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									                            The Citadel
                        School of Education




        STUDENT TEACHING INTERNSHIP

                           GUIDELINES


For Student Teaching Interns, Cooperating Teachers,
   School Administrators and College Supervisors

                              2008-2009



                            School of Education
                              307 Capers Hall
                              THE CITADEL
                             171 Moultrie Street
                            Charleston, SC 29409
                               843-953-5097
                               FAX 953-7258




[Rev. Ed.: July 2008]
The Citadel, School of Education
         WELCOME student teaching intern, cooperating teacher and college supervisor. The
         2008-2009 handbook provides the important guidelines, policies and information for the
         many aspects of the internship experience. Please read the handbook before the
         experience begins and keep it handy as a reference when questions may arise.
         The handbook in its entirety and forms are available on-line through The Citadel website
         at: http://www.citadel.edu/education/site/site.html. During this academic year we will
         continue to use the on-line LiveText computer program to document assessments.
         Beginning spring semester 2008, the required student teaching internship portfolio is
         maintained on LiveText. This process has made it easier for student teaching interns to
         keep up-to-date with specific assignments.
         I would like to extend an invitation to all of you to please contact me should you have any
         questions or concerns. I want to thank all the cooperating teachers and college
         supervisors for your willingness to mentor our students. I wish everyone a great
         semester.


         Barbara Habhegger
         Interim Assistant to the Dean
         The Citadel School of Education
         171 Moultrie Street, 307 Capers Hall
         Charleston, SC 29409
         843-953-2024
         Fax 843-953-7258
         barbara.habhegger@citadel.edu




         http://www.citadel.edu/education/site/site.html




The Citadel, School of Education                                                         -i-
                                             Table of Contents

Introduction                                                                                         1
Section 1: The Citadel’s Professional Education Unit Conceptual Framework                            2
Section 2: Overview of the Student Teaching Internship Experience                                    4
        The Framework for the Student Teaching Internship                                            4
         Program Organization                                                                        4
         Recommended Semester Calendar – Secondary Education                                         6
          Recommended Semester Calendar – K-12 Physical Education                                    7
          Managing Issues or Concerns in the Student Teaching Internship Experience                  8
Section 3: Expectations of the Student Teaching Intern                                               9
Section 4: Expectations of the Cooperating Teacher                                                  13
Section 5: Expectations of the College Supervisor                                                   18
Section 6: Expectations of the School Administrator                                                 19
Section 7: ADEPT System Guidelines                                                                  20
                ADEPT Overview                                                                      20
                Revised ADEPT Performance Standards for Classroom-Based Teachers                    20
                ADEPT Requirements for Teacher Education Programs                                   34
Section 8: Assessment and Evaluation                                                                36
Section 9: Portfolio Requirements                                                                   45
Section 10: Overview of Teacher Education Certification                                             47


APPENDICES:
Section A. Student Teacher Intern Forms                                                             51
         Liability Insurance Waiver Form                                                            52
         Schedule for Student Teaching Internship                                                   53
         Physical Education Student Teaching Internship Weekly Log with Teacher Comments            54
         Second Student Teaching Intern’s Weekly Log                                                55
         Physical Education Lesson Plan Format                                                      56
         Secondary Individual Lesson Plan Template                                                  57
         Student Teaching Intern Observation Report                                                 58
         TT1: Long-Range Plan                                                                       59
         TT2: Unite Work Sample                                                                     62
         TT3: Reflection on Instruction and Student Learning                                        65
         TT4: Professional Self-Assessment                                                          66




The Citadel, School of Education                                                           - ii -
                                      Table of Contents Continued

Section B. Cooperating Teacher Forms                                                       67
   ADEPT Weekly Student Teaching Intern Evaluation Form                                    68
    English Content Area Indicators Evaluation                                             69
   Mathematics Content Area Indicator Evaluation                                           70
   Physical Education Content Area Indicator Evaluation                                    71
   Science Content Area Indicator Evaluation                                               72
   Social Studies Content Area Indicator Evaluation                                        73
   Final Grade Recommendation                                                              74



Section C. College Supervisor Forms                                                        75
   College Supervisor’s Visitation Documentation Form Secondary Education                  76
   College Supervisor’s Visitation Documentation Form Physical Education                   77
   Student Teaching Internship Remediation Plan                                            78




Section D. Assessments Forms                                                               79
   Professional Dispositions Score Sheet                                                   80
   ADEPT Midterm Evaluation                                                                82
   ADEPT APS 1: Long-range Plan Rubric                                                     86
   ADEPT APS 2: Short-range Planning of Instruction Rubric                                 89
   ADEPT APS 3: Short-range Planning, Development and Use of Assessment Rubric             91
   ADEPT Observation Instrument: APS 4-9                                                   93
   ADEPT APS 10: Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities                                  95
   ADEPT Performance Standards Final Evaluation                                            96
   Portfolio Rubric                                                                        98
    Evaluation of Cooperating Teacher Form                                            101
    Evaluation of College Supervisor Form                                             102




The Citadel, School of Education                                                 - iii -
The Citadel, School of Education   - iv -
                                      INTRODUCTION

The student teaching internship is designed as the culmination of the professional preparation
program leading to initial certification for secondary teaching in a specific content field and
initial certification for physical education teaching K-12. The student teaching internship is
designed to reinforce the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary for a teacher candidate
to begin working as a professional educator.

The student teaching internship is a bridge between educational theory and practice. Within
this supervised teaching experience, the teacher candidate begins the transition from teacher
candidate to professional teacher. A successful transition requires the teacher candidate to
demonstrate knowledge, dedication, enthusiasm, and professionalism. In turn, the cooperating
teacher and college supervisor need to demonstrate encouragement, assistance, trust, and
compassion.

The Citadel School of Education Interim Assistant to the Dean (previously known as Director of
Internships & Field Experiences) coordinates all field experiences and internships for the
program and works directly with each school and district to provide the best possible
placement. Agreements are renewed on an annual basis between The Citadel and each school
district where student teachers may be placed, as well as on a semester basis between
cooperating teachers and The Citadel. The Citadel School of Education greatly appreciates the
many teachers, administrators, and staff members who provide Citadel faculty and teacher
candidates with outstanding professional opportunities and experiences in the public schools.

The Guidelines for Student Teaching Internship forms a handbook for student teaching interns,
cooperating teachers, principals, district coordinators, and college supervisors that provides
information on policies and procedures of the teaching internship program. The handbook also
constitutes the syllabus for the undergraduate courses EDUC 499 and PHED 499: Internship in
Teaching, and for the graduate M.A.T. courses, EDUC 520 and HESS 620: Professional
Internship.

The Secondary Teacher Education Programs at The Citadel adhere to the standards and are
recognized by their respective national specialized professional (SPA) associations, meet the
operating standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE),
comply with the regulations of the State’s ADEPT legislation, and follow the guidelines provided
by the South Carolina State Department of Education.




The Citadel, School of Education               1
                              Section 1: Conceptual Framework
                                       Vision Statement
                           The Citadel’s Professional Education Unit

    DEVELOPING PRINCIPLED EDUCATIONAL LEADERS FOR P-12 SCHOOLS

The Citadel’s Professional Education Unit prepares principled educational leaders to be
knowledgeable, reflective, and ethical professionals. Candidates completing our programs
are committed to ensuring that all students succeed in a learner-centered environment.

 Rationale:

            Now more than ever, our society is in need of principled educational professionals
             capable of and committed to ensuring that all children learn.

            Now more than ever, the quality of education available to our children and youth will
             make the difference between those who prosper in the new economy and those left
             behind.

            Now more than ever, it is time to accelerate our transformation of an educational
             system that is no longer relevant for the modern, global community.

 In today’s world, we must educate all children and at unprecedented high levels. As noted
 by Ted Hershberg and his colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, ―the evidence makes
 clear that the current structure of public education designed for a different purpose and
 different century cannot help all students become effective citizens or productive workers in
 the new economy.‖


The Citadel’s Professional Education Unit is committed to the simultaneous transformation of
the preparation of educational leaders and of the places where they work. Specifically, The
Citadel’s Professional Education Unit seeks to develop principled educational leaders who:

           have mastered their subject matter and are skilled in using it to foster student
            learning;

           know the self who educates (Parker J. Palmer) and integrate this self knowledge with
            content knowledge, knowledge of students, and in the context of becoming professional
            change agents committed to using this knowledge and skill to ensure that all students
            succeed in a learner-centered environment; and

           exemplify the highest ethical standards by modeling respect for all human beings and
            valuing diversity as an essential component of an effective learner-centered
            environment.




The Citadel, School of Education                    2
The Citadel’s Professional Educational Unit is on the march, transforming itself into a Center of
Excellence for the preparation of principled educational leaders. Through our initial
programs for teacher candidates for P-12 schools and our advanced programs for professional
educators in P-12 schools, The Citadel’s Professional Education Unit transforms cadets and
graduate students into principled educational leaders capable of and committed to
transforming our schools into learning communities where all children and youth succeed.

The Citadel’s Professional Education Unit has identified 17 performance indicators for
candidates to demonstrate that they are principled educational leaders who are
knowledgeable, reflective, and ethical professionals:

Knowledgeable Principled Educational Leaders…

      1. know in-depth subject matter of their field of professional study and practice;
      2. demonstrate and apply an understanding of developmental and learning theories;
      3. model instructional and/or leadership theories of best practice;
      4. utilize the knowledge gained from professional study to develop and implement
         an educational program that is varied, creative, and nurturing;
      5. integrate the use of technology;
      6. demonstrate a commitment to lifelong learning.

Reflective Principled Educational Leaders…

     7. develop and describe their philosophy of education and reflect upon its impact in
         the teaching and learning environment;
     8. develop and manage meaningful educational experiences that address the needs
        of all learners with respect for their individual and cultural characteristics;
     9. construct, foster, and maintain a learner-centered environment in which all
         learners contribute and are actively engaged;
    10. apply their understanding of both context and research to plan, structure,
         facilitate, and monitor effective teaching and learning in the context of continual
         assessment;
    11. research their practice by reflectively and critically asking questions and seeking
         answers.

Ethical Principled Educational Leaders…

    12. apply reflective practices;
    13. demonstrate commitment to a safe, supportive learning environment;
    14. demonstrate high values and a caring, fair, honest, responsible, and respectful
        attitude;
    15. establish rapport with students, families, colleagues, and community;
    16. value diversity and exhibit sensitivity to and respect for cultures;
    17. exhibit prompt regular attendance, wear professional attire, and communicate in
        standard English.




The Citadel, School of Education                3
                                Section 2: Overview of the
                          Student Teaching Internship Experience

           THE FRAMEWORK FOR THE STUDENT TEACHING INTERNSHIP

The student teaching intern, the cooperating teacher, the college supervisor, and the school
administrator have specific roles and responsibilities to ensure that pupils in the public school
classroom experience a positive and productive learning experience. The student teaching
internship is designed to create a new professional educator who has experienced fully the role
of the public school teacher for a short period of time. Although not every possible situation
will occur during the teaching internship, the following basic assumptions are made:
    1. The student teaching intern and cooperating teacher form a team responsible for
       organizing, planning, instructing, managing, evaluating, and reporting pupil learning.
    2. The cooperating teacher serves as mentor, coach, co-planner, and evaluator for the
       intern. This calls for the establishment and maintenance of a high-quality professional
       relationship.
    3. The student teaching intern familiarizes him/herself with the cooperating teacher’s style
       of teaching and management in the classroom. Gradually the student teaching intern
       assumes the teaching responsibilities of the cooperating teacher with as little
       interruption to the learning environment as possible.
    4. The cooperating teacher and student teaching intern are encouraged to follow the
       ―Recommended Semester Calendar‖ described in detail at the end of this section.
    5. Physical Education interns have two placements with one at an elementary school and
       the other at a middle or high school. Each placement is for a minimum of 30 days.


