Parking Enforcement Plan

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					Parking &
Enforcement Plan
                  London Borough of Hackney
                     Parking & Enforcement Plan


Contents

Foreword

Overview

1          Introduction                            7
           General                                 7
           Issues Summary                          8
           Scope of Work                          10
           Policy Plan Structure                  11

2          Plan Priorities and Objectives         15
           General                                15
           Priorities                             15
           Objectives                             16

3          Customer Satisfaction                  19
           General                                19
           Consultation Strategy                  20
           Customer Focus and Feedback            21

4          Data Management                        23
           General                                23
           Data Collection                        23
           Information Technology                 23

5          Parking Supply and Charges             25
           General                                25
           On-street Supply                       25
           On-street Charges                      27
           Off-street Supply                      28
           Off-street Charges                     29

6          CPZ Strategy                           31
           General                                31
           CPZ Coverage                           31
           Zone Review                            33

7          Parking Permits and Charges            37
           General                                37
           Resident’s Permits                     37
           Visitor Vouchers                       40
                                       1
     Business Permits                                 41
     Essential Community Service Permits              42
     Doctor’s Permits                                 42

8    Estate Parking                                   43
     General                                          43
     Estate Permits and Enforcement                   43

9    Disabled Parking                                 45
     General                                          45
     Disabled Permits                                 45
     Disabled Bays                                    48

10   Enforcement                                      51
     General                                          51
     Contract                                         51
     Partnership Working                              52
     Parking Attendants and Patrols                   52
     Uncontrolled Areas                               53
     Abandoned Vehicles                               53
     Persistent Evaders                               53
     Clamping and Removals                            53
     Funerals                                         53
     Religious Festivals                              54

11   Non-car Modes                                    55
     General                                          55
     Pedal Cycle Parking                              55
     Powered Two-wheel Vehicle Parking                56
     Coach Parking                                    56

12   New Development                                  57
     General                                          57
     London Plan Parking Standards                    57
     Parking Standards Policy                         58

13   Supporting Mechanisms                            59
     General                                          59
     Congestion Charging                              59
     Travel Plan and Sustainable Travel Initiatives   59
     Transport for London Road Network                61
     Parking Finances                                 61
     Internal Communications                          61

14   Policy Recommendations                           63




                                   2
Appendices

Appendix A   Workshops
Appendix B   Benchmarking Exercise                      Available
Appendix C   Policy Inputs                              upon
Appendix D   Blue Badge Scheme: Audit Recommendations   application
Appendix E   London Plan Parking Standards




                              3
Tables and Figures

Table 1.1   Hackney 1991 and 2001 Car Ownership Levels   10
Table 2.1   Hierarchy of Parking Need                    16
Table 5.1   Council Off-street Public Car Parks          28
Table 6.1   Existing Controlled Parking Zones (CPZs)     32

Figure 1.1 Borough Key Plan                              13
Figure 6.1 Existing CPZs                                 35




                                      4
Foreword Councillor Jessica Crowe
Deputy Mayor of Hackney and
Lead Cabinet Member for Environment
I am pleased to introduce Hackney Council’s Parking
Enforcement Plan which was agreed by the Mayor and
Cabinet in January 2005. A great deal of work preparing this
plan was overseen by my predecessor as lead Cabinet
member, and I would like to pay tribute to Cllr Stops for that
work. It is extremely welcome that we have a comprehensive
statement of the Council’s overarching strategic parking policies.

The management and fair allocation of road space has become an increasingly complex
and controversial issue for residents, businesses and visitors to our Borough, as set out in
the Plan. For this reason we engaged in a wide-ranging consultation with councillors,
residents, businesses, interest groups and regional stakeholders before adopting this
Plan, which was revised to take account of comments that we received. I hope that these
debates will continue as we roll out the Operational and Work Plans that will support the
delivery of the policy objectives set out in this Plan.

I want to reiterate - because there is a widespread misunderstanding of this - that the
Council does not use revenue raised from parking charges for anything other than those
prescribed by law under Section 55 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act (RTRA) 1984.
Thanks to this administration’s careful financial management of recent years, the
Council’s finances are now in a sound state, but even if they were not, we could not switch
money from the Parking Account to subsidise the Council’s general expenditure.

We do, however, have a legal obligation under the Road Traffic Reduction Act 1997, to
seek to reduce traffic and its impact on the health, safety and general environment of our
residents. Parking management is a tool that can contribute to this aim. However, the
Council wishes to work with residents - not against them - to help reduce their
dependency on the private car and to encourage alternatives where possible. The aim of
the PEP is to provide a framework for parking that supports economic regeneration
consistent with constraining overall traffic volumes within levels which do not jeopardise
environmental objectives.

We have recently seen a huge expansion in bus service, thanks to London Mayor Ken
Livingstone, and Hackney’s Mayor Jules Pipe is unstinting in his efforts and lobbying to
bring the tube to Hackney. Colleagues in schools and health services are also working to
highlight the health benefits - particularly for children - of more walking and cycling and of
a less polluted environment.

Over the coming year the Council will also be consulting on and approving a wide-ranging
Transportation Strategy, to which the policies set out in the PEP will contribute. I
commend this Plan to all stakeholders and believe that it will greatly assist us to meet our
wider social, environmental and economic objectives as set out in Hackney’s Community
Strategy, Mind the Gap.




Cllr Jessica Crowe
Deputy Mayor of Hackney and Lead Cabinet Member for Environment




                                               5
Overview

The Council is seeking to improve parking conditions in the Borough. To help
achieve this, a Parking and Enforcement Plan (PEP) has been developed to
provide a strong policy framework to guide the Council’s parking management
activities. The overall aim of the PEP is to help support a better and safer
environment for the Borough.

The PEP has three parts: a Policy Plan, an Operational Plan and a Work Plan.
The Policy Plan addresses the why. It identifies the overall policy basis which will
guide the Council’s parking-related decisions and presents a series of policy
recommendations. The Operational Plan addresses the how. It explains how the
Council’s Parking Services, working in partnership with its Stakeholders, will
implement these policies. The Work Plan addresses the when and by whom. It
identifies a range of parking activities over the short to medium term, up to the
2006/07 financial year.

Policy recommendations in the PEP Policy Plan are based on prioritising clearly
identified parking needs, such as the needs of people with disabilities, local
residents and local businesses. This helps to manage parking in the Borough on a
fair and consistent basis.

Meeting the objectives in the PEP Policy Plan requires robust, accurate parking
data to help inform the decision-making process. A key policy recommendation,
therefore, is the development of a data management strategy to collect local
parking supply and demand data which is supported by the best use of information
technology (IT).




                                          6
1         Introduction


General
1.1       The Council is seeking to develop and implement a Parking and
          Enforcement Plan (PEP) for the Borough. The PEP is intended to
          replace the previous Borough Parking Plan (1999 – 2002), which has
          now elapsed.

1.2       The PEP will provide the policy framework for effective parking
          management, which is supportive of strategic objectives for integrated
          land use and transport planning, environment, social inclusion,
          economic prosperity and regeneration: all ingredients of sustainable
          development.

1.3       A PEP is a clear policy requirement set out in the Mayor of London’s
          Transport Strategy (July 2001). Proposal 4G.17 of the Transport
          Strategy requires London boroughs to submit a PEP as an integral part
          of their Local Implementation Plan (LIP). A PEP is expected to fully
          reflect the objectives of the Transport Strategy and, in particular:

          •     be comprehensive, including consideration of parking provision,
                charging regimes, on-street controls and parking standards;

          •     be co-ordinated and compatible with surrounding authorities;

          •     provide a clear strategy for effective enforcement;

          •     support the economic viability of town centres, whilst reducing the
                overall availability of long-stay parking;

          •     ensure that the needs of disabled people, motorcycles, buses,
                coaches, business and freight are taken into account, along with
                loading and signing issues in relation to parking; and

          •     demonstrate how the provision, location, safety and security of
                public car parks will deliver the objectives of the strategy.

1.4       The scope of the PEP is necessarily broad, in part reflecting the
          complex and challenging linkages between parking and transport,
          environmental, economic and planning issues.

1.5       The PEP is an over-arching strategic policy tool which will be integral to
          the Council’s review of its current Unitary Development Plan (UDP),
          which was adopted in June 1995. This provides the opportunity to
          develop a coordinated and systematic parking policy approach, with
          clear linkages between the emerging Local Development Framework
          (LDF) and the PEP.

1.6       The importance of complementary parking policies between the
          emerging LDF (formerly UDP) and PEP is recognised in the Mayor of
          London’s London Plan (February 2004), which states that an,
          ‘integrated approach is needed in boroughs’ parking policies in UDPs,

                                         7
        in exercising their development control functions, and in boroughs’
        transport Local Implementation Plans’ (3.210).

1.7     The PEP is intended to make recommendations for the future direction
        of parking policies in the Borough. The main outputs of the PEP will be
        proposals for parking that support economic regeneration consistent
        with constraining overall traffic volumes within levels which do not
        jeopardise environmental objectives. The PEP needs to balance all
        parking needs and demonstrate how they may be met against clear
        policy objectives and indicate supporting measures that the Council can
        take.

1.8     The PEP comprises three elements as follows:

        •   Policy Plan;

        •   Operational Plan; and

        •   Work Plan.

1.9     This document presents the Council’s PEP Policy Plan, which gives
        clear policy recommendations for the effective management of parking
        in the Borough. Both the Operational and (five year) Work Plans are
        presented in separate, supporting documents.


Issues Summary
1.10    The PEP needs to address various challenging parking-related issues
        which are currently experienced in the Borough. These challenges stem
        largely from the fact that Hackney is a diverse Borough undergoing
        change. A Key Plan of the Borough is provided in Figure 1.1 (at the
        end of this section) for information.

1.11    The Borough’s population is increasing. Over the last decade the
        population has grown from approximately 180,000 (1991 Census) to
        just over 200,000 (2001 Census). The Borough’s average household
        size (2.34 people/household) is close to the national average (2.36
        people/household), according to the 2001 Census. The Borough is
        densely populated and is formed by a complex network of Victorian
        streets.

1.12    To the south, the Borough is bordered by the City of London and the
        nearby City fringe area; the Bethnal Green area of London Borough of
        Tower Hamlets and Victoria Park. To the east, the Borough is bordered
        by Hackney Marshes and the Lower Lee Valley. To the north the
        Borough is bordered by the South Tottenham area of the London
        Borough of Haringey and Finsbury Park. To the west, the Borough is
        bordered by both the Highbury and Canonbury areas of the London
        Borough of Islington.

1.13    The Borough falls within the defined East London sub-region, as
        defined in the London Plan. Large parts of the Borough are identified as
        Areas for Regeneration. In addition, two Opportunity Areas,
                                      8
       Bishopsgate/South Shoreditch and Stratford, border the Borough to the
       south and east respectively, for which clear targets have been set for
       growth in jobs and new homes.

1.14   The Borough exhibits both Inner and Outer London characteristics. The
       southern part of the Borough falls within the City Fringe and borders the
       Congestion Charging Scheme (CCS) Inner Ring Road charging zone
       boundary. Here public transport accessibility levels are generally high,
       but so too is the demand for commuter parking around mainline rail and
       underground stations and major bus interchanges.

1.15   To the north and east of the Borough conditions are more typical of
       Outer London, with lower population and employment densities. Here
       rail networks (overground and underground) are less dense, increasing
       the importance of the local bus network.

1.16   The Borough has recently benefited from the introduction of a number
       of new and extended bus routes. A total of 16 new and extended bus
       routes, including three night buses, have been implemented.

1.17   Whilst social exclusion and multiple deprivations persist in parts of the
       Borough, where sustained renewal is urgently needed, other
       neighbourhoods are undergoing widespread gentrification. Increases in
       population and higher car ownership levels mean that parking demand
       will continue to grow. This socio-economic polarisation is a particular
       challenge facing the Borough, as recognised in the Council’s
       Community Strategy Discussion Paper, The Future of Hackney
       (September 2003).

1.18   Car ownership information for both 1991 and 2001 for the London
       Borough of Hackney is summarised in Table 1.1 below for information.

1.19   The Census results for the last two decades indicate that the level of
       car ownership has increased in the Borough over time. In 1991
       approximately 62% of Borough households did not own a car. By 2001
       this figure had fallen to 56%. An increase in multiple car ownership is
       also evident in Table 1.1. Relative to other inner London boroughs, let
       alone outer London boroughs, Hackney’s car ownership levels are low.
       For example, approximately 51% and 29% of households in inner and
       outer London respectively do not own a car.

1.20   Local evening and night time economies are expanding in particular
       areas, notably Shoreditch, Hoxton and the Hackney Cultural Quarter.
       This growth can exacerbate on-street parking conflicts between local
       residents and visitors to these vibrant areas.




