Offered: Fall/Yearly

MUS 372 Conducting and Performance                                               2 Credit Hours
This course is the study of literature and rehearsal and performance techniques of choirs and small
ensembles. It includes an emphasis on score analysis and conducting regular and irregular beat patterns,
expressive and phrasal gestures. 20 hours of field observation is required.
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing                                       Offered: Fall /Yearly

MUS 373 Vocal Pedagogy           Teaching Youth to Sing (K-12)                   3 Credit Hours
This course involves the study of the art and science of classroom and individual voice instruction through
appropriate literature and vocal repertoire.
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing                                     Offered: Spring/Yearly

MUS 383 Music History: Middle Ages to Late Sixteenth Century                     3 Credit Hours
This course is the study of Western Music history from the end of the Ancient World to vocal music of the
late Baroque.
Prerequisite: MUS 123                                          Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

MUS 393 Music History: Late Sixteenth Century to the Present                     3 Credit Hours
This course is the study of Western Music history beginning with instrumental music from late Baroque to the
present.
Prerequisite: MUS 123                                        Offered: Spring/Every Other Year

MUS 413 Instrumentation and Orchestration                                        3 Credit Hours
This course is the study of orchestration and arranging for band, orchestra, and chamber ensembles. Also
arranging and techniques of voicing for choirs and vocal chamber ensembles.
Prerequisite: MUS 223                                           Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

MUS 481 TExES Preparation                                                         1 Credit Hour
This is a course designed to introduce students to the components of the TExES examination and to
impart techniques and skills for taking the examination.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing                                   Offered: As Needed

                                 APPLIED MUSIC
MUS 11p - 41p Lower-Division Piano                                                1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction in piano performance. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: None                                                 Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 51p - 71p Upper-Division Piano                                                1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction in piano performance. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: MUS 41p                                              Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 11o – 81 Organ                                                                1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction in organ performance. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Keyboard skills as determined by the professor Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly


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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                 2006-2008


MUS 11v - 41v Lower-Division Voice                                                   1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction in solo vocal performance. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: None                                                  Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 51v - 71v Upper Division Voice                                                   1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction in solo vocal performance. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: MUS 41v.                                                Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 11i- 41i Lower-Division Principal Instrument                                     1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction in music performance for the following instruments: clarinet,
flute, violin, trumpet, tuba, trombone, saxophone, pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments. May
be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: None                                                         Offered: As Needed

MUS 51i - 71i Upper-Division Principal Instrument                                    1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction in music performance for the following instruments: clarinet, flute,
violin, trumpet, tuba, trombone, saxophone, pitched and non-pitched percussion instruments. May be repeated for
credit.
Prerequisite: MUS 41i                                                            Offered: As Needed

MUS 11b - 81b Band/Instrumental Ensemble                                             1 Credit Hour
This course involves three one-hour sessions per week, open to all University students. It involves
instruction in Band/Instrumental Ensemble literature and performance.
Prerequisite: None                                                    Offered: As Needed

MUS 10b - 80b Band/Instrumental Ensemble                                             0 Credit Hour
This course involves three one-hour sessions per week, open to all University students. It involves
instruction in Band/Instrumental Ensemble literature and performance.
Prerequisite: None                                                    Offered: As Needed

MUS 11c - 81c Concert Choir                                                          1 Credit Hour
This course involves three one-hour sessions per week, open to all University students. It involves
performance and instruction in concert choral literature.
Prerequisite: None                                            Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 10c - 80c Concert Choir                                                          0 Credit Hour
This course involves three one-hour sessions per week, open to all University students. It involves
performance and instruction in concert choral literature.
Prerequisite: None                                           Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MUS 61R Junior Recital (Piano, Voice, or Principal Instrument)                       1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction, designed for music majors and minors. Students must
prepare and perform a thirty-minute public recital.
Prerequisite: Upper Standing                                   Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly




                                                  41
Huston-Tillotson University                                                          2006-2008


MUS 81R Senior Recital (Piano, Voice, or Principal Instrument)                 1 Credit Hour
This course involves individual instruction, designed for music majors and minors. Students must
prepare and perform a one-hour public recital.
Prerequisite: Upper Division Standing                                 Offered: As Needed


                              THE MINOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES (REL)

Description and objectives
In this program students will become familiar with a diverse range of religious phenomena.
They will be able to compare foundational beliefs among many religious traditions (including the
Zulu religion, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam)
about such topics as human nature, the origin of the universe, life after death, gender roles, the
relation between science and religion, the relation between religion and philosophy, and the
grounding of ethics. The instruction will focus on helping students develop 1) their own
approach to religious diversity, 2) their own perspective on religion and spirituality, 3) an ability
to interpret scripture, 4) credentials for ministry and/or further scholarship, 5) an awareness and
understanding of key 21st century issues surrounding religion, such as the manner of promoting
religious tolerance, the role of religion in global ethics, the ability of religion to promote
environmental awareness, the compatibility of deep religious differences, the role of religion in
local and global politics, the part religion plays in race relations, the role of gender in the world’s
religions, and the relation between science and religion.

                          Requirements for the Minor in Religious Studies

The minor comprises 18 semester hours of courses beyond the Core Curriculum requirement of 3
semester hours of either ―Philosophy and Ethics‖ or ―Comparative Religion.‖

    1) The following 12 hours are required for the minor:

                 REL 203 Comparative Religion or PHI 213 Philosophy and Ethics. One
                     of these two classes satisfies the Core Curriculum requirement.
                     The other satisfies a requirement for the minor.

                 REL 323 Philosophy of Religion
                 REL 333 Interpretation of the Bible
                 REL 343 Science and Religion

    2) Six hours of elective courses chosen from the following:
                 REL 353 History of Christianity
                 REL 383 Special Topics in Religion: ―American Religious History,‖
                     ―Chinese Religions,‖ ―Religion and Ethics,‖ ―Methodology for Inter-
                     religious Dialogue.‖




                                              42
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008


    3) Students must also fulfill 20 hours of service learning engaged in a project centered on a
       particular religious community. The service learning can be ministry or research
       oriented.


                   COURSES IN RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY (REL/PHI)

REL 203 Comparative Religion                                                       3 Credit Hours
This course describes and compares the fundamental beliefs and practices of many religions from the East
and West, from the North and the South, and from both pre-historic and historic times, although emphasis
will be on present day religions. This course compares the religions with respect to their views on: 1) the
origin of our universe, 2) the nature and meaning of the individuality of persons, 3) the individual’s
relation to society, 4) the natural environment, and 5) gender roles. Other topics include the future of
religion, the relation between religious belief and science, the diversity within religions, and the basis for
dialogue among religions.
Prerequisite: English 113                                             Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

PHI 213 Philosophy and Ethics                                                      3 Credit Hours
This course presents foundational perspectives on the typical studies and issues engaged in philosophy
and ethics. We compare thinkers from the East and West, the North and South, in order to highlight the
unique qualities of each. We discuss, in a comparative fashion, central philosophers from many different
periods of philosophy. Stressing primary texts, we consider the philosophers in their historical contexts,
and discuss their answers to central philosophical issues such as the foundations of 1) religion, 2) ethics,
3) reality, 4) knowledge, 5) individuality, and 6) freedom.
Prerequisite: English 113                                            Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

PHI 223 Logic                                                                      3 Credit Hours
This course will rigorously introduce students to central forms of argumentation. The emphasis will be on
helping students improve oral and written argumentative skills. These skills will help students express
themselves in a more efficacious and convincing manner. We will talk about three systems of logic,
categorical logic, prepositional logic, and predicate logic.
Prerequisite: English 113                                        Offered: Once Every Two Years


REL 323 Philosophy of Religion                                                     3 Credit Hours
In this class we explore answers to some of the most important issues developed in the history of
philosophy and religious studies. The course will facilitate the development of each participants’ views
on crucial life issues, some of which follow: 1) The relation between science and religion, 2) The nature
of religious experience, 3) The problem of evil, 4) The possibility of miracles, 5) The possibility of
rational justification for religious belief, 6) The relation between reason and faith, 7) Knowledge of the
attributes of God or ultimate meaning, and 8) The possibility of unity among religions.
Prerequisite: English 113                                        Offered: Once Every Two Years

REL 383 Special Topics in Religion                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course will rigorously introduce students to central forms of argumentation. The emphasis
Prerequisite: English 113                                       Offered: Once Every Two Years




                                                 43
Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


REL 333 Interpretation of the Bible                                              3 Credit Hours
Contemporary understandings of both the Old Testament and New Testament will be explored in this
class. The course will take a historical approach to the study of scripture, pointing out the influences of
temporal context wherever possible. This course introduces students to the central tools within the study
of the Bible. The historical-critical method is thoroughly described. Students will produce two exegetical
papers using the tools they have learned for interpreting and understanding the Bible.
Prerequisite: English 113                                       Offered: Once Every Two Years

REL 343 Science and Religion                                                     3 Credit Hours
This course explores many ways of relating religion and science, and starts with the fourfold classification
system developed by Ian Barbour for relating science and religion (they conflict, can be integrated, are
independent, or can dialogue). The course compares how knowledge is attained in the sciences to how
knowledge is acquired in religion. The course describes the historical attempts to relate science and
religion, focusing on Galileo, Newton, and Darwin. It also describes the evolutionary theory within
modern biology and discusses different ways religious people respond to it. It examines the significance
modern perspectives on the origin of the universe have for competing religious views of the origin.
Developments in neuroscience and quantum physics are discussed as they related to religious views about
the individual and the nature of reality.
Prerequisite: English 113                                     Offered: Once Every Two Years

REL 353 History of Christianity                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course presents the history of Christianity. It discusses the Roman, Jewish, and Near Eastern
contexts in which Christianity was born, the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, and asks the question ―To
what extent can we have knowledge about the life of Jesus?‖ The course explores the teaching of St. Paul
and his impact on the development of Christianity. The course describes the formation of New Testament
scripture, explains the major developments in the Patristic, Medieval, and Modern periods of Christian
history, and discusses the key ideas, events, figures, and developments of the Protestant Reformation.
    Prerequisite: English 113                                      Offered: Once Every Two Years




                                                44
Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008




                                            LANGUAGES
Although Huston-Tillotson University does not offer a major nor minor in languages, many majors
require at least 6 hours in a language other than English. HT offers courses in French, Spanish, and
Chinese.


                                  COURSES IN FRENCH (LFR)
LFR 113 French I                                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to French language and culture. It emphasizes speaking, lis tening,
reading, and writing competencies in French and stresses syntax, grammar, and vocabulary.
Prerequisite: None                                                   Offered: Fall/Yearly

LFR 123 French II                                                                3 Credit Hours
This course is a continued study of French language and culture. It advances skills in speaking,
listening, reading, and writing in French and assists vocabulary enrichment.
Prerequisite: LFR 113                                                 Offered: Spring/Yearly

LFR 213 Intermediate French I                                                    3 Credit Hours
This is a continuation of LFR 123 with an emphasis on speaking and listening.
Prerequisite: LFR 123                                                  Offered: As needed

                                   COURSES IN SPANISH (LSP)
LSP 113 Spanish I                                                                3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to Spanish language and culture. It emphasizes speaking, listening, reading,
and writing competencies in Spanish and stresses syntax, grammar, and vocabulary.
Prerequisite: None                                                  Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

LSP 123 Spanish II                                                               3 Credit Hours
This course is a continued study of Spanish language and culture. It advances skil ls in speaking,
listening, reading, and writing in Spanish and assists vocabulary enrichment.
Prerequisite: LSP 113                                           Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

LSP 213 Intermediate Spanish I                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of LSP 123 with an emphasis on speaking and listening.
Prerequisite: LSP 123                                                 Offered: As needed

LSP 223 Intermediate Spanish II                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of LSP 213 with an emphasis on speaking and listening.
Prerequisite: LSP 213                                                Offered: As needed

LSP 313 Spanish Conversation and Composition I                                   3 Credit Hours
This course involves intensive practice in the Spanish language in speaking and writing.
Prerequisite: LSP 223                                                        Offered: As needed

LSP 323 Spanish Conversation and Composition II                                  3 Credit Hours
This course involves intensive practice in the Spanish language in speaking and writing.
Prerequisite: LSP 313                                                     Offered: As needed


                                                45
Huston-Tillotson University                                                               2006-2008


LSP 433 Survey of Hispanic Literature I                                           3 Credit Hours
This course involves a study of representative selections from Hispanic Literature from the beginnings to the
present day.
Prerequisite: LSP 323 or Instructor Permission                                 Offered: As needed


LSP 443 Survey of Hispanic Literature II                                          3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of LSP 433.
Prerequisite: LSP 323 or Instructor Permission                                 Offered: As needed


                                       COURSES IN CHINESE
LCH 113 Chinese I                                                                 3 Credit Hours
This is an introductory course to the basics of Mandarin Chinese and is intended for students with no
prior knowledge of the language and have never taken a Chinese language course. This course will focus
on the Chinese Pinyin system in developing a student’s listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.
Upon completion of this course, students should be able to take part in general conversation as well as
read and write simple articles in simplified characters.
Prerequisite: None                                                                Offered: Fall


LCH 123 Chinese II                                                                3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of LCH113. It will continue to introduce students to the basics of Mandarin
Chinese in addition to introducing Chinese cultural values, philosophies, and history.
Prerequisite: LCH 113                                                             Offered: Spring




                              COURSES IN COMMUNICATION (MED)

Public Speaking is a required core course as well as a requirement for several major areas of study.


MED 103 Public Speaking                                                           3 Credit Hours
This course develops public speaking skills, with an emphasis on personal interaction in business
and other professional settings. Students are introduced to basic principles of oral communication
through community and classroom speaking experiences and in group interaction. Students give
individual performances and engage in constructive critiques.
Prerequisite: None                                          Offered: Fall and Spring/Yearly




                                                 46
Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008



         DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

           THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJP)

The Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice is a four-year interdisciplinary program in the study of
crime and the administration of the justice system. The ―criminal justice system‖ study consists
of law enforcement, courts, and corrections as a system for the administration of city, county,
state, and federal laws and procedures. The University strives to endow students with the skills
necessary for critical knowledge, communication, personal growth, and real-world application
opportunities within the Criminal Justice discipline. The curriculum includes an historical
overview of the stages of development through which the criminal justice system has evolved
and the current state of the system. A broad range of analyses will be offered to meet the
academic needs of both professional students who plan future careers in the criminal justice field
and those already employed in the criminal justice system.

The primary focus of the program is on the interrelationship of the criminal justice system with
other social institutions: crime prevention; the types of crimes and the classification of offenders;
causes and remediation of deviant behavior; policing and crime control; crime scene
reconstruction and evidence gathering; the court; probation and parole; rehabilitation; treatment
and group counseling programs; and statistical methods in the measurement and analysis of
crime.

Degree Requirements for a Major in Criminal Justice:

The major requires 45 credit hours of courses in Criminal Justice of which 39 hours are required
on core classes and (6) hours are electives. In addition there are two tracks of supporting
coursework to choose from to be determined by professional career path.

Required Criminal Justice classes (39 hours) include:
CJP 113 Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJP 123 Community Policing
CJP 223 Police Practices and Procedures
CJP 233 Criminal Law / Procedures
CJP 253 Criminology
CJP 313 Juvenile Justice
CJP 323 Criminal Investigations/Forensics
CJP 333 Research Methods Related to Criminal Justice
CJP 343 American Court System
CJP 413 Corrections / Rights
CJP 423 Ethics and Criminal Justice
CJP 453A Internship I in Criminal Justice
CJP 453B Internship II in Criminal Justice




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                     2006-2008


Six credits hours of electives (two classes) must be chosen from the following:
CJP 213 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice
CJP 353 Comparative Criminal Justice
CJP 393 A/B Special Topics
CJP 433 Crime Prevention
CJP 443 Probation and Parole

Supporting Course Work Track I - Twenty-four hours – social science emphasis.

Six hours (two classes) from these offerings in Political Science:
PSC 203 Information Management
PSC 313 Constitutional Law
PSC 353 Public Policy
PSC 373 Public Administration

Six hours (two classes) from these offerings in Sociology:
SOC 273 Conflict Resolution
SOC 283 Addictions
SOC 323 Minority Group Relations
SOC 343 Victimology

Six hours (two classes) from these offerings in Psychology:
PSY 263 Human Growth and Development
PSY 293 Special Topics: AIDS/HIV
PSY 443 Abnormal Psychology

The following two classes are also required:
BUS 221 Principles of Accounting I
ENG 393 Technical Writing

Supporting Course Work Track II - Twenty-two hours - computer forensics emphasis.

CSC 113 Programming Foundations 1
CSC 123 Programming Foundations 2
CSC 303 Computer Forensics
CSC 313 Computer Organization
CSC 353 Operating Systems and Theoretical Foundations
CSC 384 Computer Networks and Distribution Systems

The following class is also required:

ENG 393 Technical Writing




                                           48
Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008


Requirements for a Minor in Criminal Justice

Students must complete 18 credit hours.

Required:

CJP 113 Introduction to Criminal Justice
CJP 253 Criminology

Of the twelve additional CJP credit hours, six hours (two classes) must be upper division
courses; three hours (one class) must be senior level.




                                            49
Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008




        A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJOR

Year 1 Fall                                                Spring
          ENG 113         Intro to College Comp.      3    ENG 123       College Rhetoric & Comp.   3
          MTH 143         College Algebra             3    MED 233       Public Speaking            3
          UNIV 101        The HT Experience            2   KIN 113       Health & Wellness          3
          KIN 101, 111    Personal Fitness/Sports      1                 Fine Arts Core             3
                          Language I                   3                 Language II                3
          CSC 103         Intro to Computers           3
          Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                              15

Year 2 Fall                                                Spring
                          Science I                   4                  Science II                 4
          ENG 213,        World Literature I, II or   3    CJP 113       Introduction to Criminal   3
          223, or 233     American Literature                            Justice
                                                           PSC 113 or    U.S. Government or
          HIS 213, 223 U.S. History I or II           3                                             3
                                                           PSC 123       Texas Government
          REL 203,        Religion/Philos.            3                  Supporting Course          3
          PHI 213
                          Supporting Course            3                 Supporting Course           3
          Total Hours                                 16   Total Hours                              16

                        Year 2    Summer
                                 Behavioral Science                       3
                                 Total Hours                              3

Year 3 Fall                                                Spring
          CJP 213        Elective for CJP             3    CJP 123       Community Policing         3
          CJP 223        Police Practice /            3    CJP 313                                  3
                                                                         Juvenile Justice
                                     Procedures
          CJP 233        Criminal Law /               3    CJP 323                                  3
                                                                         Criminal Investigation
                         Procedures
          CJP 253        Criminology                   3   CJP 333       Research Methods/CJP        3
          CJP 343        American Court System         3                 Elective for CJP            3
          Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                              15

Year 4 Fall                                                Spring
          CJP 423         Ethics & Criminal           3    CJP 453       Internship in CJ           3
                          Justice
          CJP 433         Crime Prevention             3   BUS 213       Basic Accounting I          3
          CJP 443         Probation & Parole           3   ENG 393       Technical Writing           3
          CJP 453A        Internship in CJ             3                 Supporting Course           3
                          Supporting Course            3                 Supporting course           3
          Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                              15




                                                 50
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                         2006-2008



                                  Courses in Criminal Justice (CJP)
CJP 113 Introduction to Criminal Justice                                                   3 Credit Hours
This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the history, philosophy and progress of the
criminal justice system in the United States. Included is an overview of the ethical considerations, crime defined,
law enforcement, court system, prosecution and defense, trial process and corrections. The responsibilities of
various agencies of the Criminal Justice System will also be delineated.
Prerequisite: None                                                                      Offered: Yearly

CJP 123 Community Policing                                                                 3 Credit Hours
This is a basic introductory course treating the broad field of police and relations, focusing particularly on police and
community response. Included in this course will be discussion of the philosophy of community policing, its impact
on police administration and personnel, and implementation and evaluation issues. Prerequisite: CJP 113
              Offered: Yearly

CJP 213 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice                                            3 Credit Hours
This course will address current issues in the criminal justice system such as racial profiling, terrorism,
safety, and community involvement related to safety issues.
Prerequisite: None                                                              Offered: Yearly

CJP 223 Police Practice and Procedures                                                     3 Credit Hours
This course is an overview of the history and philosophy of law enforcement in a democratic society in
accordance with the Constitution. Emphasis will be given to the police profession: organization of law
enforcement systems, the police role, police discretion, ethics, police-community interaction, and current
and future issues.
Prerequisite: CJP 113                                                           Offered: Yearly

CJP 233 Criminal Law and Procedures                                                        3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the nature of criminal law: philosophy and historical developments, major
definitions and concepts, classification of crime, elements of crimes and penalties using Texas Statutes as
illustrations, and justifications of and defenses to criminal responsibility. Criminal procedure will also
address: prosecution, right to counsel, pre-trial release, grand juries, the adjudication process, types and
rules of evidence, and sentencing.
Prerequisite: CJP 113                                                              Offered: Yearly

SOC/CJP 253          Criminology                                                           3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the nature and causation of crime, crime typologies, and the extent of criminality.
Specific topics to be addressed may include crime as a form of deviant behavior; nature and extent of crime;
past theories; evaluation and prevention, control, and treatment programs.
Prerequisite: CJP 113                                                             Offered: Yearly

CJP 313 Juvenile Justice                                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to review the nature and extent of delinquency; explanatory theories; the juvenile
justice system: history, philosophy, and evaluation of the juvenile court; juvenile courts and procedures;
the role of a police officer and the correctional officer.
Prerequisite: CJP 113                                                             Offered: Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                  2006-2008


CJP 323      Criminal Investigations and Forensics                                   3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the fundamentals of investigation; duties and responsibilities of the investigator;
interrogation techniques, and protecting the crime scene; collections and preservation of evidence, scientific
aids and other sources of information; court perpetration and case follow-up. Students will gain basic
knowledge of forensic evidence developments in crime scene techniques with some practical experience
techniques concerning various types of evidence including fingerprint, impressions, hair, fiber, trace, firearms,
biological, accelerant, explosives and drugs.
Prerequisites: CJP 113, CJP 233                                                     Offered: Yearly

CJP 333      Research Methods Related to Criminal Justice                            3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to provide methodological strategies and techniques in the measurement and
analysis of crime and delinquency. Additional topics to be addressed may include the analysis of criminal
justice research and survey methods.
Prerequisite: None                                                             Offered: Yearly

CJP/PSC 343 American Court System                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the judiciary in the criminal justice system including the American court system
including their legal basis, structure, jurisdiction and operation. It will also involve an analysis of the legal
transactions involved in the accusation, arrest, adjudication, and disposition of criminal offenders.
Prerequisite: None                                                                     Offered: Yearly

                   Prerequisite: CJP 113, CJP 233
CJP 353 Comparative Criminal Justice                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course is a survey of the organizational, administrative, and philosophical principles of criminal
justice systems around the world. This course meets a diversity requirement.
Prerequisite: None                                                            Offered: Yearly
This course also meets a diversity requirement.

CJP 393 A/B Special Topics                                                           3 Credit Hours
Topics vary according to the current interests of the department and/or students. May be repeated once
when topics vary.
Prerequisite: None                                                             Offered: Yearly

CJP 413 Corrections and Rights                                                       3 Credit Hours
This course is a systematic study of the official ways in which society reacts to persons who have been
convicted of committing criminal acts, including persons handled by the juvenile courts. The rights of the
accused will also be addressed.
Prerequisite: CJP 113, CJP 233                                                   Offered: Yearly

CJP 423 Ethics and Criminal Justice                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to explore moral decision-making. Basic moral or ethical frameworks are applied
to ethical decisions which often need to be made in the Criminal Justice System by police officers, judges,
prosecutors, and correctional officers.
Prerequisite: CJP 113                                                            Offered: Yearly

CJP 433 Crime Prevention                                                             3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to review the nature, causation, and extent of personal, business, and
property crimes and proven methods and techniques and experimental means of dealing with
criminal activity. This course will also address the human and civil resources necessary to engage
in an effective and comprehensive crime prevention program. Prerequisites: CJP 113, CJP 253
           Offered: Yearly


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Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


CJP 443 Probation and Parole                                                     3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the philosophy, evaluation, and functions of probation and parole. Specific topics
will include differentiation between probation and parole, the processes involved in the consideration for
granting probation and parole and the related conditions; This course will also look closely at how
probation and parole are impacted by recidivism (or the effectiveness of probation and parole).
Prerequisites: CJP 113, CJP 343                                                   Offered: Yearly

CJP 453A Internship in Criminal Justice                                          3 Credit Hours
This course provides upper-level students the opportunity to perform as participants in established
criminal justice agencies at the local, state, and federal levels. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisites: Approval by Instructor and Chair;                                       Offered: Yearly
This is a writing Intensive Course

CJP 453B       Internship in Criminal Justice                                    3 Credit Hours
This course provides upper-level students the opportunity to perform as participants in established
criminal justice agencies at the local, state, and federal levels. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisites: Approval by Instructor and Department;                                  Offered: Yearly
This is a writing Intensive Course




                                                53
Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008




          THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC)

The curriculum in Political Science is designed to provide knowledge and understanding of the
basic concepts of political science, the fundamental theories of the state and its evolution, the
national and international political forces and the constitutional system. The major or minor
sequence in Political Science may serve as basic undergraduate preparation for (1) entrance into
graduate school, (2) entrance into law school, (3) a career in public service, or (4) the teaching of
government, civics, or other related social studies in the public schools.

                              Requirements for a Major in Political Science

    The major in Political Science consists of a minimum of 36 credit hours, (in addition to the
    PSC 113 Core requirement) and a maximum of 39 credit hours.

        1. The following courses are required: PSC 123, 143, 203, 233, 253, 373, 363, or
           473, and 483.

        2. The balance of required semester hours must be selected from the list of
           Political Science electives: PSC 133, 223, 263, 313, 323, 333, 353, 383, 423,
           443, 453, 463, and 493A/B, and ECO 213 or ECO 223, or ECO 413.



                              Requirements for a Minor in Political Science

    The minor in Political Science consists of 18 credit hours.

        1. The following courses are required: PSC 123, 143, 213, and 353.

        2. The balance of the credit hours may be selected from the list of required
           Political Science electives: PSC 133, 223, 263, 313, 323, 353, 383, 423, 453,
           463, and 493A/B.




                                                54
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008




        A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR

Year 1 Fall                                                  Spring
          ENG 113         Intro to College Comp.        3    ENG 123       College Rhetoric & Comp.      3
          MTH 143         College Algebra               3    MED 233       Public Speaking               3
          UNIV 101        The HT Experience              2   KIN 113       Health & Wellness             3
          KIN 101, 111    Personal Fitness/Sports        1                 Fine Arts Core                3
                          Language I                     3                 Language II                   3
          CSC 103         Intro to Computers             3
          Total Hours                                   15   Total Hours                                 15

Year 2 Fall                                                  Spring
                          Science I                     4                  Science II                    4
          ENG 213,        World Literature I, II or     3                  Behavioral Science Core       3
          223, or 233     American Literature
          HIS 213, 223    U.S. History I or II          3                  Diversity Core I              3
          REL 203,        Religion/Philos.              3    PSC 203       Information Management        3
          PHI 213
          * PSC 113       U.S. Goverment                 3                 Political/Social Sciences      3
          Total Hours                                   16   Total Hours                                 16

                        Year 2    Summer
                                 Behavioral Science                         3
                                 Total Hours                                3

Year 3 Fall                                                  Spring
          PSC 143        Intro to Political Science     3    PSC 363       Ancient Political Theory or
                                                             PSC 473       Modern Political Theory       3
          PSC 233        Soc. Science Statistics I       3                 Political Science Elective     3
          PSC 373        Public Administration           3                 Political Science Elective     3
                         Diversity Core II               3                 Elective                       3
                         Elective                        3                 Elective                       3
          Total Hours                                   15   Total Hours                                 15

Year 4 Fall                                                  Spring
          PSC 253         Comparative Government         3                 Political Science Elective     3
                          Political Science Elective     3   PSC 483       Senior Seminar                 3
                          Elective                       3                 Elective                       3
                          Elective                       3                 Elective                       3
                          Elective                       3                 Elective                       3
          Total Hours                                   15   Total Hours                                 15




                                                   55
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                    2006-2008


                              COURSES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (PSC)

PSC 113 American Government (Federal)                                                  3 Credit Hours
A study of the organization, processes, and functions of the Federal government of the United States,
emphasizing an analysis of the U.S. Constitution, its origins, development, and interpretation. Other topics
include the operation of our representative democracy, civil rights and civil liberties, political parties, and
elections. It is required of all teacher certification candidates.
Prerequisites: None                                                   Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

PSC 123 American Government (State and Local)                                          3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the organizational processes and problems of state and local government in
our country, with particular emphasis on the government of the State of Texas. The course covers
the Texas Constitution, its legislative, executive, and judicial functions, and how polic y is formed at
the state and local level. It is required of all teacher certification candidates.
Prerequisites: None                                                    Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

PSC 133 Introduction to Transportation                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course is a survey of concepts, research methods, career opportunities, institutions and groups
involved in the field of transportation studies.
Prerequisite: PSC 143 or consent of the instructor.       Offered: Fall/Every Three Years

PSC 143 Introduction to Political Science                                              3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the evolution of the discipline, contributions of major political thinkers, techniques of
political analysis, and career options for students of political science. This course is required for all Political
Science majors.
Prerequisites: Six hours of lower-division Political Science.             Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

PSC 203 Information Management for Political and Social Science                        3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the Internet, intermediate to advanced level applications on electronic spreadsheet,
database, graphics, and other modes of presenting ideas and reports. It involves a survey of case
applications in public and private organizations, and one hour of lecture and three hours of laboratory
work.
Prerequisite: CIS 103                                                     Offered: Spring/Yearly

PSC 223 International Politics                                                         3 Credit Hours
This course is a review of political principles, problems, and factors involved in the foreign policies and
relations of nation-states. Particular emphasis placed on the sources and uses of national power and
difficulties in limiting the use of such power.
Prerequisites: None                                          Offered: Spring/Every Three Years

PSC 233 Social Science Statistics I                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course introduces concepts and methods used in social science statistics and helps students learn how to
use statistical tools wisely. It is required for Psychology and Sociology majors.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                             Offered: Fall/Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008


PSC 253 Comparative Government                                                     3 Credit Hours
This course is a comparative treatment of the governmental and political institutions of selected modern
states and of state and local governments of the U.S.
Prerequisites: None                                          Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

PSC 263 Research in Political Science                                              3 Credit Hours
This course covers concepts, principles, and techniques involving political research. It involves a focus on
problem definition, problem statement, data collection, data analysis using SPSS, and presentation of research
findings.
Prerequisite: PSC 233                                                        Offered: Spring/Yearly

PSC 313 American Constitutional Law                                                3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the origin and development of American constitutional principles, law, and
practices; judicial review; and the impact of constitutional law and practice on policy development and
execution. Case materials consist of leading constitutional decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court.
Prerequisites: None                                              Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

PSC 323 Urban Politics                                                             3 Credit Hours
This course is an examination of political behavior in urban areas of the United States. It reviews patterns
of urban political systems and politics in America’s large cities and their relations to and impact on
minorities living in the inner city. It emphasizes the strategies and tactics of groups in shaping urban
politics and programs.
Prerequisites: None                                           Offered: Spring/Every Other Year

PSC 333 Social Science Statistics II                                               3 Credit Hours
This course emphasizes advanced quantitative methods needed to perform statistical analysis using
microcomputers. Students learn how to use the SPSS/PC+ program to perform statistical analysis.
Emphasis is on analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple regression. May be counted as an elective in
Psychology and Sociology.
Prerequisites: PSC 233                                              Offered: Spring/Yearly

PSC 353 Public Policy                                                              3 Credit Hours
This course emphasizes introductory concepts and analytical techniques in policy analysis as well as the
role of various constituents in the policy process.
Prerequisites: PSC 133 and PSC 233                                        Offered: Fall/Yearly

PSC 363 Ancient Political Theory                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course is an examination of the classical foundations of political thought.
Prerequisites: None                                                        Offered: Spring/Yearly

PSC 373 Public Administration                                                      3 Credit Hours
This course is an examination of all aspects of the art and science of administering governmental
agencies: coordination and control, communication, personnel management, public relations, and
planning. Comparisons are made with private management.
Prerequisites: None                                                   Offered: Fall/Yearly




                                                 57
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                 2006-2008


PSC 383 Social Welfare Policy                                                       3 Credit Hours
This course is a survey of the development of selected legislation, such as adoptions, housing, child
labor, physical and mental health, and social security, with emphasis on pre -legislative and
legislative developments affecting welfare services. Same as SOC 383.
Prerequisite: SOC 113                            Offered: Spring (during Legislative Session)

PSC 423 Internship/Coop in Political Science                                        3 Credit Hours
This is an internship experience for Political Science majors. Students work as interns with three options: 423L
Legislative Work; 423P Parties, Campaigns and Elections; 423R Governmental Research.
Prerequisites: PSC 233, nine hours upper division,                              Offered: As Needed
               and/or division approval.