                                   PROGRAM ORGANIZATION

A. The Citadel School of Education Interim Assistant to the Dean (previously The Director of
   Internships & Field Experiences) is responsible for the placement, overall supervision, and
   monitoring of student teaching interns.

B. The public school accepting the student teaching intern will fulfill the following requirements:
    1) be accredited by the State Department of Education and, when applicable, the Southern
       Association of Colleges and Schools;
    2) possess a well defined curriculum and adequate teaching resources;
    3) possess adequate physical facilities and enrollment patterns;
    4) provide evidence of a staff that demonstrates a willingness to work with student
       teaching interns;
    5) demonstrate a safe and orderly environment; and
    6) provide opportunities for student teaching interns to experience appropriate methods,
       materials, and professional relationships.



The Citadel, School of Education                4
C. The cooperating teacher accepting the student teaching intern will fulfill the following
   requirements:
    1) possess continuing contract teacher status;
    2) possess a professional teaching certificate in the content area;
    3) complete the South Carolina System for Assisting, Developing, and Evaluating
        Professional Teaching (ADEPT) training for cooperating teacher and college supervisors;
    4) successfully completed the school district's teacher evaluation;
    5) provide evidence of a minimum of three (3) years experience as a classroom teacher
        with at least two (2) years of teaching experience at the grade level and/or subject area
        for assigned supervision;
    6) possess a positive attitude toward the teaching profession and students;
    7) be willing to participate in the evaluation of the intern;
    8) exhibit a willingness to serve as a cooperating teacher;
    9) be recommended by his/her principal; and
    10) participate in an orientation program for cooperating teachers.

D. The college supervisor assigned to work with the cooperating teacher and the student
   teaching intern will fulfill the following requirements:
    1) complete the South Carolina System for Assisting, Developing, and Evaluating
       Professional Teaching (ADEPT) training for cooperating teacher and college supervisors;
    2) demonstrate prior professional involvement in public schools germane to the area of
       supervision;
    3) complete at least two (2) years of teaching experience in public schools or institutions;
       and
    4) be prepared as a professional educator in the teaching major of the student teaching
       intern(s). (In cases where the college supervisor does not have professional preparation
        in the teaching major of the interns, she/he will team with a content area faculty
        member.)

E. The process for the selection of public schools and cooperating teachers includes the
   commitment of the public school to participate in the professional development of pre-
   service teachers, provide highly-qualified cooperating teachers, and support the teacher and
   the student teaching intern. The selection steps include:
       candidates make application for the student teaching internship two semesters
        prior to internship;
       candidates progress toward completing requirements are monitored;
       potential placement sites are contacted, and school administration and teacher formally
        agree to host a student teaching intern based on the criteria listed in B and C above;
        and
       candidates are formally approved when all requirements have been met.




The Citadel, School of Education                5
                           RECOMMENDED SEMESTER CALENDAR
                         For Secondary Education Teaching Interns

The cooperating teacher will consult regularly with the student teaching intern to make
decisions about teaching responsibilities as outlined on the calendar. Cooperating teachers will
consider such factors as the academic needs of students and the capabilities of the student
teaching intern. The following calendar offers some guidelines. Logs and ADEPT weekly
evaluations should be turned in weekly to the college supervisor.
Stage 1 - Observation             Observe cooperating teachers’ classes and instruction.
                                  Learn students’ names and gather student information.
Week 1
                                  Become familiar with physical building and bell schedule.
                                  Assist the cooperating teacher with non-instructional routine.
Stage 2 –                         Continue to assist cooperating teacher.
Observing/Assisting               Work with students needing extra help.
                                  Determine the order you will assume responsibility for teaching classes.
Week 2
                                  Complete and submit ADEPT Performance Standard (APS) 1: Long-Range
                                   Plan to college supervisor.
Week 3                            Begin teaching one class, using a lesson plan prepared jointly or modeled
                                   in an earlier class taught by the cooperating teacher.
                                  Continue with all other supporting/non-instructional activities.
Week 4                            Add another class to your teaching responsibilities.
                                  Work on unit plans (APS 2 and 3: Unit Work Sample). Seek
                                   resources/assistance from the cooperating teacher and other appropriate
                                   sources.
                                  Begin writing lesson plans independently and submit to cooperating
                                   teacher for approval.
Week 5                            Add another class to your teaching responsibilities.
                                  Assume most homeroom responsibilities, if applicable.
Stage 3 –                         Carry full instructional/class load responsibilities.
Independent                       Cooperating teacher, student teaching intern, and college supervisor
Teaching                           complete ADEPT Midterm Evaluation.
                                  Mid-term conference with college supervisor.
Weeks 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Stage 4 – Phase-                  Begin returning one or two classes to the cooperating teacher.
Out/Observation                   Assume the role of assistant to the cooperating teacher.
Week 11
Week 12                           At week’s end, return class instruction back to cooperating teacher.

Week 13                           Make arrangements to observe other classes in the school or in another
                                   school for a day. Complete observation forms.
                                  Return all materials to the cooperating teacher.
                                  Complete all required forms and portfolio, including APS 10 Professional
                                   Self-Assessment questions.
                                  Final conference with college supervisor.




The Citadel, School of Education                      6
                            RECOMMENDED SEMESTER CALENDAR
                        For K – 12 Physical Education Teaching Interns

The cooperating teacher will consult regularly with the student teaching intern to make flexible
and on-going decisions about the calendar. Cooperating teachers will consider such factors as
the readiness of the student teaching intern, the ability of pupils, classroom management
issues, and the subject matter. The student teaching intern is required to teach full time for two
weeks at each placement. Three weeks at each placement is more desirable. The following
calendar offers some guidelines. Logs and teacher ADEPT weekly evaluations should be turned
in weekly to the college supervisor.
Stage 1 -               Observe cooperating teachers’ classes and instruction.
Observation             Learn students’ names and gather student information.
Week 1                  Become familiar with physical building and bell schedule.
                        Assist the cooperating teacher with non-instructional routine.
                        Work on ADEPT Performance Standard 1 – Long-Range Plan.
Stage 2 –               Continue assisting cooperating teacher.
Observing/              Begin co-teaching or working with students needing extra help.
Assisting               Determine the order you will assume responsibility for teaching classes.
                        Start teaching parts of classes after the teacher models the lesson in an earlier
Week 2
                         class. Reflect on how your lesson could be improved by observing the teacher again
                         and modeling other classes.
                        Continue to use cooperating teacher’s plans as you begin to teach more classes.
                        Complete and submit ADEPT Performance Standard (APS) 1: Long-Range Plan to
                         college supervisor.
                        Work on unit plans (APS 2 and 3: Unit Work Sample). Seek resources/assistance
                         from the cooperating teacher and other appropriate sources.
Week 3                  Begin working into full-time teaching using the teacher’s plans or your own that
                         have been developed with cooperating teacher’s help.
                        Work into full-time teaching by adding another class or two each day until teaching
                         all classes by the end of the week.
                        Complete and turn in unit plans to college supervisor after approval of the
                         cooperating teacher.
                        Continue with all other supporting/non-instructional activities.
                        Plan lessons independently for use in the next two weeks. Submit to college
                         supervisor after approval of the cooperating teacher.
Stage 3 –               Carry full instructional responsibilities.
Independent             Complete and submit ADEPT Midterm Evaluation Summary.
Teaching Week           Complete Professional Dispositions Score Sheet on LiveText.
4-5
Stage 4 –               Return classes one or two at a time to the cooperating teacher and assume role of
Phase-Out/               assistant by the end of the week.
Observation             Complete forms for APS 10 and all other assignments in the portfolio.
Week 6                  Make arrangements to observe 2-3 classes with different teachers at each level
                         (elementary and secondary). Complete observation forms.

                        GO TO NEW PLACEMENT AND REPEAT THE FIRST SIX WEEKS
During Week Thirteen: Complete the write up of your reflective evaluation of your internship
experience at both placements, including APS 10 Professional Self-Assessment questions. Make any
corrections needed for portfolio.




The Citadel, School of Education                    7
                               Managing Issues or Concerns in the
                             Student Teaching Internship Experience

During any given student teaching internship, it is possible for difficulties to arise. Some of
these difficulties or situations may be easily resolved while others may be of a more serious
nature. Whenever any member of the triad – student teaching intern, cooperating teacher or
college supervisor – has a concern, it should be addressed as soon as possible. In certain
situations a remediation plan will be written. Additional observations by the college supervisor,
content area specialist and/or Director of Internships & Field Experiences may be needed.
If the student teaching intern or the cooperating teacher has a concern or problem he/she
should use the following protocol:
    1) Contact the college supervisor.
    2) The college supervisor will decide if a meeting to discuss the situation needs to occur.
    3) The college supervisor will arrange the meeting.
    4) The meeting is held and hopefully the situation is resolved.
    5) If the problem persists, the college supervisor will share his or her concerns with the
        Director of Internships & Field Experiences.
If all of these efforts do not resolve the situation, a conference should be held. The conference
may be called for the purpose of:
    1) Establishing a remediation plan;
    2) Removing or withdrawing a student teaching intern from a specific placement; or
    3) Reassigning an intern to a new placement (the college supervisor or the Director of Field
        Experiences will be responsible for informing the new cooperating teacher of any
        relevant details concerning the original internship experience).
The suggested process for the conference is:
   1) Clarification of events leading to the current situation;
   2) Outline of possible options for the student teaching intern, including grade and financial
      liability; and
   3) Development of a written remediation plan (See template on page_____).
A copy of the signed Student Teaching Internship Remediation Plan will be placed in the intern’s
file at The Citadel.




The Citadel, School of Education               8
             Section 3: Expectations of the Student Teacher Internship

The student teacher internship is a specific period of time where acquired knowledge including
theory and content will be applied to a real-life classroom. The cooperating teacher and college
supervisor make up a team of professionals who will assist the student teaching intern in
developing teaching skills.
A. Application to the Student Teaching Internship
Two semesters prior to registering for the student teaching internship, the prospective intern
must complete the following process:
  1. Complete and submit to the Director of Internships and Field Experiences in the School of
      Education an application for student teaching internship along with a current resume;
  2. Complete the fingerprinting and State of South Carolina Teacher Certification application;
      and
  3. Successfully complete all course requirements and pass all required PRAXIS tests for
      South Carolina certification.
  4. All candidates must submit evidence of a negative Tuberculosis test (TB) to the Director
      of Internships and Field Experiences prior to the start of the student teaching internship.
B. Responsibilities
The student teaching intern is expected to:
   1. Attend all scheduled Citadel campus meetings and seminars;
   2. Attend all classes in the cooperating school for a minimum sixty (60) full days;
   3. Recognize the "guest" status of the intern in the school and that final authority for
       classroom procedures rests with the cooperating teacher;
   4. Keep accurate records as required by the cooperating school and college supervisor
   5. Maintain a weekly log (sample form in appendix; actual form found at
   6. Participate in all duties, school meetings, and activities in which the cooperating teacher
       is involved. (Does not include activities or duties for which cooperating teacher receives
       a stipend/compensation);
   7. Participate in parent/teacher conferences;
   8. Learn how to access audio/visual aid equipment and library materials;
   9. Prepare and submit, one week in advance, lesson plans to cooperating teacher;
   10. Physical Education Teaching Interns - prepare lesson plans one week in advance, submit
       to cooperating teaching who initials review of lesson plans. Give a copy to college
       supervisor prior to week of teaching. Final corrected copies to be placed in portfolio;
   11. Observe five (5) classes other than your cooperating teacher, complete ―Classroom
       Observation Report‖, and submit on LiveText to college supervisor; and
   12. Submit a completed portfolio on LiveText to college supervisor prior to the end of the
       internship.