                                     9
Table 1.1 Hackney 1991 and 2001 Car Ownership Levels

         No. Cars/Vans No.% Hackney Households by Car Ownership
                       and Year
         per Household 1991                                   2001
                              No.                %            No.               %
         0                    46,674             61.7         48,219            56.1
         1 (1)                23,878             31.6         31,876            37.0
         2                    4,422              5.8          5,018             5.8
         3                    657                0.9          689               0.8
         4+                   -                  -            240               0.3
         All                  75,631             100.0        86,042            100.0
         (Source: Local Area Statistics from 1991 and 2001 Census, www.hackney.gov.uk)

             1. 1991 data available for 0 to 3+ cars/vans per household only.

1.21     The PEP takes on board the diverse range of both internal and external
         challenges to the Borough, particularly the need to balance economic,
         social and environmental objectives. The growing demands for car
         ownership and access within the Borough threaten air quality objectives
         and undermine the maintenance of a safe and efficient road network.
         Change is the main challenge facing Hackney and this will place an
         increasing emphasis on the need for effective parking management to
         resolve potential policy and practical conflicts.


Scope of Work
1.22     The PEP is a strategic policy instrument, with a firm basis in transport
         policy, which sets out in a clear and transparent way in which parking
         management within the Borough will progress over the coming years.

1.23     There are a number of key parking issues which are addressed in the
         PEP. The PEP will:

         •       provide a clear framework for the possible expansion of CPZs
                 within the Borough;

         •       take into account planning, land use and transportation issues;

         •       ensure that a clear parking enforcement strategy is developed and
                 that it is reflected within the new Parking Enforcement Contract
                 (PEC) - commenced September 2004. This will also include
                 possible parking enforcement on housing estates which will allow
                 the Council to provide a seamless parking service as well as
                 exploiting operational synergies to support an efficient and effective
                 enforcement function;

         •       ensure that a clear framework which addresses parking for
                 disabled persons within the Borough, as well as mechanisms for
                 dealing with fraud of the Blue Badge Scheme;
                                            10
          •    ensure that the PEP is consistent with the Council’s overarching
               strategic policies and strengthens linkages with the cross cutting
               services, for example Streetscene – in targeting abandoned and
               untaxed vehicles and allowing access to street cleansing and
               refuse vehicles; and Enforcement Strategy;

          •    develop a coherent and transparent policy for different types of
               parking permits, including; rational underpinning of the pricing
               structure of permits; criteria for dispensations; waivers and
               suspensions; and

          •    sets out short, medium and long term action points for parking
               within the Borough over the coming years and will include data
               collection and management to establish a clearer understanding of
               supply and demand issues at local area level. This allows major
               changes to be made after adequate review against observed
               parking patterns of demand.

1.24      The PEP is sufficiently flexible and robust to evolve and adapt to
          incorporate and address new parking issues, as and when they occur.
          The PEP sets out a positive, ambitious vision for the Council’s Parking
          Service as the premier service shaping best practice in the field of
          parking management in London.

1.25      The PEP will form one (albeit important) element of the Council’s wider
          traffic and transportation policies, which together have the common
          aims of reducing the need to travel by private car, improving alternative
          travel modes, whilst supporting initiatives to increase economic activity
          and community and environmental regeneration throughout the
          Borough. It is recognised that PEP parking initiatives in isolation are
          insufficient to achieve wider transport, environmental, social and
          economic benefits and must be assisted by a range of supporting
          mechanisms. This highlights the need for the integration of the PEP
          with LIP and UDP as the Borough’s integrated transport strategy.


Policy Plan Structure
1.26      The Policy Plan provides the strategic policy framework for the PEP
          and presents a series of policy recommendations to guide the overall
          direction of parking management in the Borough.

1.27      Following this introductory section, Section 2 identifies the PEP
          priorities and objectives, followed by customer satisfaction, including
          consultations (Section 3).

1.28      Good parking management is underpinned by robust parking data and
          information technology and informs the decision-making process.
          Section 4 describes the policy with regard to data collection and
          management.




                                        11
1.29      The main body of this document presents policy recommendations for a
          range of parking management topic areas, comprising: on & off-street
          parking supply and charges (Section 5); the Council’s CPZ Strategy
          (Section 6); parking permits and charges (Section 7); estate parking
          (section 8); disabled parking, including Blue Badges (Section 9);
          parking enforcement (Section 10); non-car modes such as cycles,
          powered two-wheel vehicles and coaches (Section 11); parking
          guidelines for new developments (Section 12).

1.30      Supporting policy mechanisms, such as the Congestion Charging
          Scheme, travel plan initiatives and the management of the Transport for
          London Road Network (TLRN) or Red Routes are discussed in Section
          13.

Workshops
1.31    A series of PEP workshops were held in September 2003 to assist in
        an issue identification process. The main purpose of the PEP
        workshops was to help understand the Council’s current parking
        management practice; identify problems (and opportunities); review
        issues at a more detailed level and assist in general ‘fact finding’. In
        addition, the workshops provided the opportunity to identify future
        aspirations and direction for the Council. PEP workshop minutes and a
        summary note of the PEP workshop discussions are included in full at
        Appendix A for information.

1.32      The following workshops were held (in alphabetical order):

           •    Communications;
           •    Corporate Centre;
           •    Housing;
           •    Parking Function;
           •    Planning;
           •    Social Services; and
           •    Transportation.

Benchmarking
1.33    The Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy makes clear the importance
        of co-ordination and compatibility with surrounding authorities. This
        highlights the important role of benchmarking the Council’s parking
        service against other London boroughs, especially neighbouring and
        other comparable boroughs.

1.34      A bespoke pro-forma was developed for the purposes of the
          benchmarking exercise. Parking officers at each of the 33 London
          boroughs (including Hackney) were identified and contacted. The
          benchmarking exercise output is included in full at Appendix B.




                                       12
13
14
2            Plan Priorities and Objectives


General
2.1          The Policy Plan provides the basis for a strongly policy-led PEP, which
             reflects parking policies across the national, regional, London-wide and
             local policy tiers. The PEP Policy Plan will be reviewed in order to keep
             up to date with relevant emerging policies and best practice. Details of
             key parking policies are included at Appendix C for information.

2.2          Parking management can influence how and when people travel by car
             and other transport modes and, therefore, affects a wide range of
             people, organisations and places in Hackney. Parking policies, from
             national to local level, seek to restrain unnecessary private car travel,
             especially for local trips within the Borough, and encourage sustainable
             travel choices, such as public transport, walking and cycling.

2.3          Transport for London (TfL) is responsible for the Transport for London
             Road Network (TLRN), or Red Routes, including the A10 (amongst
             others), which runs north/south across the Borough. The Council is
             responsible for all other public streets in the Borough.

2.4          The supply, location and pricing of parking can influence travel choice,
             including car use and, ultimately, car ownership. Parking policies are
             generally used to reduce unnecessary car trips, for example by
             deterring long-stay commuter parking in town centre areas with good
             public transport accessibility, such as Hackney Central and Dalston.

2.5          Parking policies therefore can help achieve the Council’s traffic
             reduction targets, as well as National Air Quality Strategy objectives to
             reduce vehicle emissions and improve local air quality in the Borough.
             The Council also aims to provide for short-stay shopper and other
             visitor parking in the Borough’s main retail areas to support town centre
             regeneration initiatives.

2.6          This section sets out both the priorities and objectives of the PEP Policy
             Plan.


Priorities
2.7          It can be helpful to define a clear hierarchy of parking need for the
             Borough to assist overall parking management and prioritisation. This
             can be from both a road user and vehicle type perspective, as shown in
             Table 2.1 overleaf.

2.8          A clearly defined hierarchy of parking need helps to balance the use of
             street space in the Borough and create a safe and pleasant street
             scene. Parking management should take specific account of pedestrian
             needs and access as a priority and generally improve the walking
             environment.



                                           15
Table 2.1 Hierarchy of Parking Need

          Hierarchy Type Priority
          Road User           • local disabled resident parking need
                              • non-local disabled parking need
                              • local resident parking need
                              • essential worker in the delivery of public service
                              • local business essential parking/servicing need
                              • short-stay shopper/visitor parking need
                              • long-stay shopper/visitor parking need
                              • long-stay commuter parking need
          Vehicle Type        • emergency vehicle
                              • pedal cycle
                              • bus
                              • public service vehicle
                              • delivery vehicles/lorries and vans
                              • powered two-wheeler
                              • taxi
                              • shared/pool car
                              • cleaner/greener private car
                              • conventional private car

Objectives
2.9      This section identifies both Strategic Objectives and Parking Objectives
         to provide a robust policy framework for the PEP. The Strategic
         Objectives are drawn from strategic policy guidance, as well as over-
         arching themes from the Council’s emerging Community Strategy (see
         Appendix C), and will deliver high-level strategic policies in relation to
         the broader transport environment. The Parking Objectives are more
         specific and provide guidance for parking management in the Borough.

         Strategic Objectives:
2.10     The six PEP Strategic Objectives (S1 to S6) are:

         S1   Support strong, diverse and sustainable economic growth and job
              creation, and locate new development where it can be readily
              accessed by non-car travel modes.

         S2   Reduce the need to travel, especially by car, and encourage more
              sustainable patterns of travel.

         S3   Manage overall traffic levels in the Borough to reduce traffic
              congestion and realise environmental and safety benefits.



                                       16
       S4   Encourage the development of an efficient and effective transport
            system which maximises economic development opportunities.

       S5   Promote the social and economic revitalisation and regeneration
            of the Borough’s existing town centres by improving accessibility
            for all modes of travel.

       S6   Deliver an integrated transport policy which supports community
            opportunity, inclusion and equity by improving access to jobs and
            services for all, in accordance with clearly identified priorities.

       Parking Objectives
2.11   The twenty PEP Parking Objectives (P1 to P20) are:

2.12   The Council should meet the needs of all road users by:

       P1   Managing the overall parking supply and demand to allocate
            space in accordance with policy principles based on transparent
            assessment of needs and priorities.

       P2   Recognising the needs of disabled people and providing
            conveniently located and effectively enforced parking to enable
            easy access to activities and facilities.

       P3   Ensuring that parking management is supportive of road safety
            initiatives (especially for pedestrians, cyclists and other vulnerable
            road users), including Safer Routes to School initiatives and
            emergency access requirements.

       P4   Supporting the legitimate parking and loading requirements of
            businesses, taking into account commercial needs for delivery and
            servicing movements and the opportunity for changing delivery
            schedules and vehicle sizes.

       P5   Ensuring that parking management is supportive of the safe and
            efficient operation of the public transport network in the Borough.

2.13   The Council should support effective parking management by:

       P6   Coordinating the management (including charging) of on- and off-
            street parking to ensure a comprehensive and complementary
            approach.

       P7   Giving priority to short-stay shopper/visitor parking over long-stay
            commuter parking, to complement policies to encourage town
            centre vitality and discourage inter and intra Borough car trips.

       P8   Allocating parking permits with clear conditions of use based on
            transparent and consistent principles, which give priority in
            accordance with the defined hierarchy of parking need.

       P9   Regularly collecting parking data and monitoring changes in the
            parking stock to inform parking management activities.
                                      17
       P10 Maximising the potential of the Council’s information technology
           (IT) to support an effective and efficient parking management
           operation.

2.14   The Council should seek to improve sustainable access by:

       P11 Providing secure and conveniently located cycle parking,
           especially in areas of high demand.

       P12 Providing adequate powered two-wheel vehicle parking, especially
           in areas of high demand.

       P13 Setting car parking standards for new development as maxima in
           accordance with the London Plan standards, taking into account
           the relative levels of public transport accessibility across the
           Borough.

       P14 Ensuring that parking management is supportive of sustainable
           travel initiatives, such as travel plans, car clubs and car free
           development.

2.15   The Council should meet environmental objectives by:

       P15 Ensuring that parking management complements the Council’s
           transport policies, having regard to the Council’s ability to meet
           road traffic reduction targets for the Borough and to reduce
           unnecessary car travel.

       P16 Supplying and locating parking spaces and set parking charges,
           having regard to the Council’s ability to meet air quality and other
           environmental objectives for the Borough.

       P17 Ensuring that parking management is supportive of local
           environmental improvement initiatives, including the Council’s
           Streetscene initiative.

2.16   The Council should focus on Customer needs by:

       P18 Ensuring an efficient, robust and customer-friendly parking permit
           system which effectively tackles permit fraud, especially in relation
           to the Blue Badge Scheme.

       P19 Ensuring an effective and fair (i.e. consistent) enforcement
           operation to maximise compliance with the Borough’s parking
           regulations.

       P20 Consulting and communicating with both internal and external
           stakeholders to inform cross-cutting parking management issues.




                                     18
3         Customer Satisfaction


General
3.1       To improve consultation is not only a Council aspiration; it is also a
          statutory requirement. Consultation operates at a number of levels,
          from informing people to partnership in decision-making.

3.2       The Council recognises the importance of involving its citizens and key
          stakeholders in mapping out the future of the Borough. One of the
          Council’s three key objectives set out in the Corporate Plan 2003 –
          2006 is:

          •   Involving the public in what we are doing to get better.