PSC 443 Quantitative Methods for the Social Sciences                                3 Credit Hours
This course covers introductory concepts, models, and techniques of quantitative analysis designed to
facilitate decision making and problem solving for students interested in public management. Topics
include project management, simulation, scheduling, and quality control.
Prerequisite: PSC 233                                          Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

PSC 453 Foreign Policy                                                              3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the principles, problems, and issues involved in the formulation and
execution of American foreign policy as well as analysis of current trends in foreign policy.
Prerequisites: None                                          Offered: Fall/Every Three Years

PSC 463 African Government and Politics                                             3 Credit Hours
This is a survey course on contemporary government and politics of Sub-Saharan Africa designed to
broaden political perspective through exposure to African political culture and to provide historical
background from which the student may examine and analyze political trends and ideologies in
contemporary Africa.
Prerequisites: None                                       Offered: Fall/Every Three Years

PSC 473 Modern Political Theory                                                     3 Credit Hours
This course is a survey of major political philosophers, theorists, periods, and movements. Emphasis is
placed on modern ideologies and on the evolution and development of the American political system.
Prerequisites: None                                                           Offered: As Needed

PSC 483 Senior Seminar                                                              3 Credit Hours
This is a capstone course involving a comprehensive review of the discipline including its core competencies. It
covers test preparation and test taking techniques and includes a comprehensive departmental examination.
Prerequisites: Senior Status                                                  Offered: Spring/Yearly

PSC 493 A/B        Special Topics in Political Science                              3 Credit Hours
This course covers specific topics in Political Science, which vary from one semester to the next.
Examples of possible topics include, but are not limited to, Technology and World Politics, The Geo-
Politics of Energy/Environment, Global Terrorism, and the Politics of Global Narcotics. Students may
take the course twice when a different topic is covered. The course is open to upper-level majors and
minors or by permission of the instructor.
Prerequisites: None                                                      Offered: As Needed

                                  THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR (PSY)



                                                  58
Huston-Tillotson University                                       2006-2008


DESCRIPTION FOR THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR. (Can be taken from the description in the
old bulletin).




                                    59
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008



        A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR

Year 1 Fall                                                 Spring
          ENG 113         Intro to College Comp.        3   ENG 123       College Rhetoric & Comp.      3
          MTH 143         College Algebra               3   MED 233       Public Speaking               3
          UNIV 101        The HT Experience             2   KIN 113       Health & Wellness             3
          KIN 101, 111    Personal Fitness/Sports       1                 Fine Arts Core                3
                          Language I                    3                 Language II                   3
          CSC 103         Intro to Computers            3
          Total Hours                                  15   Total Hours                                15

Year 2 Fall                                                 Spring
                          Science I                     4                 Science II                    4
          PSC 233         Soc. Science Statistics I     3   PSY 263       Human Growth & Dev.           3
                                                            PSC 113 or
          HIS 213, 223 U.S. History I or II             3                 U.S. or Texas Government      3
                                                            PSC 123
          REL 203,        Religion/Philos.              3                 Diversity Core I              3
          PHI 213
          PSY 113         Intro to Psychology           3                 World Literature I, II or     3
                                                                          American Literature
          Total Hours                                  16   Total Hours                                16
Year 3 Fall                                                 Spring
          PSY 333        Theories in Psychology         3   PSY 463     Counseling Theory /             3
                                                                        Application
                         Psychology Elective            3   PSY/SOC 373 Methods in Social Research      3
                         Psychology Elective            3                Psychology Elective            3
                         Diversity Core II              3                Psychology Elective            3
                         Elective                       3               Elective                        3
          Total Hours                                  15   Total Hours                                15

Year 4 Fall                                                 Spring
          PSY 493         Field Placement               3   PSY 453       Senior Seminar                3
                          Psychology Elective           3   PSC 483       Senior Seminar                3
                          Elective                      3                 Elective                      3
                          Elective                      3                 Elective                      3
                          Elective                      3                 Elective                      3
                          Elective                      1                 Elective                      1
          Total Hours                                  16   Total Hours                                16




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                               2006-2008


                               COURSES IN PSYCHOLOGY (PSY)

UNIV 101: The HT Experience                                                       2 Credit Hours
This is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course that is the foundation for a successful University
experience. This course is a comprehensive introduction to the world of work, careers, community
service, and the University curriculum.
This course does not count towards psychology major requirements.
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

PSY 113 Introduction to Psychology                                                3 Credit Hours
This is a general survey of the field of psychology with specific coverage of the use of the scientific
method in increasing knowledge about psychology, biological explanations of human behavior, and the
different basic theoretical perspectives on the description and explanation of human behavior, such as,
behaviorism, psychoanalysis, cognitive, and humanistic psychology. It is an eclectic and multicultural
approach that attempts to understand people through a dynamic interaction of biological, psychological,
socio-cultural, and historical factors and balances principles and contemporary applications of
psychology. This is a fundamental course to prepare students for more advanced study in the social
sciences. It is a prerequisite for all other psychology courses.
Prerequisite: None                                                         Offered: Fall/Yearly

PSY 263 Human Growth and Development                                              3 Credit Hours
This course examines: physical, cognitive, emotional, language, social, and moral development throughout
the entire lifespan of humans, including conception, prenatal, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and
adulthood within a socio-cultural environmental perspective; and psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic,
and cognitive theories of development.
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                       Offered: Spring/Every Other Year

PSY/SOC 273 Conflict Resolution                                                   3 Credit Hours
Conflicts often occur when there is a perceived divergence of interest or when there is a belief that
individual or group aspirations can not be met simultaneously. Consequently, interpersonal and inter-
group relationships frequently are unsatisfactory, unproductive, and abusive. This course will focus on
types of conflicts, forces that escalate conflicts, and models of conflict resolution. This course is crossed
referenced to Sociology and is a support course for the Criminal Justice Program.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: None                                             Offered: Spring/ Every other Year

PSY/SOC 283 Addictions                                                            3 Credit Hours
The course examines drug, alcohol, eating, cigarette, sexual and gambling addictions, and the addictive
process. Treatment and recovery for addictive individuals will be covered. This Course is cross-referenced
to Sociology and is a support course for the Criminal Justice Program.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: None                                               Offered: Fall/ Every other Year




                                                 61
Huston-Tillotson University                                                               2006-2008


PSY 293 A/B Special Topics in Psychology                                          3 Credit Hours
This course covers specific topics in the area of Psychology. Topics vary from one semester to the next.
Examples of possible topics are: current topics in the biopsychosocial aspects of HIV/AIDS or racial
disparities in health; health psychology; survey of the application of psychology to contemporary issues in
African America; the psychology of violence; experimental Psychology, physiological psychology, history
and systems of psychology; etc. It is open to upper-level majors and minors and requires the instructor’s
approval. Two of these courses can count towards major degree requirement in psychology and only one
of these courses can count towards minor degree requirements in psychology.
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                                              Offered: Yearly

PSY 303/SOC 303 Social Psychology                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course surveys theories about the factors that shape individuals’ feelings, behaviors, and thoughts in
social situations and the use of the scientific method in understanding these factors. The wide range of
social, cognitive, environmental, cultural, and biological conditions that shape the social behavior and
thought of individuals will be covered.
Prerequisite: PSY 113 or SOC 113                                 Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

PSY 313 Educational Psychology and Measurements                                   3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the application of scientific knowledge about individual differences, personality
development, and the process of learning to the problems of teaching and learning. This course includes
the examination of measurement and evaluation of student achievement using standardized tests and
informal assessment procedures. (Same as EDU 313.)
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                         Offered: Spring/Every Other Year

PSY 323 Adolescent Psychology                                                     3 Credit Hours
This course is a detailed study of the physical, emotional, and intellectual development of adolescents.
(Same as EDU 233.)
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                       Offered: Spring/Every Other Year

PSY 333 Theories in Psychology                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course is a systematic analysis of the major theoretical perspectives in psychology on behavior, e.g.,
behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, motivational, and psychodynamic perspectives.
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                                         Offered: Fall/Yearly

PSY 363 Perception and Cognition                                                  3 Credit Hours
The focus of this course will be on how humans take in and process information about the world around
them. It will address cognitive styles, patterns of thinking, neutral bases of thought, and current models of
cognitive processing.
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                             Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

PSY 373/SOC 373 Methods in Social Research                                        3 Credit Hours
This course presents the application of scientific methods of investigation in the social and behavioral
sciences.
Same as SOC 373 Prerequisites: PSY 113 or SOC 113 & PSC 233 Offered: Spring/Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                               2006-2008


PSY 383 Learning and Memory                                                       3 Credit Hours
After covering in detail classical and operant conditioning, this course will go on to address other models
of learning (e.g., cognitive learning, social learning). Modern models of memory will be addressed,
including short-term and long-term memory, and depth of processing models.
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                                        Offered: Every Year

PSY 393 Personality                                                               3 Credit Hours
The course explores the major current and historical theoretical approaches (psychodynamic, trait,
behaviorism, and humanism) to the study of the different characteristic patterns of behaving, thinking, and
feeling that exist across individuals; the variety of tests and inventories used to assess personality;
and their contemporary application.
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                               Offered: Every Other Year

PSY 413 Psychology of the African American Experience                             3 Credit Hours
This course covers the unique experiences of African Americans from a perspective that focuses on
psychology, including affective, cognitive, and social aspects, but is interdisciplinary in its scope. Topics
include: the importance of culture in understanding psychological development; theoretical and
methodological considerations necessary in doing research in African American psychology; coping with
racism and oppression and other mental health issues; workplace social pathology; cultural competence
training; correlates of achievement; and the use of African-centered principles to re-socialize and re-
educate African American youth in the new millennium.
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                                        Offered: Every Year

PSY 443 Abnormal Psychology                                                       3 Credit Hours
This course covers historical and current various approaches to mental abnormality and how
psychologists use these approaches to diagnose and treat patients. The schizophrenias, mood,
anxiety, somatoform, dissociative, personality, and sexual and gender disorders and the different
models of psychotherapy are examined.
Prerequisite: PSY 113                                     Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

PSY 453 Senior Seminar                                                            3 Credit Hours
This is a capstone course that provides students with a comprehensive review of the discipline of
psychology including the development of a senior thesis project that demonstrates their accomplishments.
Each of the following must be passed at 70% or better to pass this course and graduate in psychology (the
comprehensive exam over the field of psychology, the thesis project, and the average of other class
content). Students must have completed at least 34 hours in psychology and have last semester senior
standing or permission from the professor.
Prerequisite: 24 hours in Psychology                                Offered: Spring/Every Year


PSY 463 Counseling Theory and Application                                         3 Credit Hours
This course covers counseling theory and how it is applied, including the different models of
psychotherapy.
Prerequisite: PSY113 or SOC 113                                   Offered: Every Year

PSY 483 Independent Research                                                      3 Credit Hours
The purpose of this course is to encourage Psychology majors and the Psychology faculty to collaborate in
hands-on research. Students will receive three hours credit for undertaking research with a faculty
member. The question being addressed by the research need not be original with the student, but the
student must play a significant role in the conduct of the research. It will be up to the student and faculty



                                                 63
Huston-Tillotson University                                                           2006-2008


member to agree on what that role will be. * A student can take only one of these courses and the
professor’s approval is required. Instructor Approval required.
Prerequisite: PSY 113, PSC 233, PSY/SOC 373, two other PSY courses, Offered: As Needed

PSY 493 Field Placement                                                       3 Credit Hours
This course will provide pre-graduation exposure to the real-world setting in which psychologists are
employed. Students will work 12-15 hours per week toward a minimum of 156 hours in the field.
Students must have at least second semester junior or senior standing and the approval of the professor.
Prerequisite: PSY 113, PSC 233, PSY/SOC 373, and                       Offered: Fall/Every Year
              four other PSY courses.




                                               64
Huston-Tillotson University                                                    2006-2008


                THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

The curriculum in the field of Sociology is designed to:
1. Provide broad knowledge and understanding of the organization, institutions, culture, and
   processes of society.
2. Make clear the interrelatedness of Sociology and other social disciplines.
3. Provide the viewpoints and tools essential for significant, systematic, and study and
   interpretation of social problems.
4. Prepare students for advanced study in graduate and professional institutions and for work.
5. Incorporate technology into the discipline.
6. Help students master the nine core competencies.

Requirements for a Major in Sociology
A student majoring in Sociology must complete 37 credit hours.
   1. Twenty-five of these hours must be: SOC 113, Introduction to Sociology; SOC 233,
       Social Science Statistics I; SOC 353, Social Theory; SOC 373, Methods in Social
       Research; SOC 393, Interventive Methods of Social Work; SOC 443, Senior Seminar;
       SOC 484, Field Placement; and PSC 203, Information Management for Political and
       Social Science. SOC 113 is a prerequisite for other courses unless otherwise noted.
   2. 12 additional credit hours are to be taken from the Sociology offerings, but cannot be
       one of the required core courses.
   3. A student without a minor must also take PSY 113 and two 300 level English writing
       courses and receive a ―C‖ or above in each course (total of nine hours).
   4. Students MUST receive at least a ―C‖ in all English courses.
   5. Students MUST have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher in the major and overall.
   6. Students wishing to emphasize Social Welfare Studies should include in their
       program the social welfare sequence: SOC 243, 323, 363, 383, 393, and 484.
   7. All majors must complete a professional portfolio and pass a comprehensive
       Sociology exam at 75% or better.
   8. Sociology majors must complete a total of 124 hours.

Requirements for a Minor in Sociology
A student who minors in Sociology is required to complete 21 credit hours.
    1. Required courses are SOC 113 and 393.
    2. 15 additional hours.
    3. SOC 113 is a prerequisite for other courses unless otherwise noted. No grades of ―D‖ or
       lower are accepted in the minor.
    4. Students MUST receive at least a ―C‖ in ENG 113 and ENG 123.
    5. Students MUST have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher in the minor.




                                           65
Huston-Tillotson University                                                            2006-2008




         A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE SOCIOLOGY MAJOR

Year 1 Fall                                                Spring
          ENG 113         Intro to College Comp.       3   ENG 123       College Rhetoric & Comp.      3
          MTH 143         College Algebra              3   MED 233       Public Speaking               3
          UNIV 101        The HT Experience            2   KIN 113       Health & Wellness             3
          KIN 101, 111    Personal Fitness/Sports      1                 Fine Arts Core                3
                          Language I                   3                 Language II                   3
          CSC 103         Intro to Computers           3                 Elective                      1
          Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                                16

Year 2 Fall                                                Spring
                          Science I                    4                 Science II                    4
                                                           PSC 203       Information Management
          SOC 233      Soc. Science Statistics I       3                 for Social Sciences           3
          HIS 213, 223 U.S. History I or II            3                 Sociology Elective            3
          REL 203,                                                       Contemporary Social
          PHI 213      Religion/Philosophy             3                 Problems                      3
                                                                         World Literature I, II or
          MED 100         Public Speaking              3                 American Literature           3
          Total Hours                                 16   Total Hours                                16
Year 3 Fall                                                Spring
          SOC 353         Social Theory                3   SOC 373       Methods in Social Research    3
          SOC 393         Interventive Methods         3                 Diversity Core I              3
                          Sociology Elective           3                 Sociology Elective            3
                          Diversity Core I             3   ENG 373       Elective or minor in ENG      3
          *               Elective or minor or Eng     3                 Elective or Minor             3
          Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                                15

Year 4 Fall                                                Spring
                          Sociology Elective           3   SOC 443       Senior Seminar                3
                          Elective or minor or         3                                               3
                          Intro to Psychology                            Field Placement
                          Elective                     3                 Elective                      3
                          Elective                     3                 Elective                      3
                          Elective                     3                 Elective                      3
          Total Hours                                 15   Total Hours                                15

*NOTE:

             1. Two required English courses and Introduction to Psychology will substitute for 9
                hours of electives if student doesn’t have a minor.
             2. Those having a minor will substitute minor courses for some of the elective courses.




                                                 66
Huston-Tillotson University                                                               2006-2008




                                COURSES IN SOCIOLOGY (SOC)

SOC 113        Introduction to Sociology                                          3 Credit Hours
This course is a preliminary survey of the field of Sociology. It introduces students to concepts, research
areas, and prospects in Sociology. Portfolios will be developed.
Prerequisite: None                                                          Offered: Fall/Yearly

SOC 233 Social Science Statistics I                                               3 Credit Hours
This course introduces concepts and methods used in social science statistics and helps students learn how
to use statistical tools wisely. Same as PSC 233.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                       Offered: Fall/Yearly

SOC 243 Contemporary Social Problems                                              3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of contemporary social issues, problems, and trends in the United States and
a cursory examination of world problems. Basic social institutions in crisis (family, education,
religion, government, economics, etc.) are examined. Students are required to write an eight-to
ten- page research paper or complete 25 hours of volunteer work.
Prerequisite: None                                                  Offered: Spring/Yearly

SOC/CJP 253 Criminology                                                           3 Credit Hours
This course is a critical examination of criminal behavior as an aspect of social deviation, including
theories of criminality, causes, and treatment.
Prerequisite: SOC 113 or CJP 113, Same as CJP 253.              Offered: Fall/Every Other Year.

SOC 263 Human Sexuality                                                           3 Credit Hours
Human reproduction, birth control, and sexually transmitted diseases are among the topics discussed. The
development of sex roles and the cultural impact on sexual relationships are introduced. Students are
allowed to explore any issue related to human sexuality. A research paper is required.
Prerequisite: SOC 113                                                   Offered: Spring/Yearly

SOC 273/PSY Conflict Resolution                                                   3 Credit Hours
Conflicts often occur when there is a perceived divergence of interest or when there is a belief that
individual or group aspirations can not be met simultaneously. Consequently, interpersonal and inter-
group relationships frequently are unsatisfactory, unproductive, and abusive. This course will focus on
types of conflicts, forces that escalate conflicts, and models of conflict resolution. This course is crossed
referenced to Psychology and is a support course for Criminal Justice Program.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: None                                           Offered: Spring/ Every Other Year

SOC/PSY 283 Addictions                                                            3 Credit Hours
The course examines drug, alcohol, eating, cigarette, sexual and gambling addictions, and the addictive
process. Treatment and recovery for addictive individuals will be covered. This course is cross referenced
to Psychology and is a support course for the Criminal Justice Program.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: None                                             Offered: Fall/ Every Other Year

SOC 293 Special Topics A/B                                                        3 Credit Hours



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Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


The topic will vary, allowing for the expertise of professors and the emerging information in the field. It
could be taught either semester. Examples are, Collective Behavior, Cultural Anthropology, Gangs.
Students may only take a total of two special topics selected from SOC 293 or SOC 493.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: May vary depending upon the course.                           Offered: As Needed

SOC 303 Social Psychology                                                        3 Credit Hours
This course surveys theories about the factors that shape individuals’ feelings, behaviors, and
thoughts in social situations and the use of the scientific method in understanding these
factors. The wide range of social, cognitive, environmental, cultural, and biological
conditions that shape the social behavior and thought of individuals will be covered.
Prerequisite: SOC 113 or PSY 113                         Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

SOC 323 Minority Group Relations                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course will focus primarily on race, gender, class and sexuality and the interrelated systems of
inequality based in social relationships of power and control. It will examine the privilege positions of
those with power and control and the oppressions that harm and restrict others. A conceptual framework
will be used to understand and recognize dimensions of privilege and oppression and how these processes
are manifested within interpersonal and institutional relationships. It is a support course for the Criminal
Justice Program. It is a support course for the Criminal Justice Program.
This is a writing intensive course and meets a diversity requirement.
Prerequisite: SOC 113 or SOC 243.                                 Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

SOC 343 Victimology                                                              3 Credit Hours
This course examines the wide range of victimization experiences from the perspective of the victim, their
families and society. Discussions will center on the historic plight of crime victims, problems and
dilemmas faced by crime victims, relationship between offenders and victims, victim's rights, victim
justice, attitudes toward victimization and the emergence of the victim's role in the criminal justice
process. Students are to learn and be able to apply theoretical and/or practical responses to issues
involving victimization and victim assistance programs. Crimes that may be studied include workplace
violence, corporate crime, robbery, burglary, assault, rape, stalking, domestic violence, homicide, suicide,
elderly abuse and child sexual abuse and exploitation. It is a support course for the Criminal Justice
Program.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: SOC 113 or CJP 113                              Offered: Spring/ Every other Year

SOC 353 Social Theory                                                            3 Credit Hours
This course is a systematic analysis of the development of concepts and theories of Sociology, with
extensive readings from outstanding writers, with an emphasis on the relationship of social theory to
political, social, and economic backgrounds.
Prerequisite: SOC 113 and three additional hours in Sociology          Offered: Fall/Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


SOC 363 Marriage and the Family                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course examines relationships within traditional and non-traditional marriages. Families are analyzed
cross-culturally according to their form, structure, and life-cycle. Family violence will also be examined.
It is a support course for the Criminal Justice Program.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: SOC 113 or SOC 243                                  Offered: Fall/Every Other Year


SOC 373 Methods in Social Research                                               3 Credit Hours
This course presents the application of scientific methods of investigation in the social and behavioral
sciences.
Prerequisite: SOC 233 and SOC 113.                                     Offered: Spring/Yearly

SOC 383 Social Welfare Policy                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course is a survey of the development of selected legislation, such as adoptions, housing, child labor,
physical and mental health, and social security, with emphasis on pre-legislative and legislative
developments affecting welfare services. Same as PSC 383.
Prerequisite: SOC 113 for Sociology majors and a course in Political Science recommended
but not mandatory.                                    Offered: Spring (During Legislative Session)

SOC 393 Interventive Methods in Social Work                                      3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of techniques used by the professional social worker, emphasizing methods of
working with individuals, groups, and communities. Writing, interviewing, listening, and problem
assessment skills are emphasized. Case assessment and record keeping are stressed.
This is a writing intensive course.
 Prerequisite: SOC 113 or SOC 243                                         Offered: Fall/Yearly

SOC 403 Social Change                                                            3 Credit Hours
This course examines the state of society: what it is, how it works, and how it changes. It includes studies
of the progress, problems, and prospects of contemporary society; trends and the dynamics of world
development. Attention is also given to individual reactions to social change.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: SOC 113                                                 Offered: Every Other Year

SOC 443 Senior Seminar                                                           3 Credit Hours
As a capstone course, students will engage in a comprehensive review of the discipline of Sociology and
the core competencies they were to have mastered. Students will contact graduate schools and potential
employees, as well as develop a comprehensive portfolio that demonstrates their accomplishments, take a
practice GRE, LSAT, or MCAT, and pass the Sociology comprehensive exam with a score of 75% or
above. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: 24 hours in Sociology.                                  Offered: Spring/Yearly

SOC 453 The Community                                                            3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the physical, social, psychological, and institutional characteristics of
communities in the United States. Problems in the community are stressed.
This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: SOC 113 and three additional hours in Sociology. Offered: Every Other Year




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


SOC 484 Field Experience                                                         4 Credit Hours
The focus is on the translation and extension of social work knowledge in professionally supervised practice
with individuals, groups, and/or communities in public or private organizations. Students work 12 hours a
week and a minimum of 156 hours total in the field. Students must have junior or senior standing and the
approval of the professor. The agency supervisor MUST evaluate the student. The course can be repeated
once at a different placement for Sociology credit.
Prerequisite: SOC 113, 393 and four other Sociology courses.             Offered: Spring/ Yearly

SOC 493 A/B Special Topics in Sociology                                   3 Credit Hours
This course covers specific topics in the area of Sociology, which vary from one semester to the
next. Examples of possible topics are, Gender Issues, Urban Sociology, Homelessness,
Population Problems, and the Sociology of Poverty, Sociology of the Arts. Topics are not
restricted to those listed. Students may take the course twice when a different topic is covered.
This is a writing intensive course. Open to upper-level majors and minors or by permission of
the instructor.
Prerequisite: May vary depending upon the course.                            Offered: As Needed




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                            2006-2008



                                   THE PRE-LAW MINOR
Description and objectives
In this program students will take an interdisciplinary course of study that will help prepare them
to gain admission to, and graduate from, accredited law schools in the United States.

Requirements for the Minor in Pre-Law Studies
The minor comprises twenty four hours of courses beyond the Core Curriculum. These courses
are:


        PSC 313 American Constitutional Law
        PSC 363 Ancient Political Theory
        ENG 353 Advanced Composition
        ENG 363 Advanced Rhetoric and Argumentation
        ENG 393 Technical Writing
        HIS 223 U.S. History II
        PHI 223 Logic
        ECO 213 Principles of Microeconomics



                              COURSES IN THE PRE-LAW MINOR


PSC 313 American Constitutional Law                                             3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the origin and development of American constitutional principles, law, and
practices; judicial review; and the impact of constitutional law and practice on policy development and
execution. Case materials consist of leading constitutional decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court.
Prerequisites: None                                              Offered: Fall/Every Other Year

PSC 363 Ancient Political Theory                                                3 Credit Hours
This course is an examination of the classical foundations of political thought.
Prerequisites: None                                                        Offered: Spring/Yearly

ENG 353 Advanced Composition                                                    3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced writing course combining theory and practice of modern research with an examination of
modern standard American English that stresses rhetorical and pragmatic approaches to the use of writing
conventions and appropriate grammar and usage. Students learn to use the tools of revision, rhetoric, and
technology. The difference between first draft writing and writing for publication is stressed.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or its equivalent.                                              Offered: Fall Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008


ENG 363 Advanced Rhetoric and Argumentation                                        3 Credit Hours
This course offers a survey of the history of rhetoric from classical to contemporary and the analysis of
significant argumentation, particularly law and politics. The study is sensitive to the historical and
cultural contexts in which arguments are produced and received and considers how rhetorical theory and
practice change over time.
Prerequisite: ENG 123; Recommended: ENG 353                               Offered: Spring Yearly

English 393 Introduction to Technical Writing                                      3 Credit Hours
This course helps students gain understanding, experience, and skill in scientific, technical, and business
communication. They learn basic theories of scientific and technical writing and explore how to use logic,
arrangement, and style in writing for various scientific and technical audiences. Major writing assignments,
class discussions, and other coursework introduce students to principles and contexts of specific types of
scientific, technical, and professional documents. Genres might include research proposals, research reports,
lab reports, professional resumes, and job application letters. Assignments model real-world scientific and
professional writing and include team projects and oral presentations. The course reinforces general
principles of good writing. Students will assess, revise, and edit their own writing. By the end of the course,
students should have the ability
to write clearly and succinctly on technical subjects.
Prerequisite: Completion of the English core curriculum courses;                     Offered: Yearly
                recommended completion of Advanced Composition.

HIS 223 United States History II                                                   3 Credit Hours
An introduction to United States history from Reconstruction to the present. It is required of all
teacher certification candidates.
Prerequisite: ENG 113 or Instructor Approval                 Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

PHI 223 Logic                                                                      3 Credit Hours
This course will rigorously introduce students to central forms of argumentation. The emphasis will be on
helping students improve oral and written argumentative skills. These skills will help students express
themselves in a more efficacious and convincing manner. We will talk about three systems of logic,
categorical logic, prepositional logic, and predicate logic.
Prerequisite: English 113                                        Offered: Once Every Two Years

ECO 213 Principles of Microeconomics                                               3 Credit Hours
An introduction to the basic descriptive, analytical, and policy problems at the microeconomic level.
Emphasis will be placed on the roles of supply, demand, and price in the allocation of scarce resources.
Prerequisite: None                                                 Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                       2006-2008


                                    TEACHER EDUCATION (EDU)

The Huston-Tillotson University Teacher Education Program offers teacher preparation designed
to meet the needs of undergraduates in Interdisciplinary Studies and Academic Specializations.
Meeting the new standards approved by the State Board for Educator Certification, September
2002, the Program offers 12 certification areas.

                                         DEGREES OFFERED

Degree programs offered by the Teacher Education Department prior to Fall 2002 no longer
meet recent statewide changes in teacher certification. Students who did not complete required
coursework before May 2002 are subject to the new state certification standards. Subsequently,
students interested in pursuing teacher certification at any level should consult an advisor in the
Teacher Education Program. Students may choose from the following teacher certification
programs:

                                       Interdisciplinary Studies
                                 Early Childhood - 4th Grade, Generalist
                                 Technology Applications (Grades 8-12)
                                   Special Education (EC- Grade 12)

                                        Academic Specializations
                                     Computer Science (Grades 8-12)
                              English, Language Arts / Reading (Grades 8-12)
                                          History (Grades 8-12)
                                         Mathematics (Grades 4-8)
                                        Mathematics (Grades 8-12)
                                        Life Science (Grades 8-12)
                                      Physical Science (Grades 8-12)

                                                All Level
                                          Music (EC-Grade 12)
                                    Physical Education (EC-Grade 12)


                              GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The Teacher Education Program prepares certification-seeking professionals for educational,
societal, and technological teaching needs through a holistic curriculum. Integrating field-based
experiences through the theoretical/pedagogical course delivery is a hallmark of the Huston-
Tillotson University Program. Particular attention is given to effective decision-making and best
practices for tomorrow’s classrooms. Program goals provide students a nurturing learning
environment in which they may explore:
     Extensive supervised field-based and laboratory experiences that empower teachers with
        the knowledge, skills, abilities, and attitudes necessary to guide and instruct the diverse
        needs of all learners.
     Opportunities to learn professional practices, legal responsibilities, and the organizational

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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008


      structure of the education profession that produces teachers who are at the forefront of
      educational innovation and are a valued member of an educational team.
     Instructional activities that develop levels of expertise beyond the required standards for
      educator testing and certification.


                Requirements for Undergraduate Seeking Teacher Certification
As the State of Texas mandates specific academic requirements for persons seeking teacher
certification, students should plan lower-division coursework schedules carefully. In order to
obtain adequate counsel from Teacher Education Program faculty, students interested in attaining
a teacher certification are encouraged to declare as a major early in their University sequence.
However, declaring a major is not synonymous with admittance into the Teacher Certification
Program. Students desiring certification through the Teacher Education Program MUST
comply with the program's three-step admission process.

        Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program Requires a Three-Step Process
     STEP 1                                      STEP 2                           STEP 3
     1. Compete program application              1.Sumit Profession E-Portfolio   1. Complete Final
                                                                                  Admissions process
     2. Post cumulative GPA average of 2.75      2. Post grade of C or better     2. Complete Student
                                                 in all education classes with    Teaching
                                                 an overall GPA of 2.75
     3. Post THEA scores:                        3. Complete three interviews     3. Demonstrate
           Reading, 250                         with Senior professors.          readiness to take
           Mathematics, 230                     Complete an interview with the   TExES
           Writing, 230                         Teacher Education Committee
     4. Complete Pre-admission assessments:
           E-Lassi
           Watson-Glaser
           Nelson-Denny Reading Inventory
           Praxis General Knowledge Test
           OWLS Oral Language Test
     5. Demonstrate acceptable proficiency in:
           Oral/written communications
           Quantitative skills
           Critical thinking
           Reading
           General knowledge skills
     6. Complete an interview with the
        Education Review Team.
     7. Submit written approval from
        certification area chair.
     8. Submit Criminal History Search Form
     9. Demonstrate entry level technology
        skills mastery (EDU 223 portfolio)
     10. Remove all incomplete (I) and failing
         grades from transcript.




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                   2006-2008


                    Teacher Education Program Required Three Step Process

Step One
Apply for provisional admission and receive acceptance into the Teacher Education certification
program before or during the first semester of their sophomore year. Provisional admission is
the prerequisite for enrollment in the Professional Responsibilities and Pedagogy sequence
of courses.

Provisional admission requirements are offered within EDU 201, Orientation to the
Teaching Profession. Students identified with deficiencies based on results of the diagnostic
assessments are required to participate in the University’s tutorial program to improve their
skills.

Step Two
Successful completion of the three interviews provides valuable information regarding the
teacher candidate’s professional and emotional readiness for teaching. More importantly, the
Professional E-Portfolio including documentation of the three interviews, field internship
experiences, and evidence of preparation for student teaching and certification is vital to gainful
employment.

Step Three
Students seeking designation as a Program Completer*, one who is eligible to take the state
certification examinations, must complete Step Three requirements. Otherwise, the
University will not designate (recommend to the State) the student as a Program Completer*.
Therefore, the student is not eligible to take the state certification examinations.

In order for the Huston-Tillotson University Teacher Education Program to recommend a teacher
candidate for a Texas teaching certificate, a student must successfully complete student teaching
or equivalent internship as a teacher of record in an approved school and demonstrate readiness
to take the Texas Examination for Educator Standards (TExES) examinations. Candidates for
teacher certification must pass the designated pre-certification examination in Pedagogy and
Professional Responsibilities and the designated pre-certification examination in the specific
content area (e.g. the Mathematics Program will administer and evaluate the pre-certification
content examination for students seeking teacher certification in mathematics.)

*Note: Since program guidelines for new State Standards became effective September 2002, graduates prior to that
date are not considered Program Completers. Since September 2002, continued eligibility as a Program Completer
is honored only if there have been no changes in State standards, the HT Teacher Program policies, or the Bulletin
under which the person registered. If a Program Completer does not attain certification within one year after
graduation, the Program Completer’s status is re-evaluated on an individual basis by the HT Certification
Officer, who may request that the person return to campus for additional coursework or academic
preparation.