The Citadel, School of Education               9
Student Teaching Internship Professional Checklist
         Obtain phone numbers of the cooperating teacher, college supervisor, and school;
         Use proper grammar, spelling and punctuation in all correspondence including email;
         Read and comply with all approved policies and practices of the cooperating school;
         Maintain a high standard of ethics and professionalism at all times;
         Show initiative and resourcefulness;
         Maintain confidentiality of student records;
         Prepare lesson plans, materials, and portfolio on time;
         Keep up-to-date with weekly logs and portfolio;
         Display enthusiasm and interest in all phases of the internship experience;
         Ask questions, seek input; and
         Complete all evaluations and forms as required.
 C. Absences
 The student teaching intern is expected to be present in the school every day and is required
 to follow the school district's holiday schedule not The Citadel’s schedule. If it becomes
 necessary to be absent, you must call the (1) cooperating teacher, (2) school, and (3) college
 supervisor. Absences should be only for illness, death in the immediate family, or direct
 involvement in or occurrence of catastrophic events. Failure to notify the appropriate
 individuals will result in disciplinary action. Days missed must be made up so that a minimum
 of sixty (60) full days of student teaching are completed as required by State law. If an intern
 is absent more than two days, she/he must meet with the Director of Internships & Field
 Experiences to assess her/his continuation in EDUC-499/EDUC-520/PHED-499.
 D. Substitute Teaching/Employment by the School District
 The student teaching intern may not, under any circumstances for any part of the school day,
 be used as substitute teachers. Interns may not, in any capacity, be paid employees in the
 cooperating school or district.
 E. Confidentiality of Student/School Information
 Confidentiality of information pertaining to students is critical. Official school information
 about students and personnel must not be discussed outside of the professional setting.
 F. Corporal Punishment
 Under no circumstances may a student teaching intern in any school, use corporal
 punishment, threaten to use corporal punishment, or be an official witness to corporal
 punishment.




The Citadel, School of Education                 10
 G. Use of Personal Automobile
 Transportation to and from the cooperating school is the student teaching intern's
 responsibility. The intern should not, under any circumstances, transport students in his/her
 automobile, including field trips that are officially sponsored by the school or school district.
 H. Legal Responsibility and Liability Insurance
 The student teaching intern is not given any defined legal status in the public schools in South
 Carolina. Regularly employed teachers do have a legal responsibility for their classroom. For
 example, if a teacher through negligence allows a child to be injured in the classroom, that
 teacher may be brought to trial and may have damages assessed. It is generally assumed
 that the legal responsibility of the regular teacher cannot be passed to the intern; however,
 this is an un-adjudicated point.
 Therefore, The Citadel strongly suggests that you purchase student interns' insurance that will
 provide you with liability insurance (see form in appendix). This coverage would be available to
 assist in defense and damages assessed due to legal action taken by the student or parent.
 These funds would be available only if the student teaching intern has not violated any school
 district policies or regulations in carrying out job responsibilities. Insurance is available for a
 nominal fee from either Palmetto State Teachers Association or Student-South Carolina
 Education Association. Candidates must sign a ―Liability Insurance Waiver‖ form to the start of
 the internship.
 I. Professional Conduct
 The student teaching intern is expected to conduct themselves as professional educators at all
 times. This professionalism relates to dress, demeanor, language, preparation, punctuality,
 and attendance. Fraternization with students in social situations and communication of a
 personal nature by phone or e-mail are not permitted. The use of controlled substances is a
 violation of The Citadel’s policy and South Carolina law. Interns who engage in
 unprofessional, unethical, or illegal behavior will be removed immediately from the cooperating
 school and dismissed from the education program.
 Cadets teaching in the classroom are required to wear appropriate leave uniform - Physical
 Education interns wear leave uniform to and from school. In their school, they must wear a
 collared (golf type) shirt, socks, tennis shoes, shorts and coaching pants approved by their
 school for their cooperating teacher. All undergraduate cadet interns must have their hair cut
 and be shaved according to cadet regulations. M. A.T. interns are required to conform to
 individual school dress policy. The Citadel does not permit ―dress down days‖ for teaching
 interns.




The Citadel, School of Education                 11
 J. OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens
If an incident occurs where blood or other potentially infectious body fluids come in contact
with a student teacher’s non-intact skin or mucous membranes or there is a parental incident
such as a human bite or a needle stick which breaks the skin, the following procedure should be
followed:
   1. The affected student teaching intern and cooperating teacher need to contact the school
       health official, principal and college supervisor; and
   2. Proper forms should be completed per school regulations and procedures followed
       just as with a regular employee.

 K. Visits by Arts and Sciences Faculty
 Each student teaching intern should expect to be contacted by a Citadel faculty member from
 his/her content area and be asked to schedule a classroom observation. The faculty member
 will prepare a written statement relating to the intern's performance and ability to manage
 subject area content. This written statement will be placed in the student's permanent record
 in the School of Education and will be reviewed by the college supervisor at the time of the
 evaluation process to aid in the determination of the student intern's course grade. The
 criteria for judging performance are based on certain indicators. These indicators are the
 results of ratings of either competent or developing competence as reflected in the South
 Carolina ADEPT performance standards. Please refer to the appendix for specific content
 indicators.




The Citadel, School of Education              12
                  Section 4: Expectations of the Cooperating Teacher

The cooperating teacher is the person who works on a daily basis with the student teaching
intern. Collaboration between the two individuals is necessary as the intern begins to develop
professional competence. Initially, the cooperating teacher will oversee the activities of the
intern very carefully and extensively. As the intern becomes more proficient, the cooperating
teacher will transfer increasing duties and responsibilities to him/her. Ultimately, the student
teaching intern should function in the total teaching role by maintaining and undertaking all
duties and activities normally performed by the cooperating teacher. Throughout the
internship, the cooperating teacher is encouraged to develop and sustain a cooperative
relationship with the intern. In the rare instance where a cooperating teacher needs to be
absent for an extended period of time, an alternative placement may be made.

A. Orientation
Introduction
       Explain classroom responsibilities and procedures;
       Discuss professional expectations such as appropriate attire, school policies and
        procedures;
       Discuss each other’s expectations of this experience to begin building a professional
        working relationship; and
       Provide a copy of your class schedule and teacher editions of textbooks and curriculum
        guides.
Orientation to the School and Staff
       Provide a copy of the staff and school handbook;
       Inform the student teaching intern about special support services offered by the school,
        including resource personnel such as school psychologist, guidance counselor, speech
        therapist;
       Introduce the student teaching intern to all school personnel;
       Provide general information about the school and community; and
       Tour the school building.
Orientation to the Classroom
       Introduce the student teaching intern as a co-professional/teacher (provide a warm,
        supportive atmosphere in the classroom);
       Provide the student teaching intern with his or her own work space if possible;
       Provide a class list and seating chart;
       Discuss daily routines, procedures, class schedule, classroom rules, and nature of the
        student population; and
       Orient the student teaching intern to supplies, materials and policies regarding the use
        of materials.


The Citadel, School of Education                  13
Planning
       Assist the intern in planning a schedule of activities leading from observation to full-time
        teaching;
       Clarify planning expectations and procedures;
       Establish a specific time for joint planning and evaluation;
       Share written lesson plans and provide the student teaching intern with sample long-
        range plans;
       Help the student teacher intern clarify and think through his or her lessons and units of
        instruction, including how objectives are determined, why specific activities are selected;
       Review, critique and approve the student teacher intern’s daily lesson plans (lesson
        plans and instructional materials should be submitted for your approval a week in
        advance but no later than the Wednesday before the week of instruction);
       Discuss your proactive classroom management techniques;
       Share resources for the student teaching intern to use;
       Show how to modify plans to provide for ALL students; and
       Help the student teacher intern modify and revise plans as appropriate.
Teaching
       Model instructional techniques and strategies, lessons, and professional responsibility in
        every phase of the experience;
       Encourage your student teaching intern to try her or his own ideas and techniques,
       Formally observe the student teaching intern a minimum of twice during his or her
        placement, and
       Share your favorite time-tested teaching ideas and suggestions.
Assessment
       Assist the student teaching intern in writing and administering teacher-made tests;
       Discuss outcomes for student learning so that the intern understands your performance
        expectation for all students;
       Share grading procedures, grade book, and how to keep accurate records of student
        learning; and
       Provide opportunities for reflection on the intern’s effectiveness in assessment of
        student learning.
Working with Parents
       Oversee all communication with parents whether written or by phone;
       Discuss confidentiality regarding sharing information with parents about other students;
       Provide opportunities for the student teaching intern to participate in school functions
        where parents are present; and
       Assist the intern in his or her development of a plan for communicating with parents.


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B. Responsibilities
To assist the student teaching intern in achieving a successful experience, each cooperating
teacher is expected to:
 1.   Attend the orientation for cooperating teachers;
 2.   Maintain responsibility for the academic progress of pupils by continuing to monitor
      individual progress and providing instructional assistance as needed;
 3.   Maintain legal responsibility for the physical well-being of pupils by frequently monitoring
      classroom conditions throughout the student teaching experience;
 4.   Participate in regular conferences with the college supervisor and contact the supervisor
      with all questions or requests for assistance; and
 5.   Assume when necessary the role of counselor in anticipating needs, addressing
      apprehensions, minimizing fears, and supporting expectations of the intern.
C. Absences of Cooperating Teachers
During a cooperating teacher's absence a student teaching intern may not under any
circumstances for any part of the school day be used as substitute teachers. If it becomes
necessary for the cooperating teacher to be absent on a regular day of teaching, she/he should
notify the school administrator and request the assignment of a substitute. Also, it is
inappropriate for a cooperating teacher to be assigned a substitute’s role in another teacher’s
classroom.
D. First Week of Student Teaching Internship
Introduction into teaching should be a gradual process in which the student teaching intern
assumes responsibility for a few basic activities. As the student teaching intern gains
experience and confidence, more assignments can be added. A warm, supportive environment
that facilitates risk-taking is essential for the student teaching intern’s success.
Suggested activities during the observation period are: carrying out brief teaching
activities with individuals or small groups; distributing and collecting papers; assisting in
checking attendance; assisting in supervising; helping in administering tests and quizzes;
assisting in laboratory and project work; working with individuals or small groups; operating
equipment; assisting the teacher with demonstrations; and explaining a specific procedure or
technique.
E. Tips for Sharing Teaching Responsibility with the Student Teaching Intern
The student teaching internship allows both the cooperating teacher and the student teaching
intern to share in the responsibility of guiding the learning of pupils. The professional
relationship that evolves over the 12-week period promotes a sense of collegiality and
cooperation within the school setting.
F. Observation of the Student Teaching Intern
The cooperating teacher will remain in the classroom to observe instruction and provide
feedback on the student teaching intern’s performance. Initially, the cooperating teacher


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should provide constant supervision followed by a gradual relinquish of control in the classroom,
as the intern becomes an effective manager and instructor. Since the cooperating teacher
completes weekly written evaluation reports, it will be necessary to continue supervision in the
room regularly throughout the assignment.
Suggestions for observing the teaching intern:
    1. Quietly move around in the back, checking materials, setting up displays, or checking
       references;
    2. Appear preoccupied by such activities as grading papers or leafing through some
       publications;
    3. Arrange to work with an individual or a small group of pupils while the intern is involved
       in teaching;
    4. Show positive reinforcement through smiles and other encouraging facial expressions;
    5. Avoid interruptions in class (Interruptions from the cooperating teacher should occur
       only in extreme circumstances. For example, a mistake in content can be discussed with
       the intern later, and the intern can make any necessary explanations on the following
       day without losing the respect of the class or composure and self-confidence.); and
    6. Make follow-up suggestions that emphasize the improvement of learning for the class.
G. Feedback on Performance of the Student Teaching Intern
Informal: Informal observations of the student teaching intern will occur daily. Based on
informal observations, the cooperating teacher will complete the ADEPT Weekly Teaching Intern
Evaluation Form and share it with the student teaching intern. The student teaching intern will
make this evaluation available to the college supervisor via the LiveText portfolio.
Formal: The cooperating teacher will conduct two formal ADEPT observations and the college
supervisor will conduct four formal ADEPT observations. The intern, cooperating teacher and
college supervisor will meet for a conference at least twice during the internship (mid-term and
final) to assess competence in the ADEPT performance dimensions.
When conferring with the intern, the cooperating teacher should:
    1. Recognize areas of strength and provide suggestions for areas of growth;
    2. Ask questions to promote reflection and provoke the intern's own problem-solving (e.g.,
       What do you think of ...? How could you explain that concept more clearly? What other
       approaches could you use?);
    3. Offer specific rather than general suggestions or references (Example: Instead of saying,
       "You need to be more assertive," say, "When Bob asked the question about homework,
       you were hesitant.");
    4. Ask "What if ..." rather than saying, "If you ...;‖
    5. Use terms such as "effective," "helpful," and "creative," rather than "super" and
       "wonderful;" and
    6. Set realistic goals for the student teaching intern, and hold him/her accountable.