3.3       The Council can achieve this through:

          •   Improving consultation;

          •   Making it easier to find out about Council services; and

          •   Dealing with service requests promptly and efficiently.

3.4       Hackney’s Community Strategy Discussion Paper, The Future of
          Hackney, sets out the Council’s commitment to ‘open and honest’
          consultation. The paper states that:

          In order to ensure our consultation is of the highest quality we will:

          1. Say what we are consulting on and why;

          2. Say who we are consulting;

          3. Say how we will consult;

          4. Tell people about the consultation;

          5. Use the results; and

          6. Be inclusive.

3.5       This commitment is enshrined in Hackney’s Public Consultation
          Charter, which is contained in draft form in the Council’s Consultation
          and Public Information Strategy (Part 3). The Charter is built around the
          six standards identified above. Meaningful consultation is about seeking
          the public’s views, not simply asking for ticks in boxes.

3.6       This section examines both the contribution of the Council’s
          Consultation Strategy and the importance of customer focus and
          feedback to delivering a better Parking Service for the Borough.




                                         19
3.7      In order to ensure continuity in communication with key stakeholders,
         Parking Services will make provision to facilitate a Quarterly or Half
         Yearly ‘Parking Forum’ enabling any issues to be raised, ensuring
         timely responses and interaction by Parking Services.


Consultation Strategy
          Issues
3.8      The Council’s October 2003 Issues Paper from the Director of
         Environment for the PEP identifies a number of consultation-related
         issues. This paper highlights the importance of making a clear
         distinction between a public referendum and a public consultation
         exercise and raises the question of whether the introduction of new
         CPZs should be a referendum issue or not.

3.9      The difference lies in the level of influence residents have on deciding
         matters, such as parking, in their local areas. With consultation
         exercises, responses from residents are only one part of the process of
         policy formulation. Although it is a crucial part, other aspects are
         considered, such as cost and environmental impacts. Within a
         referendum framework, residents have a clear veto.

3.10     Consultation response rates are discussed in the paper. It is not
         uncommon for the Council’s public consultation exercises to yield an
         overall response rate of under 10%, with many of the participants either
         strongly supportive or strongly opposed to the proposals.

         Policy Mechanisms
3.11     The Council has appointed a Public Consultation Officer within the
         Communications Team to help deliver best practice consultation in the
         Borough. Parking Services is working closely with Corporate
         Communications to meet the standards set out in the Consultation
         Charter, for example through the development of a CPZ Consultation
         Strategy. This includes both Stage One (In Principle Consultation) and
         Stage Two (Detailed Design Consultation) elements.

3.12     Stage One (In Principle Consultation) is an initial consultation exercise
         to gauge the level of public support for new parking controls from the
         local community. A number of consultation tools are available,
         including:

         •   20% doorstep surveys with both residents and businesses;

         •   Public consultation leaflet drop, including questionnaires;

         •   Translation provision;

         •   The use of Hackney Today to ensure a high level of awareness;
             and

         •   Local Ward Member consultation.



                                       20
3.13    The 20% doorstep surveys are designed as a quality control
        mechanism to specifically increase the response rate and increase
        community awareness of an on-going consultation exercise.

3.14    Through the Stage One (In Principle Consultation) process the Council
        will have ensured that local needs are taken into account before any
        decision is made.

3.15    Stage Two (Detailed Design Consultation) addresses specifics such as
        operational hours and days and the allocation of road space and
        parking bays, rather than re-visiting the in principle stage. The above
        consultation tools are used, in addition to local public exhibitions staffed
        by Council officers.

3.16    The Council should ensure that the issue of displaced parking is fully
        and transparently addressed in any CPZ consultation. New parking
        controls invariably result in displaced on-street parking activity to
        adjacent uncontrolled streets. Local residents and businesses in these
        adjacent areas (or ‘buffer zones’) should be kept fully informed of
        possible parking displacement effects.

3.17    After Stage Three (Implementation), the Stage Four (Review) process
        takes place. This is looked at under customer focus and feedback
        below.

3.18    The future potential of on-line public consultations via the Internet is
        also recognised.


Customer Focus and Feedback
         Issues
3.19    Customer focus and feedback channels are very important means of
        communication between the Council and the Borough’s diverse
        communities. They provide means of disseminating and receiving
        information and to help identify public views on the Council’s services.

3.20    Current means of obtaining public feedback are through letters, email
        via the Council’s website, phone contact and ‘mystery shopper’
        exercises by phone. The Council disseminates information via its
        website and newspaper, Hackney Today.

        Policy Mechanisms
3.21    The Council recognises the importance of improved communications
        and is currently preparing a Communications Strategy for the
        Environment Directorate. This Strategy aims to put in place a proactive
        system to help deal with various communications issues, such as bad
        press. The Strategy also highlights the importance of parking
        consultation and the need to allocate a budget for it.




                                       21
3.22   The Council proposes to carry out a review one year after a new CPZ
       has been implemented to obtain customer feedback. The findings of
       each review process will be presented to the CPZ Implementation
       Project Board (see para. 6.11). The review will encompass the
       consultation, design and implementation stages of the CPZ. The
       Council also proposes to undertake a review of all CPZs in the Borough
       on a three yearly basis.

3.23   The use of periodic customer satisfaction surveys and the provision of
       customer feedback forms, e.g. at the councils parking shop are useful
       tools to obtain customer feedback.

3.24   In addition, the Council should consider ways of improving customer
       access to its parking services, such as extending the parking Shop
       Opening times and maximizing the potential of e-government via the
       internet.




                                    22
4         Data Management


General
4.1       Data management is essential to the operation of an effective parking
          management system. Systematic and robust data collection enables
          resources to be effectively targeted, interventions (e.g. the introduction
          of new parking controls) to be justified and the outputs of any policy or
          operational change to be monitored and assessed.

4.2       As a priority, the Council is seeking to develop and implement a data
          management strategy to guide parking management in the Borough
          and inform the decision-making process. This section briefly examines
          the roles of both data collection and information technology.


Data Collection
          Issues
4.3       The Council does not currently undertake a programme of systematic
          data collection to monitor the use of both on-street and publicly-
          available parking in the Borough. As a result, there is limited data
          available on parking supply and demand in Hackney.

          Policy Mechanisms
4.4       The collection of information on parking supply and demand at the local
          area level is essential and informs parking management decisions, e.g.
          the identification of parking stress areas in the Borough.

4.5       There is a clear need for a comprehensive annual parking survey
          programme to obtain accurate parking supply and demand data for the
          Borough. Parking survey requirements are detailed in the Operational
          Plan.


Information Technology
          Issues
4.6       The availability of up-to-date, accurate and usable parking data for the
          Borough is essential for effective parking management. The use of
          current and future information technology (IT) systems, to their full
          capabilities, is vital to maximise the potential of this parking data.

4.7       The Council is developing a Corporate IT Strategy, which is currently in
          draft format. This emerging strategy will help realise the full potential of
          the Council’s IT systems, such as Geographical Information Systems
          (GIS), the ParkMap system, close circuit television (CCTV) systems
          and Internet services. The importance of compatible, integrated IT
          systems is recognised here.




                                         23
        Policy Mechanisms
4.8    The best use of IT is essential to maximise customer access to the
       Council’s parking services. In order to realise this potential, the Council
       is investigating options for the outsourcing of a 24/7 payment line, to
       enable customers to pay Penalty Charge Notices (PCNs) at any time.

4.9    In the longer term, as effective e-government systems are put in place,
       the Council’s parking services can be accessed via the Internet, e.g.
       on-line public consultations, parking permit renewals and general
       parking information for the Borough. Camden’s Parking Solutions
       website provides one-stop solutions for people parking in the borough
       and is an example of best practice in this field (see
       http://www.camden.gov.uk/parking/index.html).

       Policy Recommendations
4.10   It is recommended that:

          •   The Council should employ CCTV and traffic management
              enforcement cameras to assist parking enforcement in the
              Borough.

          P-DM1



          •   The Council should investigate the future potential of an on-line
              one-stop shop for parking on the Council’s website to meet
              customers’ needs and promote effective consultation through e-
              government.

          P-DM2




                                      24
5         Parking Supply and Charges


General
5.1       Parking supply, especially on-street road side space, is limited and
          under increasing pressure as car ownership (and multiple car
          ownership) grows in the Borough. An effective parking policy framework
          is therefore essential in order to manage potentially competing and
          intensifying parking demands in the Borough.

5.2       Charging policies for both on- and off-street parking can significantly
          influence parking demand, parking space turnover and, ultimately, car
          use and ownership. Parking charges are also a highly sensitive subject
          and are often the result of political judgment, rather than being the
          outcome of defined pricing criteria.

5.3       This section examines the coordinated management and charging of
          both on- and off-street parking supply in the Borough.


On-street Supply
           Issues
5.4       Approximately one half of the Borough’s area is presently controlled,
          i.e. has a Controlled Parking Zone (CPZ) in place (CPZs are discussed
          further in Section 6). Outside of these CPZs, generally in the
          uncontrolled areas to the north and east of the Borough, only limited
          lengths of kerbside waiting and loading restrictions or yellow lines are in
          place on-street.

5.5       The Council is actively introducing new parking controls at junctions on
          the Borough’s road network. These parking controls make the junctions
          safer for vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians and cyclists, as
          well as drivers. They also keep junctions on bus routes free from
          obstruction and delay.

5.6       Where the Council has introduced CPZs, different types of on-street
          parking bays are put in place (e.g. resident’s bays, business permit
          bays, pay and display bays and shared use bays) to meet specific local
          parking needs.

5.7       Shared use bays can be introduced in CPZs to meet a range of local
          parking needs. These bays can be used by any parking permit holder
          and also offer pay and display parking for visitors. Shared use bays are
          therefore a flexible form of parking suitable for areas with competing
          on-street parking demands.

5.8       However, in some parts of the Borough, especially outside public
          buildings (e.g. Hackney Town Hall) long-stay parking activity by parking
          permit holders in shared use bays reduces the availability of short-stay
          and pay and display parking. In these circumstances there is a need for
          pay and display only bays to meet short-stay on-street parking
          demands.
                                         25
5.9    In parts of the Borough footway parking currently takes place. In these
       areas parked vehicles dominate the street scene and can cause
       obstruction to other road users, such as parents with push chairs and
       disabled people. This contravenes the Highway Code, which requires
       drivers to show consideration for all road users.

5.10   The problem of footway parking was highlighted in the House of
       Commons Environment, Transport and Regional Affairs. Eleventh
       Report entitled Walking in Towns and Cities, printed in May 2001. This
       Parliamentary Select Committee Report states (75):

       Parking on the pavement is a serious and growing problem, especially
       outside London (in the capital it is illegal, elsewhere it is not). It blocks
       the way of parents pushing buggies and of elderly and disabled people
       in wheel chairs and electric carts.[125] The pavement surface is soiled
       by oil stains and broken by the weight of vehicles, leading to an uglier
       walking environment and an increased risk of trips and falls. Moreover,
       tolerance of it symbolises the widespread assumption that the car driver
       is king and encourages contempt for pedestrians. It indicates that all
       public space, pavements as well as roads, belongs to the motorist.

5.11   Footway parking is not permitted in London under Section 15 of the
       Greater London Council (General Powers) Act, 1974. Exceptions are in
       designated streets for which Traffic Management Orders (TMOs) are
       published that regulate such activity. There is very limited designated
       footway parking across the Borough.

5.12   On-street disabled parking policy is specifically examined in Section 9.
       On-street powered two-wheel vehicle and cycle parking policies are
       examined in Section 11.

       Policy Mechanisms
5.13   As competing parking demands intensify and conflict, the need for
       skilled and effective on-street parking management based on clearly
       defined priorities increases. It is essential that this management
       process is guided by a firm understanding of variations in on-street
       parking supply and demand across the Borough.

5.14   The designation or allocation of on-street road side space therefore
       needs to accord with the parking need hierarchy set out in Section 2
       (see Table 2.1).

5.15   The Council can vary the supply, location and charging of on-street
       kerb side space to both encourage or discourage specific parking
       demands, e.g. giving priority to short stay shopper/visitor parking in the
       Borough’s main town centres of Hackney Central, Dalston and Stoke
       Newington to support the local retail economy.

5.16   Footway parking results in higher maintenance costs for the Council.
       Footways are not designed to take the weight of motor vehicles and, as
       such, damage to the pavement can occur. Transport policies
       emphasise the need to prioritise pedestrians, reduce the dominance of
       the car and, in doing so, improve the street environment. The Council

                                       26
         should therefore minimise footway parking in the Borough to ensure
         that local pedestrian access and amenity is not adversely affected.

5.17     The Council should review on-street parking supply in a clear,
         consistent and transparent manner. This review process should be
         informed by robust data generated by the data management strategy,
         as well as local consultation. The review process is important to identify
         local parking supply and demand and, in doing so, help to meet and
         manage local on-street parking needs.