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008


Special Conditions
Transfer Students applying for admittance to the Teacher Education Program must provide an
official transcript including catalogs from previous colleges attended. The University policy
requires that the student complete 50% of the courses in the major at Huston-Tillotson
University. Each transfer candidate’s application is individually reviewed. Transfer students who
wish to transfer hours in an area of specialization are required to take a subject examination(s) to
determine preparedness. Based on examination results, the program faculty may determine what
course(s) or tutorial studies each person must take, retake, or pursue to fulfill requirements for
teacher certification.

Teacher candidates seeking course credit by experience for Teacher Education courses
must apply for provisional admittance to the program and compile the required Professional
Portfolio with documented evidence of knowledge and skill performance as related to content in
the course description(s) explained in the Bulletin. Each candidate’s work will be individually
reviewed, and the program faculty will determine each person’s specific needs. Education majors
may not test out of courses in the Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities block, Reading, or
Special Education.

Important Terminology/Distinctions

Criminal Search: Prior to a teacher candidate beginning a field internship, the school district in
which a candidate is assigned for field experience has the right to conduct a criminal history
check on the teacher candidate. Using the data, the school district has the right to clear or refuse
the candidate entry to district campuses and events. Students seeking admission to the program
will be required to sign an acknowledgment form attesting to their understanding of this policy
and its implications. Rather than wait the necessary time to secure clearance via a criminal search
by the school district, each intern is encouraged to procure the data by accessing the Department
of Public Safety website at personal cost, about $5.00. In this way, the teacher candidate directly
pays and prints off the data, which can include a sex offender report as well as proof of
fingerprints. The website address for the DPS check is http://records.txdps.state.tx.us/

Program Completer is a student who has successfully fulfilled the requirements of Step Three
of the Teacher Education Admission Process.

Non-Completer is a candidate who enrolled in an education course(s) but did not choose to
advance through, or did not satisfy the qualifications for, Step Three of the Teacher Education
Admissions process. Therefore, the student does not graduate as a teacher certification candidate,
and is not eligible to take the state certification examinations.

Academic Specialization Major – Teacher Certification Candidate signifies a student’s
major coursework is within one subject discipline area. Therefore, the student will follow the
degree program guidelines within that academic major in addition to the education course
requirements.




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008


Interdisciplinary Studies Major – Teacher Certification Candidate requires a minimum of
48 semester credit hours drawn from several disciplines, at least 21 of which are upper division,
and includes no education courses. The student will also complete the additional education
coursework that meets state requirements for teacher certification.

Interdisciplinary Studies Major – Learning Specialist requires a minimum of 48 semester
credit hours drawn from several disciplines, at least 21 of which are upper division, and includes
no education courses. The student must also complete 18 education course hours. Learning
Specialist majors may not enroll in EDU 374 and 414. However, the student does not meet the
requirements to be considered a Program Completer and is not eligible to take the state
certification examinations.

Application for Certification
After fulfilling all University course work, graduation, and certification examination
requirements, candidates apply to the state for their teacher certification. The State Board of
Education Rule 19 TAC 141.5 requires the Texas Education Agency to conduct an investigation
of all certification applicants for criminal felony and/or misdemeanor convictions. All applicants
for Texas teaching certificates are screened through the Texas Department of Public Safety. In
accordance with Article 6252-13c Texas Civil Statutes, the Texas Education Agency may refuse
to issue a teaching certificate to a person who has been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor for
a crime which directly relates to the duties and responsibilities of the teaching profession.
Evidence of the person’s rehabilitation or rehabilitative effort following the release is considered.
The denial of a certificate may be appealed.

Program Policies
It is imperative that students interested in becoming certified teachers seek qualified counsel
from Education Program faculty. After meeting with an Education advisor to plan the program
degree sequence, it is the student’s responsibility to become familiar with all degree
requirements. Students are expected to utilize electronic communication, the campus web site,
and online/printed media to stay abreast of program requirements, changes, and related activities.

Teacher candidates admitted to the Teacher Education Program will adhere to the following
policies:

     Show proof of student membership in an affiliate teacher organization (i.e. TCTE, ATPE,
      or TMA) prior to beginning the first field internship and continue to update this
      membership through the interim of all education courses and field assignments.
     Maintain a 2.75 overall GPA and make at least a C in all education courses.
     Build a Professional Portfolio with evidence of educator preparation to be presented to
      senior professors during the Final Admission process and to personnel directors or
      principals during job interviews.
     Present evidence that any ―I‖ grade has been satisfactorily removed from transcripts from
      previous semesters prior to enrolling in education courses.
     Provide documentation to fulfill the University mandate of 120 hours in community
      service prior to graduation (approximately one hour per week / 15 hours per semester).



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Huston-Tillotson University                                                   2006-2008


Degree Program Sequence

Core Curriculum for all Teacher Certification Candidates

The initial curriculum for students seeking teacher certification is the same as the core
curriculum described in the Academic Program section of this Bulletin with the exception that
all teacher certification candidates must take 6 credit hours in government (PSC 113 and
PSC 123) and 6 credit hours in history (HIS 213 and HIS 223). Two courses may be taken by
education majors to earn credit for both the core curriculum and Education Program
requirements: EDU 233, Educational Psychology and Human Development (fulfills behavioral
science requirement); and EDU 273, Teaching Learners of Diverse Cultures (fulfills
diversity/global perspectives requirement).

All candidates seeking teacher certification MUST complete 21 hours in the Pedagogy and
Professional Responsibilities course sequence. A student MUST adhere to advisement
recommendations before permission is granted to enroll in upper-division EDU courses, which
have prerequisites that are closely monitored. Most EDU courses in the Pedagogy and
Professional Responsibilities sequence include a 45-hour fieldwork component in which teacher
candidates mentor and tutor children in public school classrooms. The student teaching course,
EDU 426, involves a full-day internship for 12 weeks under the supervision of a classroom
teacher.

Prerequisite Courses for Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities Sequence
Course           Course Title                                                  Hours
EDU 201          Orientation to the Teaching Profession                         1
EDU 223          Technology Applications in Education                           3
                                                                                4

Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities Upper-Division Sequence for All
Teacher Certification Candidates
Course           Course Title                                                  Hours
SED 313          Survey of Exceptional Learners                                 3
EDU 313          Teacher and Student in a Multicultural Society (Level 1)       3
EDU 374          TEKS Curriculum for K-12 (Level 2)                             4
EDU 411-A        Teacher Certification Examination Preparation - PPR            1
EDU 414          Assessment, Instructional Strategies, Management (Level 3)     4
EDU 426          Professional Collaborations: Student Teaching (Level 4)        6
                                                                               21




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008




    Teacher Education Program Degree and Teaching Certificate Offerings


                                                  Grades 8-12
        Degree                     Major                      Certificate       Semester Hours

   Bachelor of Arts               Biology                     Life Science           132

  Bachelor of Science            Chemistry                  Physical Science         139

  Bachelor of Science         Computer Science             Computer Science          124

   Bachelor of Arts               English                  English Language          127
                                                             Arts/Reading

   Bachelor of Arts               History                       History              123

   Bachelor of Arts       Interdisciplinary Studies           Technology             126
                                                              Applications

  Bachelor of Science           Mathematics                  Mathematics             133




                                                  Grades 4-8
   Bachelor of Arts             Mathematics                  Mathematics             134




                                                  Grades EC-4
   Bachelor of Arts       Interdisciplinary Studies            Generalist            120




                                              Grades EC-12
   Bachelor of Arts           Interdisciplinary            Special Education         123
                                   Studies

  Bachelor of Science           Kinesiology                Physical Education        134

   Bachelor of Music               Music                         Music               138




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     Huston-Tillotson University                                                                            2006-2008


                                                    BACHELOR OF ARTS
                                                      BIOLOGY MAJOR
                                                     TOTAL HOURS 132
                 COURSE SEQUENCE LEADING TO AN 8-12 LIFE SCIENCE CERTIFICATE
    Year 1              Fall                                          Year 1            Spring
    BIO 124             Organisms and Evolution            4          BIO 134           Ecology and Behavior            4
    CSC 103             Intro to Computers                 3          BIO 202           Explorations in Biology         2
    MTH 163             Alg & Trig for Science Majors      3          PSC 113           American Government Fed         3
    ENG 113             English I                          3          ENG 123           English II                      3
    PSY 102             College Experience                 2          KIN 113           Health and Wellness             3
                                                                      KIN 101, 111      Personal Fitness/Team Sports    1
    Total Hours                                           15          Total Hours                                       16
    Year 2              Fall                                          Year 2            Spring
    BIO 224             Cellular & Molecular Biology       4          BIO 314           Cell Biology                     4
    BIO 240             2nd Year Sci Seminar               .5         BIO 240           2nd Year Seminar                 .5
    CHE 114             General Chemistry I                3          CHE 124           General Chemistry II             4
    MED 233             Public Speaking                    3          ---------         Fine Arts Core                   3
    ----------          Language I                         3          ---------         Language II                      3
    PSC 123             American Government Fed            3          EDU 201           Orient to the Teaching prof.     1
    Total Hours                                           16.5        Total Hours                                       15.5
                                      Year 2                      Summer
                                    EDU         223             Technology Applications          3
                                    RDG         383 *           Reading Across Curriculum        3
                                    Total Hours                                                  6
Year 3           Fall                                             Year 3          Spring
    BIO     340                3rd Year Science Seminar     .5         BIO        340   3rd Year Science Seminar               .5
    ------- --------           Diversity Core                3         BIO        334   Vertebrate Physiology                   4
    BIO     244                Human Anatomy (elective)      4         BIO        304   General Microbiology                    4
    BIO     302                Field Biology                 2         BIO        353   Sci/Mth Know & Skills, 8-12             3
    EDU     233                Edu Psy & Human Growth        3         HIS        223   History II                              3
    HIS     213                History 1                     3         EDU        313   Tchr & Stdnt in Multicul Soc            3
    ENG     213, 233           World Literature I or II      3
    Total Hours                                            18.5        Total Hours                                            17.5

Year 4           Fall                                             Year 4          Spring
   BIO     344       Genetics                          4      EDU 414         Assess Instruct Strat Mngmnt                          4
   BIO     401       4th Year Science Seminar          1      BIO     411     4th Year Science Seminar                              1
   SED     313       Survey of Exceptional Learners    3      EDU 426         Prof Collab: Stdnt Tchng                              6
   EDU     374       TEKS Curriculum                   4      EDU 411-A Teacher Certification Prep                                  1
   ----    ------    Ethics/Religion Core              3
    Total Hours                                       15          Total Hours                                                   12
           Education majors may test out of CSC 103 and satisfy computer requirement by taking EDU 223.
                   Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.
     * Additional Requirement: RDG 413 Language Arts Across the Curriculum (Advisor Decision).




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  Huston-Tillotson University                                                                                  2006-2008


                                               BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
                                                 CHEMISTRY MAJOR
                                                  TOTAL HOURS 139
       COURSE SEQUENCE LEADING TO AN 8-12 PHYSICAL SCIENCE CERTIFICATE
  Year 1 Fall                      Year 1    Spring
  ENG      113      English I                         3           ENG      123               English II                         3
  MTH      163      Alg & Trig for Sc Majors          3           MTH      173               Precalculus                        4
  PSY      102      College Orientation               2           PSC      113               American Government Federal        3
  CHE      114      General Chemistry I               4           CHE      124               General Chemistry II               4
  CSC      103      Intro to Computers                3           KIN      113               Health and Wellness                2
                                                                  KIN      101/111           Pers. Fit/Team Sports              1
  Total Hours                                        15           Total Hours                                                  17
  Year 2     Fall                                              Year 2         Spring
  CHE     314    Organic Chemistry I                  4          CHE       324               Organic Chemistry II                4
  CHE     240    2nd Year Sci Seminar-Fall           .5          CHE       241               2nd Year Sci Seminar-Spring        .5
  MTH 224        Calculus I                           4          MTH       234               Calculus II                         4
  PHY     214    Physics I                            4          PHY       224               Physics II                          4
  MED 233        Public Speaking                      3          -------   ------            Fine Arts Core                      3
  ------- ----   Diversity Core                       3
  Total Hours                                       18.5           Total Hours                                                 15.5
                                Year 2                          Summer
                                EDU         223         Technology Applications in Ed                3       EDU
                                EDU         201         Orien to the Tchng Prof                      1
                                Total Hours                                                          4
  Year 3     Fall                                                 Year 3      Spring
CHE         414        Physical Chemistry I           4             CHE              424        Physical Chemistry II           4
CHE         340        3rd Year Sci Seminar-Fall      .5            CHE              341        3rd Year Sci Seminar-Spring     .5
CHE         334        Quantitative Analysis          4             GEO              -----      Geology (Dist. Learning)        3
LSPLFR 113             Language I                     3             LSP, LFR         123        Language II                     3
ENG         213/ 233   World Literature I or II       3             HIS              213        US History I                    3
PHY         334        Physics/Astronomy              3             PSC              123        American Govt. State & Local    3
Total Hours                                          17.5           Total Hours                                                16.5
                                                  Year 3          Summer
                                                  RDG            383*         Reading Across the Content Area              3
                                                  HIS            223          US History II                                3
                                                  Total Hours                                                              6
  Year 4     Fall                                                 Year 4      Spring
CHE        401      Senior Seminar                         1            CHE         411         Senior Seminar                  1
EDU        233      Edu Psy & Human Growth                 3            EDU         414         Assess Instrct Strat, Mngmnt    4
CHE        411      Ethics/Religion Core                   3            EDU         426         Prof Collab: Student Tchng      6
CHE        493      Chemical Research                      3            EDU         411-A       Teacher Certification Prep      1
EDU        374      TEKS Curriculum                        4
SED        313      Survey of Exceptional Learner          3
Total Hours                                      17       Total Hours                                                          12
       Education majors may test out of CSC 103 and satisfy computer requirement by taking EDU 223.
               Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.
         Additional Requirement: RDG 413 Language Arts Across the Curriculum (Advisor Decision).



                                                           81
Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


                                        BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
                                       COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR
                                          TOTAL HOURS 124

      COURSE SEQUENCE LEADING TO AN 8-12 COMPUTER SCIENCE CERTIFICATE

 Year 1        Fall                                    Spring
 CSC 113       Programming Foundations I          3    CSC 123       Programming Foundations II          3
 CSC 103       Intro to Computers                 3    ------        Language I                          3
 MTH 163       Alg. & Trig for Science Majors     3    HIS213        US History I                        3
 ENG 113       English I                          3    ENG123        English II                          3
 PSY 102       College Experience                 2    KIN113        Health & Wellness                   3
 KIN 101       Personal Fit/Team Sports           1    PSC123        American Govt. State & Local        3
 Total Hours                                     15    Total Hours                                      18

 Year 2        Fall                                    Spring
 MTH 224       Calculus I                          4   MTH 234       Calculus II                          4
 CSC 240       2ND Year Sci Seminar               .5   CSC 241       2ND Year Sci Seminar                .5
 --------      Language II                         3   EDU 201       Orientation to Teaching Profes.      1
 HIS 223       US History II                       3   ---------     Diversity Core                       3
 CSC 153       Data Structures & Programming       3   ---------     Fine Arts Core                       3
 MED 233       Public Speaking                     3   CSC 163       Website Design & Maintenance         3
                                                       EDU 223       Technology Applications in Ed        3
 Total Hours                                    16.5   Total Hours                                     17.5

 Year 3        Fall                                    Spring
 CSC 353       Operating Systems I                 3   CSC 353       Operating Systems II                 3
 EDU 323       Video Foundations                   3   CSC 383       Computer Networks                    3
 CSC 273       Intro to Multimedia                 3   CSC 193       Advanced Applications                3
 CSC 340       3rd Year Sci Seminar               .5   CSC 341       3rd Year Sci Seminar                .5
 ENG 213       World Lit I or II                   3   EDU 313       Teacher & Student in Mult. Soc       3
 EDU 223       Edu Psy & Human Growth              3   RDG 383*      Rding Across the Content Area        3
 Total Hours                                    15.5   Total Hours                                     15.5

 Year 4        Fall                                    Spring
 CSC 401       Senior Science Seminar             1    CSC 411       Senior Science Seminar              1
 SED 313       Survey of Exceptional Learner      3    EDU 414       Assess Instruct Strateg. Mgt.       4
 CSC 423       Computer Graphics                  3    EDU 426       Prof. Collab: Student Teaching      6
 ----------    Ethics/Religion Core               3    EDU 411       Teacher Certification Prep          1
 EDU 374       TEKS Curriculum                    4
 Total Hours                                     14    Total Hours                                      12



     Education majors may test out of CSC 103 and satisfy computer requirement by taking EDU 223.
              Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.
* Additional Requirement: RDG 413 Language Arts Across the Curriculum (Advisor Decision)




                                                 82
Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008


                                              BACHELOR OF ARTS
                                                ENGLISH MAJOR
                                               TOTAL HOURS 127


             COURSE SEQUENCE LEADING TO AN 8-12 ENGLISH LANGUAGE ART/
                              READING CERTIFICATE
 Year 1           Fall                                 Spring
 ENG 113          Intro to Composition             3   ENG 123         Rhetoric and Composition       3
 MTH 143          College Algebra                  3   MED 233         Public Speaking                3
 PSY 102          College Experience               3   KIN 113         Health and Wellness            3
 ---------        Fine Arts Core                   3   PSC 113         American Government Fed.       3
                  Personal Fitness/Team
 KIN 101/111      Sports                           1   LSP,LFR,LCH     Language II                     3
 LSP,LFR,LCH      Language I                       3   CSC 103         Intro to Computers              3
 Total Hours                                      16   Total Hours                                    18

 Year 2           Fall                                 Spring
 ENG 213, 223                                          ENG 213, 223,
 or 233           Literature                       3   or 233          Literature                      3
 HIS 213          U.S. History I                   3   ENG 233         Modern Critical Theory          3
 EDU 233          Educational Psychology           3   HIS 233         U.S. History II                 3
 PSC 123          Amer. Gov. State & Local         3   PHY 114         Science 2 (Physical Sci)        4
 BIO ---          Science I (Biology)              4   EDU 223         Technology Applications         3
                                                       EDU 201         Orientation Teaching Prof.      1
 Total Hours                                      16   Total Hours                                    17

 Year 3           Fall                                 Spring
 ENG 313          Topics in U.S. Literature        3   ENG 383         Topics in World Literature     3
 ENG 303          Languages and Cultures           3   ENG 373         Topics in Writing              3
 ENG 353          Advanced Composition             3   ENG 343         Topics in British Literature   3
                  Ethics / Religion Core           3   RDG 383*        Reading in the Content Area    3
                  Survey of Exceptional                                Teacher & Student in
 SED 313          Learners (Divers.)               3   EDU 313         Multicultural Soc.              3
 Total Hours                                      15   Total Hours                                    15

 Year 4           Fall                                 Spring
 ENG 383          Topics in World Literature       3   ENG 493         Senior Seminar                 3
 ENG 443          Children & Adolescent Lit.       3   ENG 414         Assessment, Instructional      4
                                                                       Strategies, Management
 ENG 473          African American Literature      3   EDU 426         Professional. Collaboration:   6
                                                                       Student Teaching
 EDU 411-A        Teacher Certif. Exam Prep        1
 ENG --           English Elective                 3
 EDU 374          TEKS Curriculum K-12             4
 Total Hours                                      17   Total Hours                                    13


      Education majors may test out of CSC 103 and satisfy computer requirement by taking EDU 223.
              Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.
       * Additional Requirement: RDG 413 Language Arts Across the Curriculum (Advisor Decision).




                                                  83
Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


                                              BACHELOR OF ARTS
                                               HISTORY MAJOR
                                               TOTAL HOURS 123

               COURSE SEQUENCE LEADING TO AN 8-12 HISTORY CERTIFICATE
 Year 1           Fall                                 Spring
 PSY 102          College Experience               2   MTH 143          College Algebra                 3
 ENG 113          English I                        3   ENG 123          English II                      3
 KIN 113          Health and Wellness              3   MED 233          Public Speaking                 3
                                                                        Amer. Government State
 CSC 103          Introduction to Computers        3   PSC 123          Local                           3
                  Personal Fitness/Team
 KIN 101, 111     Sports                           1   LSP, LFR 123     Language II                     3
 LSP, LFR 113     Language I                       3
 Total Hours                                      15   Total Hours                                      15

 Year 2           Fall                                 Spring
 HIS 213          US History I                     3   HIS 223          US History II                    3
 HIS 113          World Cultures & Civiliz. I      3   HIS 123          World Cultures & Civil. II       3
 EDU 223          Educational Psychology           3   EDU 201          Orient. Teaching Profession      1
 PSC 113          American Government Fed          3   ---------        Fine Arts Core                   3
 BIO ----         Science I (Biology)              4   EDU 223          Tech. Applic. In Education       3
                                                       PHY 114          Sci II (Physical Science)        4
 Total Hours                                      16   Total Hours                                      17

 Year 3           Fall                                 Spring
 --------         Ethics/Religion Core             3   HIS 383          Afr Amer Hist II       or
                                                                                                        3
 HIS 323          Latin American History           3   HIS 443          Race Relations in the Amers
 HIS -----        History Elective                 3   Upper Division   Social Sci or Humanities Elec   3
 HIS 382          Afr Amer Hist I (diversity)      3   HIS 498          History Methods         or
                                                                                                        3
                                                       HIS 499          History Seminar
 SED 313          Srvy of Except. Lrnrs (diver)    3   RDG 383*         World Literature/18th century    3
 EDU 233          Edu Psy & Human Develop          3   EDU 313          Teacher/Student in Mult. Soc.    3
 Total Hours                                      18   Total Hours                                      15

 Year 4           Fall                                 Spring
 ---------        Behavioral Science Core          3   HIS -----        Non-Western Hist. Elective      3
 HIS 413 or 423   Early or Mod Euro History        3   EDU 426          Prof Collab: Student Tchng      6
                  Soc Stud/Hist Meth- Sec
 HIS 343          Tchrs                            3   EDU 414          Assess Instrct Strat, Mngmnt    4
 EDU 411-A        Tchrs Cert Exam Prep-PPR         1
 EDU 374          TEKS Curriculum for K-12         4

 Total Hours                                      14   Total Hours                                      13


     Education majors may test out of CSC 103 and satisfy computer requirement by taking EDU 223.
              Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.
* Additional Requirement: RDG 413 Language Arts Across the Curriculum (Advisor Decision).




                                                  84
  Huston-Tillotson University                                                                   2006-2008


                                           BACHELOR OF ARTS
                                     INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES MAJOR
                                            TOTAL HOURS – 126
     COURSE SEQUENCE LEADS TO AN 8-12 TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS CERTIFICATE

Year 1    Fall                                              Year 1     Spring
CSC       113    Programming Foundations I         3        CSC        163      Website Design & Maintenance      3
CSC       103    Intro to Computers                3        ----       ----     Language I                        3
MTH       ----   Fund I, Pre-/Calculus or Trig.    3        HIS        213      US History I                      3
ENG       113    English I                         3        ENG        123      English II                        3
PSY       102    College Experience                2        KIN        113      Health & Wellness                 3
KIN       101    Personal Fit/Team Sports          1        MED        233      Public Speaking                   3
Total Hours                                       15        Total Hours                                          18

Year 2    Fall                                              Year 2     Spring
PSC       123    American Govt. State & Local     3         PHY        114      Science II (Physical Science)     4
----      ----   Language II                      3         ----       ----     CSC/ENG Elective                  3
CSC       273    Intro to Multimedia              3         ----       ----     Fine Arts Core                    3
BIO       ----   Science I (Biology)              4         EDU        201      Orient to the Teaching Prof.      1
HIS       223    US History II                    3         ----       ----     CSC/ENG Elective                  3
CSC       ----   CSC/ENG Elective                           EDU        223      Technology Applic. in Educ.       3
Total Hours                                       16        Total Hours                                          17

Year 3    Fall                                              Year 3     Spring
EDU       233    Edu Psy & Human Growth            3        ----       ----     CSC/ENG Elective                 3
CSC       273    Intro to Multimedia               3        CSC        193      Advanced Applications            3
EDU       323    Video Foundations                 3        ----       ----     CSC/ENG Elective                 3
PSC       113    American Govt. Federal            3        EDU        313      Tcher & Stdnt/Multicult Soc      3
ENG       213    World Lit I or II                 3        RDG        393*     Rding Across the Content Area    3
----      ----   Ethics/Religion Core              3
Total Hours                                       18        Total Hours                                          15

Year 4    Fall                                              Year 4     Spring
SED       313    Survey of Exceptional Learner     3        ----       -----    CSC/ENG Elective                 3
CSC       423    Computer Graphics                 3        EDU                 Assess Instruct Strat, Mgt       4
CSC              CSC/ENG Elective                  3        EDU                 Prof. Collab: Student Teaching   6
EDU       374    TEKS Curriculum                   4
EDU       411    Teacher Certification Prep        1
Total Hours                                       14                                                             13



         Education majors may test out of CSC 103 and satisfy computer requirement by taking EDU 223.
                 Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.
          * Additional Requirement: RDG 413 Language Arts across the Curriculum (Advisor Decision).




                                                       85
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                    2006-2008


                                           BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
                                            MATHEMATICS MAJOR
                                             TOTAL HOURS 133
          COURSE SEQUENCE LEADING TO AN 8-12 MATHEMATICS CERTIFICATE
 Year 1           Fall                                       Spring
 LSP, LFR 113     Language I                           3     LSP, LFR 123     Language II                      3
 CSC 103          Introduction to Computers            3     ---------        Fine Arts Core                   3
 MTH 163          Alg. & Trig. For Sci Majors          3     HIS 213          US History I                     3
 ENG 113          English I                            3     ENG 123          English II                       3
 PSY 102          College Experience                   2     KIN 113          Health and Wellness              3
 KIN 101, 111     Personal Fit. /Team Sports           1
 Total Hours                                          15     Total Hours                                      15

 Year 2           Fall                                       Spring
 MTH 224          Calculus I                           4     MTH 234          Calculus 2                        4
 MTH 240          2nd Yr Sc. Seminar – Fall           .5     MTH 241          2nd Yr Sc. Seminar – Fall        .5
 PSC 123          Amer. Gov. State and Local           3     EDU 223          Tech. Applic. In Education        3
 MED 233          Public Speaking                      3     -------          Diversity Core                    3
 HIS 223          US History I                         3     PSC 113          American Government Fed           3
 ------           Science I                            4     -------          Ethics/Religion Core              3
 Total Hours                                        17.5     Total Hours                                     16.5

                                                 Year 2     Summer
                              EDU         201       Orientation to the Teaching Prof   1            EDU
                              RDG         383*      Reading Across the Content Area    3
                              Total Hours                                              4

 Year 3           Fall                                       Spring
 MTH ----         Geometry                             3     MTH 433          Differential Equations            3
 EDU 233          Educational Psychology               3     MTH 333          Probability                       3
 MTH 324          Calculus 3                           4     MTH 341          3rd Year Sc Seminar-Spring       .5
 MTH 353          Linear Algebra                       3     --------         Science II                        4
 MTH 340          3rd Year Sc Seminar-Fall            .5     ENG 213, 233     World Literature I or II          3
 SED 313          Survey of Exceptional Lrnrs          3     EDU 313          Teacher/Student Multic. Soc.      3
 Total Hours                                        16.5     Total Hours                                     16.5

 Year 4           Fall                                       Spring
 MTH 363          Fund. Concepts of Math               3     MTH 473          Special Topics                   3
 MTH 413          Real Analysis                        3     MTH 411          Senior Seminar                   1
 MTH401           Senior Seminar                       1     EDU 414          Assess, Instrct Strat, Mgt       4
 MTH403           Modern Algebra                       3     EDU 426          Prof Collab. : Stdnt Tchng       6
 MTH 443          Numerical Analysis                   3
 EDU 411-A        Teacher Certification Exam           1
 EDU 374          TEKS Curriculum K-12                 4
 Total Hours                                          18     Total Hours                                      14



      Education majors may test out of CSC 103 and satisfy computer requirement by taking EDU 223.
              Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.
       * Additional Requirement: RDG 413 Language Arts Across the Curriculum (Advisor Decision).




                                                     86
   Huston-Tillotson University                                                                                          2006-2008


                                                      BACHELOR OF ARTS
                                                INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES MAJOR
                                                       TOTAL HOURS – 120
                       COURSE SEQUENCE LEADS TO AN EC-4 GENERALIST CERTIFICATE

Year 1         Fall                                                      Year 1        Spring
PSY            102       College Orientation                   2         ------        ----         Fine Arts Core                           3
CSC            103       *Intro to Computers                   3         MED           100          Public Speaking                          3
ENG            113       English I                             3         ENG           123          English II                               3
HIS            213       U.S. History                          3         PSC           113          American Government                      3
-----          -----     ^Language I                           3         -----         ----         ^Language II                             3

Total Hours                                                    14        Total Hours                                                         15
Teacher candidates are highly recommended to take 6 hours in
summer school after freshman year and another 6 hours in                 ^Spanish recommended. * If person tests out of CSC 103, satisfy
summer school after sophomore year. Suggested summer                     computer requirement by taking EDU 223. Take Texas Higher
courses are government fine arts, public speaking, and                   Education Assessment (THEA) exam.
philosophy, history, or computer applications.


Year 2         Fall                                                      Year 2        Spring
PHY         114          Physical Science                       4        BIO 114 or 134             Evrnmntl or Eclgy/Bhvr                    4
MTH         143          College Algebra                        3        ----       ----            Ethics Core                               3
ENG         213          World Literature I or II               3        PSC        123             Amer Gov State & Local                    3
KIN         114          Personal Fit/Well/Health               3        EDU        201             Orientation to Teaching                   1
HIS         213*         U.S. History I                         3        EDU        223             Technology Application                    3
Total Hours                                                    16        Total Hours                                                         14

Year 3         Fall                                                      Year 3        Spring
EDU         312          Soc. Studies Elem.                     2        BIO 204/104                Prin Hum Ana or Intro Bio                4
MTH         303          Concept of Math I                      3        MTH       313              Concept of Math II                       3
ENG         443          English Lit. for Child                 3        EDU       373              Teaching Diversity Learners              3
RDG         323          Fundamentals Literacy                  3        RDG       413              Language Arts Across Curric              3
EDU         303          Art, Music, Movement                   3        EDU       313              Child in Multicultural Society           3
SED         313          Survey of Exc. Lrnr                    3
Total Hours                                                    17        Total Hours                                                         16
Enrollment eligibility in upper division education courses               STEP TWO ADMISSION: Submit professional portfolio with
requires a student to have a 2.75 GPA and removal of all                 documentation of field internship experiences and preparation for
incomplete grades in any coursework.                                     teaching and certification training.


Year 4         Fall                                                      Year 4        Spring
RDG            493       Diagnostic Reading                    3         EDU           414          Assess, Instruct, Mgt                    4
KIN            213       Dev. Approp. Activities               3         BIO           353          Science in Elementry School              3
SED/EDU        374/      Hu Grth or Ed Psy /Hu Dev             3         EDU           426          Student Teaching                         6
               233
EDU            374       TEKS Curriculum                        4        EDU           411-B        Cert. Exam Prep EC-4                     1
EDU        411-A         Cert. Exam Prep, PPR                   1
Total Hours                                                    14        Total Hours                                                         14


                       Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.




                                                                    87
  Huston-Tillotson University                                                                     2006-2008


                                             BACHELOR OF ARTS
                                       INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES MAJOR
                                               TOTAL HOURS 123

         COURSE SEQUENCE LEADS TO AN EC-12 SPECIAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATE


Year 1     Fall                                             Year 1     Spring
ENG       113     English I                        3        ENG        123         English II                        3
MTH       143     College Algebra                  3        MED        233         Public Speaking                   3
PSY       102     College Experience               2        KIN        113         Health and Wellness               3
-----     -----   Fine Arts Core                   3        PSC        113         American Government Federal       3
-----     -----   Language I                       3        -----      -----       Language II                       3
KIN       101     Personal Fit/Team Sports         1        CSC        103         Intro to Computers                3
Total Hours                                       15        Total Hours                                             18

Year 2     Fall                                             Year 2     Spring
SED       313     Surv of Excep Learners           3        -----      ------      Ethics/Religion Core              3
HIS       213     History I                        3        HIS        223         History II                        3
BIO       ----    Science I (Biology)              4        PHY        ----        Science II (Physical Science)     4
EDU       223     Educational Psychology           3        EDU        373         Teaching Learners of Diversity    3
PSC       123     American Gov State & Local       3        EDU        223         Technology Applic. in Educ.       3
Total Hours                                       16        Total Hours                                             16

                         Year 2           Summer
                         EDU 201          Orientation to the Teaching Profession        1
                         RDG 383*         Reading Across the Content Area               3
                         Total Hours                                                    4

Year 3     Fall                                             Year 3     Spring
MTH       303     Fundamental Concepts I           3        MTH        313         Fundamental Concepts II          3
RDG       323     Foundations of Literacy          3        RDG        413         Language Arts Across Curric.     3
EDU       303     Creative Arts, Mus & Mov         3        SED        374         Behavior Management              4
SED       364     Curric. For Except. Learners     4        EDU        313         Tcher & Stdnt/Multicult Soc      3
SED       333     Assessment & Programming         3
Total Hours                                       16        Total Hours                                             13

Year 4     Fall                                             Year 4     Spring
SED        386    Practicum                        6        EDU        411-A       Teacher Certif. Exam Prep.       1
EDU        374    TEKS Curriculum                  4        EDU        414         Assess Instruct Strat, Mgt       4
SED        493    Diagnostic & Corr Rdg            3        EDU        426         Prof. Collab: Student Teaching   6
                                                            EDU        411-C       Teacher Certification Prep       1

Total Hours                                       13                                                                12



         Education majors may test out of CSC 103 and satisfy computer requirement by taking EDU 223.
                Education majors are required to take History II & PSC 123 Texas Government.