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H. Guidelines for Writing a Letter of Recommendation
At the conclusion of the internship, cooperating teachers may be asked to write a letter of
recommendation for the student teaching intern. Following are some suggestions to assist you
in creating an effective representation of the student teaching intern:
   Use school letterhead whenever possible;
   Include a brief description of the school and/or community setting;
   Mention the grade levels and course/content area taught by the student teaching intern;
   Use brief examples and describe two or three of the strengths you observed;
   Comment on the future or potential of the student teaching intern as a classroom teacher;
    and
   Keep it to one-page in length.
I. Policy Statement for Compensating Cooperating Teachers
In lieu of salary, cooperating teachers who supervise student teaching internships during fall or
spring semesters have the option of selecting a voucher or a stipend. The voucher authorizes
payment for in-state enrollment for one three-credit hour course at The Citadel, and the stipend
offers compensation in the amount of $250.00 ($125 for each physical education placement).
Vouchers are non transferable, good for five years, and are not replaced if lost.
Cooperating teachers will receive compensation information from the Director of Internships &
Field Experiences and should return the completed forms before the end of the semester for
compensation at the conclusion of the internship.
The Director of Internships & Field Experiences will process the forms and compensation will be
mailed to the cooperating teacher at the conclusion of the internship semester.
Revised Policy: September 18, 2006




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                    Section 5: Expectations of the College Supervisor

The college supervisor has the responsibility for preparing, guiding, and supervising the student
teaching intern during the period of orientation and the student teaching experience. The
college supervisor works closely with the school and cooperating teacher to ensure that each
intern is provided with the opportunity for a meaningful and comprehensive student teaching
internship.
Student teaching interns will be visited by college supervisors on a regular basis as individual
schedules permit. The classroom visit should be followed by a conference. When necessary a
three-way conference that includes the student teaching intern, the cooperating teacher, and
the college supervisor may be held. The student teaching intern, the cooperating teacher, or
the college supervisor may request these conferences. The college supervisor will facilitate
formal midterm and final conferences with the cooperating teacher and student teaching intern
to assess competence using the ADEPT performance standards.
Each college supervisor is expected to:
   1. attend the college's orientation program;
   2. assist the cooperating teacher in supervising the student teaching intern’s performance;
   3. evaluate the work of the student teaching intern jointly with the cooperating teacher and
      the intern;
   4. serve as a resource teacher for the student teaching intern;
   5. provide support for the individual student teaching intern concerning professional issues
      and consult with the director of internships & field experiences when the problem is
      personal in nature;
   6. engage in the ADEPT process and provide follow-up conferences with the cooperating
      teacher and student teaching intern;
   7. complete administrative responsibilities as required;
   8. complete six site visits with a minimum of four observations of at least fifty minutes
      duration for each student teaching intern;
   9. inform the cooperating teacher of specific strengths and weaknesses of the student
      teaching intern and solicit information from the cooperating teacher in order to best
      address the professional development of the student teaching intern;
   10. interact with the cooperating teacher and principal as professional peers and colleagues;
   11. evaluate the cooperating teacher's effectiveness in working with the student teaching
       intern;
   12. conduct a midterm and final conference; and
   13. as necessary, work with the director of internships & field experiences to develop a
       formal, written remediation plan.




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                    Section 6: Expectations of the School Administrator

The principal of the school serves as the educational leader and administrator for the school
staff. The principal is responsible for the education program and all other activities carried on
within the school. As the leader, the principal has certain responsibilities to and involvement
with the student teaching internship experience.
The principal or designated administrator is expected to:
   1. develop a positive attitude in his/her school that participation in teacher training is a
      professional responsibility;
   2. promote to the parents and community of the cooperating school a positive, public image
      regarding the student teaching interns;
   3. identify and recommend teachers in the school who will be asked to serve as cooperating
      teachers. This decision should be based on the satisfactory fulfillment of the school
      district's criteria for cooperating teachers and The Citadel's Department of Education
      accreditation standards listed in these Guidelines;
   4. conduct an orientation for the student teaching intern and introduce him/her to members
      of the faculty and staff;
   5. provide facilities and materials necessary for a successful student teaching experience;
   6. assist the student teaching intern wherever possible to become a successful future
      teacher;
   7. communicate expectations for the cooperating teacher and provide adequate support
      and supervision;
   8. conduct exit interviews with the student teaching intern(s); and
   9. provide for the removal of inadequate student teaching interns. In this matter, the
      principal maintains the right to request at any time, after consulting with the college
      supervisor, cooperating teacher, and director of internships & field experiences, the
      removal of any student teaching intern for due cause (i.e., inappropriate actions,
      inadequate preparations, obvious personal deficiencies, or for any action detrimental to
      the school system).




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                             Section 7: ADEPT System Guidelines

ADEPT Overview
South Carolina’s system for Assisting, Developing, and Evaluating Professional Teaching
(ADEPT) grew out of the knowledge that good teaching is fundamental to student achievement.
Implemented statewide in 1998, the ADEPT system has become a vital part of the state’s
overall teacher quality initiative. In addition to achieving the minimum score or better on
appropriate examinations on both content and general teaching area knowledge, as established
by the State Board of Education, teachers must successfully complete all ADEPT requirements in
order to be eligible to advance to a professional teaching certificate. As its name implies, the
ADEPT system addresses teacher performance through three primary processes: assisting,
developing, and evaluating. Since these processes are interrelated, all of them occur in every
phase of the career continuum. However, the emphasis placed on each process differs
according to the needs and the career stage of the particular teacher. During the first phase of
their careers, candidates enrolled in teacher education programs focus on developing the
requisite knowledge, skills, and dispositions inherent in the ADEPT Performance Standards.
ADEPT standards are among the state accreditation requirements for college and university
teacher education programs. Upon entering the profession, new teachers receive assistance
designed to promote their successful transition into professional practice. Research clearly
indicates that providing support to new teachers enhances their teaching performance,
increases student achievement, and improves teacher retention. Assessment at this stage is
formative in nature, and development focuses on enhancing strengths and improving
weaknesses related to the Performance Standards.
The third stage of ADEPT, formal evaluation, signals a dramatic shift in purpose. It is at this
point that high-stakes, consequential decisions are made on the basis of teaching performance.
Given appropriate preparation and support during the previous two stages, most teachers are
successful in achieving the high level of performance defined by the ADEPT standards.
Nonetheless, the formal evaluation process is an important part of quality assurance. It is at
the fourth and final stage, informal evaluation that the ADEPT system comes full circle. Once
again, the primary focus is on professional development, but in contrast to the initial stage, the
responsibility for continuous professional growth now falls on the teacher. It is through this self-
directed goals-based process that experienced, successful teachers are able to engage in
lifelong learning and, further, to give back to the profession


Revised ADEPT Performance Standards for Classroom-Based Teachers
Introduction
Central to the ADEPT system is a set of expectations for what teaching professionals should
know, be able to do, and assume responsibility for accomplishing on an ongoing basis. These
expectations, called the ADEPT Performance Standards, are the linchpins that connect all stages
of a teacher’s career, beginning with teacher preparation and continuing through induction,
highstakes performance evaluation(s), and, finally, ongoing self-directed professional
development. A teacher’s proficiency in each of the standards is expected to occur
developmentally and to increase continuously throughout the entirety of his or her teaching
career.




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There are ten ADEPT Performance Standards for classroom-based teachers. For the purposes
of ADEPT, the term classroom-based teachers refers to certified teachers of core academic
subjects, related subjects (e.g., physical education, career and technology education), and
special education. The term classroom-based teacher does not include special-area personnel
(i.e., school guidance counselors, library media specialists, and speech-language therapists).
The ten ADEPT Performance Standards (APS) for classroom-based teachers can be grouped into
four broad categories, or domains:
Domain 1: Planning
APS 1 Long-Range Planning
APS 2 Short-Range Planning of Instruction
APS 3 Planning Assessments and Using Data
Domain 2: Instruction
APS 4 Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Learners
APS 5 Using Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning
APS 6 Providing Content for Learners
APS 7 Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing Learning
Domain 3: Classroom Environment
APS 8 Maintaining an Environment That Promotes Learning
APS 9 Managing the Classroom
Domain 4: Professionalism
APS 10 Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities
Each of these Performance Standards contains a set of key elements—the critical components
of the standard. Although the key elements are essential to the standards, the examples that
follow the key elements in this document are included for illustrative purposes only and are not
to be considered all-inclusive, universal, or absolute indicators. Because of the highly complex
and contextual nature of teaching, the adjectives applicable and appropriate appear frequently
throughout the standards. Good teaching takes different forms, depending on the content, the
students, and the intended outcomes. Oftentimes a variety of instructional and assessment
methods and approaches are equally viable. For this reason, a checklist is far too restrictive to
be used as tool for gauging teacher effectiveness.

The central purpose of the ADEPT system is to promote teacher quality and, ultimately, to
increase student achievement—that is, to produce measurable growth in a student’s knowledge
and skills in a particular area or areas over a specified period of time. The impact of teaching
performance on student achievement is determined by the teacher’s ability to set appropriate
goals for student learning and development; to accurately measure and analyze student
growth; and to plan, implement, and adjust instruction to ensure maximum student progress.
Student achievement is indeed an integral part of the ADEPT system. As such, student
achievement has a direct relationship to each of the ADEPT domains for classroom-based
teachers (planning, instruction, environment, and professionalism) and the related ADEPT
Performance Standards, as the figure on the following page shows:




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                                        Planning
                                         APS 1
                                         APS 2
                                         APS 3




                                      Planning
                                       APS 1
                                       APS 2
                                       APS 3



                                                            Instruction
                                                              APS 4             Instruction
                 Professionalism                              APS 5
                     APS 10          STUDENT                                      APS 4
                                                              APS 6               APS 5
                                   ACHIEVEMENT                APS 7
                                                                                  APS 6




                      APS 7


                                      Environment
                                         APS 8
                                         APS 9




                                         APS 7




Each of these interrelated domains is important because, in order to promote student
achievement, classroom-based teachers must be able to:
       determine what the students need to know and/or be able to do [ planning];
       appropriately evaluate student performance before, during, and after instruction
        [planning and instruction];
       design and implement instruction that is appropriate for and meaningful to the students
        [planning and instruction];
       create and maintain a classroom environment that is conducive to learning [planning
        and environment];
       analyze and reflect on student performance to determine student progress and the
        impact of the instruction on student learning [planning and instruction];
       use the results of these analyses to guide future planning and instruction [planning];
        and
       assume responsibility for continuously improving and sharing their professional
        knowledge and skills to the benefit of the students [ professionalism].