         Policy Recommendation
         It is recommended that:

            •   The Council review the extent of footway parking within the
                borough, identifying any exempt roads. An enforcement plan to
                address the issue would need to be agreed and appropriate
                enforcement action applied.

            P-PS1


On-street Charges
         Issues
5.18     The Council’s current on-street pay and display charges vary by zone
         and maximum length of stay, with charges highest close to the City
         fringe. The Council’s charges are generally in line with other London
         boroughs, as shown by the benchmarking exercise (see Appendix B).

         Policy Mechanisms
5.19     The Council’s current on-street pay and display charges structure
         establishes the principle of variation in parking charges across the
         Borough to reflect local parking conditions.

5.20     Pay and display charges should reflect local on-street parking demand
         and turnover of spaces. Where demand for short-stay parking is high
         (e.g. around busy shopping areas and public buildings), the pricing
         mechanism (in parallel with the maximum length of stay) should be
         used to encourage rapid turnover of spaces.

5.21     To measure the accuracy of parking charges levied in any geographical
         area, occupancy levels should be monitored to assess whether they
         exceed 85%. Occupancy levels greater or less than 85% may indicate
         that a review of the charges is required.




                                       27
         Policy Recommendations
5.22     It is recommended that:

            •  The Council should undertake a comprehensive and coordinated
               review of on-street pay and display charges, informed by output
               from the data management strategy. Any decision for variable
               charges to be introduced should be weighted against demand
               within the locality, be subject to justification and reviewed to
               measure effectiveness.
            P-PS2

Off-street Supply
           Issues
5.23      Publicly available off-street parking is an important element of the total
          parking stock and, similarly to on-street provision, its availability
          influences the overall number of car trips. The management of off-street
          car parks can therefore be an important tool in discouraging non-
          essential car-based trips, such as commuter journeys, where there are
          alternative and more sustainable travel choices realistically available.

5.24      The Council owns a limited number of small publicly-available off-street
          car parks in the Borough, located in Hackney, Dalston and Stoke
          Newington town centres. Details of these are shown in Table 5.1 below
          for information.


Table 5.1 Council Off-street Public Car Parks

          Town Centre              Location                 No. Spaces
          Hackney                  Amhurst Road             25
          Dalston                  Gillett Street           74
          Dalston                  Bentley Road             109
          Stoke Newington          Wilmer Place             34
          Total                    -                        242


5.25      The Councils four car parks are open from 7.00am to 7.00pm Monday
          to Saturday, with all day stay permitted in all car parks, except Gillett
          Street, Dalston, where a two hour maximum stay applies.

5.26      There are a number of privately-operated public off-street car parks in
          the Borough. A number of these (mainly National Car Parks Ltd or NCP
          sites) are located in the City fringe area. Given their location, these car
          parks are likely to serve a commuter market for nearby employment
          uses. The Council’s previous Parking Plan (1999 – 2002) estimated
          that there were approximately 800 spaces in the Borough’s privately-
          operated, publicly-available off-street car parks.




                                         28
5.27      There are also a number of temporary car parks, especially towards the
          south of the Borough close to the Congestion Charge Scheme (CCS)
          boundary. TfL is currently funding a study to review all off-street car
          parks in the south of the Borough, close to the CCS boundary, to
          identify authorised and unauthorised facilities.

5.28      Unregulated, ad hoc off-street parking activity is not confined to the
          southern parts of the Borough, close to the CCS boundary; this is a
          problem in other areas, e.g. two informal car parks on Dalston Lane.

5.29      The Council’s ability to intervene in the private operations of public car
          parks is severely limited, in the absence of site-specific planning
          conditions relating to, for example, the annual review of parking
          charges.

           Policy Mechanisms
5.30      It is a policy objective of the PEP that different types of parking, i.e.
          public/private and on-street/off-street, should not be considered in
          isolation, but managed collectively to achieve a balance of supply and
          demand.

5.31      The Council aspires to improve off-street public parking facilities in the
          Borough. There is potential to negotiate public use of new off-street car
          parks associated with new development (e.g. supermarkets), to
          maximise shared parking facilities in the Borough’s main town centres.


Off-street Charges
          Policy Mechanism
5.32      Through the pricing mechanism, the Council should seek to encourage
          short-stay parking with rapid turnover of spaces and deter long-stay
          parking. The Council should also seek to encourage the use of publicly
          available off-street paid parking facilities, over the use of on-street pay
          and display parking.




                                         29
30
6         CPZ Strategy


General
6.1       A Controlled Parking Zone (CPZ) is an area within which specified
          hours of parking control apply to the public highway; CPZ controls do
          not apply to private roads. CPZs are designed and implemented to
          assist areas suffering from parking stress.

6.2       The main purpose of a CPZ is to effectively manage on-street parking
          activity in an area and, in doing so, improve road safety and the general
          street scene. An important objective of a CPZ is to protect local
          residents’ parking needs from non-local parking demands, e.g.
          commuters, to enable residents to park conveniently close to their
          homes. The introduction of CPZs help to fund parking enforcement,
          which provides tangible benefits to other priority road users.

6.3       CPZs can be tailored to meet the parking needs of disabled people and
          short-stay shoppers, as well as the essential waiting and loading needs
          of local businesses. CPZ controls assist the operation of local buses by
          preventing illegal, obstructive on-street parking activity. They can also
          enhance the local environment by creating a safer, less cluttered street
          scene, free from dangerously parked and abandoned vehicles. The
          Council is developing a Streetscene Strategy and a Public Realm
          Design Guide to assist the delivery of an improved street scene in the
          Borough.


CPZ Coverage
6.4       The Council has introduced a total of eleven CPZs to date. These are
          shown in both Table 6.1 and Figure 6.1 (at the end of the section) for
          information.

6.5       CPZs now cover approximately half of the Borough, and are focused
          around main town centres (Zones C, D and E), main rail stations (G1,
          G2 and G) and towards the City fringes towards the south-west corner
          of the Borough (Zones A, B and F). Extensive parts of the Borough,
          mainly towards the north and the east, remain uncontrolled.

          Issues
6.6       The Council recognises the need for a robust, systematic framework,
          rooted in policy, for future CPZ implementation in the Borough. This will
          help gain and maintain public confidence in the CPZ roll out process.
          There is a strong policy presumption in favour of extended parking
          controls. Policy 4G.5 of the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy
          specifically supports the expansion of CPZs in Inner London (see
          Appendix C).

6.7       A range of internal pressures, including pressures from new
          development, increased car ownership and residents’ complaints,
          increase the need for additional parking controls.

                                        31
Table 6.1 Existing Controlled Parking Zones (CPZs)

          Zone     Area                     Hours of Control
          A        Wenlock                  Monday – Friday, 8.30am – 6.30pm
          B        South Shoreditch         Monday – Saturday, 7.00am – 11.00pm
          C        Dalston                  Monday – Saturday, 7.00am – 7.00pm
          D        Hackney Central          Monday – Saturday, 7.00am – 11.00pm
          E        Stoke Newington          Monday – Saturday, 7.00am – 7.00pm
          E ext    Stoke Newington          Monday – Saturday, 8.30am – 6.30pm
          F        Hoxton                   Monday – Saturday, 7.00am – 7.00pm
          G1       Manor House              Monday – Saturday, 7.00am – 7.00pm
          G2       Finsbury Park            Monday – Saturday, 7.00am – 7.00pm
          G        Brownswood               Monday – Friday, 8.30am – 6.30pm
          H        De Beauvoir              Monday – Friday, 8.30am – 6.30pm
          J        Queensbridge             Monday – Friday, 8.30am – 6.30pm
          J ext    Queensbridge             Monday – Friday, 8.30am – 6.30pm
          M        Clissold                 Monday – Saturday, 8.30am – 6.30pm

6.8      The Borough also faces a number of external pressures for on-street
         parking controls. The southern tip of the Borough lies directly adjacent
         to the City of London, London’s financial hub. Without suitable parking
         controls, this area would be prone to acute parking stress caused by
         commuter parking activity.

6.9      The expansion of CPZs in neighbouring boroughs increases the
         pressure for further parking controls in Hackney, as a result of cross-
         boundary, displaced on-street parking activity.

         Policy Mechanisms
6.10     A seamless and accountable process, for the whole ‘life cycle’ of a CPZ
         from consultation and design through to implementation and review, will
         be provided by the Council’s Parking Services to successfully deliver
         the framework.

6.11     It is proposed that a CPZ Project Implementation Project Board is set
         up to oversee the process. This Project Board should be chaired by a
         chief officer, the Assistant Director of Planning and Transportation. The
         Cabinet Member for Environment, Transportation and Planning will be
         invited to attend.

6.12     The Council should adopt a phased approach to assessing parking
         stress areas and their need for new parking controls. This will allow
         better management and control of the process and ensure that the
         necessary resources are targeted effectively to deliver a robust
         scheme.




                                       32
6.13    The need for the introduction of new parking controls in identified
        parking stress areas should be assessed using the following three
        criteria:

        •     Technical assessment: officer-level assessment using robust local
              parking data generated by the data management strategy;

        •     Member support: the level of member support for the scheme; and

        •     Deputations: the level of public comment, complaints and petitions.

6.14    The consultation process, which forms a key element of the Council’s
        CPZ strategy, is developed in detail in Section 3. The process
        comprises both Stage One (In Principle Consultation) and Stage Two
        (Detailed Design Consultation) consultations.


Zone Review
6.15    Current hours of control for the Council’s eleven existing CPZs are
        shown in Table 6.1 and Figure 6.1.

        Issues
6.16    The Council’s CPZ strategy seeks to roll out CPZs in a phased and
        consistent manner to improve conditions in areas subject to parking
        stress. Having implemented new parking controls, it is vital that the
        Council subsequently reviews the CPZ to ensure that it is operating
        effectively and to assess the need for scheme modifications, if required.

6.17    An important objective of a CPZ is to protect local residents’ parking
        needs from non-local parking demands. Parts of the Borough are
        becoming popular late-night hot spots and this has led to an increase in
        on-street visitor parking, as well as parking related anti-social behaviour
        e.g. slamming doors and loud car stereos, in some areas. The Borough
        also comes under parking pressure as a result of events taking place in
        neighbouring boroughs, for example, on match days due to the
        proximity of Arsenal FC’s current home ground, at Highbury in Islington,
        as well as concerts held at Finsbury Park.

        Policy Mechanisms
6.18    The Council should systematically and thoroughly review both new and
        existing CPZs in the Borough. This review process should be directed
        by the CPZ Project Implementation Board. Consultation techniques for
        each review are identified in Section 3.




                                       33
       Policy Recommendations
6.19   It is recommended that:

         •   The Council should carry out a review of every new CPZ
             introduced in the Borough within one year of implementation.
             The review process should include full consultation with both
             local residents and businesses in the zone. This should involve
             an assessment of the success of the CPZ and include an
             evaluation of the design and bay allocation and other scheme
             adjustments, as required. In addition, other smaller scale issues
             may be brought to the Council’s attention by local residents and
             businesses, and these will be addressed on an on-going basis.

         P-CPZ1



         •   There may be a clear need for the review of a new CPZ to be
             completed earlier than within one year of implementation.
             Circumstances of this nature will be reviewed as a priority should
             the need be identified.

         P-CPZ2



         •   The Council should review each existing CPZ in the Borough
             every three years. This triennial review should take into account
             the impact of CPZ parking controls on the local resident and
             business community and other regeneration factors which
             support the sustainability of the local area.

         P-CPZ3



         •   Specifically, the CPZ review process should include an
             assessment of displaced parking activity in the surrounding area.
             The review should consult local residents and businesses in
             streets adjacent to existing CPZs to identify the need for
             additional parking controls in adjacent streets to relieve local
             parking stress areas.

         P-CPZ4




                                    34
Existing Controlled Parking Zones (CPZ’s)
                               Figure 6.1




    35
36
7         Parking Permits and Charges


General
7.1       This section considers the issue and charging of all permits currently
          issued by the Council’s Parking Shop. It also considers the introduction
          of the Council’s new essential community service permit scheme.
          Estate residents’ permits are discussed separately in Section 8.

7.2       The number and type of parking permits issued by the Council can
          have a significant impact on parking demand across the Borough.
          Parking permit policies (primarily through the pricing mechanism) can
          also influence car ownership patterns. Consequently, parking permits
          are a vital parking management tool to help achieve stated PEP policy
          objectives.

7.3       To ensure that parking permit policies and pricing structures continue to
          meet the demands of stakeholders, a comprehensive parking permit
          review will be performed to identify if any changes are required.

7.4       Parking permits are issued by the Council’s Parking Shop for the use of
          designated parking places in the Borough’s CPZs. Parking permits are
          currently issued to several groups of users, including residents, visitors,
          businesses and doctors: - however provision will soon be made to
          restrict permit issue on the grounds of payment contravention. Permits
          will not be issued to those residents and/or business users who have
          outstanding parking fines which are neither at appeals stage or
          indicated as being in the process of payment.