                                                       88
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008




                          COURSES IN TEACHER EDUCATION (EDU)


EDU 201          Orientation to the Teaching Profession                             1 credit hour
Designed specifically for students seeking admission into the Teacher Education Program, this
introductory course offers an overview of the teacher certification process, roles and responsibilities of
Texas educators, and the structure of state educational systems. Students will assess their own academic
preparation via multiple diagnostic instruments, demonstrate oral and written proficiency, and begin to
build their electronic Professional Portfolio. 12 hours required internship allows students to explore
different educational levels in two diverse school settings. Prerequisite: NoneOffered:       Fall/Spring
Yearly

EDU 223          Technology Applications in Education                               3 credit hours
Open to majors and non-majors, students will explore the integration of technology and creativity across
the curriculum for writing, research, collaboration, and personal productivity. Particular emphasis is
placed on the identification, use, and evaluation of applications that support appropriate instructional
strategies to positively impact the learning process. Students will build a digital or electronic portfolio to
document mastery of entry-level technology skills. This projects-based course employs the use of Office
applications, audio/video/ image editing software, and dual computing platforms.
Prerequisite: CSC 103 (or placement eligibility).                     Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

EDU 233          Educational Psychology and Human Development                       3 credit hours
Open to majors and non-majors, the study of human development - physical, social-emotional, moral,
and intellectual - from birth to young adulthood via major historical and contemporary theories in
educational psychology. Includes the application of scientific knowledge about individual differences
and the process of learning to the problems of teaching and learning. Students will examine
measurement and evaluation of student achievement using standardized and informal assessment
procedures. Incorporates distance learning and requires internet access to complete. Substantial
writing component. Prerequisite: None                            Offered: Fall /Spring Yearly

EDU 303          Creative Arts, Music, and Movement                                 3 credit hours
Provides active and hands-on experiences in fine arts and movement education. Practical applications in
the integration of art, music and movement activities for the elementary classroom will be explored and
practiced.
Prerequisite: None                                                         Offered: Fall Yearly

EDU 312          Social Studies for Teachers, Grades K- 8                           2 credit hours
Designed specifically for teachers of young and middle school children, this field-based course will give
the student the knowledge and skills needed for planning, organizing, and effectively delivering
instruction based upon the Social Studies Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Social studies
content areas emphasized will be history,, geography, economics, government, citizenship, and culture.
Students will discuss understandings of the social and environmental consequences of scientific discovery
and technological innovations.
Prerequisite: None                                                      Offered: Spring Yearly




                                                 89
Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008


EDU 313        Teacher and the Student in a Multicultural Society                  3 credit hours
(Level One) This course optimizes opportunities for teacher candidates to use word processing,
databases, telecommunications, and a variety of media-technology as teaching tools. Prospective teachers
will discuss controversial issues in education, develop lessons to honor multicultural perspectives, prepare
a parent involvement plan, and acquire knowledge of principles of classroom discipline and management
through effective delivery systems. Required 45 hours of internship in public schools. Substantial writing
component. Prerequisite: Provisional Acceptance into Teacher Education ProgramOffered:                  Fall
and Spring/Yearly

EDU 323        Video Foundations                                                   3 credit hours
Students will investigate techniques in camera operation, lighting, digital editing, digital audio, and
producing video for the WWW in this projects based course. Also covered is story development and
project organization concepts common to single camera field productions. The course prepares students to
make basic television programs and short videos with style, creativity, flair, and professionalism. Web-
based delivery. Enrollment limited to 15 students.
Prerequisite: CSC 113 (or placement eligibility)                                 Offered: Spring

EDU 373        Teaching Learners of Diverse Cultures                               3 credit hours
A course open to majors and non-majors and designed to help prepare parents and teachers for the
immense challenges that arise in honoring children from diverse or underrepresented cultures. Each
participant will first focus upon his own cultural heritage and then focus on significant aspects of other
heritages. Activities involve community interviews, guest speakers, field trips, electronic journaling and
research, role playing, extensive readings, and observations in public school classrooms. Emphasis is
placed on understanding the needs of second language learners and bilingual students as well as the ethics
and execution of state and national laws. Involves substantial writing component and internet research.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing (completed minimum 30 credit hours) Offered: Spring Yearly

EDU 374        TEKS Curriculum for K-12 (Level Two)                                4 credit hours
A laboratory course designed to acquaint prospective teachers with the scope and sequence of Texas
Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) curriculum in their respective specialization subject areas.
Students will correlate TEKS to TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills) and to competencies
in the state subject certification tests. Students will compare, contrast, and apply educational theories to
practical teaching situations. Students will plan lessons, prepare materials, demonstrate methods,
determine assessment techniques, and strategize modifications that support and enrich state mandated
curriculum. Requires time-intensive projects as well as 45 hours of internship in public schools.
Prerequisite: Provisional Acceptance into Teacher Education ProgramOffered:                  Fall       and
Spring/Yearly

EDU 411-A Teacher Certification Examination Preparation –              1 credit hour
Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities A systematic investigation of content, philosophy,
and test-taking strategies fundamental to passing the state’s Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities
licensure examination. Required for all education majors prior to graduation. Course should be repeated
until candidate successfully passes state test. Prerequisite: Provisional Acceptance in Teacher
Education Program.
                                                                Offered: Fall and Spring/Yearly




                                                90
Huston-Tillotson University                                                            2006-2008


EDU 411-B Teacher Certification Examination Preparation –                    1 credit hour
EC-4 Generalist As the teacher candidate engages in concentrated preparation for the EC-4 Generalist
licensure examination, focus is placed on determining the person’s strengths and weaknesses in the six
content subject areas. If the participant does not achieve 85% mastery on the qualification test, or
successfully pass the state examination, the participant may repeat the coursework, or continue via an
individualized contract and online study. Prerequisite: Provisional Admission to Teacher Education
Program        Offered: Spring/Yearly

EDU 414      Assessments, Instructional Strategies, and Management (Level Three)
4 credit hours This team-taught course investigates laws and legalities in Texas schools, cooperative
learning activities, inquiry and problem-solving strategies, formal and informal assessments, holistic
grading and rubric formats, and the P.D.A.S. (Professional Development Appraisal System). Each teacher
candidate will design a classroom discipline/management system, a weekly plan, a yearly plan, and an
interactive learning center. An understanding of learning theories will be demonstrated through
development of lessons taught in multi-media settings. Requires time-intensive projects as well as 45
hours of internship in public schools. Prerequisite: Provisional Acceptance into Teacher Education
Program
                                                              Offered: Fall and Spring/Yearly

EDU 426     Professional Collaborations: Student Teaching (Level Four)
6 credit hours In this capstone course the teacher candidate will practice instructional competency
under the supervision of a classroom teacher five days per week, all day, for 12 weeks in a public school
setting. As a professional practitioner, the candidate will demonstrate effective assessment, planning,
implementation, and critical reflection. In addition, the candidate will participate in a weekly one-hour
seminar and be asked to complete a senior research media project and/or develop a workshop to share
professional expertise. Prerequisite: Final Admission into Teacher Education Program Offered:
Fall and Spring/Yearly




                                               91
Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008




                                 COURSES IN READING (RDG)

RDG 323          Fundamentals of Literacy Instruction, EC-4                      3 credit hours
This course provides primary teachers with foundation knowledge and strategies for understanding and
promoting literacy development in young children in pre-kindergarten through grade 4. Emphasis is on
beginning reading instruction, diagnosis and assessment, the Reading Standards for primary level, and the
Language Arts TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills). Teacher candidates will acquire
appropriate methods to assess and teach phonological awareness, the alphabetic principle, decoding, word
analysis, fluency, and reading comprehension. Materials will be created to reinforce literacy development.
If not taken as a co-requisite course with EDU 313 or EDU 374, the student must complete an additional
15 hours of field experience for this course.
Concurrent Enrollment: EDU 313 or EDU 374                                   Offered: Fall/Yearly

RDG 383          Reading in the Content Areas Grades 4-12                        3 credit hours
A course designed to prepare teachers of students in grades 4-12 in understanding the reading process.
Emphasis is on instructional strategies to assess and teach the Reading Language Arts TEKS including
vocabulary, structural analysis, fluency, reading comprehension, and written communication skills across
curriculum areas. By examining the social characteristics of pre-teen and adolescent learners, teacher
candidates will also focus on the promotion of speaking and listening skills, inquiry skills, and the
integration of technology for the advancement of student achievement. If not taken as a co-requisite
course with EDU 313 or EDU 374, the student must complete an additional 15 hours of field experience
for this course.
Concurrent Enrollment: EDU 313 or EDU 374                                  Offered: Fall/Yearly

RDG 413          Language Arts Across the Curriculum                             3 credit hours
This course prepares the preK-12th grade teacher with understandings of the spiraling objectives in the
Language Arts TEKS and how these skills and concepts can be interwoven to reinforce instruction and
learning in all subject areas. Emphasis is placed on strategies to nurture research explorations, creative
expression and critical thinking through writing, reading, speaking, and listening experiences. Concurrent
enrollment in EDU 374 or EDU 415 is highly recommended to gain field internship experiences that help
connect best practices to theories and methods. Prerequisite EDU 313 and RDG 383 or RDG 323.
Prerequisite: Recommended RDG 323 or RDG383                               Offered: Spring/Yearly

RDG/SED          493 Diagnostic and Corrective Reading                           3 credit hours
Required for special education, ECE-4th and 4-8th grade teacher candidates, students will learn to
administer both formal and informal diagnostic reading assessments. Using data students will design,
implement, and monitor instruction focused on individual children’s needs. Interventions will include
direct instruction, and use of games, manipulatives, and technology supported instruction. Students will
explore commercial materials and compare a variety of reading programs. Twelve-hour clinical
component.
Prerequisite: RDG 323 or RDG 383                                         Offered: Fall/Yearly




                                               92
Huston-Tillotson University                                                           2006-2008


                              COURSES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (SED)
SED 313          Survey of Exceptional Learners                                 3 credit hours
Students will investigate terminology, historical perspectives, characteristics, and etiology of
exceptional students, including physical, mental, and emotional aspects. Field experiences involve a
minimum of 10 hours of observation in a variety of educational settings serving exceptional students.
Required activities involve substantial internet research and writing components. Open to majors and
non-majors.
Prerequisite: Upper-division standing or instructor approval             Offered: Fall/Yearly

SED 333          Assessment and Programming of Exceptional Learners             3 credit hours
Design and implementation of individualized programs for exceptional students; determination of
learner strengths and deficiencies; educational planning, instructional modification and behavior
control; supervised clinical practice.
Prerequisite: SED 313                                                     Offered: Spring

SED 364          Curriculum for Exceptional Learners                            3 credit hours
Basic organization of programs, state special education standards, instructional aids and materials,
records and reports, clinical observations. Special emphasis on specific teaching approaches
appropriate for the individual differences characteristic of exceptional learners.
Prerequisite: SED 313                                                  Offered: Spring//Summer

SED 374          Behavior Management of Exceptional Learners                    3 credit hours
Behavior management strategies and techniques to prevent, alter, improve, and maintain social,
emotional, and academic behaviors of exceptional learners; special emphasis on environmental
engineering, management of surface behavior, behavior modification techniques, and appropriate
referral services.
Prerequisite: SED 313                                                     Offered: Fall

SED 386         Practicum in Special Education                            6 credit hours
Supervised teaching and clinical experience with individuals with a variety of educational
disabilities; application of learned competencies to characteristics of exceptional individuals,
assessment procedures, educational programming, specific teaching approaches, and evaluation
of instructional strategies.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                  Offered: Fall/Spring

SED/RDG 493 Diagnostic and Corrective Reading                                   3 credit hours
Required for special education, ECE-4th and 4-8th grade teacher candidates, students will learn to
administer both formal and informal diagnostic reading assessments. Using data students will design,
implement, and monitor instruction focused on individual children’s needs. Interventions will include
direct instruction, and use of games, manipulatives, and technology supported instruction. Students will
explore commercial materials and compare a variety of reading programs. Twelve-hour clinical
component.
Prerequisite: RDG 323 or RDG 383                                         Offered: Fall/Yearly

SED 411-C Teacher Certification Examination Preparation –                      1 credit hour
Special Education
Prior to registration for the special education certification test, students will prepare by reviewing
competencies and taking practice exams.
Prerequisite: at least 6 hours special education courses                Offered: Spring/Yearly


                                              93
Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008



     ALTERNATIVE TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM (ATCP)
The Huston-Tillotson University Alternative Teacher Certification Program (HT ATCP) is a
University-based program delivered in collaboration with local districts and the Regional
Education Service Center, and is designed to attract qualified individuals to the teaching
profession who hold a degree from an accredited institution. Program participants are by
selection only.

                               The Two Components of HT ATCP

The Standard Component provides certification in one of these areas:

                       EC-4 (grades early childhood through four) Generalist
                    Generic Special education, grades early childhood through 12

The Post Baccalaureate Component offers training leading to certification in one of these
areas:

                                 English Language Arts (grades 8-12)
                                        History (grades 8-12)
                                      Life Science (grades 8-12)
                                   Physical Science (grades 8-12)
                                  Mathematics grades (4-8 and 8-12)
                                   Computer Science (grades 8-12)
                                Technology Applications (grades 8-12)
                                    All-Level Physical Education
                                           All-Level Music

To be admitted to either component of the program, an applicant must meet the following
requirements:

 hold a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, and/or from an approved
  TEA credentialing institution for applicants holding out-of-country degrees;
 have an overall grade point average of 2.5 or higher on a four-point scale;
 have passed all parts of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) with a minimum
  score of 250 in reading and 230 in mathematics and writing;
 complete an application to the HT ATCP by the deadline date;
 submit a current and original copy of his or her criminal record report which includes
  fingerprints obtained from the Department of Public Safety;
 successfully complete the screening process which includes an interview with the HT ATCP
  Coordinator and/or appointee.

In addition to the requirements described above, persons applying for admission to the Standard
Component of the program must also have a required block of 24 semester hours in a
combination of English, mathematics, natural science, and social studies with a grade point
average of 2.5 or above on a four-point system with at least three hours in each course (only


                                             94
Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008


grades of ―C‖ or above will be considered for this calculation).

Admission to the Post-Baccalaureate Component of the program requires an applicant to meet
the above described mandates and have a major or 24 hours in the area of certification being
sought with an overall grade point average of 2.5/4.00 in these courses (only grades of ―C‖ or
above being considered for this calculation).

The HT ATCP is implemented in a three-semester sequence with the first semester being the
initial phase of training prior to a required internship of an academic year or its equivalent.
During phases two and three, ongoing training occurs along with the required internship. The
strategy for delivering training consists of workshops presented by real-world practitioners who
exemplify best teaching practices.


                      Course Requirements for EC-4 Generalist Certification
Training for Alternative Teacher Certification Program participants seeking certification in EC-4
Generalist will be provided as follows, with the participant having earned 18 hours of University
credit in teacher education at the end of the training and internship.

                                        Phase One, EC-4

ACRG 342: English Language Arts and Reading                                2 Credit Hours
This course provides primary teachers with foundational knowledge and strategies for
understanding and promoting literacy development in young children in kindergarten through
fourth grade. It also provides special education teachers with reading intervention for students
with mild to moderate disabilities in kindergarten through high school. Emphasis is on beginning
reading instruction, classroom assessment, preventing reading difficulties in elementary students,
and the Reading and Language Arts TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills). Teacher
candidates will acquire appropriate methods to assess and teach phonological awareness, the
alphabetic principle, decoding, word analysis, fluency, and reading comprehension. The course
also focuses on strategic approaches to teaching reading that improves comprehension and
thinking for students in a middle school reading program, where students learn to prepare
authentic reading activities and build a bank of instructional strategies to meet the needs of the
varied learning styles. Students learn about Gardener’s Theory of Eight Multiple Intelligences.
Prerequisite: None                                                 Offered: All Semesters

ACEU 362: Curriculum for the EC-4 Teacher                               2 Credit Hours
This course optimizes opportunities for teacher candidates to use word processing, databases,
telecommunications, and a variety of media-technology as teaching tools. Teacher candidates
discuss controversial issues in education, develop age-appropriate lesson plans which honor
multicultural perspectives, and demonstrate knowledge of principles of classroom discipline and
management through effective delivery systems.
Prerequisite: None                                              Offered: All Semesters




                                            95
Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008


ACEU 372: Math for the EC-4 Teacher                                    2 Credit Hours
This course covers the content and methods for teaching mathematics in grades EC-4. Content
has been aligned with Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills so that ATCP students learn how to
help children develop number sense and quantitative reasoning, patterning and algebraic
thinking, Geometry and spatial reasoning, measurement, and probability. ATCP students
participate in hands-on activities and learn how to appropriately use manipulatives in the
classroom. Students also learn math vocabulary so that they can communicate in the language of
math effectively.
Prerequisite: None                                              Offered: All Semesters
                                       Phase Two, EC-4

ACPR 311: Child in the Multi-cultural Society                             1 Credit Hour
This course has been designed to help students in developing culturally relevant practices in the
classroom. Students read selections and discuss what it means to understand and manage
culturally diverse classrooms. They also develop lesson plans which honor multi-cultural
discipline and perspectives, and demonstrate knowledge of principles of classroom management
through effective delivery systems.
Prerequisite: None                                              Offered: All Semesters

ACPR 322: TEKS Curriculum                                            2 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the TEKS and TAKS in science and writing. Students review TAKS
assessments for both science and writing. Students use the TAKS and the TEKS to prepare
lessons for classroom presentations. Students build a bank of questioning strategies and are
required to incorporate them in their presentations.
Prerequisite: None                                            Offered: All Semesters

ACPR 332: Assessment Strategies and Management                           2 Credit Hours
This course is designed to acquaint the teacher candidate about the importance of formal and
informal assessments. Students examine standardized tests, criterion referenced assessments, and
create teacher-made assessments to help in gathering data about comprehending student
performance.
Prerequisite: None                                               Offered: All Semesters

ACPR 411A: Test Preparation: Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities
This course investigates the content, philosophy, and test-taking strategies fundamental to
passing the state’s Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities (PPR) licensure examination. If
the participant does not achieve 85% on the qualification test , or pass the state examination, he
or she is required to continue the effort to accomplish mastery via an individualized contract
and/or online study.
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: All Semesters

                                      Phase Three, EC-4

ACRG 352: Diagnostic and Corrective Reading                               2 Credit Hours
In this course, teacher candidates are provided opportunities to learn to administer formal and
informal diagnostic reading assessments; then using the data from the results of an assessment to
design activities and instructional strategies focused on individual children’s needs. They will

                                            96
Huston-Tillotson University                                                     2006-2008


learn interventions that include direct instruction, games, manipulatives, and technology
supported instruction.
Prerequisite: None                                          Offered: All Semesters

ACEU 382: Educational Psychology and Human                                 2 Credit Hours
               Development of the EC-4 Learner
The teacher candidate will explore the integration of technology and creativity across the
curriculum for writing, research, collaboration, and personal productivity. Emphasis is placed on
the identification, use, and evaluation of applications that support appropriate instructional
strategies to impact the learning process.    Limit: 10 students
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: All Semesters

ACEU 391: Exceptional Child and Modification for the EC-4 Learner 1 Credit Hour
In this course, teacher candidates are provided opportunities to use word processing, databases,
telecommunications, and a variety of media-technology as teaching tools. Participants plan
lessons, prepare materials, demonstrate methods, determine assessment techniques, and
strategize modifications that support and enrich state mandated curriculum.
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: All Semesters

ACPR 411B: Test Preparation-E-4 Generalist                              1 Credit Hour
As the teacher candidate engages in concentrated preparation for the EC-4 Generalist licensure
examination, focus is placed on determining the person’s strengths and weaknesses in the six
content areas. The participant is required to pass a qualifying test with 85% accuracy.
Participants who do not achieve the 85% mastery on the qualifying test or pass the state
examination, must continue the effort to accomplish mastery via an individualized contract
and/or online study.
Prerequisite: None                                             Offered: All Semesters



                   Course Requirements for EC-12 Generic Special Education
Training for Alternative Teacher Certification participants seeking certification in Generic
Special Education, EC-12, will be provided as follows with the participant having earned 18
hours of University credit in teacher education at the end of the training and internship.

                                       Phase One, SPED

ACSE 311:        Survey of Exceptional Learners                           1 Credit Hour

Teacher candidates will investigate terminology, historical perspectives, characteristics, and
etiology of exceptional students, including physical, mental, and emotional aspects.
Prerequisite: None                                                 Offered: All Semesters




                                           97
Huston-Tillotson University                                                       2006-2008


ACSE 331: Assessment and Programming for Exceptional Learners 1 Credit Hour
This course provides opportunities for teacher candidates to focus on design and implementation
of individualized programs for exceptional students; determination of learner strengths and
deficiencies; educational planning, instructional and behavior modification; and supervised
clinical practice.
Prerequisite: None                                               Offered: All Semesters

ACSE 362: Curriculum for Exceptional Learners                        2 Credit Hours
Basic organization of programs, state special education standards, instructional aids and
materials, records and reports, and clinical observations. Emphasis is placed on specific
teaching approaches appropriate for the individual differences characteristic of exceptional
learners.
Prerequisite: None                                           Offered: All Semesters

ACSE 411C: Test Preparation for Special Education                           1 Credit Hour
Special education instruction is provided throughout the training process to prepare the teacher
candidate for the state certification examination. The participant is required to pass a qualifying
test with 85% accuracy. Participants who do not achieve the 85% mastery on the qualifying test
or pass the state examination, must continue the effort to accomplish mastery via an
individualized contract and/or online study.
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: All Semesters

ACSE 371: Behavioral Management of the Exceptional Learner                1 Credit Hour
This series of workshops is designed to teach the teacher candidates behavioral intervention
strategies for effective classroom management. The research based strategies will include studies
of current behavioral approaches including behavior modification, positive behavioral supports,
classroom management for diverse population and cognitive self management interventions. The
interns will also be introduced to the pioneers and the current educational theorists who have
impacted current behavior classroom management approaches. The theorists to be studied will
include Lee Canter, Jacob Kounin, Linda Albert, Jane Nelsen, William Glasser and others. The
course will culminate with students creating their own personal philosophy of discipline.
Prerequisite: NoneOffered:                              All                            Semesters




                                       Phase Two, SPED

ACPR 311: Child in the Multi-cultural Society                           1 Credit Hour
This course provides opportunities for teacher candidates to use word processing, databases,
telecommunications, and a variety of media-technology as teaching tools. Prospective teachers
will discuss controversial issues in education, develop lessons to honor multicultural
perspectives, prepare a parent involvement plan, and acquire knowledge of principles of
classroom discipline and management through effective delivery systems.
Prerequisite: None                                             Offered: All Semesters




                                            98
Huston-Tillotson University                                                       2006-2008


ACPR 322: TEKS Curriculum                                               2 Credit Hours
A laboratory course designed to acquaint prospective teachers with the scope and sequence of
Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) curriculum in their respective specialization
subject areas. Students will correlate TEKS to TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge and
Skills) and to competencies in the state subject certification tests. Students will compare,
contrast, and apply educational theories to practical teaching situations. Students will plan
lessons, prepare materials, demonstrate methods, determine assessment techniques, and
strategize modifications that support and enrich state mandated curriculum. Requires time-intensive
projects as well as 45 hours of internship in public schools.
Prerequisite: None                                                   Offered: All Semesters

ACPR 332: Assessment Strategies and Management                            2 Credit Hours
This team-taught course investigates laws and legalities in Texas schools, cooperative learning
activities, inquiry and problem-solving strategies, formal and informal assessments, holistic
grading and rubric formats, and the P.D.A.S. (Professional Development Appraisal System).
Each teacher candidate will design a classroom discipline/management system, a weekly plan, a
yearly plan, and an interactive learning center. An understanding of learning theories will be
demonstrated through development of lessons taught in multi-media settings. Requires time-
intensive projects as well as 45 hours of internship in public schools.
Prerequisite: None                                                 Offered: All Semesters

ACPR 411A:Test Preparation -Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities 1 Credit Hour
A systematic investigation of content, philosophy, and test-taking strategies fundamental to
passing the state’s Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities licensure examination. Required
for all education majors prior to graduation. Course should be repeated until candidate
successfully passes state test.
Prerequisite: None                                               Offered: All Semesters

                                                 Phase Three, SPED

ACRG 342: English Language Arts and Reading                                2 Credit Hours
This course provides primary teachers with foundational knowledge and strategies for
understanding and promoting literacy development in young children in kindergarten through
fourth grade. It also provides special education teachers with reading intervention for students
with mild to moderate disabilities in kindergarten through high school. Emphasis is on beginning
reading instruction, classroom assessment, preventing reading difficulties in elementary students,
and the Reading and Language Arts TEKS (Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills). Teacher
candidates will acquire appropriate methods to assess and teach phonological awareness, the
alphabetic principle, decoding, word analysis, fluency, and reading comprehension. The course
also focuses on strategic approaches to teaching reading that improves comprehension and
thinking for students in a middle school reading program, where students learn to prepare
authentic reading activities and build a bank of instructional strategies to meet the needs of the
varied learning styles. Students learn about Gardener's Theory of Eight Multiple Intelligences.
Prerequisite: None                                                 Offered: All Semesters

ACRG 352: Diagnostic and Corrective Reading                              2 Credit Hours
In this course, teacher candidates are provided opportunities to learn to administer formal and


                                                        99
Huston-Tillotson University                                                       2006-2008


informal diagnostic reading assessments; then using the data from the results of an assessment to
design activities and instructional strategies focused on individual children’s needs. They will
learn interventions that include direct instruction, games, manipulatives, and technology
supported instruction.
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: All Semesters

ACEU 382: Educational Psychology and Human Development                     2 Credit Hours
of the EC-4 Learner
The teacher candidate will explore the integration of technology and creativity across the
curriculum for writing, research, collaboration, and personal productivity. Emphasis is placed on
the identification, use, and evaluation of applications that support appropriate instructional
strategies to impact the learning process.
Limit: 10 students
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: All Semesters


                    Course Requirements for Post-Baccalaureate Component

Participants in the Post-Baccalaureate Component of the HT ATCP are enrolled in six hours of
University credit toward teacher education for the first and second semesters and four hours the
third semester, thus earning 16 hours toward teacher certification at the completion of the
program.

                                           Phase One

EDU 314 Section 1: The Teacher and Student in a                         4 Credit Hours
Multi-cultural Society
This course optimizes opportunities for teacher candidates to use word processing, databases,
telecommunications, and a variety of media-technology as teaching tools. Prospective teachers
will discuss controversial issues in education, develop lessons to honor multicultural
perspectives, prepare a parent involvement plan, and acquire knowledge of principles of
classroom discipline and management through effective delivery systems.
Prerequisite: None                                             Offered: All Semesters

EDU 2682B, Section 1: Integrating Technology                               2 Credit Hours
through a Holistic Curriculum
Post Baccalaureate participants will explore the integration of technology and creativity across
the curriculum for writing, research, collaboration, and personal productivity. Particular
emphasis is placed on the identification, use, and evaluation of applications that support
appropriate instructional strategies to positively impact the learning process. Students will build
a digital or electronic portfolio to document mastery of entry-level technology skills. This
projects-based course employs the use of Office applications, audio/video/ image editing
software, and dual computing platforms.
Prerequisite: None                                                 Offered: All Semesters

                                           Phase Two



                                            100
Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008


EDU 374, Section 1: TEKS Curriculum for 8-12                              5 Credit Hours
This course is designed to acquaint post baccalaureate teacher candidate with the scope and
sequence of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) curriculum in their respective
specialization subject areas. Students will correlate TEKS to TAKS (Texas Assessment of
Knowledge and Skills) and to competencies in the state subject certification tests. Participants
will compare, contrast, and apply educational theories to practical teaching situations. They will
also plan lessons, prepare materials, demonstrate methods, determine assessment techniques, and
strategize modifications that support and enrich state-mandated curriculum.
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: All Semesters

EDU 411A, Section 1: Teacher Certification Examination Pedagogy 1 Credit Hour
and Professional Responsibilities
This course investigates the content, philosophy, and test-taking strategies fundamental to
passing the state’s Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities (PPR) licensure examination. If
the participant does not achieve 85% on the qualification test, or pass the state examination, he or
she is required to continue the effort to accomplish mastery via an individualized contract and/or
online study.
Prerequisite: None                                                  Offered: All Semesters

                                           Phase Three

EDU 414, Section 1: Assessment, Instructional Strategies                 4 Credit Hours
and Management
This course investigates laws and legalities in Texas schools, cooperative learning activities,
inquiry, and problem-solving strategies, formal and informal assessments, holistic grading and
rubric formats, and the Professional Development Appraisal System (PDAS). Teacher
candidates are taught behavioral intervention strategies for effective classroom management.
The research based strategies will include studies of current behavioral approaches including
behavior modification, positive behavioral supports, classroom management for diverse
population and cognitive self management interventions. Participants will also be introduced to
the pioneers and the current educational theorists who have impacted current behavior classroom
management approaches. The theorists to be studied will include Lee Canter, Jacob Kounin,
Linda Albert, Jane Nelsen, William Glasser and others. Participants will demonstrate their
understanding of learning theories, principles of classroom management, multi-cultural
perspectives through the development and presentation of effective lessons.
Prerequisite: None                                               Offered: All Semesters




                                            101
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008




                    Courses in Generic Special Education (Pre-K – 12)

Summer Level I:
ACP 316 The Special Needs Teacher – Past and Present                                6 credit hours
This pre-assignment course presents a broad overview of the Special Educator and the Special Education
field and includes competencies that address strategies needed to successfully enter the classroom. These
competencies include curriculum and instruction, subject content knowledge, collaboration with regular
education, overview of the child-centered process, behavior/classroom management, and understanding
exceptionalities.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                     Offered: Summer/Yearly

Fall Level II:
ACP 376 Special Education: Essential Elements of Curriculum                         6 credit hours
This course focuses upon the academic, intellectual, emotional, physical, and social aspects of curriculum and
presents instructional planning, delivery, and remediation strategies related to curriculum.
 Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                                  Offered: Fall/Yearly

Spring Level III:
ACP 416. Professional Educator                                                      6 credit hours
This course presents an educational perspective on the values and ethics relating to educator
professionalism, legal aspects, and community resources.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                              Offered: Spring/Yearly


                      Courses in Elementary Education (Grades 1-6)
Summer Level I:
ACP 316. The Education Teacher – Past and Present                                   6 credit hours
This pre-assignment course presents a cognitive view of the understanding of subject matter,
pedagogy, and technology which will foster clear connections between theory and practice needed
upon entering a classroom environment.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                               Offered: Summer/Yearly

Fall Level II:
ACP 376. Elementary Curriculum – Essential Elements of Curriculum-                  6 credit hours
This course offers an overview of the academic, intellectual, emotional, physical, and social aspects of
curriculum and presents instructional planning, delivery, and remediation strategies related to curriculum.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                           Offered: Fall/Yearly

Spring Level III:
ACP 406. Instructional Strategies                                                   6 credit hours
This course presents instructional strategies, methods, and techniques. Competencies addressed include
curriculum modification, remediation, educator professionalism, instructional delivery, conflict resolution,
and motivation of students.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                       Offered: Spring/Yearly




                                                102
Huston-Tillotson University                                                       2006-2008


                                    KINESIOLOGY (KIN)

The Kinesiology Program provides individuals the expertise to guide themselves and others in
the process of becoming physically active and healthy for a lifetime. Kinesiology graduates are
prepared for successful careers as physical educators, athletic coaches, recreational leaders,
and/or graduate students.


                                     DEGREES OFFERED

The Program provides students two degree options: the Physical Education Concentration or the
Human Performance Concentration. Leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree, the total number of
semester credit hours required for the Physical Education Concentration is 120 and 120 for the
Human Performance Concentration.

                              GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

A grade of ―D‖ or below is not accepted in a student’s area of specialization, including the
minor. Subsequently, the student must repeat the course. Additionally, consult other sections of
this Bulletin for a discussion of additional requirements:

       Field experience requirements
       Course portfolios
       Department examinations
       Requirements for admission to Teacher Education
       Permission to take courses outside of Huston-Tillotson University
       THEA score requirements

Transfer Students
All students considering a major or minor in Kinesiology are advised, at the time of registration,
by a Kinesiology program advisor. However, when a student returns to the University after a
five-year absence or transfers from an accredited institution, the Department Chair determines
Kinesiology major and minor course requirements. To receive credit for a course taken at
another institution, transfer students must provide an official transcript, and/or a copy of that
institution’s Bulletin and course syllabus. Transfer students with sophomore standing who are
seeking teacher certification must file an application for provisional admission to a certification
program immediately upon enrolling at Huston-Tillotson University.