So that the classroom-based teacher’s impact on student achievement can be clearly reflected,
a new component, the unit work sample, has been added to the ADEPT formal evaluation
requirements. Through unit work sampling, classroom-based teachers engage in an iterative
process that both examines and strengthens their abilities to promote student achievement


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                                          APS 1
                                   Long-Range Planning

   An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by establishing appropriate long-
   range learning goals and by identifying the instructional, assessment, and management
   strategies necessary to help all students’ progress toward meeting these goals.


Long-range planning requires the teacher to combine knowledge of content, standards, and
curriculum with knowledge of specific learning-teaching contexts and student characteristics.
Although long-range planning is an essential process for all teachers, long-range plans (LRP)
will differ according
to variables such as content (i.e., subject matter, concepts, principles, process, and related
skills) and context (e.g., setting, learning needs of the students). In developing LRP, the
teacher should work
both independently and collaboratively. LRPs are dynamic documents that should be reviewed
continuously and revised, as necessary, throughout the school year.

                                        KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
 1.A The teacher obtains student information, analyzes this information to
     determine the learning needs of all students, and uses this information to
     guide instructional planning.
      The teacher begins the long-range planning process by gaining a thorough understanding
      of students’ prior achievement levels, learning styles and needs, cultural and socio-
      economic backgrounds, and individual interests. The teacher gathers this information
      from a variety of sources, including student records (e.g., permanent records,
      individualized education programs) and individuals such as other teachers, special-area
      professionals, administrators, service providers, parents, and the students themselves.
      From this information, the teacher identifies the factors that are likely to impact student
      learning. The teacher then uses this information to develop appropriate plans for meeting
      the diverse needs of his or her students.
1.B The teacher establishes appropriate standards-based long-range learning and
    developmental goals for all students.
      The teacher’s goals are aligned with relevant federal, state, and local requirements and
      reflect the applicable grade-level academic standards. For preschool children and students
      with severe disabilities, the teacher’s goals align with appropriate developmental and/or
      functional expectations.
1.C The teacher identifies and sequences instructional units in a manner that
    facilitates the accomplishment of the long-range goals.
      In this context, an instructional unit is a set of integrated lessons that is designed to
      accomplish learning objectives related to a curricular theme, an area of knowledge, or a
      general skill or process. Consistent with relevant federal, state, and local curriculum
      and/or academic standards, the teacher’s instructional units provide for appropriate



The Citadel, School of Education               23
      coverage of the key themes, concepts, skills, and standards related to the subject area(s)
      and are designed to expose students to a variety of intellectual, social, and cultural
      perspectives. The sequence of the teacher’s units (as presented through timelines,
      curriculum maps, planning and pacing guides, and so forth) follows a logical progression,
      with an appropriate amount of time allocated to each instructional unit.
1.D The teacher develops appropriate processes for evaluating and recording
    students’ progress and achievement.
      The teacher’s evaluation process includes the major formal and informal assessments to
      be used (e.g., observations, exams, research papers, performance, projects, portfolios)
      and the evaluation criteria for each. The teacher’s evaluation methods are appropriate for
      the learning goals and the content. The evaluation criteria match state, local, and/or
      individually determined expectations for student progress and achievement. The teacher’s
      record-keeping system provides a confidential and well-organized system for storing,
      retrieving, and analyzing all necessary student data.
1.E The teacher plans appropriate procedures for managing the classroom.
      The teacher’s rules and procedures for managing student behavior, whether developed
      independently by the teacher or collaboratively with the students, are clearly stated,
      appropriate for the students, and consistent with school and district policies. The rules are
      stated in positive terms, when possible, and focus on behaviors rather than on students.
      The teacher’s procedures for managing essential noninstructional routines (e.g.,
      transitioning between activities and/or subjects, taking roll, collecting student work,
      preparing learning centers or labs, retrieving instructional materials or resources) promote
      efficiency and minimize the loss of instructional time.

                                           APS 2
                             Short-Range Planning of Instruction

 An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by planning appropriate learning
 objectives; selecting appropriate content, strategies, and materials for each instructional unit;
 and systematically using student performance data to guide instructional decision making.

In this context, the term instructional unit is defined as a set of integrated lessons that is
designed to accomplish learning objectives related to a curricular theme, an area of knowledge,
or a general skill or process. The length of instructional units—that is, the number of days or
lessons they cover—will vary in accordance with such factors as the number of objectives to be
accomplished; the complexity of the content to be covered; and the ability levels of the
particular students.

                                        KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
2.A     The teacher develops unit objectives that facilitate student achievement of
        appropriate academic standards and long-range learning and developmental
        goals.




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        The teacher’s objectives define what the students should know (i.e., the factual,
        conceptual, procedural, and/or metacognitive knowledge) and be able to do (e.g., the
        cognitive processes—remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating,
        and/or creating) upon completing the unit. The teacher’s objectives are student-
        oriented, explicit, and assessable statements of intended learning outcomes. There is a
        clear connection between the unit objectives and grade-level academic standards (or,
        for preschool children or students with severe disabilities, between the unit objectives
        and appropriate developmental and/or functional expectations). The unit objectives are
        consistent with the long-range goals, assessment results from previous instructional
        units, state and local curriculum guidelines, individualized education programs (IEPs),
        and the needs and interests of the students. The unit objectives are logically linked to
        previous and future learning objectives.
2.B     The teacher develops instructional plans that include content, strategies,
        materials, and resources that are appropriate for the particular students.
        The content of the teacher’s instructional plans is drawn from multiple sources that are
        accurate and current and is applicable to the students’ grade-level academic standards,
        instructional needs, ability and developmental levels, and interests. The sources of the
        content expose students to a variety of intellectual, social, and cultural perspectives as
        appropriate. The teacher selects a variety of instructional strategies and materials in
        order to present content in formats that accommodate learning differences and that
        translate into real-life contexts for the students. Instructional technology is included as
        appropriate. The instructional strategies are logically sequenced and include sufficient
        opportunities for initial learning, application and practice, and review. The strategies
        lead the students to increasingly higher levels of thinking and problem solving. They
        promote active student engagement during both independent and collaborative learning
        tasks, and they provide opportunities for the teacher and students to vary their roles in
        the instructional process (e.g., instructor, facilitator, coach, audience).
2.C     The teacher routinely uses student performance data to guide short-range
        planning of instruction.
        The teacher develops lesson and unit plans on the basis of accurate conclusions that he
        or she has drawn from analyses of the particular students’ prior performance (i.e., their
        behavior, progress, and achievement).


                                           APS 3
                            Planning Assessments and Using Data

   An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by assessing and analyzing student
   performance and using this information to measure student progress and guide instructional
   planning.


In this context, the term assessment refers to any formal or informal measurement tool,
activity, assignment, or procedure used by a classroom teacher to evaluate student
performance. Assessments may be commercially produced or developed by the teacher, but all
should be valid, reliable, and maximally free from bias.



The Citadel, School of Education                25
                                        KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
3.A The teacher develops/selects and administers a variety of appropriate
    assessments.
      The assessments used by the teacher are technically sound indicators of students’
      progress and achievement in terms of the unit objectives, the grade-level (or individually
      determined) academic standards, and the student achievement goals. The assessments
      align with the learning objectives and the instruction in terms of the type(s) of knowledge
      (i.e., factual, conceptual, procedural, and/or metacognitive) and the cognitive processes
      (i.e., remembering, understanding, applying, analyzing, evaluating, and/or creating). The
      teacher is not overly reliant on commercially produced assessments, but when he or she
      uses them, the teacher is careful to ensure that any necessary modifications are made.
      Assessment materials are free of content errors, and all assessments include verbal
      and/or written directions, models, and/or prompts that clearly define what the students
      are expected to do. The assessments are appropriate for the ability and developmental
      levels of the students in the class. The teacher provides appropriate accommodations for
      individual students who require them in order to participate in assessments.
3.B At appropriate intervals, the teacher gathers and accurately analyzes student
    performance data and uses this information to guide instructional planning.
      The teacher routinely obtains student baseline data, analyzes the data to determine
      student learning needs, and uses this information to develop appropriate instructional
      plans. At appropriate intervals throughout instruction, the teacher analyzes student
      performance on informal assessments (e.g., individual and group performance tasks,
      quizzes, assignments) and formal assessments (e.g., tests, projects, portfolios, research
      papers, performances) to determine the extent to which both individual students and
      groups of students are progressing toward accomplishing the learning objectives. On the
      basis of these analyses, the teacher determines the impact of instruction on student
      learning and makes appropriate decisions about the need to modify his or her
      instructional plans.
3.C The teacher uses assessment data to assign grades (or other indicators) that
    accurately reflect student progress and achievement.
      The teacher makes decisions about student performance, progress, and achievement on
      the basis of explicit expectations that clearly align with the learning objectives and
      achievement goals, the assessments, and the students’ level of ability. The teacher may
      present his or her evaluation criteria in the form of scoring rubrics, vignettes, grading
      standards, answer keys, rating scales, and the like. Assessments are appropriately
      weighted on the basis of the relative importance of each in determining overall progress
      and achievement. The teacher maintains accurate, current, well-organized, and
      confidential records of assessment results. The teacher uses available information
      technology to store and assist with the analysis of student data.




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                                       APS 4
            Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Learners

        An effective teacher establishes, clearly communicates, and maintains appropriate
                expectations for student learning, participation, and responsibility.

In this context, the term participation refers to student effort.

                                         KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
4.A The teacher establishes, communicates, and maintains high expectations for
    student achievement.
      The teacher’s expectations are appropriately challenging for the grade and/or ability levels
      of the particular students. The teacher communicates the learning objectives so that
      students clearly understand what they are expected to know and be able to do. The
      teacher reviews and/or clarifies the objectives as necessary.
4.B The teacher establishes, communicates, and maintains high expectations for
    student participation.
      The teacher’s expectations are appropriate for the grade and/or ability levels of the
      particular students and for the subject area. The teacher effectively communicates these
      expectations so that his or her students will readily apply them to instructional activities
      and events during the lessons and to assignments and tasks both in and out of the
      classroom.
4.C The teacher helps students assume responsibility for their own participation
    and learning.
      The teacher clearly communicates the importance and relevance of the academic
      standards and learning objectives as well as the way the standards and objectives relate
      to the students’ previous and/or future learning. The teacher encourages the students to
      become the active agents of their own learning and to take the initiative to follow through
      with their work. The teacher provides appropriate opportunities for the students to
      engage in self-assessment and reflection on their learning and to develop a metacognitive
      awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses. The teacher assists the students in
      developing strategies to compensate for their weaknesses when it is necessary.

                                         APS 5
                  Using Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning


              An effective teacher promotes student learning through the effective use of
                                  appropriate instructional strategies.

The term instructional strategies refer to the methods, techniques, technologies, activities, or
assignments that the teacher uses to help his or her students achieve the learning objectives.



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                                           KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
5.A The teacher uses appropriate instructional strategies.
      The teacher’s strategies are appropriate for the particular objectives and content and the
      particular students’ grade, developmental, and ability levels. The strategies build on the
      students’ interests and prior learning and are appropriate for the students’ stage of
      learning (e.g., initial, application, practice, review) with regard to the particular material.
      The teacher’s strategies promote higher levels of thinking and/or performance.
5.B The teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies.
      The teacher draws from a substantial repertoire of instructional strategies, varying his or
      her strategies both within and among lessons according to the particular objectives and
      content and the students’ ability levels, learning styles, rates of learning, and special
      needs.
      The teacher conveys information in a variety of formats (e.g., lectures, videotapes, texts,
      DVDs) and approaches (e.g., demonstrations, guided practice, guided discovery, and
      simulations). As appropriate to the learners and the learning, the teacher’s instructional
      strategies include sharing instructional responsibilities with other teachers, guest
      speakers, and/or parents; varying and/or exchanging roles (e.g., instructor, facilitator,
      coach, and observer) with students; and creating opportunities for both independent and
      collaborative learning experiences.
5.C The teacher uses instructional strategies effectively.
      The teacher uses instructional strategies that actively engage his or her students and that
      ultimately result in meaningful learning for them. All students receive opportunities to
      experience success.