7.5       The Council’s Social Services administers parking permits for disabled
          people under the Blue Badge Scheme, which is discussed separately in
          Section 8 below.


Resident’s Permits
          Issues
7.6       Any permanent resident of the Borough over the age of 17 who owns a
          car, motorcycle or small van and lives within a CPZ is eligible to apply
          for a resident’s parking permit. A resident’s permit allows the holder to
          park in any vacant resident’s or shared use bay during the CPZ’s hours
          of operation. The Council issued approximately 16,900 resident’s
          permits during 2002/03.

7.7       Resident’s permit applications require proof of vehicle ownership and
          proof of residence in a CPZ. The proof, must be less than three
          months old and where applicable, be valid for more than half of the
          permits term of validity. A utility bill or bank statement would be an
          acceptable evidence as proof of residence. A resident is defined as a
          person who resides for a minimum of 5 days a week within that CPZ.
          Residents are required to update their permit if a vehicle is replaced.



                                         37
7.8    The Council currently has no limit on the number of resident’s permits
       issued per household. This conflicts with traffic reduction policies.
       Permit allocation criteria and measures to influence demand will need
       to be used increasingly to ensure that PEP objectives are met. This
       may mean, for example, that the Council introduces an upper limit on
       the number of resident’s permits issued per household.

7.9    Resident’s parking permit charges are a highly sensitive subject, with
       the issue being frequently raised by local residents during CPZ public
       consultation exercises.

7.10   The same rates for resident’s permit charges apply to all zones across
       the Borough (i.e. a flat rate). Charges for second and subsequent
       resident’s permits are the same as those for the first. A resident’s
       permit currently costs £80/year.

       Policy Mechanisms
7.11   Parking permit issue is an essential function of the Council’s Parking
       Shop. The Council should prepare an Annual Parking Report which
       details the number of permits issued by type for the financial year.

7.12   Part IV of the Environment Act 1995 requires local authorities to
       monitor air quality in their area. If a local authority identifies a local air
       quality problem, the authority is required to declare an Air Quality
       Management Area (AQMA) and prepare a Local Air Quality Action Plan
       to improve local air quality in the designated AQMA.

7.13   In March 2001 the Council designated the South Shoreditch area, and
       areas along major arterial roads, as AQMAs. Current air quality
       assessments indicate that the annual mean levels of nitrogen dioxide
       (NO2) are expected to exceed National Air Quality Strategy thresholds.
       Similarly, fine particulates (PM10) are expected to exceed these
       thresholds in the South Shoreditch area.

7.14   The Council has recently prepared a Local Air Quality Action Plan,
       which sets out the Council’s intention to designate the whole Borough
       an AQMA. PEP policies have an important contribution to make with
       respect to improving local air quality in the Borough.

7.15   The resident’s permit charging structure can be used to encourage the
       take up of cars run on alternative fuels, i.e. recognised ‘greener’ fuel
       such as electric, LPG or LNG or hybrid vehicles. Similarly, the pricing
       mechanism can be used to encourage ownership of cars with smaller
       engine sizes, such as Smart Cars.

7.16   HM Customs and Excise currently offers Vehicle Excise Duty (VED)
       discounts for cars run on cleaner, alternative fuels (HM Customs and
       Excise, November 2000, Using the Tax System to Encourage Cleaner
       Fuels: The Experience of Ultra-Low Sulphur Diesel, 2.6; HM Treasury,
       2000, Tax and the environment: using economic instruments, 6.22).




                                       38
7.17   Housing Services currently operates a strict policy of not issuing estate
       resident’s permits to applicants who are in debt to the Council, in
       addition to applicants who cannot prove that a vehicle is taxed. This is
       recognised as an effective policy to reduce the number of untaxed
       vehicles on the Borough’s streets.

       Policy Recommendations

7.18   It is recommended that:

          •   When a resident applies to renew a permit, and providing the
              vehicle details and place of residence that were provided as
              evidence has not changed since the previous years application
              was processed, there would be no requirement to provide the
              relevant documentation prior to reissuing the permit. Under
              these circumstances the renewal letter will be sufficient
              evidence. However, the council will require actual sight of all
              original documents every three years. This would apply to all
              permit applications and types.

          P-PP1



          •   The Council should review the residents permit structure to take
              into account the emissions based best practice model currently
              used by the DVLA. The revised structure should be transparent,
              fair and equitable. This has been included within the Work Plan,
              and is scheduled for action during 05/06.

          P-PP2



          •   It is therefore recommended that the Council introduces a 25%
              discount for the charge of a residents permit for LPG, LNG and
              hybrid cars in accordance with the emission-based best practice
              model currently used by the DVLA. This environmentally led
              discount has been in effect since 1st April 2004.

          P-PP3



          •    It is also recommended that the Council offers free resident and
              business permits for electric cars. This exemption has taken
              effect from the 1st April 2004, however currently it is only
              applicable to resident permits. Business permit holders with
              electric cars, will qualify for free permits with effect of 1st April
              2005.

          P-PP4


                                      39
            •   The Council should take measures to reduce the number of
                untaxed vehicles parked in a CPZ displaying a resident permit,
                while also displaying an expired Vehicle Excise Duty (VED), will
                invalidate the resident permit resulting in a Penalty Charge
                Notice (PCN) being issued. This will further develop the
                Councils partnership with the DVLA.

            P-PP5



            •   Any changes to the terms and conditions for use of a permit will
                need to be added to all permit application literature and reflected
                in Traffic Management Orders.

            P-PP6


Visitor Vouchers
         Issues
7.19     On-street visitor parking in the Borough’s CPZs is controlled through
         the issue of visitor’s vouchers, which may be purchased in books of ten
         by the Borough’s residents. Visitor vouchers allow holders to park in
         residential and shared use bays for up to five or six hours, depending
         on the CPZ. Visitor vouchers are identified by zone, i.e. ‘Zone A’ etc. is
         stamped on the voucher. The Council issued approximately 200,000
         visitors vouchers during 2002/03.

7.20     The period of time that a vehicle is permitted to park while displaying a
         visitor voucher varies across the Borough. In order to match the
         voucher permitted parking time to the specific zone, a review will take
         place, incorporating all permits managed by Parking Services.

7.21     The Council does not currently require powered two-wheel vehicles to
         display visitor vouchers, as displayed vouchers are vulnerable to theft.

7.22     The workshop discussions indicated that the visitor voucher scheme is
         prone to abuse, details of which can be found in Appendix A.

         Policy Mechanisms
7.23     It is recognized that both the number of, as well as need for, visitors
         varies by household, with specific visitor needs for households with
         elderly and/or disabled residents. Limiting the number of visitor
         vouchers issued per household could therefore adversely impact some
         of the Borough’s residents.

7.24     Given the specific enforcement difficulties associated with the theft of
         visitor vouchers from powered two-wheel vehicles, it is recommended
         that the Council maintains the current policy of not requiring them to
         display visitor vouchers.




                                        40
7.25     To manage the distribution of available parking space, the Council
         should withdraw the option of parking in a shared use bay when
         displaying a visitor voucher, and restrict the use of visitor vouchers to
         resident parking bays only.

         Policy Recommendations
7.26     It is recommended that:

            •   The Council should comprehensively review the visitor’s voucher
                scheme, including charges, when robust visitor parking demand
                data is made available through the data management strategy.

            P-PP7


Business Permits
          Issues
7.27     The Council’s business permit scheme applies to all businesses located
         in the Borough’s CPZs. A business is entitled to a business permit if
         vehicles are, ‘essential for the efficient operation of the business’. The
         Council issued approximately 1,200 business permits during 2002/03.

7.28     Businesses that make multiple applications are required to justify their
         request for more that one permit. Provided that the vehicles are
         specified, the Council allows the permit to be issued in the company
         name, so that it can be transferred between company vehicles.

7.29     Business permit charges vary by zone and charges for the second and
         third permit are the same as those for the first. Business permit charges
         are currently higher for Zones A and B, as these areas are close to the
         City fringe.

7.30     The Council also currently issues what is termed an all zone business
         permit, which can also be issued to either an individual or shared
         between a number of specified vehicles. To date, the Council has
         issued approximately 400 all zone permits, approximately 70% of which
         are issued to Council employees. An all zone business permit allows
         the holder to park in resident’s bays, business bays and shared use
         bays.

         Policy Mechanisms
7.31     The Council needs to ensure that the legitimate on-street parking needs
         of local businesses are met to support the Borough’s local economy.

7.32     There remains a strong case for varying business permit charges
         across the Borough. On-street business parking is an alternative to off-
         street provision, the costs of which are higher in some parts of the
         Borough than others.

7.33     In 2000, the Road Charging Options for London (RCOL) report
         estimated that the rental value of a parking space in inner London was
         approximately £1,500. This estimate will have increased with inflation
         and the introduction of the CCS. Current business permit charges for
                                        41
         Zones A and B on the City fringe compare highly favourably with this
         estimate.

7.34     The Council should therefore undertake a medium-term review of
         business permit charges, in the light of local parking data generated by
         the data management strategy.

7.35     It is also suggested that the private sector usage of the all zone
         business permit is reviewed. The review should consider the need for
         stricter allocation criteria with the permit charge linked to the number of
         zones required, rather than issuing a blanket all zone permit at a flat
         rate.


Essential Community Service Permits
         Issues
7.36     Owing to the development of Controlled Parking Zones in Hackney and
         the absence of a specific, affordable, parking permit available for staff
         working with public sector and voluntary sector organisations in
         Hackney, the Council have identified a growing need for a specific
         parking permit enabling public servants, who may, for example, be
         providing health and social care to house-bound residents, to park
         within the Borough.

7.37     Equally, due to the limited parking space available within Hackney, as
         detailed elsewhere in this report, the Council have identified a need to
         adopt a balanced approach by balancing parking priorities. In order to
         establish the appropriate balance, the Council has performed a
         comprehensive consultation exercise to establish the relevant
         stakeholders and have held round-the-table meetings with senior
         representatives to establish the appropriate criteria under which
         Permits will be provided.

          Policy Mechanisms
7.38     The Council has comprehensively described the policy mechanisms
         implemented in respect of the Essential Community Service Permits in
         its report to Cabinet on 25th October 2004 entitled Essential Community
         Services Permits, which is fully consistent with the principles
         established throughout the Parking and Enforcement Plan.

7.39     It is recommended that the Essential Community Service Permit
         scheme is monitored in order to establish whether the scheme meets
         the needs of public servants and whether it should be extended to other
         groups working within the community. This will be an ongoing process
         lead by Parking Services and informed under the Data Management
         Strategy described in this report.


Doctor’s Permits
7.40     The Council currently issues annual doctor’s parking permits. A total of
         48 permits were issued in 2002/03. Doctor’s permits allow doctors to
         park in designated doctors bays.
                                        42
8         Estate Parking


General
8.1       Approximately 30% of the Borough’s residents live on the Council’s
          housing estates across the four Neighbourhood Areas (Homerton,
          North East, Shoreditch and Stoke Newington).

8.2       Parking was identified as the single most important issue affecting
          estate residents in workshop discussions; it was rated above crime in
          terms of importance (see Appendix A).


Estate Permits and Enforcement
          Issues
8.3       The Council’s Housing Services is responsible for the management of
          the Borough’s housing estates, including responsibility for parking
          control and enforcement. Though a number of the estates are gated,
          some estate roads are indistinguishable from public roads in the
          Borough.

8.4       Similarly to elsewhere in the Borough, increasing levels of car
          ownership among estate residents is resulting in greater parking
          pressure, to an extent that local amenity is being adversely affected in
          some areas. Certain estate households are suggested to own up to four
          cars, with many lone parents owning cars (lone parents over twenty are
          identified as the most frequent car owners).

8.5       Parking enforcement on the Council’s housing estates is currently
          enforced independently of the Borough’s public highway. Vehicles not
          displaying a valid parking permit in estates with controlled parking
          schemes are either clamped or removed.

8.6       Current methods of enforcement are by means of clamp and tow.
          However where it has been implied that a driver is in breach of local
          parking regulations the motorist has the right to appeal in accordance to
          the Road Traffic Act 1991. This provides motorists with a transparent
          appeals process where they can appeal directly to the Local Authority
          failing that they may approach an independent adjudicator.

8.7       An alternative method of Parking Enforcement within Estates is
          ticketing followed by removal. This ensures the residents are offered a
          seamless and fair service as enforcement is made in relation to the
          severity of the offence. The resident is not put at risk whilst waiting for
          the clamp to be removed and they still have the same rights to appeal.

8.8       The Council’s housing estates are prone to illegal parking (including
          footway parking) and abandoned vehicles, and the anti-social
          behaviour associated with these activities. In response to this, Housing
          Services has implemented (or is currently implementing) gated
          schemes in some 25 estates across the Borough. To date, the gated
          schemes have been received positively by estate residents.
                                         43
       Policy Mechanisms
8.9    Parking issues cut across the Council’s housing estates and the
       Borough’s streets and this highlights the need for a regular liaison
       group, bringing together officers from both Housing and Parking
       Services to discuss common parking issues.