Requirements for a Major in Kinesiology – Physical Education Concentration
As a result of the State Board for Educator Certification teacher certification requirements,
students pursuing teaching certification should:


     Select the Physical Education Concentration.



                                            103
Huston-Tillotson University                                                   2006-2008


     Take the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test no later than the sophomore
      year. A reading and mathematics score of 230 and a writing score of 250 is required for
      admittance into the teacher education program.
     Pass all three parts of the THEA prior to admittance into the Teacher Education Program.
     Interview with the Teacher Education advisory committee soon after competition of EDU
      201.
     Apply for final admission through the Teacher Education Program. File an application
      with the Teacher Education Program one semester prior to student teaching. A student
      must post a score of 80% on the Kinesiology Comprehensive Examination before
      enrolling in student teaching.

Degree course requirements are
       Take KIN 102, KIN 213, 203, 233, 303, 313, 333, 363, 413, 441, and 454
       Choose eight (8) hours from the following, KIN 112, 122, 132, 142, 152, 162 and 172
       Choose six (6) hours from the following, KIN 403, 423, 433, 443, and 463.
        Take the following Teacher Education courses: EDU 201, 223, 303, 313, 374, 411-A,
        414, 426, SED 313, and RDG 383 or RDG 413 (Advisor’s Decision).

Requirements for a Major in Kinesiology – Human Performance Concentration

Students pursuing a career in recreation or exercise science select the Human Performance
Concentration. All three sections of the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) test must
be passed, or receive an equivalent exemption, no later than the sophomore year. A student must
pass the Kinesiology Comprehensive Examination with a score of at least 80 before being
allowed to enroll in KIN 466 Human Performance Internship.


Degree course requirements are
     Take KIN 102, 213, 203, 233, 303, 313, 333, 363, 413, 454, 466;
     Choose eight (8) hours from the following, KIN 112, 122, 132, 142, 152, 162, 172;
     Choose six (6) hours from the following, KIN 403, 423, 433, 443, and 463.


Requirements for a Minor in Kinesiology
A Minor in Kinesiology requires 25 semester credit hours.
     Take KIN 102, 203, 213, 454
     Choose no more than six (6) hours from the following, KIN 112, 122, 132, 142, 152, 162,
      or 172
     Choose seven (7) hours from the following KIN 233, 303, 313, 333, 363, 403, 413, 423,
      433, 443, 454, or 463.




                                          104
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                      2006-2008


                               KINESIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


KIN 101/102 Personal Fitness –
Non-majors/Majors 1 credit hour for non-majors /2 credit hours for majors
Students will attain the skills necessary for developing personal fitness programs for others and self. Emphasis will
be placed on the essential components of health fitness, including cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, muscular
strength and endurance, body weight, and body composition. Students will perform assessment of fitness level and
develop an individual activity program commensurate with personal goals.
Prerequisite: None                                                     Offered: Fall and Spring/Yearly

KIN 111/112 Team Sports –
Non Majors/Majors. 1 credit hour for non-majors/2 credit hours for majors
Sport history, rules, drill and practice routines, strategies, and sport -specific physical conditioning
exercises for basketball, volleyball, soccer, softball, and flag football will be covered. Majors will
focus on information required to build quality team sports units.
Prerequisite: None.                                                        Offered: Fall/Yearly.

KIN 113             Dimensions of Health and Wellness                                     3 credit hours
A study of personal health issues and the concept of wellness. The course includes basic principles of
safety, weight control and nutrition, disease prevention, physical fitness, stress management, substance
abuse, and sexual responsibility. The laboratory portion assesses physical fitness by measuring strength,
cardio-respiratory endurance, body composition, and flexibility.
Prerequisite: None                                              Offered: Fall and Spring/Yearly

KIN 121/122 Individual Sports –
Non-Majors/Majors 1 credit hour for non-majors/2 credit hours for majors
Sport history, rules, drill and practice routines, strategies, and sport -specific physical conditioning
exercises for tennis, badminton, golf, archery, and pickle ball will be covered. Majors will focus on
information required to build quality individual sports units.
Prerequisite: None.                                                      Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 131/132 Outdoor Education –
Non-Majors/Majors. 1 credit hour for non-majors/2 credit hours for majors.
Course introduces skills, pedagogy, and issues of outdoor education with emphasis on wilderness travel
and survival. Application of skill and knowledge includes group dynamics activities, camping, hiking,
backpacking, and orienteering. One overnight camping trip is required. Prerequisite: None
                   Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 141/142 Aerobic Exercise –
Non-majors/Majors. 1 credit hour for non-majors/2 credit hours for majors
Development and maintenance of aerobic capacity of the circulatory and respiratory systems through various activities.
Includes information on the values and means of developing and assessing aerobic fitness.
Prerequisite: None.                                                            Offered: Fall/Odd Years




                                                    105
Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008


KIN 151/152 Rhythmic Activities –
Non-majors/Majors- 1 credit hour for non-majors/2 credit hours for majors
Topics covered in the class include basic motor skills, line, folk, square, and aerobic dance.
Emphasis will be given to instructional materials and methods for teaching developmentally
appropriate activities for various rhythmic movements and dances.
Prerequisite: None                                                Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 161/162 Aquatics –
Non majors/Majors- 1 credit hour for non-majors/2 credit hours for majors
This course presents selected movement activities that emphasize aquatic skill. Application of skill and
knowledge includes stroke mechanics, water aerobics, rehabilitation and adapted water activities, diving,
and water games.
Prerequisite: None                                                    Offered: Fall/Odd Years

KIN 171/172        Special Topics                                                3 credit hours
Course topics will be designed to give an in depth study of one or two physical activities.
Example courses might include, but are not limited to, Golf and Tennis for the Business Major,
Hiking and Biking in Central Texas, Fencing, and Martial Arts.
Prerequisite: None                                                 Offered: TBA/Yearly

KIN 203          Foundations of Kinesiology                                      3 credit hours
Introduces the student to the various fields within Kinesiology, provides a historical background, and
acquaints the student with the basic physiological, mechanical, psychological, and sociological principles
of the profession.
Prerequisite: None.                                                        Offered: Fall/Yearly

KIN 213          Developmentally Appropriate Activities                          3 credit hours
This course introduces the sequence and relationship of motor development and perceptual activity
throughout the pre-school and elementary school years. It includes experiences related to readiness for
learning physical skills, movement education approaches, and curricular content for early childhood and
elementary physical education. Six hours of field experience is required.
Prerequisite: None                                                        Offered: Fall/Yearly

KIN 233          Care & Prevention of Movement Injuries                          3 credit hours
Identification, first aid, rehabilitation, and prevention of injuries sustained in physical education,
recreation, and athletic situations. Supplemental information will be provided for first aid and safety in
the home, school, and community.
Prerequisite: None                                                      Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 303          Tests and Measurements                                          3 credit hours
Course will provide an introduction to various tools and measurements used to assess human physical
performance. Students will develop proficiency in the administration of tests and the application of the
results. Emphasis will be given to the development of skill in elementary statistical procedures.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                        Offered: Fall/Yearly




                                               106
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008


KIN 313          Biomechanics                                                       3 credit hours
Application of anatomical and mechanical principles in the study of human movement. Topics include
analyses of projectile-related activities, aerodynamics in sport, principles of stability, and qualitative and
quantitative analysis of sport activities. Laboratory activities cover functional anatomy and mechanical
principles applied to movement and sports skills.
Prerequisite: BIO 204, MTH 143                                             Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 333          Motor Behavior                                                     3 credit hours
Principles of motor control, motor development, and motor learning as they relate to skill acquisition and
motor competency will be examined. Topics will include theories of cognitive processing, feedback,
practice scheduling, and stages of learning. Laboratory activities cover practical application of theories
related to skill acquisition and motor control.
Prerequisite: BIO 204                                                   Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 363          Physiology of Exercise                                             3 credit hours
Provides the essential physiological background necessary to understand the cardiopulmonary and
muscular/skeleton systems’ response to exercise. Training principles for human performance and
health/fitness promotion are emphasized. Laboratory activities cover application of physiological
principles and fitness assessment techniques.
Prerequisite: None                                                    Offered: Fall/Yearly

KIN 403          Recreational Leadership                                            3 credit hours
The course is intended to give the necessary background and experiences that would enable the student to
work in a variety of recreational settings. Topics will include scheduling, budgeting, and equipment
management as related to recreation. Six hours of field experience is required. Prerequisite: None
                Offered: Fall/Yearly

KIN 413          Adapted Physical Education                                         3 credit hours
Emphasizes the problems underlying the need for an adapted physical education program in schools.
Stresses the formation of individual programs for the most prevalent types of disabilities found in school
populations. Six hours of field experience is required.
Prerequisite: None                                                      Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 423          Structural Organization of Physical Education                      3 credit hours
Designed to consider factors in program effectiveness, including matters of finance, policymaking,
curriculum construction, liability for injury, care and purchase of equipment, and staff and personnel
problems. Six hours of field experience is required.
Prerequisite: None                                                        Offered: Fall/Yearly

KIN 433          Coaching Education                                                 3 credit hours
Emphasizes basic principles, philosophies, and methods for effective coaching. Topics include coaching
philosophy, practice considerations, travel and budgeting, rules and regulations, and motivation. Six hours
of field experience is required.
Prerequisite: None                                                        Offered: Spring/Yearly




                                                107
Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008


KIN 441          Teacher Certification Examination Preparation                   3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to allow the student to focus on requirements for teacher certification with
intensive preparation for the State Physical Education TExES Examination. Students will be able to
review pertinent subject matter covered on the state examination as well as learn effective test-taking
techniques via practice examination. This course is required of all P.E. majors during the final semester
prior to the state certification test.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                        Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 443            Principles of Officiating                                     3 Credit Hours
Emphasizes basic principles, philosophies, and methods for effective officiating. Topics include
officiating philosophy and ethics, professional organizations and certifications, rule interpretations and
mechanics of officiating various sports. Six hours of field experience is required.   Prerequisite: None
                 Offered: Fall/Yearly

KIN 454          Theory and Methods of Teaching Physical Education                4 credit hours
Curriculum planning, materials, and course content related to teaching all-levels (K-12) physical
education. Topics will include writing objectives and lesson plans, teaching and learning styles, legal
liability, assessment, and State of Texas requirements. Fifteen hours of field experience in local
elementary and secondary schools are required.
Prerequisite: 21 credit hours in Kinesiology                           Offered: Spring/Yearly

KIN 463A–J Special Topics                                                        3 Credit Hours
An in depth study of selected topics in Kinesiology. Course topic will be designed to enhance the
student’s specialized interest within Kinesiology. Example courses might include, but are not limited to,
Women and Minorities in Sport, Cardiac Rehabilitation, Allied Health Careers, and Technology in
Physical Education.
Prerequisite: None                                                       Offered: TBA/Yearly

KIN 466          Human Performance Internship                                     6 credit hours
Clinical experience in selected settings as a physical education practitioner under the supervision of
University and program professionals. This course is the culminating experience for students who want to
pursue specializations such as corporate fitness programs, personal training, hospital or clinical wellness
programs, and community recreational fitness programs. Student will be responsible for performing 100
hours of designated intern duties under supervision, as well as participate in weekly on-campus seminars.
Prerequisite: 21 credit hours in Kinesiology                     Offered: Fall and Spring/Yearly




                                               108
Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008



    DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS

The mission of the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics is to provide courses of
study in Biology, Chemistry/Physics, and Mathematics. The Department assists students in
recognizing the cultural significance of science and mathematics and in gaining proficiency in
the use of the scientific method for innovation problem solving through laboratory and
technology experiences.

Department Goals

1. To graduate proficient science majors eager to make significant contributions to their
   profession or to pursue graduate studies;
2. To provide all HT students with an exemplary science core education that explores
   historical scientific learning and issues relative for today and the future;
3. To equip future K-12 science educators with a state-of-the-art foundation in one or more
   of the sciences.

Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics Vision Statement

The Department of Natural Science and Mathematics is aware of the global needs and
challenges of society today. We, therefore, provide opportunities for men and women to be
effectively and competently prepared to contribute to the development of solutions for these
needs and challenges as well as to compete in our rapidly changing technological society. Our
intent is to address the necessities of a multicultural student population and to provide adaptive
curriculums that foster personal confidence and academic excellence. We desire that every
student is successful and realize their full potential as well as their professional and personal
goals.

The following degrees are offered by the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

-Bachelor of Arts in Biology
-Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics

-Bachelor of Science in Biology
-Bachelor of Science in Chemistry
-Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

A minor can be earned in Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics. Students may also prepare
for pre-engineering, pre-medical, pre-dental and other health-related disciplines.




                                           109
Huston-Tillotson University                                                        2006-2008


                                      Degree Requirements

The requirements for either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree are:

1. A minimum of 120 semester hours.

2. Completion of the required Core Curriculum courses.

3. Selection and completion of a major. Selection of a minor area is strongly recommended for
    science majors.

4. A grade of ―C‖ or better in each required course taken in the major or minor field receives
   credit. In order to take a course with prerequisite or co-requisite requirements, a student
   must meet all of the requirements prior to enrolling in the course. A student not receiving a
   grade of ―C‖ or better in a prerequisite course will not be allowed to enroll in the course
   requiring that prerequisite.

5. Each student in the Department who is seeking a Bachelors degree is required to participate
   in the 2nd year, 3rd year and senior seminar courses. Advanced topics in the major fields as
   well as pre-professional and career development topics are covered in these seminar courses.

6. Students seeking teacher certification must satisfy the requirements determined by the
   Teacher Education Program.

                              Requirements for Transfer Students

1. All requirements for their major or minor listed in this Bulletin must be fulfilled.

2. Credits for courses taken at institutions other than Huston-Tillotson University may be
   accepted towards the major or minor requirements in the Department of Natural Sciences and
   Mathematics only if the grade received was a ―C‖ or better and they are determined by the
   Department to be equivalent to courses offered at HT.

3. In the major, at least 14 credit hours of upper division coursework (courses numbered 300
   and above) must be completed at Huston-Tillotson University. This requirement includes at
   least two semesters of the major Senior Seminar. Third-Year Science Seminar (340/341) is
   not counted towards this 14-hour requirement.

4. Second- and Third-Year Science Seminar course requirements will be determined based on
   the number of major credits transferred to the University.

5. Students seeking a minor in the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics must
   complete at least 10 semester hours of the minor requirements while in residence at Huston-
   Tillotson University.




                                            110
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                 2006-2008


                   JOINT ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES AGREEMENT
          (Huston-Tillotson University and Southwestern Allied Health Sciences School)
Huston-Tillotson University and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas offer programs in
Clinical Dietetics, Health Services Administration, Medical Technology, Prosthetics and Orthodontics, and
Rehabilitation Services, and the Master’s degree program in Physical Therapy (MPT) and Physician Assistant
Studies (MPAS). The requirements for each degree program are listed below and the recommended prerequisite
courses are listed in the following table.
Clinical Dietetics Bachelor of Science Program (CDBS): To be considered for admission into the
Clinical Dietetics Bachelor of Science program, a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale is
recommended.
Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science Program (HSABS): To be considered for
admission into the Health Services Administration Bachelor of Science program, a GPA of at least 2.5 on
a 4.0 scale is recommended.
Medical Technology Bachelor of Science Program (MTBS): To be considered for admission into the
Medical Technology Bachelor of Science program, a GPA of at least 2.5 overall and 2.5 in science
courses on a 4.0 scale is recommended.
Physical Therapy Master’s Program (MPT): To be considered for admission into the Physical Therapy
Master’s program, a GPA of at least 3.0 overall and 3.0 in science courses on a 4.0 scale is recommended.
The completion of a bachelor’s degree and the Graduate Record Examination is required.
Physician Assistant Studies Master’s Program (MPAS): To be considered for admission into the
Physician Assistant Studies Bachelor of Science program, a GPA of at least 2.75 overall and 2.75 in
science courses on a 4.0 scale is recommended. The completion of a bachelor’s degree and the Graduate
Record Examination is required.
Prosthetics and Orthodontics Bachelor of Science Program (POBS): To be considered for admission
into the Prosthetics and Orthodontics Bachelor of Science program, a GPA of at least 2.5 overall and 2.5
in science courses on a 4.0 scale is recommended.
Rehabilitation Services Bachelor of Science Program (RSBS): To be considered for admission into
the Rehabilitation Services Bachelor of Science program, a GPA of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale is
recommended.

                            COURSE SUBSTITUTIONS FOR
                    SOUTHWESTERN ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES SCHOOL

                                                  Notes for Table

* Grade of a ―C‖ or better is required.                #  Must be completed within seven years
~ Courses must be for science majors                      prior to admission.
  and include a laboratory.                            ^ May be completed at a two-year college
! Recommended for completion by                        + Recommended Elective
  Clinical Nutrition Department (CDBS);                o Option for a specific Requirement
  Medical Laboratory Sciences Dept.                    j  At least 18 hours at junior level or
  (MTBS);                                                 higher
  Physician Assistant Studies Dept.                    BD Bachelor’s Degree
  (MPAS);
   Prosthetics and Orthodontics Program
    (POBS) (MTBS);




                                                 111
    Huston-Tillotson University                                                                      2006-2008




                                                                                SAHSS Prerequisites Credits
                                                                        CD    HAS MT     PT PAS PO               RS
                                                                        BS    BS BS      MS MS BS                BS
                                  Minimum Semester Hours                60    60 90j     BD BD 60                60
                                                                                               (52)
                                  Recommended Electives Hrs             11    22 26                   4          26
HTC Course Number                 HTC Subject Area
                                  Credits
ENG 113, 123                      6         English                     6     6     6           6*       6       6
ENG 213,253,313,323,363           3         Literature                  +3          +3                   +3      +
ENG 473                           3         Literature                              +
MED 100                           3         Public Speaking             +     +     +                    3       +
HIS 213, 223                      6         US History                  6     6     6                    6       6
PSC 113, 123                      6         US Government               6     6     6                    6       6
SOC 113                           3         Sociology                   3     3     3           3*       3       3
PSY 199                           3         Intro Psychology            3     3     3      3    3*       3       3
PSY 298                           3         Human Growth &Dev.          +                  3             3       3
ECO 213                           3         Microeconomics              +
PHI 213                           3         Humanities                  3     3     3           3*       +        +
MTH 143 or higher                 3         Mathematics                 3     +     3      3    3*       3       3
MTH 233                           3         Statistics                                     3    3*       3
BIO 114,124,134,224               4         Biology                           8o~ 8*~      8~   8o*~     4~      4o~
BIO 214 or 334                    4         Physiology                  3*        4*
BIO 214, 244                      8         Physiology, Anatomy         +     8o~ 4*~#                   8~
BIO 244 & 334                     8         Anatomy,                          8o~          8~   8o*~
                                            Physiology
BIO 304                           4         Microbiology                3*          4*#~        4*~
BIO 314 &334                      4         Cell Biology & Physiology               +
BIO 344                           4       Genetics                                              3*~
CHE 114 CHE 124!                  4       Gen Chemistry                 4*~ 8o~ 8*~        8~   8*~      4~
CHE 314 CHE 324!                  4       Org Chemistry                 4*~     4*~#            4*~
CHE 354                           4       Biochemistry                          4*#
PHY 114                           4       Physical Science                                                       4o~
PHY 214&224                       8       Physics                             8o~          8~            4~
PSB 213                           3       Accounting                          3
CSC 103                           3       Computer Applications         2     +   +             3*               +
                                          Nutrition                     3*^
                                          Medical Terminology                                   1*^
                                          Immunology                                3*#^
PSB 223,263,303,453               3     Recommended Electives                 +
PER113, PSY 303,413, ENG473       3     Recommended Electives                                                    +




                                                           112
Huston-Tillotson University                                                           2006-2008


                 JOINT SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING PROGRAM
              (Huston-Tillotson University and Prairie View A&M University)

Huston-Tillotson University and Prairie View A & M University have developed a
cooperative dual-degree program in science and engineering. The purpose of this
program, identified as the Joint Science and Engineering Program, is to provide an
opportunity for students to combine educational experiences at a small liberal arts
university and a large state-supported university that lead to baccalaureate degrees in
scientific and technological areas. Under this program, Huston-Tillotson University
students complete preliminary required courses and then transfer to Prairie View A & M
University to complete degree requirements. Upon completion of all Joint Science and
Engineering Program requirements, each student will be eligible to receive two degrees: a
Bachelor of Science from Huston-Tillotson University and a Bachelor of Science in
Engineering from Prairie View A & M University.

To be eligible for admission to the Joint Science and Engineering Program at Prairie
View A&M University, students must satisfy the following requirements at Huston-
Tillotson University:
1. Complete at least 60 semester credit hours of course work with a cumulative grade
    point average of 2.75 or higher on a scale of 4.0.
2. Declare a major area of study in the Department of Natural Sciences and
    Mathematics at Huston-Tillotson University.
3. Present a TOEFL score of 550 or higher on the Test of English as a Foreign
    Language (TOEFL), if an international student is from a country where English is
    not the dominant language.

To remain in the program while enrolled at Huston-Tillotson University, students must
maintain a 2.75 or higher grade point average.

Prerequisites and Eligibility
Students admitted to the Joint Science and Engineering Program at Prairie View A & M
University will be allowed to transfer credit in the following disciplines toward an
Engineering major:

HTC Disciplines/Credit Hours                              PVAMU Credit Hours
Composition, Written and Oral Communication
    Eng. 113-123; MED 100                             9   ENGL1123,1133, SPCH 2013            9
Cross Cultural Studies (must be in the same subject)
French - LFR 113-123 or Spanish -LSP 113-123          6   FREN 1013, 1023, SPAN 1013, 1023    6
History - HIS 213-223 (US 1 and 2.)                   6   HIST 1313, 1323                     6
Government - PSC 113-123 US and TX                    6   POSC 1113, 1123                     6
Literature - ENG 233, 243, or 253                     3   ENGL2153, 2263, 2273                3
Mathematics - MTH 224, 234, 343, 433                 14   MATH 1124, 2024, 2043, 3023        14
Chemistry - CHE 114-124                               8   CHEM 1011, 1021, 1033, 1043         8
Physics (Calculus Based) – PHY 214-224                8   PHYS 2013, 2023, 2511, 2521         8
Computer Programming - CSC 113                        3   ELEG 1042                           2
Computer Graphics - CSC 423                           3   MCEG 1222                           2
PER 101-191, PER 211 (4 separate courses)             4   Human Performance Activities        4



                                                   113
 Huston-Tillotson University                                                     2006-2008


                                          BIOLOGY
 Biological program assists students in recognizing the significance of the biological
 sciences and in gaining proficiency in the use of the scientific method to solve problems
 through laboratory experiences. The Program offers a course of study leading to the
 Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology.


                      Requirements for a Major in Biology
 1. A minimum of 41 semester hours in Biology.

         BIO 124           Organisms and Evolution                     4 hours
         BIO 144           Botany                                      4 hours
         BIO 224W          Cellular and Molecular Biology              4 hours
         BIO 234           Ecology and Behavior                        4 hours
         BIO 240W-241 Second Year Science Seminar (Fall & Spring)      1 hour
         BIO 302           Field Biology                               2 hours
         BIO 334           Vertebrate Physiology                       4 hours
         BIO 340-341W Third Year Science Seminar (Fall & Spring)       1 hour
         BIO 344           Genetics                                    4 hours
         BIO 401W-411W Senior Seminar (Fall & Spring)                  2 hours
         BIO 432           Laboratory Management                       2 hours
         BIO 483           Biological Internship or
         BIO 493           Biological Research / Project               3 hours
         and 2 biology electives (upper division)                    6-8 hours
  2. A minimum of 3 hours of mathematics, MTH 173 or higher.
* 3. CHE 114-124, General Chemistry
  4. Students seeking the Bachelor of Science degree must successfully complete MTH 224-
     234, CHE 314-324, and PHY 214-224 as cognate electives.
  5. Successful completion of the departmental exit examination.

 For students transferring from another college, please reference division requirements
 listed under the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

     *Included as the core curriculum science requirement.

                               Requirements for a Minor in Biology

 1. A minimum of 21 semester hours including BIO 124, 224, 234, 1 hour of seminar(BIO
    240W, 241, 340 or 341W) and 8 credit hours in Biology (4 hours must be upper division).
 2. Successful completion of CHE 114-124 and MTH 163 or higher.
 3. Transfer students seeking a minor in Biology must complete at least 10 semester hours in
    Biology, including at least two semesters of Biology Seminar while in residence at Huston-
    Tillotson University.




                                              114
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                  2006-2008


        A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE BIOLOGY MAJOR


Year 1 FALL                                               SPRING
         BIO 124 Organisms & Evolution            4       BIO 144 Botany                                 4
         MTH 163 Algebra & Trigonometry           3       MTH 173 Pre-calculus                           3
         ENG 113 Intro College Composition        3       ENG 123 Composition & Research                 3
         PSY 102 HTC Experience                   2       KIN 113 Health & Wellness                      3
         CSC 103 Introduction to Computers        3       PSC 113, 123 US/TX Government                  3
         Total Hours                             15       Total Hours                                16

Year 2 FALL                                               SPRING
         BIO 224W Cellular & Molecular            4       BIO 234 Ecology & Behavior                     4
                       nd                                           nd
         BIO 240W 2 Year Sc Seminar Fall          0.5     BIO 241 2 Year Sc Seminar Spring               0.5
         CHE 114 General Chemistry 1              4       CHE 124 General Chemistry 2                    4
      ^ MTH 224 Calculus 1                        4     ^ MTH 234 Calculus 2                             4
         MED 100 Public Speaking                  3       Behavioral Science                             3
         KIN 101 Personal Fitness                 1
         Total Hours                             16.5     Total Hours =                              15.5

Year 3 FALL                                               SPRING
         BIO 204 Human Anatomy (elective)         4       BIO 334 Vertebrate Physiology                  4
         BIO 340 3rd Year Sc Seminar Fall         0.5     BIO 341W 3rd Yr Sc Seminar Spring              0.5
      ^ CHE 314 Organic Chemistry 1               4     ^ CHE 324W Organic Chemistry 2                   4
         Language 1                               3       Language 2                                     3
         BIO 302 Field Biology                    2       ENG 213, 223 World Literature I/II             3
         Diversity Core 1 such as HIS 133         3       Diversity Core 2                               3
         Total Hours                            16.5      Total Hours                                17.5

Year 4 FALL                                               SPRING
         BIO 344 Genetics                         4       BIO 304 Microbiology (elective) or        4/3
                                                          BIO 473 Special Topic (elective)
         BIO 401W Senior Seminar Fall             1       BIO 411W Senior Seminar Spring                 1
         BIO 432 Lab Management                   2       BIO 483, 493 Internship/ Research              3
      ^ PHY 214 Physics 1                         4     ^ PHY 224 Physics 2                              4
         HIS 213 or 223 US History I or II        3       PHI 213 Philosophy & Ethics or REL             3
                                                          203 Comparative Religion
         Fine Arts Core                           3
         Total Hours                             17       Total Hours                             15/14


                        ^ Required courses for the Bachelor of Science Degree




                                                115
Huston-Tillotson University                                                              2006-2008



                              COURSES IN BIOLOGY (BIO)

BIO 104 Introduction to Biology                                                  4 Credit Hours
Non-majors are introduced to basic concepts in Biology. Included are discussions of the
scientific method, cellular organization, genetics, evolution, and diversity. Biology majors may
only take this course as an elective. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisite: None                                                            Offered: Fall/Yearly

BIO 114 Environmental Biology                                                    4 Credit Hours
Non-majors are introduced to basic ecological principles and the effects of humans on the
environment. The course includes studies of populations, communities, ecosystems, energy flow,
resources, pollution, waste management, and the effects of urbanization. Three lecture hours and
two laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisite: None                                                      Offered: Spring/Yearly

BIO 124 Organisms & Evolution                                                   4 Credit Hours
This course is a survey course with discussions of organisms phylogenetically, including bacteria,
protists, fungi, plants, and animals. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division Biology
courses. Non-majors must have consent of the instructor. Three lecture hours and three
laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisite: MTH 143 or Higher                                              Offered: Fall/Yearly

BIO 144 Botany                                                                   4 Credit Hours
Included in this course are discussions of the major plant groups from the perspective of
physiology, ecology, and evolutionary trends. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division
Biology courses. Non-majors must have consent of the instructor. Three lecture hours and three
laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisite: MTH 143 or Higher                                         Offered: Spring/Yearly

BIO 214 Human Physiology                                                         4 Credit Hours
This course is an examination of the function and operation of the human body. This course is
for students in Kinesiology. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisite: BIO 204                                                    Offered: Spring/Yearly

BIO 224W Cellular & Molecular Biology                                            4 Credit Hours
Included in this course are discussions of cellular organization, cell respiration and
photosynthesis, and cell reproduction. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division Biology
courses. This course is a writing intensive course. Non-majors must have consent of the
instructor. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: Biology 124 or 144 , Co-requisite: CHE 114                     Offered: Fall/Yearly

BIO 234 Ecology & Behavior                                                       4 Credit Hours
A study of the relationships between organisms and their external environment is made. Included
are studies of physiological ecology, population dynamics, community structure, energy flow
through ecosystems, and evolution. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: Biology 124 or 144                                       Offered: Spring/Yearly




                                               116
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                2006-2008


BIO 240W/241 Second Year Science Seminar                                     0.5/0.5 Credit Hours
Seminars are presented by faculty, guest lecturers and students. Topics will address recent
findings in the sciences or may be relative to professional and career development of the science
major. The course meets for a minimum of 1 hour weekly. Attendance, speaker evaluations and a
presentation or paper is required for satisfactory completion of these science seminar courses.
Prerequisites: Biology major and 24 college credits.                  Offered: Fall/Spring/Yearly

BIO 244 Human Anatomy                                                              4 Credit Hours
This course is an examination of the structure and organization of the human body. The laboratory
includes dissection of a similar organism, the cat. This course is for both biology, health science,
teacher certification and kinesiology majors. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisite: None                                                              Offered: Fall/Yearly

BIO 302 Field Biology                                                              2 Credit Hours
A study of ecological methods in terrestrial and aquatic systems is made, with an emphasis on
quantitative and experimental procedures. This course may include at least 15 hours of service
learning. Four laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIO 124, 144, and 224                                     Offered: Fall/Yearly

BIO 304 General Microbiology                                                       4 Credit Hours
This course is a survey of bacteria and viruses with emphasis on medical, industrial, and
immunological considerations. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIO 224 and 234                                      Offered: Spring As Needed

BIO 334 Vertebrate Physiology                                                      4 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the control of the internal environment with examples drawn from
various vertebrates. This is a required course for Biology majors. Three lecture hours and three
laboratory hours per week.
Prerequisites: BIO 224 and CHE 124                                     Offered: Spring/Yearly

BIO 340/341W Third Year Science Seminar Fall/Spring                         0.5/ 0.5 Credit Hours
Seminars are presented by faculty, guest lecturers and students. Topics will address recent
findings in the sciences or may be relative to professional and career development of the science
major. The course meets for a minimum of 1 hour weekly. Attendance, speaker evaluations and a
presentation or paper is required for satisfactory completion of these science seminar courses.
Prerequisites: Biology Major and 48 College Credits                    Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

BIO 344 Genetics                                                                   4 Credit Hours
An introduction to the principles of heredity at the molecular and cellular level is covered in this
course. This is a required course for Biology majors. Three lecture hours and three hours of
laboratory each week.
Prerequisites: BIO 224, 234, CHE 124                                         Offered: Fall Yearly

BIO 353 Science Knowledge and Skills in Elementary Schools                         3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the concepts and skills needed to teach science in the elementary school.
Topics to be addressed will be the knowledge and skills from the Texas Essential Knowledge and
Skills (TEKS) – the curriculum of Texas public schools. Students will have the opportunity to
observe and practice the pedagogy that they experience. A minimum of 20 hours of field
experience will be required of all students.
Prerequisites: BIO 124, 144, 224, PHY 114                           Offered: Spring As Needed


                                                 117
Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008




BIO 401W/411W Biology Senior Seminar Fall/Spring                              1/ 1 Credit Hour
Senior seminar courses are to be taken by all Biology majors. The student attends one discussion
hour per week and at least one science seminar participation hour per week. Oral discussion, a
written report, and presentation on selected topics developed from information gathered from
professional journals and reference books is required. In some cases laboratory investigations
with written reports may be substituted. Specific requirements for the satisfactory completion of
this course are outlined in the course syllabi for each semester.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing                                       Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

BIO 432 Laboratory Management                                                   2 Credit Hours
This course covers the preparation and management of laboratories for BIO 104, 114, 124, 144, or
224. One hour meeting with instructor and four laboratory (preparation) hours per week. Consent
of instructor required.
Prerequisites: BIO 224 and 234                                     Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

BIO 473 Special Topics in Biology                                               3 Credit Hours
This course will cover selected topics in biology of special interest to students and instructors.
They may be a more in-depth treatment of survey courses or cover a specialty in biology. Course
may include the background and current findings regarding a specific phyla, a life system,
reproduction, botany, ecology molecular genetics, marine or freshwater biology, integrative or
developmental biology, or neurobiology.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                            Offered: As Needed

BIO 483 Biological Internship                                                   3 Credit Hours
An internship experience for majors in Biology. Students work as interns in one of the areas of
concentration. Students may not enroll in this course without prior department approval.
Prerequisites: 12 Biology major credits & advisor approval           Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

BIO 490-4 Biological Research/ Project                            0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 Credit Hours
The student plans and implements an independent biological study using facilities available at
Huston-Tillotson University or other sites if recommended by the Biology faculty. If this course
is taken to satisfy the major internship or research requirement, it must be taken for at least 3
credit hours. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                   Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                      2006-2008




                                    CHEMISTRY (CHE)

The Chemistry program provides a thorough scientific, mathematical, and highly
professional preparation for advanced training, research and employment. It seeks to
assist students in becoming critical thinkers by teaching students to apply the scientific
method in various academic and life applications.