                                               APS 6
                                   Providing Content for Learners


    An effective teacher possesses a thorough knowledge and understanding of the discipline
           so that he or she is able to provide the appropriate content for the learners.

In this context, the term content refers to the particular aspects of the discipline that are being
taught, including subject matter, concepts, principles, processes, and related skills. Central to
this standard is
the content competence of the teacher. From this in-depth knowledge of the discipline, the
teacher must select the content that is appropriate for his or her students and then organize the
content in ways that best facilitate student learning.




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                                        KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
6.A The teacher demonstrates a thorough command of the discipline that he or she
    teaches.
      The teacher provides content that is accurate and current. The teacher’s presentations,
      demonstrations, discussions, responses to students’ questions, and methods of engaging
      the students indicate a thorough knowledge and understanding of the content. The
      teacher identifies and explains/demonstrates conceptual relationships and/or procedural
      steps. The teacher identifies and corrects students’ content errors.
6.B The teacher provides appropriate content.
      The content of the teacher’s lessons is aligned with the applicable curriculum
      requirements, grade-level academic standards, and/or student learning objectives.
      Whenever possible, the teacher draws lesson content from multiple sources and presents
      it in ways that expose students to a variety of intellectual, social, and/or cultural
      perspectives.
6.C The teacher structures the content to promote meaningful learning.
      The teacher’s instruction goes beyond the simple presentation of factual knowledge. The
      teacher aligns the content with the learning objectives and ensures that students are
      provided with opportunities to acquire the knowledge and to use the cognitive processes
      that are necessary for successful problem solving. The teacher is able to identify and to
      explain and/or demonstrate key concepts and skills as well as their broader relationships
      and applications. The teacher guides student learning by presenting concepts and/or
      procedures in a logical sequence and in clear and sufficient detail. The teacher uses
      appropriate examples to help make the content relevant, meaningful, and applicable to
      the students. When students experience difficulties in mastering the content, the
      teacher is able to identify and address the sources of the problems.


                                         APS 7
                     Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing Learning

    An effective teacher maintains a constant awareness of student performance throughout
     the lesson in order to guide instruction and provide appropriate feedback to students.

In this context, the term monitoring refers to any methods the teacher uses during the lesson
to collect information about his or her students’ understanding of the content. Assessing
includes any formal or informal measurement tools, activities, assignments, or procedures a
teacher uses during the lesson to evaluate the students’ performance and their progress toward
meeting the learning objectives. Enhancing learning refers to actions a teacher takes during the
lesson as a direct result of monitoring and assessing in order to improve or extend student
learning.
Both APS 3 (Planning Assessments and Using Data) and APS 7 involve teacher decision making
on the basis of the results of student assessments. However, APS 3 deals with decision making




The Citadel, School of Education               29
that occurs prior to and after instruction. In contrast, APS 7 deals with the decision making that
occurs during the actual lesson. In other words, the key elements of APS 7 occur ―in flight.‖

                                        KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
7.A     The teacher continually monitors student learning during instruction by using
        a variety of informal and formal assessment strategies.
        The teacher maintains a constant awareness of student learning by engaging the
        students in class-room activities such as discussions, projects, performances,
        assignments, and quizzes. During these activities, the teacher uses effective questioning
        techniques to sample a representative cross section of students. The teacher’s questions
        are appropriate to the content, the active-ties, and the students. The teacher
        determines the students’ level of understanding of key concepts and skills by carefully
        observing/listening to and analyzing students’ verbal and nonverbal responses and
        reactions, inquiries, approaches to the task, performance, and final products.
7.B     The teacher enhances student learning by using information from informal
        and formal assessments to guide instruction.
        The teacher systematically collects, analyzes, and summarizes assessment data to
        monitor students’ progress. On the basis of formal and informal assessment information,
        the teacher makes appropriate decisions regarding instruction. When his or her students
        have difficulty answering questions, the teacher provides appropriate response time,
        rephrases the question and/or provides prompts or other such assistance. The teacher
        provides additional explanations, demonstrations, or assistance, and modifies the
        content and/or the instructional strategies when necessary. The teacher adjusts the
        pace of the lessons to conform to the needs of the students. The teacher promotes
        student retention of the content by actively engaging the students in reviews of the key
        elements, steps, or procedures as necessary. The teacher extends students’ learning
        and development through appropriate enrichment activities.
7.C The teacher enhances student learning by providing appropriate instructional
    feedback to all students.
    The teacher provides feedback to the students throughout the lesson. The teacher also
    provides feedback on all significant student work. The teacher’s feedback—whether oral,
    written, or nonverbal—is equitable (i.e., provided to all students) and individualized. The
    feedback is accurate, constructive, substantive, specific, and timely. The feedback is
    effective in helping correct students’ misunderstandings or errors, reinforcing their
    knowledge and skills, and/or extending their learning.




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                                       APS 8
                 Maintaining an Environment That Promotes Learning

     An effective teacher creates and maintains a classroom environment that encourages and
                                     supports student learning.

In this context, the term environment refers to both the physical surroundings and the affective
climate of the classroom. This standard focuses on environmental factors that a teacher can
reasonably be expected to control.

                                         KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
8.A The teacher creates and maintains the physical environment of his or her
    classroom as a safe place that is conducive to learning.
      The teacher’s classroom arrangement allows all students to see, hear, and participate
      during instruction. The classroom is free from clutter and distractions that impede
      learning. The teacher ensures that all materials are safely and properly stored and that all
      applicable safety regulations and precautions are followed. Classroom displays feature
      items of educational relevance and interest, including current samples of student work as
      appropriate.
8.B The teacher creates and maintains a positive affective climate in his or her
    classroom.
      The teacher conveys confidence in his or her ability to teach the lesson content and to
      work with diverse groups of students. The teacher exhibits the enthusiasm necessary to
      generate interest in the subject matter and the patience and sensitivity necessary to
      assist and support all students, regardless of their social and cultural backgrounds or
      intellectual abilities. The teacher shows respect for the feelings, ideas, and contributions
      of all students and encourages the students to do likewise.
8.C The teacher creates and maintains a culture of learning in his or her classroom.
      The teacher exemplifies and emphasizes initiative, industriousness, inquisitiveness, and
      excellence and, by doing so, encourages the students to do likewise. The teacher
      facilitates cooperation and teamwork among students and provides them with appropriate
      incentives and rewards for learning. The teacher works to ensure that every student feels
      a sense of belonging in the classroom. To the extent appropriate, the teacher invites
      student input and suggestions when designing instructional activities and events.




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                                           APS 9
                                   Managing the Classroom

         An effective teacher maximizes instructional time by efficiently managing student
        behavior, instructional routines and materials, and essential non-instructional tasks.

                                         KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:
9.A The teacher manages student behavior appropriately.
      The teacher’s behavioral rules and consequences are appropriate for the students and are
      consistent with district and school policies. These rules and consequences are clearly
      conveyed to the students and are enforced in a fair and consistent manner. The teacher
      maintains a constant awareness of classroom events and activities. The teacher uses
      effective preventive discipline techniques (e.g., eye contact, facial expressions, proximity)
      and handles any disruptions in an appropriate and timely manner. Disciplinary actions
      focus on the inappropriate behaviors and not on the students themselves. The teacher
      encourages students to monitor and assume responsibility for their own behavior.
9.B The teacher makes maximal use of instructional time.
      The teacher ensures that his or her students are engaged in meaningful academic
      learning throughout the instructional period. Instructional materials, resources, and
      technologies are useable, well organized, and accessible. In general, instruction is
      characterized by a smooth flow of activity.
9.C The teacher manages essential noninstructional routines in an efficient
    manner.
      It is evident that the teacher has clearly communicated to his or her students the rules
      and procedures for safety routines (e.g., fire drills, tornado drills, emergency
      preparedness) and classroom operations (e.g., roll call, collecting or turning in
      assignments, obtaining and distributing instructional materials, keeping work stations or
      lab areas in order). Transitions between activities or classes are handled in an efficient
      and orderly manner, with supervision provided as is necessary and appropriate.

                                             APS 10
                            Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities

         An effective teacher is an ethical, responsible, contributing, and ever-learning
                                   member of the profession.

                                         KEY ELEMENTS

This standard requires the teacher to demonstrate the following abilities and dispositions:


10.A The teacher is an advocate for the students.
      The teacher collaborates with colleagues, administrators, and other student-oriented
      professionals (e.g., curriculum specialists, counselors, library media specialists, speech


The Citadel, School of Education                 32
      language therapists, nurses) to determine the needs of his or her students and to plan
      and provide them with the appropriate learning experiences and assessments. The
      teacher establishes appropriate professional relationships with agencies, businesses, and
      community groups that support the well-being of students.
10.B The teacher works to achieve organizational goals in order to make the entire
     school a positive and productive learning environment for the students.
      The teacher regularly attends and contributes to departmental meetings, faculty
      meetings, strategic planning sessions, and the like. The teacher actively supports the
      efforts of school organizations such as parent-teacher groups and school improvement
      councils. To the extent that is possible and appropriate, the teacher supports
      extracurricular activities that contribute to the overall learning and development of
      students (e.g., academic clubs, student council, athletics, and cultural/artistic events).
10.C The teacher is an effective communicator.
      Both inside and outside the classroom, the teacher’s spoken and written language is clear,
      correct, and appropriate for each target audience (e.g., students, parents, colleagues,
      related professionals). The teacher communicates with parents/guardians on a regular
      basis about goals and expectations for student learning, behavioral rules and
      consequences, assignments, suggestions for supporting student learning at home,
      assessment results, and student progress and performance. The teacher responds
      appropriately to parental concerns. The teacher uses a variety of formats (e.g., telephone
      contacts, meetings, conferences, letters/newsletters, Web sites, report cards, notes, e-
      mails, interactive journals) to maintain effective and ongoing communication with others.
10.D The teacher exhibits professional demeanor and behavior.
      The teacher maintains a valid teaching certificate; complies with all professional, school,
      and district rules, policies, and procedures; and is cognizant of the policies set forth in the
      SDE publication Standards of Conduct for South Carolina Educators. The teacher’s
      performance is characteristic of a professional in terms of self-management (e.g.,
      responsibility, initiative, time management, appearance), ethical standards, and quality of
      work (e.g., completing required tasks in an accurate, timely, and effective manner).

10.E The teacher is an active learner.
     The teacher is a reflective practitioner who systematically collects, synthesizes, and
     evaluates student-achievement data in order to accurately identify his or her own
     professional strengths and weaknesses and to gain professional insight and vision
     regarding ways to enhance student learning. As a result of this self-assessment, the
     teacher collaborates with his or her supervisor(s) to develop an appropriate individualized
     professional growth plan. Additionally, the teacher regularly seeks out, participates in, and
     contributes to activities that promote collaboration and that support his or her continued
     professional growth (e.g., participation in professional associations, courses, conferences,
     workshops, seminars).




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                 ADEPT Requirements for Teacher Education Programs
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
In addition to complying with the ADEPT requirements detailed in this document, all approved
teacher education programs at institutions of higher education (IHEs) must adhere to the
specifications outlined in the SDE document Policy Guidelines for South Carolina Teacher
Education Units (available online at http://www.scteachers.org/educate/edpdf/boardpolicy.pdf).

ADEPT PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
All South Carolina teacher education programs that prepare candidates for initial certification as
classroom-based teachers must ensure that the ADEPT Performance Standards for classroom
teachers are integrated throughout the candidates’ course work, field experiences, and clinical
practice. Programs that prepare candidates for certification as school guidance counselors,
library media specialists, or speech-language therapists must ensure the integration of the
applicable ADEPT special-area Performance Standards throughout all aspects of the candidates’
preparation programs.