8.10   There are clear benefits for parking enforcement on the Council’s
       housing estates to fall into the remit of Parking Services. Parking
       Services are better resourced by means of their appointed parking
       enforcement contractor, to provide a consistent level and quality of
       service within the Borough.




                                     44
9         Disabled Parking


General
9.1       Many disabled people rely on the private car as a main mode of
          transport. The ease with which they can reach their destination is
          largely dependent on whether they can park close to that destination.
          The availability of conveniently located disabled parking bays at key
          destinations, e.g. place of residence, workplace, shops and public
          buildings, is therefore vital.

9.2       Disabled access is enshrined in law. Part III of the Disability
          Discrimination Act (DDA) 1995 requires service providers to take
          reasonable steps to ensure that disabled people do not find it
          impossible or unreasonably difficult, to enjoy the service on the same
          basis as non-disabled people.

9.3       The priority accorded to disabled parking needs, particularly local
          resident disabled parking needs, is also reflected in the Borough’s
          parking need hierarchies (see Table 2.1 on p.15). This section
          considers both disabled parking permits and the supply of on-street
          disabled parking bays in the Borough.


Disabled Permits
9.4       Social Services’ Mobility Services Unit administers the disabled parking
          permit system in the Borough, under the national Disabled Persons’
          Parking Badge Scheme, known as the Blue (formerly Orange) Badge
          Scheme. The Orange Badge Scheme elapsed at the end of March
          2003.

9.5       The Blue Badge Scheme allows badge holders considerable flexibility
          in where they can park on-street. Badge holders can park free of
          charge without time limit in pay and display bays and shared use bays,
          provided a valid Blue Badge is displayed, the bay has not been
          suspended and the vehicle is being used to transport the Blue Badge
          holder. Blue Badge holders are also allowed to park for a maximum of 3
          hours on single and double yellow lines, except where there is a
          loading ban or where a bus or cycle lane is in operation.

9.6       Blue Badge holders in the Borough cannot park in resident’s bays, but
          can obtain a free resident’s parking permit if they live within a CPZ.

          Issues
          Eligibility
9.7       The Blue Badge application process is fairly basic and the guidelines
          are broad. Applicants qualify automatically for a Blue Badge if they
          meet any one of the following criteria:

          •   receive the higher rate of the mobility component of the Disability
              Living Allowance;

                                        45
       •   use a vehicle supplied by a government health department;

       •   are registered blind;

       •   receive a War Pensioners' Mobility Supplement; or

       •   have a severe disability in both upper limbs, regularly drive a motor
           vehicle but cannot turn the steering wheel of a motor vehicle by
           hand, even if that wheel is fitted with a turning knob.

9.8    There is an additional discretionary criterion under which a Blue Badge
       may be issued. The applicant must have a permanent or substantial
       disability that means they are unable to walk or have very considerable
       difficulty in walking up to 50 metres. The Council requires a letter from
       the applicant’s GP under this criterion.

9.9    There is an appeals process in place, and not many Blue Badge
       applications are ultimately rejected by the Council. The renewal
       process is currently on a biennial basis.

       Scale
9.10   The number of Blue Badges issued by the Council is the highest in
       London. The Council’s audit report (see para. 9.17 below) identifies a
       total 5,526 permits (with a further 1,003 duplicates issued for badges
       reported lost or stolen) have been issued since the Blue Badge
       Scheme came into effect on 1st April 2000.

       Fraud
9.11   Since the introduction of CCS, Blue Badge applications to the Council
       have tripled (Blue Badge holders are eligible for a 100% CCS discount).
       The Council, like many other London boroughs and local authorities
       elsewhere, experiences extensive fraudulent use of Blue Badges, to the
       extent that the level of fraud actually undermines the scheme itself.

9.12   Blue Badges displayed in parked vehicles in London are a target for
       theft and illegal distribution. This is because, under the national
       scheme, Blue Badges can be used for any vehicle (i.e. are not linked to
       a specific car registration) and allows significant flexibility in free on-
       street parking.

9.13   Under the scheme, if the Police issue a crime number, the badge is
       simply replaced. The Council’s audit report (see para.9.17 below)
       identified a particular problem whereby requests for replacement
       permits are being made when permits have not been genuinely lost or
       stolen, and are then passed on to family or friends, or sold on.

9.14   Evidence suggests, fraudulent use of Blue Badges is mainly carried out
       by relatives of Blue Badge holders. For example, the Council has made
       ad-hoc observations of Blue Badge abuse on Ridley Road, where
       approximately 200 vehicles displaying Blue Badges were observed in
       one visit.



                                      46
9.15   Such problems are not unique to the Borough and there are some
       issues that the Council has no direct control over; reports on the BBC
       and elsewhere indicate that this is a large national problem.
       Notwithstanding this, there are a number of measures that the Council
       could introduce to improve the current situation.

9.16   In response to the range of Blue Badge problems identified above, the
       Disabled Person Transport Advisory Committee (DPTAC) has
       undertaken a comprehensive review of the Blue Badge Scheme.

       Audit Report
9.17   The Council has also carried out its own detailed audit (2002/03) of the
       operation of the Blue Badge Scheme and a number of
       recommendations to combat the current high level of fraudulent use
       experienced in the Borough have been made. Audit recommendations
       are included in full at Appendix D for information.

9.18   The Council’s audit report highlights that misuse of a Blue Badge is a
       serious offence, with the following penalties:

       •   it is a criminal offence for non-disabled people to use a badge and
           they will be liable to a fine of up to £1,000; and

       •   it is a criminal offence to drive a vehicle displaying a Blue Badge
           unless the badge holder is in the vehicle.

9.19   The audit report identified a number of weaknesses in the system,
       particularly in relation to lack of application assessment and evidence of
       proper checks. In addition, it was specifically noted that information on
       lost or stolen permits is not currently passed on to Parking Enforcement
       for investigation.

       Policy Mechanisms
9.20   Implementation of the Blue Badge Scheme audit recommendations
       (see Appendix D) would significantly improve the overall scheme
       operation, and reduce the traffic in badges that have been obtained by
       fraudulent means. These disabled parking issues and progress against
       audit recommendations should be specifically reported in the Annual
       Parking Report.

       Companion Scheme
9.21   Unlike the national Blue Badge Scheme, independent concessionary
       schemes, such as the ones operated by the central/inner London
       boroughs require disabled badges to be referenced to a specific vehicle
       with registered details clearly displayed on the badge. Such schemes
       have far lower levels of fraud associated with them since the
       ‘companion’ borough car badge is worthless on the ‘market’.

9.22   Tower Hamlets’ companion borough badge scheme has been attributed
       with devaluing the ‘street’ value of a Blue Badge in the Borough. It has
       resulted in a 25% reduction in car break-ins for Blue Badges over the
       first 3 months of the scheme.


                                     47
9.23     This scheme requires the creation of a special disabled resident’s
         parking permit. This permit includes Blue Badge information directly on
         the permit, thereby eliminating the need for the display of Blue Badges.
         This scheme compliments the current Blue Badge scheme and offers
         the same priority. Non-local Blue Badge holders have extensive rights
         to park on-street (see para. 9.5 above) and it is considered that the
         scheme does not prejudice their ability to park conveniently in the
         Borough.

9.24     There is strong support in the Council for the introduction of a
         companion borough badge scheme in Hackney, similar to that for
         Tower Hamlets.

         Enforcement
9.25     Rigorous enforcement is key to running a successful Blue Badge
         operation. A call centre to specifically report blatant Blue Badge abuse
         has been suggested. This issue is also addressed in the DPTAC report,
         which gives the following recommendation:

         •   34: Legislation be introduced at the earliest opportunity in England
             and Wales to enable Badges to be checked by police officers,
             traffic wardens and parking attendants.

9.26     The Government accepted this recommendation and is seeking to
         introduce a power for the Police, traffic wardens and parking attendants
         to check the holder’s details on the reverse of the badge.

9.27     Finally, a stronger partnership between the Police and the Council’s
         Parking Services and Social Services will provide the basis for a more
         robust Blue Badge Scheme.


Disabled Bays
         Issues
9.28     The Council has approximately 400 on-street disabled parking bays
         across the Borough. There is no time restriction on these disabled
         bays.

9.29     The DDA (1995) aims to end the discrimination which many disabled
         people face by giving them employment, access to goods, facilities and
         services and other areas. Part III of the DDA gives disabled people
         important rights of access to everyday services that others take for
         granted. Under these DDA requirements, the Council should ensure
         that adequate, conveniently located disabled parking facilities are
         provided close to public buildings in the Borough.

          Policy Mechanisms
9.30     The need to prioritise on-street space for local disabled residents is
         recognised. It is acknowledged that non-local Blue Badge holders have
         extensive rights to park on-street (e.g. on single and double yellow
         lines) and it is considered that this prioritisation does not prejudice their
         ability to park conveniently in the Borough.

                                         48
9.31   The introduction of a companion badge scheme, described above,
       would assist the management of on-street disabled bays.

9.32   The Council should ensure that adequate, conveniently located
       disabled parking facilities are provided outside public buildings to fully
       meet access requirements set out in the DDA.

9.33   To ensure that disabled bays within CPZs, allocated for use by disabled
       residents are still required, a method of assessing the continued need
       for the existing bays should be implemented. This should form a
       method of a scheduled review of each CPZ every three years, and
       when necessary, revoking any disabled bay should it no longer be
       required by a disabled resident.

9.34   Any future disabled bays located within CPZs should only be approved
       for cases where severe mobility issues are identified. However, there
       should be no further implication in regard to the issuing of a free
       resident permit for residents who have been issued a disabled persons
       Blue Badge.




                                      49
50
10         Enforcement


General
10.1       Parking management includes the enforcement of on-street parking
           regulations. Illegal parking is inconsiderate; and it can be dangerous.
           The Council is directly responsible for on-street enforcement in the
           Borough, with the exception of the Transport for London Road Network
           (TLRN) (Red Routes), which remains the responsibility of Transport for
           London. TLRN issues are specifically examined in Section 13.

10.2       The aim of enforcement is to maximise compliance with regulations to
           make Hackney’s streets safer for all road users, particularly vulnerable
           road users such as school children; to prevent obstruction and delays
           (especially for buses and emergency vehicles); to ensure that parking
           bays are available for their intended use and to improve the general
           street scene.

10.3       For enforcement to be effective, it needs to be supported by the
           application of IT (see Section 4) and a robust data management
           strategy.


Contract
10.4       During Spring 2004 the Council commenced the procurement process
           for a new contract for the provision of a Parking Attendant (PA) service,
           including also vehicle clamping and removals. The service will cover
           both on-street and off-street areas in the Borough.

10.5       The new contract was awarded to Controlled Parking Services (CPS) in
           December 2004 and will run for five years. It is based on the new
           British Parking Association (BPA) standard contract for the provision of
           decriminalised parking and traffic enforcement. Hackney will be one of
           the first local authorities to adopt this new standard contract, and
           Council officers worked closely with the BPA during contract
           development.

10.6       The new contract will be quality-driven. The general premise is to
           develop a better way of operating the contract, by introducing varied
           forms of contract management, which encourages continuous
           improvement through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs). The
           standard contract is based on an open book accounting system and
           may include future add-ons, e.g. Housing Estate parking enforcement.

10.7       The new contract will form the basis for an enforcement operation that
           is fair, consistent, transparent, policy-driven and quality-led.




                                         51
Partnership Working
10.8     Successful enforcement is delivered through partnership working.
         Together with the Metropolitan Police, Council officers have developed
         new and innovative protocols to be incorporated within the new contract
         and monitored through a specific KPI. The contractor will be expected
         to develop and maintain a good working relationship with both the
         Council and the Metropolitan Police in Hackney.

10.9     It should be acknowledged that Parking Services has, and continues to,
         assist the Metropolitan Police in crime awareness and reporting
         initiatives. There is a real opportunity to work in close collaboration with
         the Metropolitan Police, establishing useful reporting tools that capture
         valuable intelligence for the service.

10.10    Illegal parking on zigzags, double yellow lines and footways can cause
         a serious road safety hazard, especially for child safety near schools.
         The Council will work with schools through the Learning Trust to
         manage local parking stress areas around schools (caused by the
         school run and associated short-stay on-street parking activity). The
         Council will adopt a ‘joined up thinking’ approach and consult on wider
         solutions, e.g. Safer Routes to School initiative.


Parking Attendants and Patrols
10.11    Enforcement should not be uniform across the Borough, but targeted to
         tackle problem areas. The new contract specification will provide a
         schedule of streets and prescribe the frequency of PA patrol visits,
         dependent upon the location. This will ensure a good parking
         enforcement regime that is both consistent and transparent.

10.12    A good parking enforcement regime needs to be backed up by the
         issue of good quality Penalty Charge Notices (PCNs), which comply
         with issue guidelines and are supported by the relevant information.
         The application of IT such as handheld computers with in-built digital
         cameras and Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities can support
         quality PCN issue.