                              Requirements for a Major in Chemistry

1. A minimum of 41 credit hours in Chemistry

      * CHE 114-124     General Chemistry I and II                8 hours
        CHE 240W-241 Second Year Science Seminar (Fall & Spring) 1 hour
        CHE 314-324     Organic Chemistry I and II                8 hours
        CHE 334         Quantitative Analysis                     4 hours
        CHE 340-341W Third Year Science Seminar (Fall & Spring)   1 hour
        CHE 401W-411W Senior Seminar                              2 hours
        CHE 414-424     Physical Chemistry I and II               8 hours
        CHE 493         Chemical Research and                     3 hours
        Two Upper Division Chemistry Electives                  6-8 hours
        (CHE 364 strongly recommended)

2. MTH 224, 234 Calculus I and II                                          8 hours

3. PHY 214, 224 Physics I and II*                                          8 hours

4. Completion of departmental examinations

It is recommended that 6-12 hours of a foreign language is completed in French.
An additional 6 hours in computer science beyond the core, CSC 103, is highly
recommended.

* Included in the core curriculum

                              Requirements for a Minor in Chemistry

A minor in Chemistry consists of 24 credit hours, including CHE 114, 124, 314, 324,
334, at least three hours of chemistry electives and one year of Science Seminar from
CHE 240W, 241, 340, and/or 341W.

For students transferring from another University, please reference division requirements
listed under the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.




                                           119
   Huston-Tillotson University                                                         2006-2008


       A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE B.S. CHEMISTRY MAJOR


Year 1 FALL                                        SPRING
        CHE 114 General Chemistry I          4     CHE 124 General Chemistry II                    4
        MTH 163 Alg & Trig for Sc Majors     3     MTH 173 Pre-calculus                            3
        ENG 113 Intro College Composition    3     ENG 123 Composition and Research                3
        PSY 102 College Orientation          2     KIN 113 Health and Wellness                     3
        CSC 103 Intro to Computers           3     PSC 113 or 123 US/TX Government                 3
        Total Hours                         15     Total Hours                                 16

Year 2 FALL                                        SPRING
        CHE 314 Organic Chemistry I          4     CHE 324W Organic Chemistry II                   4
                        nd                                    nd
        CHE 240W 2 Yr Sc Seminar Fall        0.5   CHE 241 2 Year Sc Seminar Spring                0.5
        MTH 224 Calculus I                   4     MTH 234 Calculus II                             4
        PHY 214 Physics I                    4     PHY 224 Physics II                              4
        MED 100 Public Speaking              3     Behavior Science                                3
        Total Hours                         15.5   Total Hours                                 15.5

Year 3 FALL                                        SPRING
        CHE 414 Physical Chemistry I         4     CHE 424 Physical Chemistry II                   4
                   rd                                              rd
        CHE 340 3 Year Sc Seminar Fall       0.5   CHE 341W 3 Yr Sc Seminar Spring                 0.5
        CHE 334 Quantitative Analysis        4     CHE 364 Instrumental Analysis (elective)        4
        Language I                           3     Language II                                     3
        Diversity Core 1 such as HIS 133     3     Diversity Core 2                                3
        KIN 101, 111Pers. Fit/Team Sports    1     Eng 213 or 223World Literature I or II          3
        Total Hours                         15.5   Total Hours                                 17.5

Year 4 FALL                                        SPRING
        CHE 401W Senior Seminar Fall         1     CHE 411W Senior Seminar Spring                  1
        Chemistry Elective                   3     CHE 493 Chemical Research                       3
        Computer Science Elective            3     Computer Science Elective                       3
        Fine Arts Core                       3     PHI 213 Philosophy and Ethic or REL 203         3
                                                   Comparative Religion
        HIS 213 or 223 US History I or II    3     Elective                                        2
        CHE 491 or 492 suggested
        Total Hours                         13     Total Hours                                     12




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                           2006-2008



                              COURSES IN CHEMISTRY (CHE)

CHE 114 General Chemistry I                                                    4 Credit Hours
General Chemistry covers the fundamental laws and theories of chemical processes involving the
common elements and their compounds. Topics include atomic structure, periodic classifications,
physical states, chemical formulas and equations, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, bonding
theories, molecular structure and reactions in aqueous solutions. A working knowledge of these
topics is obtained through a series of lectures, laboratory exercises, computer exercises and
molecular models. Basic mathematics and elementary algebra are sufficient to understand the
concepts presented; additional mathematical concepts are taught if needed. The course prepares
one for a better awareness of the chemical nature of the world and understanding of everyday
problems. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week.
Pre/Co-requisite: MTH 143 or higher                                       Offered: Fall/Yearly

CHE 124 General Chemistry II                                                   4 Credit Hours
Continuation of CHE 114. This course requires a working knowledge of the topics covered in
CHE 114. Greater success is achieved when these courses are taken in successive semesters.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemical processes involving the common elements and their
compounds is continued and includes the following topics: reaction rates and mechanisms,
colloids, organic carbon compounds and oxidation-reduction. A working knowledge of these
topics is obtained through a series of lectures, laboratory exercises, computer exercises and
molecular models. Basic mathematics and elementary algebra are sufficient to understand the
concepts presented; additional mathematical concepts are taught if needed. The course prepares
one for a better awareness of the chemical nature of the world and understanding of everyday
problems. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisite: CHE 114                                                  Offered: Spring/Yearly

CHE 240W/241 Second-Year Science Seminar                                 0.5/0.5 Credit Hours
Seminars are presented by faculty, guest lecturers and students. Topics will address recent
findings in the sciences or may be relative to professional and career development of the science
major. The course meets for a minimum of 1 hour weekly. Attendance, speaker evaluations and a
presentation or paper is required for satisfactory completion of these science seminar courses.
Prerequisites: Chemistry Major and 24 College Credits                 Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

CHE 314 Organic Chemistry I                                                    4 Credit Hours
Organic chemistry I is the study of aliphatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. This course
emphasizes the functionality of different classes of organic compounds, isomerism, nomenclature,
reaction mechanisms, and methods of preparation. Three lecture hours and one three-hour
laboratory period each week.
Prerequisite: CHE 124                                                      Offered: Fall/Yearly

CHE 324W Organic Chemistry II                                                  4 Credit Hours
Continuation of CHE 314 and builds on the fundamentals covered in that course. Organic
chemistry II covers the study of aromatic, organometallic, and heterocylic compounds, as well as
spectroscopy. Reactions of the major functional groups and introductory biochemical structures
and reactions are covered. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory period each week.
Prerequisite: CHE 314                                                    Offered: Spring/Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                         2006-2008


CHE 334 Quantitative Analysis                                                              4 Credit Hours
Introduction to methods of chemical analysis. Laboratory work consists of selected experiments on
volumetric analysis. Emphasis is placed on physicochemical principles and stoichiometric relations
involved in each determination. Two lecture hours and one four-hour laboratory period each week.
Prerequisite: CHE 124                                                             Offered: /Yearly

CHE 340/341W Third Year Science Seminar Fall/Spring                                0.5/ 0.5 Credit Hours
Seminars are presented by faculty, guest lecturers and students. Topics will address recent
findings in the sciences or may be relative to professional and career development of the science
major. The course meets for a minimum of 1 hour weekly. Attendance, speaker evaluations and a
presentation or paper is required for satisfactory completion of these science seminar courses.
Prerequisites: Chemistry Major and 48 College Credits                 Offered: Fall/ Spring Yearly

CHE 344 Advanced Quantitative Analysis                                                        4 Credit Hours
This continuation of CHE 334 consists of an introduction to theory and practice of optical and
electrical methods of analysis. Laboratory work is primarily gravimetric analysis and basic optical
and electrochemical analysis. Two lecture hours and one four-hour laboratory period each week.
Prerequisite: CHE 334                                                Offered: Spring As Needed

CHE 354 Biochemistry                                                                       4 Credit Hours
A survey of the major constituents of living matter. Biophysical and biochemical processes in plants and animals
are studied. Laboratory work includes isolation, identification, and application of quantitative analytical
procedures to characteristic materials. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory period each week.
Prerequisites: BIO 104 or 124 & CHE 324                                                   Offered: As Needed

CHE 364 Instrumental Analysis                                                              4 Credit Hours
Introduction to the critical use of advanced electrical and optical measurements in chemical
analysis. Two lecture hours and one four-hour laboratory period each week.
Prerequisite: CHE 334                                              Offered: Spring As Needed

CHE 401W/411W Chemistry Senior Seminar Fall/Spring                                        1/1 Credit Hour
These seminar courses are to be taken by all Chemistry majors. The student attends one
discussion hour per week and at least one science seminar participation hour per week. Oral
discussion, a written report, and presentation on selected topics developed from information
gathered from professional journals and reference books. In some cases laboratory investigations
with written reports may be substituted. Specific requirements for the satisfactory completion of
this course are outlined in the course syllabi for each semester.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing                                       Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

CHE 414 Physical Chemistry I                                                               4 Credit Hours
A presentation of the basic principles of physical chemistry with particular emphasis on
thermodynamics and its application to gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. Three lecture hours
and three laboratory hours each week.
Prerequisites: PHY 224, MTH 234, & CHE 324                             Offered: Fall As Needed




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                             2006-2008


CHE 424 Physical Chemistry II                                                   4 Credit Hours
A continuation of CHE 414: An elementary presentation of the kinetic-molecular theory, chemical
kinetics, electrochemistry, surface chemistry, transport processes, and quantum mechanics are
covered. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours each week.
Prerequisite: CHE 414                                               Offered: Spring As Needed

CHE 453 Advanced Organic Chemistry                                              3 Credit Hours
A study of carbon compounds. Emphasis on modern atomic structure, molecular spectra,
electrophilic and nucleophilic substitutions, elimination reactions, and free-radical reactions.
Prerequisite: CHE 324                                                           Offered: As Needed

CHE 463 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry                                            3 Credit Hours
A study of non-carbon compounds. Emphasis on the theories and principles of atomic structure,
periodic classification, chemical bonding, complex ions and coordination compounds, oxidation-
reduction, acids and bases, and non-aqueous solvents.
Prerequisite: CHE 324 or 334                                              Offered: As Needed

CHE 473 Special Topics in Chemistry                                             3 Credit Hours
This course will cover selected topics in chemistry of special interest to students or instructors.
They may be a more in-depth treatment of survey courses or cover a specialty in chemistry.
Possible topics include Chemometrics, Spectroscopy, Electronic Materials, Environmental,
Forensic, and Polymers.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                            Offered: As Needed

CHE 483 Chemistry Internship                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course is an internship experience for majors in Chemistry. Students work as interns in a
chemistry-related industry. Students may not enroll in this course without prior advisor approval.
Prerequisite: 12 Credits in Chemistry & Advisor Approval            Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

CHE 490-4 Chemical Research/Project                               0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 Credit Hours
The student conducts independent investigation employing basic research techniques including
instrumental methods such as infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and visible and
ultraviolet spectrophotometry, etc. The use of vacuum systems, inert solvent systems, and inert
atmosphere systems may also be included. Library research is stressed as an integral part of the
work. Variable hours per week.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                  2006-2008




                                COURSES IN PHYSICS (PHY)
The following physics courses are offered to fulfill requirements for the science core curriculum
and for a Bachelor of Science degree in biology, chemistry, computer science, or mathematics.

PHY 114 Physical Science                                                             4 Credit Hours
This course consists of lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises on topics relating to a study
of the physical universe. Included is a survey of physics, astronomy, and chemistry in an integrated
lecture-laboratory sequence. This course develops a series of fundamental concepts in physics and
chemistry through problem-solving situations. The study includes empirical law and theories of
matter, energy, loading, and structure. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.
Pre- or Co-requisite: MTH 143                                           Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

PHY 214 General Physics I                                                            4 Credit Hours
This course is primarily for science and engineering students. Vector notation and a mathematical
approach are used in the development of conventional topics: mechanics, vibratory motion, wave
motion and fluids. Topics from thermodynamics and relativity will be included if time permits.
Three lecture hours, and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Pre- or Co-requisite: MTH 224                                                Offered: Fall/Yearly

PHY 224 General Physics II                                                           4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of Physics 214 primarily for science and pre-engineering students.
Thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism are covered. Topics from modern physics will be
included if time permits. Three lecture hours, and one three-hour laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: PHY214 and Co-requisite: MTH 234                        Offered: Spring/Yearly




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                          2006-2008




                                 MATHEMATICS (MTH)


The Mathematics Program:
1. Provides challenging experiences in Mathematics, Physics, and Physical Science,
   which prepare graduates to pursue additional study in graduate, medical/dental, and
   other professional schools.
2. Provides opportunities for all students to develop quantitative and problem-solving
   skills.
3. Provides experiences that enable graduates to find employment in science-related
   careers.
4. Provides opportunities for majors to complete a cooperative education experience in
   their disciplines.

Objectives
1. To improve critical thinking and problem-solving skills of all students.
2. To prepare department majors for medical/dental, graduate, and professional schools.
3. To provide quality general education courses that produce students with skills
   required for successful careers.

Specific Competencies/Skills
1. Knowledge of the major concepts in Physics, Physical Science, and Mathematics.
2. Proficiency in scientific writing, oral and visual presentations, and computer applications.
3. Proficiency in data analysis and statistical procedures.
4. Application of research techniques.
5. Proficiency in using equipment and technology in areas of the major field

        Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Mathematics (37 hours)
        Required Courses
        MTH 224               Calculus 1                                   4 hours
        MTH 234               Calculus 2                                   4 hours
        MTH 240W-241          Second Year Science Seminar (Fall-Spring)    1 hour
        MTH 324               Calculus 3                                   4 hours
        MTH 333               Probability                                  3 hours
        MTH 340-341W          Third Year Science Seminar (Fall-Spring)     1 hour
        MTH 353               Linear Algebra                               3 hours
        MTH 401W-411W         Senior Seminar (Fall & Spring)               2 hours

       In addition Math majors are to select any five (5) courses from those listed below:
       MTH 373             General Topology                               3 hours
       MTH 383             Geometry                                       3 hours
       MTH 393             Number Theory                                  3 hours


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Huston-Tillotson University                                                    2006-2008


       MTH 403                Modern Algebra                         3 hours
       MTH 413                Real Analysis                          3 hours
       MTH 423                Complex Analysis                       3 hours
       MTH 433                Differential Equations                 3 hours
       MTH 443                Numerical Analysis                     3 hours
       MTH 463                Advanced Calculus                      3 hours
       MTH 473                Special Topics                         3 hours



             Requirements for a Bachelor of Science Degree in Mathematics
1. The required courses for a Bachelor of Arts degree
2. Eight (8) hours of Physics PHY 214* and 224*
3. Four (4) additional hours from CHE 114*, BIO 124*, or BIO 144*
4. Two (2) course selected from:
     MTH 203 Discrete Mathematics
    MTH 233 Introduction to Statistics
    CSC 113-123 Foundations of Programming 1-2


                  Requirements for a Minor in Mathematics (20 hours)
1. MTH 224 and 234 Calculus I and II
2. An additional 12 semester hours selected from MTH 233, 324, 333, 353 and 403
3. Two semester of Science Seminar (Fall and Spring semesters) from MTH 240W,
    241, 340 or 341W
    Students transferring from another University, please reference division
    requirements listed under the Department of Natural Sciences.




                                                126
Huston-Tillotson University                                                               2006-2008



   A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE MATHEMATICS MAJOR


Year 1 FALL                                              SPRING
         Language I                               3      Language II                                   3
         MTH 163 Alg & Trig for Sc Majors         3      MTH 173 Pre-calculus                          3
         ENG 113 Intro College Composition        3      ENG 123 Composition & Research                3
         CSC 103 Intro to Computers               3      PSC 113, 123 US / TX Government               3
         PSY 102 HTC Experience                   2      KIN 113 Health and Wellness                   3
         KIN 101, 111Pers. Fit/TeamSports         1
         Total Hours                             15       Total Hours                                 15

Year 2 FALL                                              SPRING
         MTH 224 Calculus 1                       4      MTH 234 Calculus 2                            4
         MTH 240W 2nd Yr Sc Seminar Fall          0.5    MTH 241 2nd Year Sc Seminar Spring            0.5
       ^ PHY 214 Physics I                        4     ^ PHY 224 Physics II                           4
         MED 100 Public Speaking                  3      Behavior Science                              3
         HIS 213 or 223 US History I or II        3      PHI 213 Philosophy and Ethics or              3
                                                         REL 203 Comparative Religion
         Total Hours                            14.5     Total Hours                                  14.5

Year 3 FALL                                              SPRING
         MTH 324 Calculus 3                       4      MTH 433 Differential Equations                3
         MTH 353 Linear Algebra                   3      MTH 333 Probability                           3
         MTH 340 3rd Year Sc Seminar Fall         0.5    MTH 341W 3rd Yr Sc Seminar Spring             0.5
       ^ MTH 233 or CSC 113 (BS elective)         3     ^ MTH 203 or CSC 123 (BS elective)             3
         Diversity Core 1                         3      Diversity Core 2                              3
         Fine Arts Core                           3      ENG 213 or 223 World Literature I/II          3
         Total Hours                            16.5     Total Hours                                  15.5

Year 4 FALL                                              SPRING
         MTH 413 Real Analysis                    3      MTH 473 Special Topics                         3
         MTH 401W Senior Seminar Fall             1      MTH 411W Senior Seminar Spring                 1
         MTH 403 Modern Algebra                   3      MTH 443 Numerical Analysis                     3
       ^ CHE 114, BIO124/144 (BS elective)        4      Electives (at least 8 hours)                   8
         Elective (at least 3 hours)              3
         Total Hours                            14       Total Hours                                  15



                          ^ Required course for the Bachelors of Science Degree




                                                127
Huston-Tillotson University                                                                    2006-2008


                           COURSES IN MATHEMATICS (MTH)
MTH 133 Introduction to Algebra                                                       3 Credit Hours
A study of fundamental concepts and methods of basic college mathematics is covered. The course
presents the important ideas of mathematical science so that the student understands the connection
between mathematics and the physical and social sciences and becomes skilled enough in
mathematical concepts to use and appreciate them. Some concepts in college algebra are
introduced. Students must pass this course with a grade of ―C‖ or better to register for MTH143.
 Prerequisite: None                                                   Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MTH 143 College Algebra                                                               3 Credit Hours
A study of the fundamental concepts of algebra, including linear, nonlinear, exponential,
logarithmic, rational functions, systems of equations, sequences, and series.
Prerequisite: Entrance Exam Placement                                Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MTH 163 Algebra and Trigonometry for Science Majors                                   3 Credit Hours
This course includes the study of exponents and radicals, graphs of equations, linear and
quadratic equations, factoring, trigonometry functions and graphs, application of right and
oblique triangles, fundamental identities, composite angle formulas, and inverse trigonometry
functions. This course satisfies the General Studies requirement.
Prerequisite: Entrance Exam Placement or MTH 143                         Offered: Fall/Yearly

MTH 173 Pre-Calculus                                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course includes the study of coordinate geometry and models, functions and graphs,
polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, analytical geometry,
and discrete mathematics. This course satisfies the General Studies requirement.
Prerequisite: Entrance Exam Placement or MTH 163                         Offered: Spring/Yearly

MTH 203 Discrete Mathematics                                                          3 Credit Hours
A required course for computer science majors. This course covers selected mathematical
concepts that facilitate a deeper understanding of computer science and programming. It
introduces number systems and computer arithmetic. Topics and concepts include sets, group
codes, logic and truth table, Boolean algebra and its application to computer logic design,
relations, and functions.    Other topics covered include elementary matrix operations,
permutations, combinations, and counting techniques.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                               Offered: Spring/Yearly

MTH 224 Calculus I                                                                    4 Credit Hours
The standard first course in calculus. Topics include functions and their graphs, composition of
functions, limits of functions, proofs, continuous functions, derivatives of algebraic functions,
Newton’s method, Rolle’s Theorem, mean value theorem, local and extreme values of functions,
application problems, related rates, concavity, higher order derivatives, and implicit differentiation.
Prerequisites: MTH 143, 163, 173 or Entrance Exam Placement                           Offered: Fall/Yearly

MTH 233 Introductory Statistics                                                       3 Credit Hours
A first course in statistics, that requires knowledge of the fundamental procedures for data
organization and analysis. Topics include frequency distributions, graphing, measures of central
tendency, dispersion, positions, binomial distribution, normal curves, probability calculation, t-
test, chi-square, F-test, hypothesis testing, and statistical estimation.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                      Offered: Fall/Yearly


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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                        2006-2008




MTH 234 Calculus II                                                                        4 Credit Hours
A second standard course in calculus. Topics include definite and indefinite integrals, using integrals to
compute areas, volumes, growth, and decay, differentiation and integration of algebraic and
transcendental functions, trigonometric substitutions, partial fractions, tables of integrals, and application.
Prerequisite: MTH 224                                                              Offered: Spring/Yearly

MTH 240W/241 Second Year Science Seminar Fall/Spring                                0.5/0.5 Credit Hours
Seminars are presented by faculty, guest lecturers and students. Topics will address recent
findings in the sciences or may be relative to professional and career development of the science
major. The course meets for a minimum of 1 hour weekly. Attendance, speaker evaluations and a
presentation or paper is required for satisfactory completion of these science seminar courses.
Prerequisites: Mathematics major, MTH 234,                            Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly
                 and 24 college credits

MTH 303 Fundamental Concepts of Math for Elementary Education I                            3 Credit Hours
A mathematics course which covers the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) objectives and
the TExES objectives for grades EC-4. Emphasis will be placed on standards of the National Council
of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). Topics include numeration systems, number systems, non-
decimal number bases, algorithms, measurement, whole number algorithms, number theory, fractions,
decimals and percents. These topics will be computer solutions to many problems using student
designed programs and given programs; real vector spaces, subspaces, bases, dimensions of vector
spaces, and spanning sets; eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and linear transformations.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                       Offered: Fall As Needed

MTH 313 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics                                                3 Credit Hours
for Elementary Education II
A mathematics course which covers TEKS objectives and the TExES objectives for grades K-4.
Emphasis will be placed on standards of the NCTM. Topics include rational numbers, real numbers,
functions, graphs, statistics, probability, geometric shapes, measurement, geometry using congruence
and similarity, coordinate geometry, and geometry using transformations. Technology (multi-media
carts) will be used throughout the course including computers and graphing calculators.
Prerequisite: Field Experience and MTH 303                                Offered: Spring As Needed

MTH 324 Calculus III                                                                       4 Credit Hours
A standard third course in calculus. Topics include infinite series, vector and analytical geometry, limits and
continuity in three-space, gradients, tangent planes, partial and directional derivatives, polar coordinates,
application of multiple integrals to area, volume, centroids, partial differentiation, and applications.
Prerequisite: MTH 234                                                                      Offered: Fall/Yearly

MTH 333 Probability                                                                        3 Credit Hours
A second course in statistics for students majoring in mathematics and sciences. The following
topics are covered in this course: Discrete and continuous Probability functions, binomial, Poisson,
normal, geometric, and gamma distribution, random variables, joint density, conditional densities,
expected values, estimations, hypothesis testing, goodness-of-fit tests, and regression.
Prerequisite: MTH 233 and MTH 234                                      Offered: Spring As Needed

MTH 340W/341 Third Year Science Seminar Fall/Spring                                 0.5/0.5 Credit Hours
Seminars are presented by faculty, guest lecturers and students. Topics will address recent
findings in the sciences or may be relative to professional and career development of the science


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major. The course meets for a minimum of 1 hour weekly. Attendance, speaker evaluations and a
presentation or paper is required for satisfactory completion of these science seminar courses.
Prerequisites: Mathematics Major, 11 Mathematics                      Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly
                Major Credits and 48 College Credits

MTH 353 Linear Algebra                                                          3 Credit Hours
This course covers matrices and their operations, special matrices including identities, symmetric
and skew symmetric, idempotents, row operations on matrices in solving systems of equations,
computer solutions to many problems using student designed and given programs, real vector
spaces, subspaces, bases, dimensions of vector spaces, spanning sets, eigenvalues, eigenvectors,
and linear transformations.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                  Offered: Fall As Needed

MTH 363 Fundamental Concepts of Math for Secondary Schools                      3 Credit Hours
A survey of topics in secondary school mathematics, include geometry, linear programming,
history of mathematics, graphing calculator, and computer applications in mathematics.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                      Offered: As Needed

MTH 373: General Topology                                           3 Credit hours
Topics include introduction to sets, relations, openness, closedness, convergence,
continuity, compactness, connectedness and fixed points in topological spaces with
special emphasis on Euclidean spaces and metric spaces.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                          Offered: As Needed

MTH 383: Geometry                                                              3 Credit Hours
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the fundamentals of plane and
solid geometry. Desirable in its own right, this foundation is also essential for the study
of higher mathematics and exceedingly helpful in everyday life.
Topics are: axioms, length and angle measurement, proofs, constructions, perpendicular
lines and planes, parallel lines and planes, ratio, proportion, similarity, area and volume.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                    Offered: As Needed

MTH 393: Number Theory                                                    3 Credit Hours
Number theory is the study of properties of numbers in particular the integers and rational
numbers. Questions in elementary number theory include divisibility properties of
integers (e.g. the Euclidean algorithm), properties of primes (e.g. there are infinitely
many), congruences, quadratic reciprocity and integer solutions to basic equations (e.g.
Diophantine equations). Even though number theory is one of the oldest disciplines in
mathematics, it has recently contributed too many practical problems such as coding
theory, cryptography, hashing functions or other tools in modern information technology.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                Offered: As Needed

MTH 401W/411W Mathematics Senior Seminar Fall/Spring                           1/1 Credit Hour
Senior seminar courses are taken by all Mathematics majors. The student attends one discussion
hour per week and at least one science seminar participation hour per week. Oral discussion, a
written report and presentation on selected topics developed from information gathered from
professional journals and reference books. In some cases laboratory investigations with written




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reports may be substituted. Specific requirements for the satisfactory completion of this course
are outlined in the course syllabi for each semester.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing                                      Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MTH 403 Modern Algebra                                                                      3 Credit Hours
This course in abstract algebra utilizes the postulational approach. Topics considered include
binary operations, mappings, number theory, rings, subrings, groups, subgroups, and fields.
Prerequisite: MTH 143                                                  Offered: Fall As Needed

MTH 413 Real Analysis                                                                       3 Credit Hours
Topics covered in this course include: real numbers, upper and bounds, intervals, mathematical
induction, sequences and series, convergence, limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals.
Prerequisite: MTH 234                                                     Offered: Fall As Needed

MTH 423 Complex Analysis                                                                    3 Credit Hours
A first course in complex analysis covering complex numbers, analytic functions, contour
integration, power series, analytic continuation, sequences of analytic functions, conformal
mapping of simply connected regions, and related topics.
Prerequisite: MTH 324                                            Offered: Spring As Needed

MTH 433 Differential Equations                                                              3 Credit Hours
This course covers solutions of linear and nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and
utilization of Laplace transform to solve ordinary differential equations.
Prerequisite: MTH 234                                                  Offered: Spring As Needed

MTH 443 Numerical Analysis                                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course covers polynomial forms and interpolation, divided differences, polynomial,
uniform, least-squares and splines approximation; orthogonal polynomials; numerical
differentiation; integration; splines; B-splines; and numerical methods for solving initial and
boundary value problems for ordinary differential equations.
Prerequisites: MTH 324, 353                                        Offered: Spring As Needed

MTH 453 Numerical Techniques for CSC Majors                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course emphasizes the use of computers in solving problems in applied mathematics. Topics
include number presentation; errors in computer arithmetic, portability issues, error classification,
well conditioned and ill-conditioned problems and iterative approximation to mathematical
problems.
Prerequisites: MTH 234 and 6 Language Credits                             Offered: Spring/Yearly

MTH 463 Advanced Calculus                                                                   3 Credit Hours
Topics covered in this course include Vector-valued functions and their analysis, the geometry of Euclidean n-
space, partial derivatives, functions of several variables, Taylor’s theorem, infinite sequences and series, line
and surface integral, LaGrange multipliers, multiple integrals, Green’s and Stoke’s theorems.
Prerequisite: MTH 324                                                                    Offered: As Needed

MTH 473 Special Topics in Mathematics                                                       3 Credit Hours
This course will cover selected topics in mathematics of special interest to students or instructors.
They may be a more in-depth treatment of survey courses or cover a specialty in mathematics.




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Possible topics include: Actuarial Science, Laplace Transforms, complex variables, calculus of
variation, integral equations, and advanced differential equations.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                   Offered: Spring As Needed

MTH 483 Mathematics Internship                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course is an internship experience for majors in Mathematics. Students work as interns in a
mathematics-related industry.
Prerequisites: 12 Math Major Credits and Advisor Approval          Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

MTH 490-4 Mathematics Research/Project                            0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 Credit Hours
The student plans and implements an independent mathematical study under the direction of
faculty, using facilities available at Huston-Tillotson University or other sites if recommended by
the mathematics faculty. Or the student may work with a mathematics faculty member in a
specific research area. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 10 credits.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                      Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly




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                SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY


The School of Business and Technology represents a collaborative model of exemplary
education guided by a code of ethics and curriculum standards for individuals seeking
degrees in the areas of Business and Computer Science. Graduates completing degrees in
either of these areas will demonstrate the requisite knowledge and thinking skills that
result in success in their career or Post-Baccalaureate education.


                  DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

                               GENERAL INFORMATION

The Business Administration Program delivers a course of study preparing competent
business professionals to meet the challenges of an interdependent world. The Program
provides the tools to enable students to make an immediate contribution to the business
environment. Students are given the opportunity to develop:

       An understanding of the modern business culture.
       An appreciation of the historical evolution of the modern business culture and
        an awareness of the social and economic forces shaping its future.
       The ability to use the contingency approach to solving business problems.
       An understanding of how to work with and learn from others.
       An ability to recognize and promote ethical and social values.
       An understanding of the major functional areas of business.
       A specialization for a highly-productive business career.
       An appreciation and preparation for advanced study.
       A global business perspective.


                              CONCENTRATIONS OFFERED

  The Program faculty guides students in developing skills to gather and utilize data,
  make and implement sensible business decisions, communicate effectively with others,
  and foster successful human relationships. The program offered is designed to meet the
  needs of students interested in accounting, management, marketing, and international
  business leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in Business Administration.

  Accounting: Courses in this curriculum prepare students for careers and professional
  certifications (e.g., CPA) focusing on accounting, financial management, or business
  administration in both the public and private sectors.




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  Management: Courses in this curriculum are designed for students who aspire to
  manage a business or start their own business. The program prepares students for
  careers in the management of corporate as well as governmental operations.

  Marketing: The marketing curriculum is designed for students who are interested in
  careers in sales, marketing, advertising, and public relations.

  International Business: Courses in the international business curriculum prepare
  students for a number of career opportunities in the global marketplace. Students are
  provided with the knowledge of how to conduct business in the international arena and
  how to meet the challenges of working in and understanding the changing nature of a
  multicultural environment.

                        DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJOR

  The Business Administration major course of study includes a series of core curriculum
  courses, core business courses, and advanced courses in the four areas of concentration:
  Accounting, Management, Marketing, and International Business. Students should
  expect to utilize a highly-technological fluency throughout the course of study.

  A student must earn a grade of ―C‖ or better in all courses counted toward the major or minor.

  The total number of semester credit hours required for the degree is 124. The 124 credit
  hours are as follows:



        A: Institutional Requirements (9 Semester Hours)
           Course #                Course Title                         Hours
           CSC 103                 Intro to Computers                      3
           KIN 113                 Wellness                                3
           PSY 101                 University Orientation                  2
           KIN                     Physical Education                      1
                                                                  Total    9

         B. General Studies Core Courses (47 Semester Hours)
           Course #                Course Title                         Hours
           ENG 113                  Freshman English I                      3
           ENG 123                  Freshman English II                     3
           MED 100                  Public Speaking                         3
           ENG 213/ENG 223          World Literature I or II                3
           HIS 213, HIS 223         US History I or II                      3
           GOV 113, GOV 123         Government: US or Texas                 3
           REL 203, PHI 213         Religion or Philo of Ethics             3


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           MTH 143                 College Algebra                            3
           MTH 233               * Statistics                                 3
           SCIENCE I               Chem I, Bio I, or Phys Sci I               4


        * General Core requirement for Business Administration majors only!