ADEPT REQUIREMENTS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE
Orientation
 All South Carolina teacher education programs must assist and evaluate teacher candidates
throughout their clinical practice (i.e., student teaching) experiences. Each teacher candidate
must receive—prior to beginning the clinical experience—a comprehensive orientation that
includes written and oral explanations of the assistance and evaluation processes; the
expectations related to each of the ADEPT Performance Standards; and the requirements,
including the ADEPT performance criteria, for successfully completing the clinical practice.
Training Requirements
 Each teacher candidate must be supervised by one or more IHE faculty supervisors and one or
more school-based supervisors (i.e., cooperating teachers) throughout the clinical practice. All
IHE and school-based supervisors must have successfully completed the appropriate ADEPT
training as described in the ―ADEPT Training Requirements‖ section of these guidelines. The
teacher education program must provide all school-based supervisors with written and oral
explanations of the IHE’s assistance and evaluation processes; expectations relative to
candidates’ performance on each of the ADEPT standards; and requirements, including the
ADEPT performance criteria, for candidates to successfully complete the clinical practice.
Formative Assessments and Assistance
 Each teacher candidate must receive formative assessments, written and oral feedback, and
assistance regarding all ADEPT Performance Standards from both his or her IHE and his or her
school-based clinical supervisors throughout the clinical practice.
The formative processes must include a minimum of four classroom observations (i.e., at least
two formative observations by the IHE supervisor and at least two formative observations by
the school-based supervisor), each followed by appropriate feedback and assistance.




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Summative Evaluations
 Teacher candidates must receive at least one summative evaluation regarding the ADEPT
Performance Standards.
Both the IHE supervisor and the school-based supervisor must participate in the summative
evaluation process.
 The summative evaluation process must be aligned with the ADEPT formal evaluation
guidelines, must include appropriate data collection and evidence documentation procedures
(including a minimum of two classroom observations—one by the IHE supervisor and one by
the school-based supervisor), and must ensure that the candidate receives written and oral
consensus-based feedback on his or her performance in terms of each of the ADEPT
Performance Standards.
PROGRAM FEEDBACK AND IMPROVEMENT
  Teacher education programs must obtain and analyze feedback on an annual basis from IHE
supervisors, school-based supervisors, and teacher candidates regarding the effectiveness of
the ADEPT preparation, evaluation, and assistance processes. Teacher education programs
must analyze the ADEPT summary data on their graduates that are provided annually by the
SDE. Teacher education programs must use the results of these analyses to continuously
improve their ADEPT preparation, evaluation, and assistance processes.
ADEPT PLANS
 Each teacher education program must submit an ADEPT plan to the SDE by July 1 annually.
The ADEPT plan must be submitted in conjunction with the teacher education program’s annual
assessment and diversity plan/report.
The ADEPT plan must describe or reference the specific ways in which the teacher education
program prepares teacher candidates by integrating the ADEPT Performance Standards
throughout course work and field experiences.
The ADEPT plan must describe or reference the specific ways in which the program implements
all requirements for the clinical practice, including the time frame for, contents of, and persons
responsible for organizing and providing the orientation for teacher candidates; the process for
providing and/or verifying appropriate training for IHE and school-based supervisors; the
process for conducting formative assessments of and providing feedback and assistance to
candidates; the process for conducting summative evaluations of the candidates and the
requirements for successful completion of the evaluations; and the processes for collecting
feedback regarding the ADEPT preparation, evaluation, and assistance processes; analyzing the
results; and using the data to make continuous program improvements.
Initial ADEPT plans will be reviewed by an SDE-appointed team of educators and must be
approved by the State Board of Education prior to implementation. Revised ADEPT plans will be
reviewed by an SDE-appointed team of educators and must be approved by the State Board of
Education prior to implementation. The SDE may allow a teacher education program to submit a
statement of assurances form on July 1, in lieu of a duplicate plan, for years during which the
program seeks to make no substantive changes to its State Board of Education–approved
ADEPT plan.




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                                        ADEPT Connection Matrix
                                        SC Department of Education

     Domain / APS / Key
                                                             Demonstrated Competency (3)
         Element

 Domain 2: Instruction
 APS 4: Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Learners
 4A The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern effectively communicates to the students:
 establishes, communicates, and       what they are expected to learn (i.e., to know and be able to do); and
 maintains high expectations for      the overall purpose and relevance (ie., why they are expected to know and/or be
 student achievement.                   able to do it.).
 4B The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern effectively communicates:
 establishes, communicates, and       appropriate expectations for student participation; during the lesson; and
 maintains high expectations for        for accomplishing related assignments and tasks.
 student participation.
 4C The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 helps students assume                encourages students to develop the initiative to become the active agents of their
 responsibility for their own           own learning; and
 participation and learning.          assists the students in developing strategies to compensate for their weaknesses
                                        when it is necessary.
 APS 5: Using Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning
 5. A. The student teaching intern   The student teaching intern uses instructional strategies that are:
 uses appropriate instruction         appropriate for the content; and
 strategies.                          appropriate for the students.
 5B The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern uses a variety of instructional strategies (that is the
 uses a variety of instruction       teacher does not always rely on the same strategy for every lesson) to:
 strategies.                          convey information; and
                                      involve and engage the students.
 5C The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern effective use of instructional strategies results in:
 uses instructional strategies        meaningful student learning; and
 effectively.                         opportunities for all students to be engaged in the learning and to experience
                                         success.
 APS 6: Providing Content for Learners
 6A The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 provides appropriate content.        provides content that is accurate and current;
                                      identifies and explains/ demonstrates conceptual relationships and/or procedural
                                        steps, and identifies; and
                                      corrects students’ content errors.
 6B The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 demonstrates a thorough              provides content that is appropriate to the learning;
 command of the discipline that       provides content that is appropriate to the learners; and
 he or she teaches.                   when possible provides content that expands students’ perspectives.
 6C The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 structures the content to            organizes content in a logical sequence;
 promote meaningful learning.         makes content relevant, meaningful, and applicable to the student;
                                      promotes higher levels of knowledge and cognitive process; and
                                      identifies and addresses problems that students may exhibit in terms of
                                        mastering the content.




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 APS 7: Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing Learning
 7A The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern maintains a constant awareness of student learning by:
 continually monitors student          engaging the students in activities such as discussions, projects,
 learning during instruction by          performances, assignments, and quizzes:
 using a variety of information        using effective questioning techniques; and
 and formal assessment                 observing/listening to and analyzing students’ verbal and non verbal
 strategies.                             responses and reactions, inquiries, approaches to the task, performances, and
                                        final products.
 7B The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 enhances student learning by         makes appropriate decisions regarding the need to make adjustments during the
 using information from                  lesson; and
 information and formal               effectively implements any needed adjustments.
 assessments to guide instruction.
 7C The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 enhances student learning by         provides feedback to students throughout the lesson;
 providing appropriate                provides feedback to students on all significant student work; and
 instructional feedback to all        provides feedback that is accurate, constructive, substantive, specific, and timely.
 students.
 Domain 3: Environment
 APS 8: Maintaining an Environment That Promotes Learning
 8A The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 creates and maintains the            displays confidence and enthusiasm; and
 physical environment of his or       maintains positive and respectful relationships with the students.
 her classroom as a safe place
 that is conducive to learning.
 8B The student teaching interns     The student teaching intern creates and maintains a physical environment that:
 creates and maintains a positive     is safe; and
 affective climate in his or her      is conducive to learning.
 classroom.
 8C The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 creates and maintains a culture      creates a culture of learning by being an active learner; and
 of learning in his or her            works to ensure that every student feels a sense of belonging in the classroom.
 classroom.

 APS 9: Managing the Classroom
 9A The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 manages student behavior             establishes and communicates apppr0priate behavioral rules and consequences;
 appropriately.                       maintains a constant awareness of events and activities in the classroom;
                                      uses effective preventive discipline techniques; and
                                      handles disruptions in an appropriate and timely manner.
 9B. The student teaching intern     The student teaching intern:
 makes maximal use of                 ensures that the students are engaged in meaningful academic learning
 instructional time.                     throughout the instructional period; and
                                      organizes the classroom in a manner that promotes a smooth flow of activity.
 9C The student teaching intern      The student teaching intern:
 manages essential                    promotes the smooth flow of noninstructional routines; and
 noninstructional routines in an      manages transitions between activities or classes in an efficient and orderly
 efficient manner.                       manner.




The Citadel, School of Education                         37
                            Section 8: Assessment and Evaluation

A. Transition Points and Common Assessments
The teacher education programs use a variety of assessments to monitor candidate progress.
These assessments include the South Carolina’s ADEPT (Assisting, Developing, and Evaluating
Professional Teaching) Standards, the INTASC (Interstate New Teacher Assessment and
Support Consortium) Standards and the standards of the individual specialized professional
associations. The tables below reflect the key common assessments that are used to monitor
candidate performance from entry into the teacher education through program completion and
recommendation for certification. The following four transition points have been identified as
Admission to Professional Education Program, Admission to Internship, Completion of
Internship, and Program Completion and Recommendation for Certification.
            Table 1: TRANSITION POINTS AND KEY COMMON ASSESSMENTS
                FOR INITIAL UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

 I. Admission to              II. Admission to              III. Completion of            IV. Program
   Professional                  Internship                     Internship              Completion and
Education Program                                                                      Recommendation
                                                                                        for Certification
Praxis I                  Praxis II Specialty Area--                                 Praxis II Specialty Area
Passing Score OR          Take                                                       Passing Score
1600 SAT Score OR
24 ACT Score
Professional              Professional Dispositions     Professional Dispositions
Dispositions              Evaluation (in Methods        Evaluation
Evaluation                courses)
                          Field Experience              ADEPT Summary                PLT
                          Observation                   Consensus Candidate          Passing Score
                          Evaluation                    Evaluation (by
                          (ADEPT 4-9)                   cooperating teacher,
                          (in Methods courses)          college supervisor, and
                                                        candidate)
                                                        (ADEPT 1-10)
                          Long-Range and Short-         Final Portfolio Evaluation
                          Range Plan Evaluation         (by college supervisor)
                          (ADEPT 1-3)                   (ADEPT 1-10)
                          (in Methods courses)
                                                        Content Indicator
                                                        Evaluation (by
                                                        cooperating teacher)
                                                        (ADEPT 1-10)

Other key assessments are: Candidate Evaluation of Field Experience (in Methods courses);
           Evaluation of College Supervisor (in Internship);
           Evaluation of Cooperating Teacher (in Internship);
           Program Completer Survey (in last semester enrolled) ;
           Graduate Follow-Up Survey (one year out);
            Employer Follow-Up Survey (one year out).