10.13    The PAs core role is to issue good quality PCNs; however PAs are also
         required to report defects. Accurate and timely reporting of all
         defective/missing signs and lines, as well as faulty/damaged pay and
         display machines and street furniture, is also important.

10.14    Good quality PCN issue is backed up in turn by highly trained, informed
         and motivated PAs. The success of the new Contract is dependent
         upon attracting PAs that are trained to the required standard and have
         achieved the appropriate BPA accreditation.




                                        52
Uncontrolled Areas
10.15      Parking in just under half of the Borough is currently controlled through
           CPZs. Uncontrolled areas are mainly to the north and east of the
           Borough, where limited lengths of yellow lines have been introduced.

10.16      The Council’s enforcement operation includes the strict enforcement of
           yellow lines outside of CPZ areas to support the safe and efficient
           operation of the Borough’s road network.


Abandoned Vehicles
10.17      Abandoned vehicles are a particular problem in parts of the Borough.
           These vehicles are an environmental nuisance and are associated with
           anti-social behaviour. Abandoned vehicles not only cause an
           unnecessary hazard wherever they are dumped, they also have a
           serious impact on residents’ quality of life and fear of crime in the local
           area.

10.18      Under the new contract, PAs will continue to report potential
           abandoned and untaxed vehicles on the Borough’s streets.


Persistent Evaders
10.19      Persistent evaders (defined as individuals with three or more unpaid
           PCNs) are a particular problem in the Borough. This is because of their
           continuation to park illegally; the resulting multiple PCN issue; the
           nuisance caused; the loss of pedestrian space in the case of illegal
           footway parking and the ‘bad example’ they set, which can result in
           further non-compliance in the area.

10.20      The Council’s enforcement operation will target persistent evaders in
           the Borough and reduce the level of evasion. To this end, the Council
           will remove vehicles belonging to persistent evaders to the car pound,
           wherever possible.


Clamping and Removals
10.21      The new contract will support robust enforcement through an effective
           clamping and removals operation. The contract will specify the times
           during which the clamping and removals operation must be available
           and duly responsive.


Funerals
10.22      Currently a maximum of 10 dispensation waivers are offered for a time
           limit of 4 hours. The Council will work with Funeral Directors (or
           equivalent) to issue a book of visitor permits per funeral, easing the
           burden on the family.



                                          53
Religious Festivals
10.23     The Council recognises that religious festivals of the six main faith
          groups in the Borough may have specific parking needs.

10.24     The Council should therefore seek dialogue and discussion with the six
          main faith groups, facilitated through the Council’s Equalities Unit. This
          will help to clearly identify and understand specific parking
          requirements generated by religious festivals. Council-run workshops
          should be held with faith group representatives to tease out the
          following information:

          •    What are the faith group’s requirements?

          •    What are the faith group’s aspirations regarding parking provision?

          •    How can effective parking management assist the faith group’s
               religious festivals?

10.25     These workshop discussions should be informed by the collection of
          local parking data generated by the data management strategy, to help
          officers reach a rational and robust parking management decision.




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11        Non-car Modes


General
11.1      The Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy recognises that the needs of
          all road users have to be continually balanced as part of the
          management of London’s streets. In Section 2 above (see Table 2.1),
          the PEP identifies a parking need hierarchy which gives priority to non-
          car modes. This section examines parking for pedal cycles, powered
          two-wheel vehicles and coaches.


Pedal Cycle Parking
11.2      The 2001 Census identifies Hackney as the Cycling Borough. As
          detailed on the London Cycling Campaign (LCC) website (see
          http://www.lcc.org.uk/), a UK wide comparison of journeys to work by
          pedal cycle shows that London boroughs lead the country in terms of
          growth. Moreover, this comparison ranks Hackney as number one in
          the UK.

11.3      The difficulty of finding a safe and secure place to park a pedal cycle is
          identified in the Mayor of London’s Transport Strategy as one of the
          biggest obstacles to cycling in London (4J.19). Proposal 4J.7 of the
          Transport Strategy expects London boroughs to require developers,
          wherever practicable, to:

          •   provide good pedal cycle access to the development;

          •   install secure pedal cycle parking; and

          •   provide showers, lockers and changing facilities.

11.4      The Council should survey the occupancy levels of current pedal cycle
          parking facilities within the borough including locations where a high
          volume of unauthorised pedal cycle parking takes place. Areas
          identified as having a high demand for pedal cycle parking greater than
          the current provision should therefore be considered for additional
          provision to be provided.

11.5      Pedal cycle parking too can obstruct the footway. Where there is a high
          demand for pedal cycle parking and available footway space is limited,
          the Council should consider introducing secure on-street pedal cycle
          parking within the carriageway.

11.6      To encourage the use of pedal cycles by Council staff for the purpose
          of commuting to and from their place of work, the council should
          consider offering dedicated secure pedal cycle parking, available solely
          for use by staff.




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Powered Two-wheel Vehicle Parking
11.7     Strategic policy guidance emphasises the air quality and traffic
         congestion benefits that may arise from the use of certain types of
         powered two-wheel vehicles (PTWs), e.g. mopeds and small
         motorcycles (under 800cc). This is if they substitute for car use,
         although not if people switch from walking, cycling or public transport.
         The relatively low pollutant emissions and effective use of road and
         kerb side space are recognised, e.g. a single on-street car space can
         accommodate up to five PTWs.

11.8     The Council should seek to introduce more on-street PTW parking
         facilities in the Borough, especially in areas of high demand, such as
         the Borough’s main commercial areas and around key public transport
         interchanges. This on-street parking should be free and without time
         limit.

11.9     The specific location of PTW parking facilities needs to be carefully
         planned. These facilities need to be highly visible, allowing the
         opportunity for public surveillance to minimise the risk of theft.


Coach Parking
11.10    The London Plan states that all large developments should provide for
         appropriate coach parking/stands (annex 4, 32).

11.11    The Borough does not currently have any on-street or off-street coach
         parking facilities. Similarly, the Council does not presently have a coach
         management strategy in place. This is mainly owing to the low level of
         coach parking demand in the Borough.

11.12    It is recommended that the Council review coach parking provision in
         the Borough, to ensure that any future coach parking demands are met,
         so as not to constrain tourism initiatives and other development
         opportunities.




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12        New Development


General
12.1      Parking standards prescribe the amount of off-street parking space by
          vehicle type (e.g. car, cycle, etc.) to be provided for new development
          in the Borough.

12.2      The Council’s parking standards are set out in the Adopted UDP (see
          Appendix C), and have not been comprehensively reviewed since
          June 1995. More recent planning policy guidance has stressed the
          need for local authorities to review parking standards and develop
          maximum, restraint-based standards, supported by location policies
          and travel plans. The aim is to reduce reliance of the private car and
          encourage sustainable travel choices in areas with good public
          transport accessibility.


London Plan Parking Standards
12.3      Policy 3C.22 of the London Plan (February 2004) seeks to, ‘ensure that
          on-site car parking at new developments is the minimum necessary and
          that there is no over-provision that could undermine the use of more
          sustainable non-car modes’. Specifically, the London Plan requires
          London boroughs to:

          •   adopt on- and off-street parking policies that encourage access by
              sustainable means of transport, assist in limiting the use of the car
              and contribute to minimising road traffic;

          •   adopt the maximum parking standards set out in the annex on
              parking standards (Annex 4) where appropriate, taking account of
              local circumstances and allowing for reduced car parking provision
              in areas of good transport accessibility;

          •   recognise the needs of disabled people and provide adequate
              parking for them; and

          •   take account of the needs of business for delivery and service
              movements.

12.4      Following on from this, Policy 3C.23 of the London Plan requires
          London boroughs to specifically set out appropriate parking standards
          for town centres. These should, help the attractiveness of town centres
          and reduce congestion; they should also take into account:

          •   the standards set out in Annex 4;

          •   the current vitality and viability of the town centres;

          •   regeneration and town centre management objectives;

          •   existing on- and off-street parking provision and control;

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         •    public transport provision and the need to reduce travel by car; and

         •    pedestrian and cycle access.

12.5     London Plan parking standards are reproduced in full at Appendix E
         for information. The Council should review its parking standards and
         develop revised standards which accord with the requirements set out
         in the London Plan, which take into account Hackney’s local
         circumstances.

12.6     The London Plan acknowledges that parking standards are only one
         mechanism or policy instrument to limit car use and achieve wider
         objectives. The London Plan states that parking standards, ‘should be
         used in conjunction with other transport and spatial integration
         mechanisms, including location polices and travel plans’ (3.201).


Parking Standards Policy
12.7     The development and application of revised parking standards, which
         meet the requirements set out in the London Plan, should have specific
         regard to a number of policy objectives. The Council’s revised parking
         standards should contribute to the delivery of new development in the
         Borough which:

         1.   Supports the Council’s road traffic reduction targets, as prescribed
              by the Road Traffic Reduction Act (1997).

         2.   Encourages the efficient use of land by avoiding over-provision of
              (under-used) parking space, which is an inefficient, unattractive
              and wasteful use of the Borough’s land.

         3.   Supports higher density, better designed new development in the
              Borough.

         4.   Meets the car-based access/car parking needs of disabled people,
              in accordance with the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) and the
              Mayor of London’s emerging Supplementary Planning Guidance
              (SPG) Accessible London: Achieving an Inclusive Environment.

         5.   Meets the operational requirements of new development in the
              Borough with respect to maintenance, servicing and deliveries.

         6.   Recognises the specific access needs of parts of the Borough
              currently characterised by poor transport accessibility.

         7.   Facilitate sustainable low-car/car-capped and/or car-free
              development in parts of the Borough characterised by good
              transport accessibility and the presence of parking controls.




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13        Supporting Mechanisms


General
13.1      The PEP is one element of the Council’s traffic and transportation
          policies, which together have shared strategic aims to reduce the need
          to travel by private car, whilst supporting initiatives to increase social
          inclusion and economic activity in the Borough. It is recognised that
          parking initiatives in isolation are insufficient to achieve wider transport,
          economic, social and environmental benefits and must be accompanied
          by supporting policies or mechanisms.


Congestion Charging
13.2      The Congestion Charging Scheme (CCS) was introduced by the Mayor
          of London in February 2003, with the aim of reducing traffic congestion
          in and around the charging zone. The congestion charge is a £5 daily
          charge for driving or parking a vehicle on public roads within zone
          between 7.00am and 6.30pm, Monday to Friday (excluding weekends
          and public holidays). The Inner Ring Road forms the boundary of the
          congestion charging zone.

13.3      Hackney’s Zone A CPZ is bounded by the congestion charging
          boundary and the southern section of Zone B is within the charging
          zone. Local residents living within the congestion charging zone can
          register for a 90% discount, and Blue Badge holders are eligible for a
          100% discount.

13.4      The close proximity of the Borough to the congestion charging zone
          presents additional parking pressures in the Borough, particularly in the
          southern areas. Since the introduction of CCS, there has been an
          increase in fraudulent use of Blue Badges, increased pressure on
          short-stay parking and the increased use of temporary car parks in the
          south of the Borough.

13.5      TfL are funding a study of all the off-street car parks in the south of the
          Borough, close to the CCS boundary, with a view to identifying which
          ones are authorised and which are not. This will inform the need for
          enforcement action against illegal car parks in the area. The aim is to
          reduce the opportunity to drive to the boundary and walk/bus into the
          congestion charging zone. It is recommended that the Council should
          extend the scope of this study to the rest of the Borough.


Travel Plan and Sustainable Travel Initiatives
13.6      The Council is in the process of developing its own Travel Plan. The
          Council is seeking to introduce a range of measures that will encourage
          staff to switch from the private car (especially single occupancy vehicle
          trips) to alternative, more sustainable travel modes. The Council’s



                                         59
        Travel Plan, when adopted, will provide ‘best practice’ for future travel
        plans in the Borough.

13.7    The use of Car Clubs is not a new concept, although it is still relatively
        uncommon in the UK (there are an estimated 1,000 car club members
        across the country). In essence Car Clubs provide for ‘pay as you drive’
        motoring and offer ‘mobility insurance’ without car ownership.

13.8    Car Clubs offer the use of a shared pool of vehicles from
        neighbourhood car stations, providing short-term car access for periods
        as brief as one hour. Typically one Car Club vehicle can replace up to
        seven privately owned vehicles, releasing road space for other users.
        Similarly, Car Club users typically reduce their car mileage by up to
        50%, relative to private car users.

13.9    Car Clubs are a practical tool to support reductions in parking
        standards for new development. There are currently two well
        established Car Club operators in London, SmartMoves and Urbigo.
        See the following websites for further information:
        http://www.carclubs.org.uk/ and http://www.smartmoves.co.uk.

13.10   Car Clubs are particularly suitable in high density urban areas where
        there is good public transport and existing on-street parking pressures;
        characteristics typical of southern parts of the Borough. As Car Clubs
        are introduced in the Borough, it will be important to ensure that
        accessible parking, including on-street parking, is made available to
        service users.