           SCIENCE II             Chem I, Bio I, or Phys Sci II               4
           LSP 113 or LFR 113,
                                  Spanish I or French I, or Chinese I         3
           LCH 113
           LSP 123 or LFR 123,    Spanish II or French II, or Chinese
                                                                              3
           LCH 113                II
           DIVERSITY              From major or electives                      6
                                                                Total         47

        C. Behavioral Science Options (3 Semester Hours)

           SOCIAL BEHAVIOR        Intro to Sociology; Intro to
                                                                              3
                                  Psychology; or Social Problems
                                                               Total          3

        D. Fine Arts Options (3 Semester Hours)
           MUSIC                  Intro to Arts; and/or Beginning
                                                                              3
                                  Piano; Choir; and/or Musicianship
                                                                Total         3


        E. Business Core Courses (38 Semester Hours):
           Course #           Course Title                                     Hours
           BUS 221            Principles of Accounting I                           3
           BUS 222            Principles of Accounting II                          3
           ECO 213            Principles of Microeconomics                         3
           ECO 223            Principles of Macroeconomics                         3
           BUS 241            Business Communications                              3
           BUS 331            Intro to Corporate Finance                           3
           BUS 340            Quantitative Methods for Business                    4
           BUS 341            Principles of Management                             3
                              Legal, Social, and Ethical Aspects of
           BUS 342                                                                 3
                              Business
           BUS 351            Principles of Marketing                               3
           BUS 441            Professional Development Seminar                      1
           BUS 444            Business Internship                                   3
           BUS 445            Business Policy                                       3
                                                                      Total        38




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        ACCOUNTING CONCENTRATION

        A: Five (5) Required Accounting Courses (15 Semester Hours)
           Course #           Course Title                             Hours
           BUS 321            Intermediate Accounting I                     3
           BUS 322            Intermediate Accounting II                    3
           BUS 323            Cost Accounting                               3
           BUS 421            Individual Income Tax                         3
           BUS 423            Auditing                                      3
                                                              Total        15

        B: One (1) Approved Accounting Elective: (3 Semester Hours)
           Course #           Course Title                             Hours
                             Accounting Information System,
           BUS 324, BUS 442,
                             Government/Not-for-Profit Accounting,         3
           BUS 424, BUS 425
                             Accounting Theory, Advanced Accounting
                                                               Total       3

        C: Six semester hours of approved Electives.


        MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION

         A: Four (4) Required Management Courses (12 Semester Hours)
           Course #           Course Title                             Hours
           BUS 343            Organizational Behavior                       3
           BUS 344            Human Resource Management                     3
           BUS 345            Small Business Management                     3
           BUS 442            Operations Management                         3
                                                              Total        12

        B: Two (2) Approved Management Electives: (6 Semester Hours)

        C: Six semester hours of approved Electives.

        MARKETING CONCENTRATION

          A: Three (3) Required Marketing Courses (9 Semester Hours)
           Course #           Course Title                             Hours
           BUS 352            Consumer Behavior                            3
           BUS 451            Marketing Research                           3
           BUS 454            Marketing Management                         3
                                                              Total        9

        B: Three (3) Approved Marketing Electives: (9 Semester Hours)


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        C: Six Semester Hours of Approved Electives.


        INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CONCENTRATION

        A: Three (3) Required Int’l Business Courses (9 Semester Hours)
           Course #             Course Title                          Hours
           BUS 361              International Business                     3
           BUS 362              International Negotiation                 3
           BUS 464              Global Business Strategies                3
                                                              Total       9

        B: Three (3) Approved Int’l Business Electives: (9 Semester Hours)

        C: Six semester hours of approved Electives.


   BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MINOR AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

A minor in Business Administration is also offered. This minor is designed for non-
business majors and requires completion of the following 21 credit hours of courses in
the Business Administration curriculum:

         BUS 221          Principles of Accounting I
         BUS 222          Principles of Accounting II
         ECO 213          Principles of Microeconomics
         ECO 223          Principles of Macroeconomics
         BUS 331          Introduction to Corporate Finance
         BUS 341          Principles of Management
         BUS 351          Principles of Marketing




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                  COURSES IN BUSINESS CONCENTRATION (BUS)

ACCOUNTING

BUS 221 Principles of Accounting I                                            3 Credit Hours
A study of the fundamental principles and problems involved in accounting for the major forms
of business organizations. Recording techniques are examined and accounting concepts are
explored. This course introduces concepts of Financial Accounting.
Prerequisite: MTH 143 with a “C” or better                              Offered: Fall/Spring

BUS 222 Principles of Accounting II                                           3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to help the student use the basic methods of internal accounting,
reporting, and analysis to support managerial decision making, planning, and control of
operations. This course introduces concepts of Managerial Accounting.
Prerequisite: MTH 143 with a “C” or better                               Offered: Spring

BUS 320 Managerial Accounting                                                 3 Credit Hours
A detailed study of accounting systems that provides information for management decision-
making. Emphasis is on the use of accounting data in budgeting, product costing, planning and
control, and capital investment decisions.
Prerequisite: BUS 221. BUS 222                                           Offered: As needed

BUS 321 Intermediate Accounting I                                             3 Credit Hours
The study of generally accepted accounting principles with an emphasis on development, effects
on corporations and financial markets, and application to corporate operational activities.
Prerequisite: BUS 221, BUS 222                                                  Offered: Fall

BUS 322 Intermediate Accounting II                                            3 Credit Hours
The study of generally accepted accounting principles with an emphasis on corporate financing
and investing activities.
Prerequisite: BUS 221, BUS 222, BUS 321                                      Offered: Spring

BUS 323 Cost Accounting                                                       3 Credit Hours
A detailed study of accounting systems that provide information for management decision-
making. Emphasis is on the use of accounting data in budgeting, product costing, planning and
control, and capital investment decisions.
Prerequisite: BUS 221, BUS 222, BUS 321                                         Offered: Fall

BUS 324 Accounting Information System                                         3 Credit Hours
The study of information systems and organizations as well as the role of the computer in system
creation. Emphasis is on providing knowledge about the capturing, the storing, the processing,
and the communicating of accounting information.
Prerequisite: BUS 221, BUS 222, BUS 321                                      Offered: As needed

BUS 421 Individual Income Tax                                                 3 Credit Hours
This course develops a foundation for the study of federal taxation and the tax practice of
accountants. Students will study the federal taxation process, tax terminology and concepts,
federal tax research methods, and the application of tax laws to individuals and businesses.
Prerequisite: BUS 221, BUS 222, BUS 321                                      Offered: Spring



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BUS 422 Governmental/Not-For-Profit Accounting                                    3 Credit Hours
Specialized emphasis and training for employment in governmental agencies. Emphasizes the
major aspects of management control problems for not-for-profit organizations.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing                                               Offered: As needed

BUS 423 Auditing                                                                  3 Credit Hours
The study of generally accepted auditing standards, the auditing profession and audit practice,
and the auditing process applied to corporate financial statements.
Prerequisite: BUS 221, BUS 222, BUS 321                                          Offered: Fall

BUS 424 Advanced Accounting                                                       3 Credit Hours
The study of generally accepted accounting principles with an emphasis on corporate mergers
and acquisitions, international business activities, and financial reporting by governments,
nonprofits, and partnerships.
Prerequisite: BUS 321, BUS 322 or instructor approval                         Offered: Spring

BUS 425 Accounting Theory                                                         3 Credit Hours
The study of the basic assumptions, definitions, principles and concepts which underlie
accounting rule-making and the reporting of accounting and financial information. Emphasis is
on the study of accounting history, directions of accounting research, the standard setting process,
accounting regulation and approaches to accounting education.
Prerequisite: Bus 321, Bus 322                                                 Offered: As needed

BUS 426 Special Topics in Accounting                                              3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced-level course and will be occasionally offered. The course is designed to
cover topics in accounting that are either not covered or not covered in depth by regularly offered
accounting courses. This course will typically be taught in a seminar format.
Prerequisite: Completion of 21 credit hours of Business courses               Offered: As needed


FINANCE

BUS 331 Introduction to Corporate Finance                                         3 Credit Hours
A study of economic and institutional aspects of the financial environment and basic techniques
of financial management of a firm.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, BUS 221, BUS 222, BUS 340                        Offered: Fall

BUS 332 Managerial Finance                                                        3 Credit Hours
A study of problems and cases in financial decision-making, designed to increase student
proficiency in the techniques of financial management.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, BUS 221, BUS 222,
BUS 242, BUS 331                                                     Offered: As needed

BUS 333 Financial Institutions and Markets                                        3 Credit Hours
A comprehensive study of financial institutions that intermediate capital formation with emphasis
on financial markets structure and instruments, money supply and the deposit expansion process.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, ECO 213, BUS 331                              Offered: As needed




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BUS 334 Short-Term Financial Management                                         3 Credit Hours
This course will provide an understanding of cash management, credit/collection policy,
inventory decisions and sources of short-term financing for corporations.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, ECO 213, BUS 331                          Offered: As needed

BUS 335 Money and Banking                                                       3 Credit Hours
This course examines the structure and operations of our monetary system and commercial
banking. It provides an introductory look at central banking, money, and capital markets.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, BUS 221, BUS 222, BUS 333             Offered: As needed

BUS 336 Risk Management and Insurance                                           3 Credit Hours
This course will focus on the study of the basic uses and functions of insurance as applied to the
overall treatment of risk. Emphasis will be on understanding how insurance helps to solve some
personal financial problems. Basic insurance concepts including review of the risks that
households experience and the policies used to ensure against these risks are presented from the
viewpoint of the consumer.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, BUS 331                                      Offered: As needed

BUS 431 Investment Management                                                   3 Credit Hours
An introduction to the development and management of investment portfolios, characteristics of
investments, media sources of information, securities analysis and selection, and performance
measurement.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, ECO 213, BUS 242                           Offered: As needed

BUS 432 International Finance                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course examines international capital movements and balance of payment problems.
Students analyze problems of international operations as they affect financial functions and
review foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange process. The course aims at
familiarizing students with the concepts of multinational financial management and financial
decision-making in the international context.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, ECO 221, ECO 222, BUS 331                     Offered: As needed

BUS 433 Financial Modeling and Forecasting                                      3 Credit Hours
This course will provide students with the computer and analytical skills to use financial and
statistical software to create financial models for prediction and decision-making.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, BUS 242, BUS 332                               Offered: As needed

BUS 434 Federal Reserve System                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course will provide a detailed analysis of the Federal Reserve System with special emphasis
on monetary theory and the formulation and administration of monetary policy.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, BUS 333, BUS 334, BUS 335                   Offered: As needed

BUS 435 Bank Management                                                         3 Credit Hours
This course uses the application of traditional finance concepts to the management of commercial
banks with emphasis on decision making and problem solving techniques to major problem areas
in banking.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233, BUS 333, BUS 334, BUS 335                     Offered: As needed




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BUS 436 Special Topics in Finance                                                 3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced-level course and will be occasionally offered. The course is designed to
cover topics in finance that are either not covered or not covered in depth by regularly offered
finance courses. This course will typically be taught in a seminar format.
Prerequisite: Completion of 21 credit hours of Business courses             Offered: As needed


MANAGEMENT

BUS 341 Principles of Management                                                  3 Credit Hours
An examination of the fundamental theories and techniques that influence contemporary
management approaches. This course will introduce students to how management is practiced
and how these practices have developed.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of THEA or equivalent                  Offered: Fall

BUS 343 Organizational Behavior                                                   3 Credit Hours
This is a study of the theories of organizations as related to effectiveness, efficiency, and impact
on the environment. The student will delineate formal and informal organizations, discuss
authority and influence and explore the phenomenon of individual and group behavior in work
organizations.
Prerequisite: BUS 341                                                               Offered: Spring

BUS 344 Human Resource Management                                                 3 Credit Hours
Basic techniques of management of human resources and human relations; job analysis; job
rating and classification; selection, training and promotion; employee health/welfare and safety;
renumeration of employees; labor turnover; employer-employee relations; government
legislation; and labor relations.
Prerequisite: BUS 341                                                           Offered: Spring

BUS 345 Small Business Management                                                 3 Credit Hours
An introduction into the processes of starting a business.       Preparation of a business plan,
marketing plan and concepts of e-business will be expected.
Prerequisite: BUS 341, BUS 351                                                       Offered: Fall

BUS 346 Managing Diversity                                                        3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to introduce students to techniques used by organizations to learn how to
"manage" people's differences in ways that will make workers more productive and more
compatible team members. The focus will be on developing one’s ability to understand and
appreciate individual differences and to work productively, particularly on teams, with people
from diverse backgrounds, cultures, and ethnicities. This course will also focus on the needs for
both individual understanding of differences and organizational systemic change.
Prerequisite BUS 341                                                             Offered: Spring

BUS 442 Operations Management                                                     3 Credit Hours
Techniques for management of direct resources required to produce goods and services. Topics
such as linear programming, transportation algorithms and quantitative tools are covered.
Prerequisite: BUS 242, BUS 341                                                 Offered: Fall




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BUS 445 Business Policy                                                         3 Credit Hours
This course is designed as a capstone in the education of undergraduate business students. It
involves the management of business organizations, in the broadest sense, integrating previous
studies in business and administration into a coherent, realistic approach to business policy and
decision making.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and completion of 21 credit hours of Business courses, which
must include BUS 331, BUS 341, BUS 351                                           Offered: Spring

BUS 446 Special Topics in Business                                              3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced-level course and will be occasionally offered. The course is designed to
cover topics in management that are either not covered or not covered in depth by regularly
offered management courses. This course will typically be taught in a seminar format.
Prerequisite: Completion of 21 credit hours of Business courses         Offered: As needed


MARKETING

BUS 351 Principles of Marketing                                                 3 Credit Hours
A survey of concepts and functions of distribution systems together with an analysis of marketing
decisions.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of THEA or equivalent                           Offered: Fall

BUS 352 Consumer Behavior                                                       3 Credit Hours
A study of the basic concepts underlying consumer behavior, sociological and psychological
phenomena which influence consumer behavior and research approaches which allow marketers
to predict and influence behavior.
Prerequisite: BUS 351                                                     Offered: Spring

BUS 353 Sales Management                                                        3 Credit Hours
A study and analysis of techniques in professional selling with special emphasis on application of
concepts in actual sales presentations. Emphasis is also on the planning and execution of an
advertising sales campaign and the economic benefits and social relationships that are derived
from such a campaign.
Prerequisite: BUS 351                                                               Offered: Fall

BUS 354 Principles of Accounting                                                3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to introduce students to the field and practice of advertising with an
emphasis on the changing nature of promoting products. The student will develop knowledge of
the business, creation and media placement of advertising, and will become acquainted with
advertising management, strategies and processes. How firms develop new media, appeals, and
methods to better compete with their rivals in a dynamic environment will also be emphasized.
Prerequisite: BUS 351                                                           Offered: Spring

BUS 451 Marketing Research                                                      3 Credit Hours
Techniques of marketing research and application of those techniques to practical marketing
problems, information gathering methods, questionnaire formulation, sampling, and report
writing.
Prerequisite: BUS 241, BUS 351                                                Offered: Fall




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BUS 452 Public Relations                                                        3 Credit Hours
This is a survey course on the function of public relations in the organization and the general
public. Relevant topics would include: counseling, news releases, brochures, and advertisements.
Prerequisite: CSC 103, BUS 241, BUS 351                                            Offered: Fall

BUS 453 International Marketing                                                 3 Credit Hours
Analysis of the multinational process of planning and promotion of goods, ideas, and services
worldwide. Emphasis is on indirect and direct exporting, product pricing and promotions,
shipping and physical distributions, and financing decisions in export markets.
Prerequisite: BUS 351                                                         Offered: As needed

BUS 454 Marketing Management                                                    3 Credit Hours
An analysis of problems which the marketing manager will encounter in modern customer-
oriented marketing, as well as techniques of planning, organizing, and controlling business
functions.
Prerequisite: BUS 351                                                     Offered: Spring

BUS 455 Distribution Channels                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course is about marketing channels: the companies that come together to bring products and
services from their point of origin to the point of consumption. This course describes how to
design, develop, and maintain effective relationships among channel members to achieve
sustainable competitive advantage. Communication strategies within the channel are also
emphasized.
Prerequisite: BUS 351                                                      Offered: As needed

BUS 456 Special Topics in Marketing                                             3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced-level course and will be occasionally offered. The course is designed to
cover topics in marketing that are either not covered or not covered in depth by regularly offered
marketing courses. This course will typically be taught in a seminar format.
Prerequisite: Completion of 21 credit hours of business courses              Offered: As needed


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

BUS 361 International Business                                                  3 Credit Hours
This is a course in multinational business that surveys the various elements of international
production and trade. The course will examine the benefits and problems that multinational
companies encounter in an international environment. It will also focus on global market
perspectives of trade agreements, international finance and global communication.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor approval                              Offered: Fall

BUS 362 International Negotiations                                              3 Credit Hours
A study of the process of making business deals across national and cultural boundaries.
Emphasis is on the basic processes that guide international negotiation: successful preparation,
building relationships, using persuasion tactics, gaining concessions, and reaching a final
agreement. Also, key cross-cultural communication issues will be provided including when one
should use an interpreter and cultural differences in nonverbal communication.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor approval                           Offered: Spring




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BUS 465 Global Business Strategies                                               3 Credit Hours
This course examines the fundamental theories and techniques that are used by multinational
corporations to develop and implement a global business strategy needed to effectively integrate
the activities of their worldwide subsidiaries. Emphasis is on the three separate components to
developing a successful global strategy: developing a core business strategy, developing an
internationalization strategy, and developing a globalization strategy.
Prerequisite: BUS 361, Senior standing or instructor approval                      Offered: Fall

BUS 466 Special Topics in Int’l Business                                         3 Credit Hours
This is an advanced-level course and is designed to cover topics in international business that are
either not covered or not covered in depth by regularly offered international business courses.
This course will typically be taught in a seminar format.
Prerequisite: BUS 361, Senior standing or instructor approval                     Offered: Spring

International Business-related courses from other disciplines:

BUS 432 International Finance                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course examines international capital movements and balance of payment problems.
Students analyze problems of international operations as they affect financial functions and
review foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange process. The course aims at
familiarizing students with the concepts of multinational financial management and financial
decision-making in the international context.
Prerequisite: ECO 221, ECO 222, BUS 331                                       Offered: As needed

BUS 453 International Marketing                                                  3 Credit Hours
Analysis of the multinational process of planning and promotion of goods, ideas, and services
worldwide. Emphasis is on indirect and direct exporting, product pricing and promotions,
shipping and physical distributions, and financing decisions in export markets.
Prerequisite: BUS 351                                                         Offered: As needed

ECO 433 International Economics                                                  3 Credit Hours
A study of the principles and methods of exchange of goods and services and of financial
arrangements between nations.
Prerequisite: ECO 221, ECO 222, BUS 331)                             Offered: As needed


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BUS 140 Introduction to Business                                                 3 Credit Hours
The introduction to the fundamental principles governing all aspects of modern business.
Students are introduced to elements of various fields of business (accounting, finance,
management, marketing, economics, and others) in order to gain a better understanding of the
role business plays in the U.S. and in the global economy.
Prerequisite: Non-business major                                               Offered: Fall

BUS 241 Business Communication                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course combines oral and written communication theory, practice, and technical report
writing. Emphasis is placed on instilling an awareness of correct grammar and punctuation in
writing for business applications. Also, students develop knowledge from hands-on experience



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with different information processing equipment and are provided laboratory experience entering
information into the computer.
Prerequisite: CSC 103, ENG 113, ENG 123                                           Offered: Fall

BUS 340 Quantitative Methods for Business                                            4 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to quantitative methods used in analyzing problems for business
decision making. A major emphasis is placed on mathematics of finance and the solving of
business problems. In addition, instruction in the statistical analysis for business, operations
management, and techniques for management of direct resources required to produce goods and
services will be provided. This course entails three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory
hour per week.
Prerequisite: MTH 143, MTH 233                                                    Offered: Fall

BUS 342 Legal, Social, and Ethical Aspects of Business                               3 Credit Hours
This course is a general introduction to business law governing transactions with emphasis on the
fundamental principles of contracts, agency and negotiable instruments. Besides being
introduced to the role of the court systems in business, students are also introduced to the social
and ethical responsibilities of management.
Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor                          Offered: Fall

BUS 441 Professional Development Seminar                                              1 Credit Hour
This course provides students with information important to being a professional irrespective of
the career they choose. This course is designed to explore human development in an
organizational setting. Students learn how to manage their time, how to make effective decisions,
how to present themselves and their work in a professional manner, and how to balance their
workload. Students will also learn how to handle stress and other issues of physical and mental
well-being as well as how to communicate effectively one-on-one and in groups. Students will
experience situations involving social and professional decorum.
Prerequisite: Completion of 21 credit hours of Business courses                    Offered: Fall

BUS 444 Business Internship                                                          3 Credit Hours
Professional quality experience in business either outside or inside the College. Students work
under supervision for 160 hours for one semester. Prior to registration, the position must be
approved. A written report is required of the students and a written evaluation by the employer
must be made to the supervising university instructor. Goals and objectives are established
collaboratively between the student, supervisor, and instructor. Course requirements may include
student reports, employer evaluations, instructor site visits.
Prerequisite: BUS 241, BUS 441, Completion of 21 credit hours of business courses and
consent of instructor                                                           Offered: Spring

ECONOMICS

ECO 213          Principles of Microeconomics                                        3 Credit Hours
An introduction to the basic descriptive, analytical, and policy problems at the microeconomic level.
Emphasis will be placed on the roles of supply, demand, and price in the allocation of scarce resources.
Prerequisites: None                                                               Offered: Fall/Spring




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ECO 223          Principles of Macroeconomics                           3 Credit Hours
An introduction to the basic descriptive, analytical, and policy problems at the
macroeconomic level. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of money and b anking,
aggregate supply and demand, and national income accounting.
Prerequisite: ECO 213                                          Offered: Fall/Spring

ECO 433          International Economics                                3 Credit Hours
A study of the principles and methods of exchange of goods and services and of financial
arrangements between nations.
Prerequisite: ECO 213, ECO 223.                                     Offered: As needed




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                   DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

The computer science program prepares students with knowledge and skills needed to
apply computing technology to solve problems in the rapidly changing world of
information technologies. And it prepares students for graduate and/or professional
studies at institutions and organizations where they must keep pace with current
knowledge to be successful. The program curriculum will enable students to acquire
specific technical skills in such areas as:
            Computer programming languages including C++, Java, and Visual Basic
            Computer network administration
            The use of Windows and UNIX operating systems
            Internetworking and data communications
            Web site design and maintenance, including the use of HTML and JAVA script
            Systems analysis and design
            Current hardware and software technologies

Computer Science Degree Core Requirements (38 hours)
CSC113 -123       Programming Foundations I and II                           6 hours
CSC240 – 241 Second Year Science Seminar (Fall and Spring)                   1 hour
CSC243           Data Structures                                             3 hours
CSC323           Database and Information Retrieval                          3 hours
CSC340 – 341 Third Year Science Seminar                                      1 hour
CSC353           Operating Systems 1: Theoretical Foundations                3 hours
CSC363           Operating Systems 2: Windows and UNIX                       3 hours
CSC384           Computer Networks and Distributed Systems                   4 hours
CSC403           Software Engineering I                                      3 hours
CSC413           Software Engineering II                                     3 hours
CSC401-411       Senior Seminar (Fall and Spring)                            2 hours
MTH 233          Statistics                                                  3 hours
MTH 353          Linear Algebra                                              3 hours

Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Computer Science (18 hours)
For the Business Track the following courses will be required:
CSC163 - Web Site Design & Maintenance                                       3 hours
CSC173 – Programming in Visual Basic                                         3 hours
CSC253 – Information Systems                                                 3 hours
BUS221– Principles of Accounting I                                           3 hours
BUS222– Principles of Accounting II                                          3 hours
BUS341– Principles of Management                                             3 hours


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Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Computer Science (18 hours)
For the Database Administration Track the following courses will be required:


CSC163 – Web Site Design & Maintenance                                        3 hours
CSC173 – Programming in Visual Basic                                          3 hours
CSC2X3 – Introduction to SQL                                                  3 hours
CSC3X3 – Database Administration Fundamentals I                               3 hours
CSC3X3 – Database Administration Fundamentals II                              3 hours
CSC3X3 - Database Performance Tuning                                          3 hours


Additional Requirements for the Bachelor of Science Degree in Computer Science (34 hours)
                           (Includes a minor in Mathematics)


CSC213-223       Java 1 & 2                                                   6 hours
CSC313           Computer Organization                                        3 hours
CSC473           Special Topics                                               3 hours
MTH 203          Discrete Mathematics                                         3 hours
MTH224-234 Calculus 1 & 2                                                     8 hours
MTH 453          Numerical Techniques for CSC majors                          3 hours
PHY214-224       Physics 1 & 2                                                8 hours


Requirements for a minor in Computer Forensics (19 hours) for Criminal Justice Majors
Requirements for getting a degree in Criminal Justice with a concentration in
Computer Forensics.

CSC 113          Programming Foundations 1.                                   3 hours
CSC 123          Programming Foundations 2                                    3 hours
CSC 313          Computer Organization                                        3 hours
CSC 353          Operating Systems and Theoretical Foundations                3 hours
CSC384           Computer Networks and Distributed Systems                    4 hours
CSC 303          Computer Forensics                                           3 hours




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  Huston-Tillotson University                                                  2006-2008



                   A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE B.A.
                      COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR – DBA Track

Year 1      FALL                                       SPRING
         CSC 113 Programming Foundations I   3      CSC 123 Programming Foundations 2      3
         MTH 143 College Algebra             3      KIN 113 Health and Wellness            3
         CSC 103 Intro to Computers          3      PSY 102 College Orientation            2
         ENG 113 Intro College Composition   3      ENG 123 Rhetoric and Composition       3
         Language I                          3      Language II                            3
                                                    KIN 101, 111Pers. Fit/Team Sports      1
         Total Hours                         15     Total Hours                            15

Year 2      FALL                                       SPRING
                       nd
         CSC 240W 2 Year Sc Seminar Fall     0.5    CSC 241 2nd Year Sc Seminar Spring     0.5
         CSC173 Visual Basic                 3      CSC 163 Web Site Design                3
         CSC243 Data Structures              3      PHI 213 Philosophy and Ethics or       3
                                                    REL 203 Comparative Religion
         CSC273 Intro to Multimedia          3      Elective                               3
         MTH 233 Intro to Statistics         3      PSC 113 or 123 US/ TX Government       3
         Science I                           4      Science II                             4
         Total Hours                         16.5   Total Hours                            16.5

Year 3 FALL                                         SPRING
       CSC 353 Operating Systems 1           3      CSC 363 Operating Systems 2            3
       CSC 323 Database & Info Retrieval     3      Elective                               3
       CSC 340 3rd Year Sc Seminar Fall      0.5    CSC 341W 3rd Yr Sc Seminar Spring      0.5
       MED 100 Public Speaking               3      CSC 383 Computer Networks              3
       CSC2X3 Intro to SQL                   3      Behavior Science                       3
       Diversity Core 1                      3      CSC3X3 DBA Fundamentals I              3
         Total Hours                         15.5   Total Hours                            15.5
Year 4 FALL                                         SPRING
       CSC 403 Software Engineering          3      CSC 411W Senior Seminar Spring         1
       CSC 401W Senior Seminar Fall          1      ENG 213 or 223 World Lit I or II       3
       MTH 353 Linear Algebra                3      CSC3Z3 DBA Performance Tuning          3
       HIS 213 or 223 US History I or II     3      Fine Arts Core                         3
       CSC3Y3 DBA Fundamentals II            3      Elective                               3
       Diversity Core 2                      3      CSC413 Software Engineering            3
         Total Hours                         16     Total Hours                            16




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  Huston-Tillotson University                                                  2006-2008


                    SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE B.A.
                       COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR – Business Track

Year 1      FALL                                       SPRING
         CSC 113 Programming Foundations I   3      CSC 123 Programming Foundations 2      3
         MTH 143 College Algebra             3      KIN 113 Health and Wellness            3
         CSC 103 Intro to Computers          3      PSY 102 College Orientation            2
         ENG 113 Intro College Composition   3      ENG 123 Rhetoric and Composition       3
         Language I                          3      Language II                            3
                                                    KIN 101, 111Pers. Fit/Team Sports      1
         Total Hours                         15     Total Hours                            15
Year 2      FALL                                       SPRING
                       nd
         CSC 240W 2 Year Sc Seminar Fall     0.5    CSC 241 2nd Year Sc Seminar Spring     0.5
         CSC173 Visual Basic                 3      CSC 163 Web Site Design                3
         CSC243-Data Structures              3      BUS222 Principles of Accounting II     3
         BUS221 Principles of Accounting I   3      CSC253 – Information Management        3
                                                    Systems
         MTH 233 Intro to Statistics         3      PSC 113 or 123 US/ TX Government       3
         Science I                           4      Science II                             4
         Total Hours                         16.5   Total Hours                            16.5
Year 3 FALL                                         SPRING
       CSC 353 Operating Systems 1           3      CSC 363 Operating Systems 2            3
       CSC 323 Database & Info Retrieval     3      BUS341 Principles of Management        3
       CSC 340 3rd Year Sc Seminar Fall      0.5    CSC 341W 3rd Yr Sc Seminar Spring      0.5
       MED 100 Public Speaking               3      CSC 384 -Computer Networks and         4
                                                    Distributed Systems
         Diversity Core 1                    3      Behavior Science                       3
         Diversity Core 2                    3      PHI 312 Philosophy and Ethics or       3
                                                    REL 203 Comparative Religion
         Total Hours                         15.5   Total Hours                            16.5
Year 4 FALL                                         SPRING
       CSC 403 Software Engineering I        3      CSC 411W Senior Seminar Spring         1
       CSC 401W Senior Seminar Fall          1      ENG 213 or 223 World Lit I or II       3
       MTH 353 Linear Algebra                3      CSC413 Software Engineering II         3
       HIS 213 or 223 US History I or II     3      Fine Arts Core                         3
       BUS341– Principles of Management      3      CSC Elective                           3
       CSC Elective                          3      CSC Elective                           3
         Total Hours                         16     Total Hours                            16




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  Huston-Tillotson University                                                  2006-2008


                   A SUGGESTED COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE B.S.
                                COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR

Year 1      FALL                                       SPRING
         CSC 113 Programming Foundations I   3      CSC 123 Programming Foundations 2      3
         MTH163 Alg & Trig for SC Majors     3      MTH 173 Pre-Calculus                   3
         CSC 103 Intro to Computers          3      KIN 114 Health and Wellness            3
         ENG 113 Intro College Composition   3      ENG 123 Rhetoric and Composition       3
         PSY102 College Orientation          2      PSC 113 or 123 US/TX Government        3
         KIN 101, 111 Pers Fit/Team Sports   1
         Total Hours                         15     Total Hours                            15
Year 2      FALL                                       SPRING
                       nd
         CSC 240W 2 Year Sc Seminar Fall     0.5    CSC 241 2nd Year Sc Seminar Spring     0.5
         MTH 224 Calculus 1                  4      MTH 234 Calculus 2                     4
         PHY 214 Physics 1                   4      PHY 224 Physics                        4
         CSC213 Java I                       3      CSC223 Java 2                          3
         CSC243 Data Structures              3      Behavior Science                       3
         MED 100 Public Speaking             3      MTH 203 Discrete Math                  3
         Total Hours                         17.5   Total Hours                            17.5
Year 3 FALL                                         SPRING
       CSC 353 Operating Systems 1           3      CSC 363 Operating Systems 2            3
       CSC 323 Database & Info Retrieval     3      CSC313 Computer Organization           3
       CSC 340 3rd Year Sc Seminar Fall      0.5    CSC 341W 3rd Yr Sc Seminar Spring      0.5
       MTH 233 Intro to Statistics           3      CSC 384 -Computer Networks and         4
                                                    Distributed Systems
         Language I                          3      Language II                            3
         Fine Arts Core                      3      ENG 213/223 World Literature I/II      3
         Total Hours                         15.5   Total Hours                            16.5
Year 4 FALL                                         SPRING
       CSC 403 Software Engineering I        3      CSC 411W Senior Seminar Spring         1
       CSC 401W Senior Seminar Fall          1      MTH Numerical Techniques               3
       MTH 353 Linear Algebra                3      CSC413 Software Engineering II         3
       HIS 213 or 223 US History I or II     3      Diversity Core II                      3
       CSC473 Special Topics                 3      PHI 213 Philosophy and Ethics or       3
                                                    REL 203 Comparative Religion
         Diversity Core I                    3      Elective                               3
         Total Hours                         16     Total Hours                            16




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                       COURSES IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSC)

CSC 103 Introduction to Computers                                               3 Credit Hours
This is a required general education course for all students at Huston-Tillotson University. This
course presents a general introduction to computers, computing, the Internet, and World Wide
Web. Topics include computer literacy, hardware components, systems software, and
applications software. The focus is on experiences using major software packages that include
word processing, spreadsheet, database management, graphics, and Internet/Web applications.
Materials covered in lectures and laboratory exercises will emphasize applications in business,
government, and education. Students may earn three credit hours by completing the course
successfully, by passing a comprehensive departmental placement test, or by documenting
appropriate experiences in a portfolio which computer science faculty will evaluate. Credit hours
gained in this course will not count toward required credits for a major or minor in CSC.
Laboratory required.
Prerequisite: None                                                   Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

CSC 113 Programming Foundations 1                                               3 Credit Hours
This course is the first core course for computer science majors and minors and for students
intending to continue on to higher level courses in computer and information systems. It is taught
in a contemporary language and emphasizes basic computer science and program construction
concepts, such as problem solving, programs and programming environment, high-level
languages and machine code, programming methodology, algorithm analysis, object orientation,
variables and expression, control structures and repetition.
Corequisites: CSC 103, MTH 163 or MTH 233                                  Offered: Fall/Yearly

CSC 123 Programming Foundations 2                                               3 Credit Hours
This is a continuation of CSC 113. The course covers arrays, streams and files; data structure and
data abstraction; exception handling; and graphics and user interface. It introduces object-
oriented programming (OOP), illustrates how classes and objects are created and used and covers
the concepts and uses of polymorphism and inheritance.
Prerequisite: CSC 113                                                  Offered: Spring/Yearly


CSC 163 Web Site Design and Maintenance                                         3 Credit Hours
The focus of this course is on creating the content of a Web Site and introducing students to
concepts, steps and issues dealing with setting up Web servers. The course covers introductory
through intermediate/advanced concepts and techniques in Hypertext Markup Language (HTML)
including basic syntax and standards that allow various browsers to recognize code. It also
includes design guidelines for HTML style sheets and dynamic HTML. Additionally, it covers
Web site design processes ranging from background research to techniques and methods of
successful design, preparation, development, and on-going maintenance. The course is hands-on
and project-oriented. It provides an opportunity for students to use commercial software programs
to construct and maintain a Web site.
Prerequisites: CSC 103 and 113                                           Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 173 Programming in Visual Basic (VB)                                        3 Credit Hours
This course introduces the VB interactive development environment, user interface with graphical
controls. It covers VB code, variables, functions and error handling objects and events, creating
programs to manage data, working with multiple forms, printing reports, working with random



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and sequential access files, database access, Dynamic Data Exchange (DDE), and Object Linking
and Embedding (OLE), creating multiple document applications, programming with classes,
creating toolbars with controls, and preparing advanced reports. This course also includes
debugging, designing object-oriented event-driven programs, and database design and
implementation.
Prerequisite: CSC 113                                                   Offered: Fall/Yearly

CSC 183 Introduction to Emerging Technologies                                      3 Credit Hours
This course is a general elective for all students at Huston-Tillotson University. This course is
designed to give students an understanding of emerging technologies and how they can impact
their lives. Some of the emerging technologies include RFID, nanotechnology including
nanoelectronics, wireless technologies, computer viruses, airborne networks, enviromatics, grid
computing, mechatronics, software assurance, machine learning, and many more. Students will
have an opportunity to research new emerging technologies that interest them. The only
requirement for this course is an innate curiosity in new discoveries and technologies.
Prerequisites: None

CSC 193W Advanced Applications                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on design, setup, text, images, file preparation, printing,
sharing/dissemination of documents, and integrating other office applications. Students in this
course will use desktop publishing technology that is widely used in education and business to
create electronic and print-based documents such as newsletters, forms, brochures, newspapers,
and web components. Creative thinking, problem solving, communications, and decision-making
are employed throughout this projects based course. This course has a substantial writing
component and fulfills the requirements for Desktop Publishing.
Prerequisite: Placement Exam or CSC 103 & Instructor Approval. Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 213 Java I                                                                    3 Credit Hours
This course continues building on the concepts learned in CSC113 and 123. Topics include:
programming methodology, algorithm analysis, object orientation, variables and expressions
control structures and repetition, arrays, streams and files. Applets are also introduced.
Prerequisite: CSC 123                                                           Offered: Fall/Yearly

CSC 223 Java II                                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of CSC 213. It covers data structure, data abstraction, exception
handling, graphics, and user interface. It includes object-oriented programming (OOP) and
graphical user interface (GUI) methods. It illustrates how classes and objects are created and used
and covers the concepts and uses of polymorphism and inheritance.
Prerequisite: CSC 213                                                     Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 240W/241 Second Year Science Seminar Fall/Spring                       0.5/0.5 Credit Hours
Seminars are presented by faculty, guest lecturers and students. Topics will address recent
findings in the sciences or may be relative to professional and career development of the science
major. The course meets for a minimum of 1 hour weekly. Attendance, speaker evaluations and a
presentation or paper is required for satisfactory completion of these science seminar courses.
Prerequisites: Computer Science Major and 24 College Credits Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

CSC 243 Data Structures and Programming                                   3 Credit Hours
This is a required course for computer science majors. It provides a strong foundation for
advanced programming. The course covers various data structures and related issues


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including string and searching techniques. It also treats implementation and analysis of
algorithms based on these and other structures, facilitating structured program design and
development.
Prerequisite: CSC123                                                           Fall/Yearly

CSC 253 Information System Concepts                                             3 Credit Hours
This is an introductory course designed to give students a broad understanding of issues involving
the use of information technology (IT) in organizations. It includes an examination of pertinent
technologies, human-machine interface, and motivations for IT uses within private and public
organizations. This course will cover topics such as the role of information systems, hardware,
software, telecommunications, end-user computing, work-group collaboration, multimedia,
hypertext, and decision support systems. The course also covers planning, implementation, and
management issues. This course is designed for CSC majors, minors, or other students interested
in information systems management.
Prerequisite: CSC 123                                                    Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 273 Introduction to Multimedia                                              3 Credit Hours
This is an introductory course that covers multimedia applications and development. It will cover
concepts and evolution of multimedia systems; hardware and software requirements including
operating systems and device drivers; digital audio MIDI and creating a MIDI arrangement; CD
formats and mastering CDs; working with data, music, and photo CDs; images, formats, scanning
and editing; animation, frames, modeling, morphing; digital video, WWW, HTML, JAVA, and
DHTML applications. Laboratory exercises and projects are designed to give students hand-on
practice in understanding, developing, and using multimedia applications.
Prerequisite: CSC 113                                                        Offered: Fall/Yearly

CSC 303 Computer Forensics                                                        3 Credit Hours
This course covers an overview of the investigators computer lab, computer forensic tools,
processing crime and incident scenes, controlling digital evidence, data acquisition from crime
scene, e-mail investigations, and network forensics. This course will involve hands-on projects.
Prerequisite: CSC 353                                                        Offered: Fall/Yearly

CSC 313 Computer Organization                                                   3 Credit Hours
This course covers Microcomputer applications using IBM and applied microcomputers. Topics
include character codes (BCD, EBCDIC, ASCII), Boolean algebra, assembly programming,
software development, implementation and debugging, computer hardware including architecture
memory, control, ALU and I/O interfacing. Loaders, assemblers, and compiler design
consideration are also covered.
Prerequisite: 6 Credit Hours of Programming Languages               Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 323 Database and Information Retrieval                                      3 Credit Hours
This course gives an overview of database systems. It covers conceptual modeling with emphasis
on the relational model. ACCESS and ORACLE will serve as the principal relational DBMS
programs. Selected micro DBMS software programs will be evaluated using magazine reviews
(InfoWorld, PC Magazine, Byte, Software Digest). An important segment of the course is DBMS
team project.
Prerequisite: CSC 123                                                      Offered: Fall/ Yearly




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CSC 333 Artificial Intelligence and Robotics                                     3 Credit Hours
This course covers the historical overview and applications of artificial intelligence, problems,
state spaces and search strategies. Emphasis will be placed on knowledge representation, pattern
recognition, expert systems, symbolic computation, and machine learning. Programming projects
will be used to reinforced concepts
Prerequisites: CSC 153 and CSC 313                                      Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 340/341W Third Year Science Seminar Fall/Spring                       0.5/ 0.5 Credit Hours
Seminars are presented by faculty, guest lecturers and students. Topics will address recent
findings in the sciences or may be relative to professional and career development of the science
major. The course meets for a minimum of 1 hour weekly. Attendance, speaker evaluations and a
presentation or paper is required for satisfactory completion of these science seminar courses.
Prerequisites: Computer Science Major and 48 College Credits Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

CSC 353 Operating Systems and Theoretical Foundations                            3 Credit Hours
This is the first course in a two-course sequence dealing with computer operating systems. It
introduces such basic concepts as performance, multiprogramming, synchronization, protection,
time sharing, asynchronous processes, and real-time systems. It examines components of
operating systems, especially file systems, scheduling (CPU, disk and drum), I/O Programming,
memory management, virtual memory, device management, distributed systems, and file
management. Throughout the course, comparisons and contrasts will be made between Unix and
Windows in terms of how several of these concepts and features are implemented.
Prerequisite: CSC 123                                                    Offered: Fall/Yearly

CSC 363 Operating Systems: Windows and UNIX Applications                         3 Credit Hours
This is the second course in the two-course sequence dealing with OS. The focus will be on
knowledge and skills needed to use Unix and Windows Operating Systems. It presents an
overview of Windows and UNIX system architecture and important concepts involved in systems
programming for Windows and UNIX. It also describes additional file systems of Windows and
UNIX. Lab assignments will be based on C/C++ and UNIX scripts.
Prerequisite: CSC 353                                                Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 373 Software Testing                                                         3 Credit Hours
This course covers various types of testing and test management and gives the students and
opportunity to practice each type of testing. Various topics include black box testing, white box
testing, system testing, web testing, context driven testing, verification and validation,
inspections, exploratory testing, performance testing, acceptance testing, automated testing plus
the latest advances in software testing. Hands-on projects will be a key part of this course.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing in CSC; CSC 323; CSC 243                        Spring/Yearly

CSC 384 Computer Networks and Distributed Systems                                4 Credit Hours
This course covers computer network concepts, network types, design, and protocols as well as
the design, implementation, and management of distributed systems. Topics include layering in
communication protocols, with particular reference to the OSI reference model, interprocess
communication, remote invocation, distributed naming, cryptographic security, distributed file
systems, data replication, distributed transaction mechanisms, and distributed timing and
coordination mechanism. UNIX and MS Windows are used for students’ hands-on exercises and
laboratory experience.
Prerequisite: CSC 353 and CSC 363                                      Offered: Fall/Yearly



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CSC 401W/411W Computer Science Senior Seminar Fall/Spring                      1/1 Credit Hour
Senior seminar courses are taken by all Computer Science majors. The student attends one
discussion hour per week and at least one science seminar participation hour per week. Oral
discussion, a written report, and presentation on selected topics developed from information
gathered from professional journals and reference books is required. In some cases laboratory
investigations with written reports may be substituted. Specific requirements for satisfactory
completion of this course are outlined in the course syllabi for each semester.
Prerequisite: Senior Standing                                          Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

CSC 403 Software Engineering 1                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course covers issues, techniques, and concepts involved in planning, designing, and
implementing software systems. Topics include problem solving concepts, software life-cycle
models, the software process, software quality, developing teams, requirements gathering,
utilizing CASE tools, risk management, black box and white box testing, creating objects,
reusability and portability, planning and estimating software projects. Student laboratory
exercises and projects will emphasize team work, coordination of multiple programmers,
documentation, user friendly interface design, and software costing.
Prerequisite: Upper division standing in CSC; CSC323; CSC243                   Fall/Yearly

CSC 413 Software Engineering 2                                                  3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of Software Engineering 1 which involves planning, designing, and
implementing software systems. Topics include analysis, both classical and object oriented,
project management, metrics, emerging development techniques, design, implementation,
modeling languages, system testing, user interface design, business process reengineering and
maintenance. Software projects will be completed in this course. More emphasis will be on
applying software engineering discipline to actual projects.
Prerequisites: CSC 403                                                 Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 423 Computer Graphics                                                       3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to computer graphics. Topics included are raster graphics
algorithms, graphics hardware and software, projections in 3-D, geometrical transformations,
object hierarchy, dialogue design, achromatic and colored light in the quest for visual realism.
Prerequisite: MTH 234                                                         Offered: As Needed

CSC 433 Distributed Systems and Networked Organizations                         3 Credit Hours
This course covers the design, implementation, and management of distributed systems.
Emphasis will be on internetworking and intranetworking. Topics will include networking,
internetworking, protocols, interprocess communication, information sharing services (such as
file systems, and e-mail), shared data and transactions, and security. The course is designed to
help students (1) learn how the major elements of the internet and intranet work; (2) appreciate
how distributed systems process transactions reliably; (3) learn how to write simple client server
applications; and (4) learn how to examine selected issues regarding the impacts of distributed
systems and organizations.
Prerequisites: CSC 383 and 363                                              Offered: Fall/Yearly




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CSC 453 Emerging Technology Solutions for Business                               3 Credit Hours
This course is for Business majors and computer science majors. In order for this class to work
there must be a mixture of students from both disciplines. Students will investigate various
emerging technologies for both their business and technical potential. Teams pairing business
students with computer science students will explore whether there are any business opportunities
in the emerging technologies that could be exploited for a new business. Business plans and
technical plans will be put together as a class project. The students will have an opportunity to
compete in the Moot Corp competitions that are nationwide. This course may have an equivalent
Business course number.
Prerequisites: BUS 341 or Instructor approval

CSC 473 Special Topics in Computer Science                                       3 Credit Hours
Special Topics in Computer Science and Computer Information Systems-Special topics include
Compiler design, Parallelism and Concurrency, Computer vision, Database principles, Computer
communications networks, Internetworking and Intranet working, Genetic and neural computing,
and Simulation. Students may repeat this course when topics vary.
Prerequisites: Instructor Approval                                  Offered: Spring/Yearly

CSC 483 Computer Science Internship                                              3 Credit Hours
This course helps to prepare students for the working environment. Students obtain assignments with
local businesses where they may use their knowledge base and explore other learning experiences.
Prerequisite: 12 CSC Major Credits and Advisor Approval              Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly

CSC 490-4 Computer Science Research/Project                       0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to focus on (1) academic thinking and problem solving; (2) research
methods: (3) report preparation; and (4) presentation. The course enables students to work
independently under the supervision of computer science or computer information systems
faculty. Broad areas of recommended topics reflect the understanding that computer science is
concerned with software technology and development. Selected topics include algorithms and
their performance; comparison of languages; knowledge-based systems; genetic and neural
algorithms; software engineering; interface technology; and communications protocols and
performance. Each student enrolled in this course must prepare and submit three deliverables:
(1.) Project proposal including problem definition, (2) Review of pertinent literature; and
(3) Final project report.
Prerequisite: Instructor Approval                                  Offered: Fall/Spring Yearly




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                                              BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Frances Alford, B.A., M.Ed. .........................................................................Austin, TX
William P. Bobo, Jr., B.S. ..............................................................................East Amherst, NY
Rambie Briggs, B.A., M.A., M.D. .................................................................Lago Vista, TX
Don W. Brown, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. ...............................................................Austin, TX
Rick Burciaga, B.A. ......................................................................................Austin, TX
Wilhelmina R. Delco, B.A., LL.D. ................................................................Austin, TX
Melvin R. Dillard, Sr., B.A., M.A., LL.D. .....................................................Houston, TX
Delphia A.York Duckens, B.A, J.D. ..............................................................New York, NY
Larry L. Earvin, Ph.D. ..................................................................................Austin, TX
Wanda Evaige, B.A. ......................................................................................Frederick, OK
Derrick Evans, B.S., M.B.A. .........................................................................Austin, TX
R. James George, B.A., J.D. ..........................................................................Austin, TX
Tommy Hodinh, B.A. ....................................................................................................................Austin, TX
Milton B. Lee, II, B.S., M.S.E.E. ...................................................................Austin, TX
Bishop. Joel Martinez, D.D. ..........................................................................San Antonio, TX
Thalia Matherson, B.A., M.L.A., Ed.D. ........................................................DeSoto, TX
Bertha S. Means, B.A., M.Ed., L.H.D., ........................................................Austin, TX
C. Mark Melliar-Smith, Ph.D. ......................................................................Austin, TX
Frank Morris, B.A., M.P.A., Ph.D.………………………………………… DeSoto, TX
Norma Jane Murphy, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. .......................................................Round Rock, TX
Mackie H. Norris, B.S.N., M.N., Ph.D. .........................................................Jonesboro, GA
David A. Talbot, Jr., B.A., J.D.......................................................................Austin, TX
Evan K. Taniguchi ........................................................................................Austin, TX
Stephen P. Wende, B.A., M.D.D., D.D.D......................................................Houston, TX
Thurmand B. Woodard, B.S. ……………………………………………. ...Austin, TX

                OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT AND EXECUTIVE SERVICES

Larry L. Earvin, Ph.D. ...........................................President and CEO
Lemuel Berry, Jr., Ph.D. ………………………. ......Provost and Vice President for
                                                                     Academic and Student Affairs
Vicki B. Minor, B.B.A. ..............................................Vice President for Institutional Advancement
Valerie D. Hue, M.B.A. .............................................Vice President for Administration and Finance
Terry S. Smith, M.Ed. ...............................................Executive Assistant to the President
Virgie B. Morton-Floyd, B.A. … ..............................Administrative Assistant


                                      ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE

Valerie D. Hue, M.B.A.…. ....................................... Vice President for Administration
                                                                              and Finance
Vacant ...................................................................... Business Manager
Gerald Green, B.A. ................................................... Fiscal Analyst
Elizabeth Lee, B.B.A. ............................................... Budget Analyst
Dominique D. Galan. ................................................. Accounts Payable Officer
Quincy Harris, B.A. ................................................... Student Accounts Officer


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Tiffany K. Wright, B.A. ............................................. Bursar
Lutgarda L. Byers. ..................................................... Central Services Officer

Vacant ...................................................................... Director of Human Resources
Vacant ....................................................................... Staff and Employment Development
                                                                               Specialist
Virgina L. Stewart-Miller, M.B.A. ........................ Director of Information Technology
Jonathan Taylor ......................................................... Programmer/Analyst
William Van Benthuysen, B.S.C.S. .......................... Senior Systems Analyst
Josh P. Ronsen ........................................................... Distance Learning Technician
Janice F. Jean, B.S. ................................................... Help Desk Technician
Lonnie C. Wormley .................................................. Webmaster/System Support Technician

Jerry G. Lowery, M.A. ........................................... Director of Facilities Management

Nick Rios .................................................................. Director of Campus Safety

Stephanie A. Bond Huie, Ph.D. .............................. Director of Institutional Research
                                                                     and Assessment
Elvarina M. Hatcher ................................................ Administrative Assistant



                              INSTITUTIONAL ADVANCEMENT

Vicki B. Minor, B.B.A. .......................................... Vice President for
                                                                             Institutional Advancement
Paul Ervin ................................................................ Administrative Assistant/Office Manager
Linda Y. Jackson, M.B.A. ………………………. Director of Public Relations
Ora B. Wilson, M.Ed. .............................................. Title III Coordinator
Vacant ..................................................................... Director of Alumni Affairs
Sylvan Allen, M.F.P. .............................................. Proposals and Grants Coordinator
Dorca I. Medina .................................................... Director of Development
David R. Adam, B.A. .............................................. Campaign Coordinator
Patricia Bloodworth-Neville ................................... Database Manager




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                          ACADEMIC AND STUDENT AFFAIRS

Lemuel Berry, Jr., Ph.D. ....................................... Provost and Vice President for
                                                                  Academic and Student Affairs
Yesenia I. Arellano, B.B.A. ..................................... Administrative Assistant


COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Joseph Jones, Ph.D. ….. ........................................... Dean of Arts and Sciences
Nancy Byers .............................................................. Administrative Assistant
Janice Sumler-Edmond, Ph.D. ................................... Chair of Humanities and Fine Arts
                                                                           Department
Joseph Jones, Ph.D. ................................................... Chair of Natural Sciences and
                                                                           Mathematics Department
Michael Hirsch, Ph.D. .............................................. Chair of Social and Behavioral
                                                                           Science Department
Judith G. Loredo, Ph.D. ............................................. Chair of Teacher Education and
                                                                           Kinesiology

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY

Steven Edmond, Ph.D. ............................................ Dean of Business and Technology
Juan C. Gonzalez ...................................................... Administrative Assistant
Steven Edmond, Ph.D. .............................................. Chair of Business Administration
                                                                        Department
Allen Johnson, Ph.D. ................................................ Chair of Computer Science Department


ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAMS

Judith G. Loredo, Ph.D. ......................................... Dean of Academic Support Programs
Wayde Frey ............................................................... Administrative Assistant
Marie Harris, Ed.D. ................................................ Coordinator of Academic Advising &
                                                                           Supplemental Instruction
Margarette Norris, B.A. ......................................... Coordinator of Alternative Teacher
                                                                           Certification Program
Helen Gordon ... ......................................................... Administrative Assistant

Janice B. Smith, M.Ed. ........................................... Coordinator of Instructional Technology
                                                                   and Distance Learning

Janice Sumler-Edmond, Ph.D. ............................... Director of the W.E.B. DuBois Honors
                                                            Program




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Huston-Tillotson University                                                                             2006-2008




Patricia Quarterman, M.S.L.S. .............................. Director of Library and Media Services
Deloris C. Harris, M.S.L.M. ...................................... Media Specialist/Curriculum Librarian
Marcia L. Atilano, M.L.S........................................... Public Services Librarian
Carlos W. Pin, M.L.I.S. ............................................ Technical Services Librarian

Katherine Oldmixon, Ph.D. .................................... Director of Writing Across the
                                                               Curriculum Program


ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

Doris Price, Ed.D. .................................................... Dean of Enrollment Management
Sheba Spears, M.Ed. ................................................ Scholarship Coordinator/Office Manager
Erica Wills, B.A. ....................................................... Records Coordinator
Vacant ...................................................................... Admission Counselor/Recruiter&
                                                                              International Student Advisor
Vacant ...................................................................... Admission Counselor/Recruiter
Larry Ulrich, B.A. ..................................................... Admission Counselor/Recruiter

Antonio Holloway, B.B.A. ...................................... Director of Financial Aid
Diane Nuñez, B.A. .................................................... Financial Aid Specialist II
Vacant ....................................................................... Default Prevention Manager

Earnestine J. Strickland, B.A ................................. University Registrar
Alicia Childs, B.A. .................................................... Records Manager

UPWARD BOUND

Gaydelle M. Lang, Ed.D. ........................................ Director of Upward Bound Program
Hillary Williams, B.A. .............................................. Assistant Director of Upward Bound
Vacant ...................................................................... Administrative Assistant
Dora Dubra ................................................................ Coordinator for Data & School Services
Felicia Craig, MA. ..................................................... Bridge Coordinator, Upward Bound
Sedrick Shaw, B.A. ................................................... Academic Advisor, Upward Bound
John Savage, M.A. .................................................... Academic Advisor, Upward Bound

STUDENT AFFAIRS

Yvonne Ortiz-Prince, M.Ed. .................................. Dean of Student Affairs
Theresa Taylor Simmons, B.A. ................................. Administrative Assistant
Donald Brewington, M. Div. .................................... College Chaplain
Dianna Dean, L.V.N. ................................................ College Nurse
Elizabeth Guillory Medina, Ph.D. ......................... Director of Campus Life & First Year
                                                                              Experience
Vacant ...................................................................... Residence Hall Director, B-B
Fran’Cee Brown ....................................................... Residence Hall Director, A-F


                                                       161
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Jacquelyn Brown ....................................................... Lobby Monitor, Residence Life A-F

Vacant ...................................................................... Administrative Assistant

Carrie D. Elliott, M.S.W. ....................................... Director of Campus Support Programs
                                                                  & Counseling
Precious D. Williams, MS.W. .................................. Disability Coordinator

Paul T. Leverington, M.S. ...................................... Director of Career & Graduate
                                                                 Development

ATHLETICS

Eric T. Granryd, M.Ed. .......................................... Director of Athletics
Arick D. Lassiter, M.A. ............................................ Coach, Men’s Soccer
Ronnie C. Kaase ........................................................ Coach, Women’s Volleyball
Kerrie Patterson-Brown, M.Ed. . .............................. Coach, Women’s Basketball
Anthony Walker, B.S. ................................................ Coach, Men’s Basketball
Alvin E. Moore, B.A... ............................................... Coach, Men’s Baseball
Howard Ware ... ........................................................ Coach, Men’s and Women’s Track/
                                                                         Conditioning Coach
Sheila T. Carr, M.Ed. ................................................ Athletic Trainer



                                                  FACULTY
Anaejionu, Paul (1985) Professor, Political Science, B.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at
  Austin.
Aynesworth, Michele (2000) Associate Professor, English; B.A., M.A., University of
  Texas at Austin; M.A., Yale University; Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin.
Baker, Chester A. (2004) Associate Professor, Management; B.B.A., Atlantic Union
  College; M.B.A., Anna Maria College; D.B.A., United States International University.
Budd, Eric (1999) Instructor, Education and Director of Field Experiences; B.A., North
  Central College; M.Ed., University of Texas at Austin.
Berry, Lemuel Jr. (2006) Provost Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs; B.A.,
  Livingstone College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Iowa.
Burnaman, Stephen P.(1999) Associate Professor, Music; B.Music, Stephen F. Austin
  State University; M.M., New England Conservatory of Music; D.M.A., University of
  Texas at Austin.
Davies, Jenefred H. (1983) Associate Professor, Education; B.S., University of
  Oklahoma; M.A. University of Texas at Austin.



                                                        162
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Davis, Vanessa L. (2000) Assistant Professor, History; B.A., Southwestern University;
  M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.
Ebenezer, Jamshi (2005) Instructor, Mathematics; B.B.A., Pondicherry University; M.S.,
  Mathematics, Texas State University.
Edmond, Steven (2002) Professor, International Business and Accounting; B.A.,
  University of Louisiana at Lafayette; M.B.A., Texas Southern University; D.B.A.,
  University of Sarasota.
E-Lotfalian, Ardavan (1990) Professor, Kinesiology; B.A., University of Tehran; M.A.,
  Ph.D., Michigan State University.
Etier, Betty A. (1977) Associate Professor, Kinesiology; B.S., M.A., North Texas State
  University.
Fatehi, Maryam B. (1992) Assistant Professor, Mathematics; B.S., Huston-Tillotson
  College; B.S. Teacher Training College (Tehran); M.S., University for Teacher
  Education (Tehran); M.S., Southwest Texas State University.
Golden, Carolyn (2001) Instructor, Computer Science; B.S., Norfolk State University;
  M.S., Virginia Tech.
Harris, Deloris C. (1982) Assistant Professor, Media Specialist, Library Services; B.S.,
  M.S.L.M., Alabama A & M University.
Hirsch, Michael (2003) Professor, Sociology; B.A., M.A., University of Wisconsin at
  Milwaukee; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.
Hudson, Julie E. (2000) Assistant Professor, English; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of
  Texas at Austin.
Imarhiagbe, Franklin (2005) Associate Professor, Business; B.S., Southern University,
  Baton Rouge, Louisiana; M.B.A., Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi;
  D.B.A., Nova SouthEastern University, Florida.
Johnson, Allen (2003) Assistant Professor, Computer Science; B.S., University of
  Pittsburgh; M.S., Syracuse University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.
Jones Jr., Joseph (2005) Professor, Biology; Morris Brown College; M.S., Northwestern
  University; Ph.D., The Ohio State University.
Kamalvand, Ahmad (1982) Professor, Mathematics; B.S., M.S., University of Texas at
  Austin; M.B.A., St. Edward’s University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.
Kellogg, Robert L. (2001) Associate Professor, Accounting; A.B., Lafayette College;
  LL.B., Yale Law School; M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Rochester.
Kraft, James (2001) Assistant Professor, Philosophy and Religion; B.A., Gonzaga
  University; M.A., Ph.D., Graduate Theological Union.



                                          163
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Loredo, Judith G. (1986) W. Akins Professor, Education; B.A., M.A., M.Ed., Our Lady
  of the Lake University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.
Martin, Rosalee R. (1973) Professor, Sociology; B.A., University of Texas at El Paso;
 M.S.S.W., Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.
McCabe, D. Rozena (2000) Associate Professor, Kinesiology; B.S., Trinity University;
 M.Ed., Stephen F. Austin State University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
Murphy, Debra L. (1997) Associate Professor, Psychology; B.S. University of New
 Mexico; M.P.H., Columbia University; M.S., Ph.D., Texas Christian University.
Murphy, Stanley, O. (1978) Assistant Professor, Political Science, B.A., Huston-Tillotson
 College; M.Ed., Southwest Texas State University.
Oldmixon, Katherine (2001) Assistant Professor, English; B.A., M.A., University of
  Houston; Ph.D, University of Texas.
Peña, Horacio G. (1989) Professor, Spanish; B.A., M.A., National University
  (Nicaragua); Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.
Quarterman, Patricia (1968) Director of Library Services, Assistant Professor; B.S.,
  Savannah State College; M.S.L.S., Atlanta University.
Quinlan, Gloria H. (1998) Associate Professor, Music; B.Mus.Ed., Texas Southern
  University; M.M., Colorado State University; D.M.A., University of Texas at Austin.
Russ, Muchere (2001) Associate Professor, Chemistry; B.S., Howard University; Ph.D.,
  University of Pittsburgh.
Samuels, Lorraine (2005) Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice; B.S., M.B.A., M.S.,
  Ph.D., Prairie View A&M University.
Schwab, Wiley Kathy (1981) Professor, Biology; B.A. Miami University; M.A., Ph.D.,
  University of Texas at Austin.
Scott, Portia (2006) Instructor, Reading and Writing; B.A., M.A., Texas State University.
Shelley, Hershall J. (2005) Assistant Professor, Computer Science; B.S., Texas A&M,
  Prairie View, Tx.; M.S. University of Texas, Austin, Tx; M.S., Southern Methodist
  University, Dallas, Tx; Ph.D. Colorado State University.
Smith, Janice (1999) Assistant Professor, Education; B.S., M.Ed., Mississippi State
  University; M.Ed., University of Houston.
Smith, Sol (2005) Instructor, Reading and Writing; B.A., San Diego State University;
  M.F.A., Goddard College.
Sumler-Edmond, Janice (2002) Professor, History; B.A., M.S., J.D., University of
  California at Los Angeles; Ph.D., Georgetown University.




                                           164
Huston-Tillotson University                                                     2006-2008


Tran, Thai-Doung (2001) Assistant Professor, Mathematics and Computer Science; B.S.,
  University of Ho Chi Minh City; M.S., Asian Institute of Technology; Ph.D.,
  University of Iowa.
Wilson, Ora B. (1967) Title III Coordinator, Assistant Professor, B.S., Huston-Tillotson
  College; M.Ed., Prairie View A & M University.




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8
                                                                                    D
8-12 BIOLOGY CERTIFICATE ....................... 78
                                                                                    Davage-Durden Union Building .......................15
8-12 COMPUTER SCIENCE CERTIFICATE . 80
                                                                                    DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES AND FINE
8-12 ENGLISH LANGUAGE
                                                                                       ARTS .............................................................19
  ART/READING CERTIFICATE ............. 81
                                                                                    Department of Natural Sciences .....................107
8-12 MATHEMATICS CERTIFICATE........... 84
                                                                                    DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES ..46
8-12 PHYSICAL SCIENCE CERTIFICATE
                                                                                    Dickey-Lawless Science Building ....................14
  ...................................................................... 79
                                                                                    discrimination .................................................... 1
A                                                                                   Downs-Jones Library ........................................14
Accounting .................................................... 131                 E
ACCREDITATION ............................................2
                                                                                    EC-4 GENERALIST CERTIFICATE ..........85
Agard-Lovinggood ........................................... 13
                                                                                    Evans Industrial Building .................................15
Allen-Frazier Residence Hall ........................... 14
ALTERNATIVE TEACHER                                                                 F
  CERTIFICATION ..................................... 92
AN 8-12 HISTORY CERTIFICATE ............... 82                                      FACULTY ......................................................160
                                                                                    G
B
                                                                                    Gymnasium.......................................................15
Beard-Burrowes Residence Hall ...................... 14
BOARD OF TRUSTEES ............................... 156                               I
Brown v. Board of Education ........................... 11
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM . 131                                               International Business ..................................132

C                                                                                   J

CALENDARS ...................................................4                      Jackson-Moody Humanities Building ..............14
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES ...... 17                                              JOINT ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES
COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR .............. 147                                             AGREEMENT ..........................................109
Conner-Washington Hall .................................. 15                        JOINT SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE B.S.                                                          PROGRAM .................................................111
  CHEMISTRY MAJOR ............................ 118                                  K
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE BIOLOGY
  MAJOR ..................................................... 113                   King-Seabrook Chapel .....................................14
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE                                                             M
  CRIMINAL JUSTICE MAJOR ................ 49
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE ENGLISH                                                     Management ..................................................131
  MAJOR ........................................................ 22                 Marketing ......................................................132
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE HISTORY                                                     MINOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES ..................42
  MAJOR ....................................................... 31                  O
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE
  MATHEMATICS MAJOR ..................... 125                                       Old Administration Building ............................16
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE MUSIC                                                       P
  MAJOR ........................................................ 37
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE POLITICAL                                                   PHYSICS.........................................................122
  SCIENCE MAJOR ...................................... 54                           Presidents ..........................................................11
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE                                                             T
  PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR ............................. 58
COURSE SEQUENCE FOR THE                                                             TEACHER EDUCATION .............................71
  SOCIOLOGY MAJOR ................................ 64                               THE PRE-LAW MINOR ...............................69
COURSES IN SPANISH ................................... 45




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