13.11   Car Clubs are best suited to mixed use development, with a minimum
        100 residential units. Mixed use development allows complementary
        usage patterns, with commercial use of Car Club vehicles during day
        time weekday periods, and residential use of the vehicles during
        evening weekday and weekend periods. Car Club developments should
        be supported by reduced parking standards.

13.12   The introduction of Car Clubs in the Borough needs to be codified in
        planning policy, through the emerging LDF (see Appendix C).

13.13   Car sharing involves the use of a formally organised lift taking or giving
        service using private cars. A web-based service has grown rapidly in
        the last few years across the UK, especially in London. The biggest
        operator is Liftshare with several thousand users within the London
        area (see http://www.liftshare.com/).

13.14   This section has identified a range of sustainable travel initiatives,
        including Car Clubs, car sharing, pool cars and bike pools that come
        under the umbrella of a comprehensive travel plan. The Council’s
        emerging Travel Plan, along with other travel plans implemented across
        the Borough, will support the delivery of the PEP Policy Plan objectives.




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Transport for London Road Network
13.15    The Council is not responsible for the designation or enforcement of
         parking spaces in Red Routes or Transport for London Road Network
         (TLRN), which is the responsibility of Transport for London (TfL).

13.16    The Council is concerned about the current level and effectiveness of
         TfL enforcement on the TLRN within the Borough boundaries. For
         example, specific concerns have been expressed about inadequate
         enforcement on the A10 Kingsland Road, Dalston, which has affected
         London Bus Initiative (LBI) (known as BusPlus) Route 149.


Parking Finances
13.17    Section 55 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act (RTRA) 1984 (as
         amended by section 282 (Financial provisions relating to parking places
         on the highway), subsection (3) of the Greater London Authority Act,
         1999) governs the operation of the Council’s On-street Parking Account
         and sets out rules for the application of the surplus of that account.

13.18    Section 55 restricts expenditure of surplus on-street parking income to
         making good any charges against an authority’s general fund; provision
         and maintenance of off-street parking; highway improvements and
         public transport schemes. The Council fully complies with the
         requirements set out within this section of the RTRA Act.


Internal Communications
13.19    Discussions with Council officers have indicated that there is strong
         support for the instigation of a cross-department Parking Steering
         Group for effective parking management in the Borough. Through
         regular meetings, the steering group would provide further opportunities
         to improve internal consultation and communications.




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62
14       Policy & Operational Recommendations
14.1     Recommendations included within the Parking and Enforcement
         Plan Policy Document:


Data Management

P-DM1    The Council should employ CCTV and traffic management enforcement
         cameras to assist parking enforcement in the Borough.

P-DM 2   The Council should investigate the future potential of an on-line one-
         stop shop for parking on the Council’s website to meet customers’
         needs and promote effective consultation through e-government.

Parking Supply and Charges

P-PS1    The Council reviews the extent of footway parking within the borough,
         identifying any exempt roads. An enforcement plan to address the
         issue would need to be agreed and appropriate enforcement action
         applied.

P-PS2    The Council should undertake a comprehensive and coordinated
         review of on-street pay and display charges, informed by output from
         the data management strategy. Any decision for variable charges to be
         introduced should be weighted against demand within the locality, be
         subject to justification and reviewed to measure effectiveness.

Controlled Parking Zones

P-CPZ1   The Council should carry out a review of every new CPZ introduced in
         the Borough within one year of implementation. The review process
         should include full consultation with both local residents and businesses
         in the zone. This should involve an assessment of the success of the
         CPZ and include an evaluation of the design and bay allocation and
         other scheme adjustments, as required. In addition, other smaller scale
         issues may be brought to the Council’s attention by local residents and
         businesses, and these will be addressed on an on-going basis.

P-CPZ2   There may be a clear need for the review of a new CPZ to be
         completed earlier than within one year of implementation.
         Circumstances of this nature will be reviewed as a priority should the
         need be identified.

P-CPZ3   The Council should review each existing CPZ in the Borough every
         three years. This triennial review should take into account the impact of
         CPZ parking controls on the local resident and business community
         and other regeneration factors which support the sustainability of the
         local area.

P-CPZ4   Specifically, the CPZ review process should include an assessment of
         displaced parking activity in the surrounding area. The review should
         consult local residents and businesses in streets adjacent to the

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         existing CPZs to identify the need for additional parking patrols in
         adjacent streets to relieve parking stress areas.

Parking Permits and Charges

P-PP1    When a resident applies to renew a permit, and providing the vehicle
         details and place of residence that were provided as evidence has not
         changed since the previous years application was processed, there
         would be no requirement to provide the relevant documentation prior to
         reissuing the permit. Under these circumstances the renewal letter will
         be sufficient evidence. However, the Council will require actual sight of
         all original documents every three years. This would apply to all permit
         applications and types.

P-PP2    The Council should review the residents permit structure to take into
         account the emissions based best practice model currently used by the
         DVLA. The revised structure should be transparent, fair and equitable.
         This has been included within the work plan, and is scheduled for action
         during 05/06.

P-PP3    It is therefore recommended that the Council introduces a 25% discount
         for the charge of a resident permit for LPG, LNG and hybrid cars in
         accordance with the emission based best practice model currently used
         by the DVLA. This environmentally led discount has been in effect
         since 1st April 2004.

P-PP4    It is also recommended that the Council offers free resident and
         business permits for electric cars. This exemption has taken effect from
         1st April 2004, however it is only applicable to residents permits.
         Business permit holders with electric cars will qualify for free permits
         with effect of 1st April 2005.

P-PP5    The Council should take measures to reduce the number of untaxed
         vehicles within the borough. By introducing an enforcement policy that
         any vehicle parked in a CPZ displaying a resident permit, while also
         displaying an expired Vehicle Excise Duty (VED), will invalidate the
         residents permit resulting in a penalty charge notice (PCN) being
         issued. This will further develop the Councils partnership with the
         DVLA.

P-PP6    Any changes to the terms and conditions for use of a permit will need to
         be added to all permit application literature and, reflected in Traffic
         Management Orders.

P-PP7    The Council should comprehensively review the visitor’s voucher
         scheme, including charges, when robust visitor parking demand data is
         made available through the data management strategy.




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14.2     Recommendations included within the Parking and Enforcement
         Plan Operational Document:


Customer Satisfaction

O-CS1    The standards set out in Hackney’s draft Public Consultation Charter
         should be fully adopted in all the Council’s parking consultation
         exercises.

O-CS2    The Council should implement the CPZ Consultation Strategy,
         undertaking Stage One (In Principle Consultation) and, where required,
         Stage Two (Detailed Design Consultation) consultations.

O-CS3    When consulting on new CPZ proposals, the Council should keep local
         residents and businesses in adjacent areas (or ‘buffer zones’) fully
         informed of possible parking displacement effects.

O-CS4    The Council should undertake a review of new CPZs in the Borough
         one year after implementation, and a review of all CPZs in the Borough
         every three years, including an evaluation of customer feedback
         received.

O-CS5    The Council should develop tools to regularly obtain customer feedback
         on parking matters in the Borough.

O-CS6    The Council should develop tools to improve customer access to its
         parking services.



Data Management

O-DM1    The Council should develop a robust annual parking survey programme
         that monitors both on- and off-street parking supply and demand in the
         Borough.


Parking Supply and Charges

O-PS1    The allocation of on-street kerb side space should accord with the
         Council’s defined hierarchy of parking need.

O-PS2    The Council should assess the need for parking controls at junctions on
         the Borough’s highway network, based on road safety, bus operations
         and general access requirements.

O-PS3    The Council should monitor, manage and review on-street pay and
         display parking to help manage long-stay commuter parking and
         promote short stay shopper and visitor parking in the Borough.

O-PS4    The Council should review and minimise footway parking in the
         Borough to ensure that priority is given to pedestrian access needs; the
         introduction of new footway parking should be discouraged.

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O-PS5     The Council should maximise off-street parking facilities in the
          Borough’s main town centres. Their usage should be reviewed to
          ensure that spaces adequately turnover to meet short-stay
          shopper/visitor parking needs, in support of the local retail economy.

O-PS6     The Council should undertake a comprehensive and coordinated
          review of off-street pay and display charges, informed by output from
          the data management strategy.


CPZ Strategy

O-CPZ1    The Council should adopt a two-phased approach to consultation:
          Stage One (In Principle Consultation) to assess parking stress areas
          and their need for new parking controls; and Stage Two (Detailed
          Design Consultation) to inform the CPZ strategy.

O-CPZ2    The Council should assess the need for new parking controls based
          on the following criteria: technical assessment, member support and
          deputations from the local community.

O-CPZ3    The Council should undertake a review of new CPZs in the Borough
          one year after implementation.

O-CPZ4    The Council should undertake a rolling review of all CPZs in the
          Borough every three years.

O-CPZ5    The Council should extend parking controls in specific locations
          experiencing continual parking pressures, subject to consultation.



Parking Permits and Charges

O-PP1     The Council should review the resident’s permit structure to take into
          account the emissions-based best practice model currently used by
          the DVLA, ensuring a transparent, fair and equitable system.

O-PP2     The Council should introduce an environmentally-led 25% discount for
          resident’s permit charges for LPG, LNG and hybrid cars, as well as
          cars with engine sizes below 1200cc. This has taken effect from 1st
          April 2004.

O-PP3     The Council should offer free resident and business permits for electric
          vehicles. This has taken effect from 1st April 2004.

O-PP4     The Council should explore the extension of Housing Services’ policy
          of not issuing estate resident’s permits for untaxed vehicles to the
          Neighbourhood Housing Office.

O-PP5     The Council should only allocate business permits to businesses who
          can demonstrate a genuine need to use a car to carry out their daily
          employment duties, supported by clear permit allocation criteria.


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O-PP6     The Council should undertake a medium-term review of business
          permit charges, informed by local parking data generated by the data
          management strategy.

O-PP7     The Council should implement the essential worker’s permit scheme
          during the 2004/05 financial year, subject to the findings of the on-
          going consultation process.

O-PP8     The Council should investigate the possibility of linking charges for
          doctor’s permits to the proposed charging structure for business
          permits.



Estate Parking

O-EP1     The Council should establish a regular liaison group to enable Housing
          and Parking Services to discuss cross-cutting parking issues and
          improve parking management in the Borough.

O-EP2     The Council should review the outcome of the three pilot housing
          estate enforcement schemes and investigate the scope for a wider roll-
          out.

O-EP3     The Council’s Parking Services should investigate the benefits of
          operating a seamless parking enforcement service, and enter into
          further discussions with Housing Services to explore taking over
          responsibility for the enforcement (through ticket issue and vehicle
          removal) of off-street parking on the Council’s housing estates.



Disabled Parking

O-DP1     The Council should introduce a companion borough badge scheme,
          similar to that for Tower Hamlets, to reduce fraud and give greater
          priority to local disabled residents’ parking needs. A rigorous,
          consistent policy should be implemented, backed up by stringent,
          targeted enforcement, to combat Blue Badge misuse and raise public
          awareness.

O-DP2     The Council should ensure that adequate, conveniently located
          disabled parking facilities are provided outside public buildings to fully
          meet access requirements set out in the Disabilities Discrimination Act
          (DDA).



Enforcement

O-E1      The Council will deliver an enforcement contract that supports a fair,
          consistent, transparent, policy-driven and quality-led enforcement
          regime.


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O-E2     The Council will specify key performance indicators (KPIs) which are
         regularly and systematically monitored to ensure Parking Services’
         performance and continuous improvement.

O-E3     The Council should work in partnership with the contractor, the
         Metropolitan Police and other agencies to achieve a safer, more
         attractive street scene.

O-E4     The Council should maximise road safety throughout the Borough
         through the fair and consistent enforcement of parking regulations.



Non-car Modes

O-NCM1   The Council should ensure that secure and conveniently located cycle
         parking and storage facilities are provided across the Borough,
         especially in areas of high demand.

O-NCM2   The Council should consider the introduction of secure on-street cycle
         parking where there is a high demand for such facilities and available
         footway space is limited.

O-NCM3   The Council should ensure that secure, conveniently located and free
         powered two-wheel vehicle parking facilities are provided across the
         Borough, especially in areas of high demand.

O-NCM4   The Council should review coach parking in the Borough and develop
         a coach management strategy which ensures that adequate provision
         is made to meet both existing and future needs.



New Development

O-ND1    The Council should develop revised parking standards which accord
         with the requirements set out in the London Plan, which take into
         account the Borough’s local circumstances.



Supporting Mechanisms

O-SM1    The Council should extend the scope of the TfL funded study on illegal
         car parks to the rest of the Borough.

O-SM2    The Council should maximise linkages between the PEP and the
         Council’s emerging Travel Plan, and identify mechanisms to deliver a
         range of sustainable travel initiatives, including Car Clubs, car sharing,
         car and bike pools within the context of travel plans for existing and
         new development in the Borough.


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