The Citadel, School of Education                       38
         Table 2: TRANSITION POINTS AND OTHER COMMON REQUIREMENTS
                FOR INITIAL UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

  I. Admission to                  II. Admission to         III. Completion of           IV. Program
    Professional                      Internship                Internship             Completion and
 Education Program                                                                    Recommendation
                                                                                       for Certification
Minimum 2.50 GPA             Minimum 2.50 GPA              Minimum 2.50 GPA          Minimum 2.50 GPA
Overall                      Overall                       Overall                   Overall
Application                  Application

Completion of 45             Completion of all                                       Completion of all
semester hours               Professional Education                                  requirements for
                             AND Content coursework,                                 graduation
                             except Internship
Passing grade in EDUC        Completion of 100 clock       Minimum C grade in
101 OR PHED 101              hours of field experiences    Internship
                             Certification Application
                             AND Background Check
Approval by Admission        Approval by Admission         Approval by Admission     Approval of Dean
and Retention                and Retention Committee       and Retention
Committee                                                  Committee

            Table 3: TRANSITION POINTS AND KEY COMMON ASSESSMENTS
                 FOR INITIAL GRADUATE MAT EDUCATION PROGRAMS

  I. Admission to                  II. Admission to         III. Completion of           IV. Program
    Professional                      Internship                Internship             Completion and
 Education Program                                                                    Recommendation
                                                                                       for Certification
Minimum Score of 396         Praxis II Specialty                                     PLT
on MAT OR 900 on GRE         Area Passing Score                                      Passing Score
Professional Dispositions    Professional Dispositions     Professional
Evaluation                   Evaluation (in Methods        Dispositions Evaluation
                             courses)
                             Field Experience              ADEPT Summary
                             Observation                   Consensus Candidate
                             Evaluation                    Evaluation (by
                             (ADEPT 4-9)                   cooperating teacher,
                             (in Methods courses)          college supervisor, and
                                                           candidate) (ADEPT 1-
                                                           10)
                             Long-Range and Short-         Final Portfolio
                             Range Plan Evaluation         Evaluation (by college
                             (ADEPT 1-3)                   supervisor)
                             (in Methods courses)          (ADEPT 1-10)
                             Research Competency           Content Indicator
                             (in EDUC 512                  Evaluation (by
                             OR HESS 540)                  cooperating teacher)
                                                           (ADEPT 1-10)




The Citadel, School of Education                      39
Other key assessments are: Candidate Evaluation of Field Experience (in Methods courses);
           Evaluation of College Supervisor (in Internship);
           Evaluation of Cooperating Teacher (in Internship);
           Program Completer Survey (in last semester enrolled) ;
           Graduate Follow-Up Survey (one year out);
           Employer Follow-Up Survey (one year out).

         Table 4: TRANSITION POINTS AND OTHER COMMON REQUIREMENTS
                 FOR INITIAL GRADUATE MAT EDUCATION PROGRAMS

  I. Admission to                  II. Admission to         III. Completion of         IV. Program
    Professional                      Internship                Internship           Completion and
 Education Program                                                                  Recommendation
                                                                                     for Certification
Minimum 2.50 GPA             Minimum 3.00 GPA              Minimum 3.00 GPA        Minimum 3.00 GPA
Overall Undergraduate        Overall                       Overall                 Overall
Application                  Application

Program of Study             Completion of all             Minimum C+ grade in     Completion of all
                             Professional Education        Internship              requirements for
                             AND Content coursework,                               graduation
                             except Internship
                             No more than two C
                             grades in MAT Program
                             Completion of 100 clock
                             hours of field experiences
                             Certification Application
                             AND Background Check
Approval by Admission        Approval by Admission         Approval by Admission   Approval of Dean
and Retention                and Retention Committee       and Retention
Committee                                                  Committee

B. Purpose
The purpose of assessment is to state quantitatively and qualitatively the degree to which a
teaching candidate possesses the knowledge, skills, and dispositions competencies necessary to
become a successful teacher.
The evaluations conducted during the student teaching internship are a continuous process
involving the student teaching intern, the cooperating teacher, and the college supervisor.
Feedback on the intern’s performance will be provided in a timely manner to provide ample
opportunity for interns to make necessary changes to improve. At any time, however, if it is
determined that the student teaching intern is not progressing satisfactorily, he/she may be
removed from the student teaching experience.

C. Assessment Methods
The basic sources for assessing the student teaching intern’s knowledge, skills and dispositions
during the teaching internship are:
   1. Data collected on the Professional Dispositions Evaluation and the ADEPT Performance
      Standards (APS) including ADEPT Summary Consensus Candidate Evaluation; and
   2. Final Portfolio Evaluation, Content Indicator Evaluation, and Professional Dispositions.


The Citadel, School of Education                      40
D. Assessment Tool – College LiveText edu solutions™, http://college.livetext.com
The student teaching internship portfolio and assessments are maintained on the web-based
system LiveText. Candidates and college supervisors have access to the system. The student
teaching intern is expected to upload assignments and portfolio into he/her LiveText account.
College Supervisors will assess assignments, portfolio and additional assessments on LiveText.
E. Overview of the ADEPT System Performance Standards
Articulated standards or expectations for competent practice are the defining attributes of any
profession. They provide a blueprint for designing appropriate professional preparation
programs, focusing assistance for novice members of the profession, designing assessments
which may be used to make decisions about continued practice of the profession, and designing
strategies for promoting continued professional growth and development. Research suggests
that teaching is becoming an increasingly demanding profession and that successful practice
requires mastery of complex bodies of knowledge and skill. Furthermore, research suggests
that there is no one recipe for effective teaching and that attempts to define and assess
teaching in terms of a set of discrete behaviors and skills vastly over-simplifies teachers'
responsibilities. Rather, effective teaching requires a large repertoire of knowledge and skill
that can be drawn upon, as needed, to handle ever changing contexts (e.g., different types of
students and subject-matter).
The ADEPT System Performance Standards (APS's) provide the foundation and continuity for all
regulations, procedures, and programs in the ADEPT System. They articulate upgraded
expectations for what all South Carolina teachers should know and be able to do and reflect
fundamental principles of competent professional teaching. The APS's were developed based
on several sources of information. They build on earlier efforts that developed the skills and
behaviors assessed by the APT and the State Board of Education Content Criteria for Evaluating
Annual and Continuing Contract Teachers, as well as more recent efforts including South
Carolina's Curriculum Frameworks, the Model Standards for Beginning Teacher Licensing and
Development, which were developed by the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support
Consortium (INTASC), and the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS).
Each ADEPT System APS contains a Standard Description, which describes the broad range of
interrelated knowledge and skills covered by the standards, a set of Documentation Questions
for assisting evaluators in recording evidence, and a Competent Performance Description that
describes the level of job performance competent professional teachers should demonstrate on
a typical basis. Performance in each standard is interpreted holistically and in context.
The ADEPT System APS's will provide the focus for formative evaluation and assistance
activities for preservice teachers during student teaching and for provisional contract teachers
during Induction Programs. Annual contract teachers must pass an evaluation of their typical
performance in each APS to become eligible for continuing contract status. During the
evaluation process, evaluators will collect information on teachers' performance from a variety
of sources including reviews of long-range plans, assessment interviews, reviews of
teacher-made instructional and assessment materials, and classroom observations. The APS's
will also provide a focus for evaluation and professional development activities for continuing
contract teachers.
All student teaching interns will attend the ADEPT Orientation Session during the professional
seminar conducted prior to beginning and during their student teaching internship placement.




The Citadel, School of Education               41
F. ADEPT Evidence Documentation Sheet
Over the course of four to six observations, college supervisors will collect evidence of the
intern's progress in each of the ADEPT Performance Standards. The cooperating teacher and
college supervisor will complete a combined total of six ADEPT observations. For the purpose
of discussing strengths and weaknesses of teaching performance, follow-up conferences
between the college supervisor and student intern are to be held within one week of the last
observation. Student teaching interns will be provided with written documentation of identified
strengths and weaknesses, and remediation will be discussed. A remediation plan will be
prepared in the event the intern does not attain competency in one or more of the Performance
Standards.
Cooperating teachers are responsible for completing the ADEPT Weekly Student Teaching
Internship Evaluation Forms.
G. ADEPT Evaluation Criteria

                      Domain                APS          Total #    # Key Elements
                                                       Key Elements Needed to Pass
                      Planning             #1-3             11           ≥10

                     Instruction           #4-7            12                ≥11

                    Environment            #8-9             6                 ≥5

                  Professionalism           #10             5                 ≥4

                       TOTAL                 10            34


H. ADEPT Midterm Evaluation and Student Teaching Internship Evaluation
  Summary Form
Midterm and final evaluations represent the summative evaluation component of the ADEPT
process. Evaluation results must be appropriately documented to protect teachers from
arbitrary or capricious decisions. Written documentation also provides the intern with
meaningful information to improve or enhance performance.
The midterm evaluation provides a checkpoint for future growth and development as a
professional and should be completed by the college supervisor, cooperating teacher, and
student teaching intern mid-way in the internship. The originals of all forms will be submitted
to the Director of Internship & Field Experiences, and copies of the forms will be included in the
intern's portfolio.
The final evaluation summary should be completed at the end of the last week of the student
teaching internship. After judgments have been made for each APS, the college supervisor,
cooperating teacher, and intern must make an overall evaluation decision. The student
teaching intern may receive one of three possible judgments, Unsatisfactory, Developing
Competence, or Competent. This decision is made by comparing the APS level judgments to
the following decision guideline.




The Citadel, School of Education                  42
Competent (3)
        An intern will receive an overall judgment of Competent, if no more than one APS is
        judged as Developing Competence.
        Developing Competence (2)
        An intern will receive an overall judgment of Developing Competence if 2-3 APS's are
        judged as Developing Competence.
        Unsatisfactory (1)
        An intern will receive an overall judgment of Unsatisfactory if more than 3 APS's are
        judged as Developing Competence or there is one or more APS judged unsatisfactory.
The overall decision must be recorded, along with the APS level judgments, on the appropriate
Summary Evaluation Sheet. After completing this documentation the college supervisor,
cooperating teacher, and student teaching intern should date and sign the summary sheet.

I. Grading System

The following letter-value scale is currently used for all college courses. To assist in achieving a
standard rating procedure among all cooperating teachers, each letter-value grade is briefly
described. For further information or assistance, feel free to discuss the grading policy with the
college supervisor.
Recommendations of the cooperating teacher are an integral part of the material considered
when assigning the student teaching intern's final grade; however, the final responsibility for
the grade determination resides with the college supervisor. Each intern will have the
opportunity to confer with the college supervisor regarding the grade assignment.
A (OUTSTANDING)
   An outstanding candidate shows great promise a teacher. The student teaching intern
   demonstrates initiative in undertaking teaching and professional responsibilities that surpass
   the normal requirements and receives ratings of 3 in all professional dispositions. The
   portfolio includes all components and meets the highest professional standard. Superiority is
   demonstrated through the judgment of competency in all ten of the "ADEPT Performance
   Standards".
B+ (HIGH QUALITY for graduate MAT candidates only)
   A high quality candidate shows considerable promise as a teacher. The student teaching
   intern participates fully and competently in all teaching and professional activities and
   receives primarily ratings of 3 in the professional dispositions. The portfolio includes all
   components. The intern demonstrates competence in nine of the ten ADEPT Performance
   Standards and developing competence in the other area.
B (ABOVE AVERAGE for undergraduate and AVERAGE for graduate MAT
       candidates)
   The candidate shows promise as a teacher. The student teaching intern complies with all
   requests to participate in teaching and professional activities and receives primarily ratings of
   3 in the professional dispositions. The portfolio includes all components and meets an
   acceptable professional standard. The candidate demonstrates competence in eight of the
   ten ADEPT Performance Standards and developing competence in the two other areas.


The Citadel, School of Education                43
C+ (BELOW AVERAGE for graduate MAT candidates only)
   This candidate has completed the requirements for the course. The professional dispositions
   are rated in the acceptable range with ratings 2 and/or 3. The student teaching intern lacks
   effectiveness in several areas of the field and needs additional remediation to achieve a level
   of competency. The portfolio either lacks components or does not meet professional
   standards. The candidate is able to demonstrate competence in seven of ten ADEPT
   Performance Standards and developing competence in the three other areas.
C (SATISFACTORY for undergraduate and UNSATISFACTORY for graduate
        MAT candidates)
   This candidate has completed the requirements for the course. The professional dispositions
   are judged generally acceptable, but some deficiencies are noted. The portfolio lacks
   components or does not meet professional standard. Performance level has been minimal
   and only minimum requirements have been fulfilled. The graduate MAT candidate fails to
   demonstrate competence in seven ADEPT Performance Standards. In addition, four areas
   are judged either developing competence or unsatisfactory. The undergraduate candidate
   must demonstrate competence in seven of the ten ADEPT Performance Standards.
D (UNSATISFACTORY for undergraduate candidates only)
   This candidate has fulfilled the minimum requirements for the student teaching internship
   but for a combination of reasons shows no promise as a successful teacher at this time. The
   professional dispositions are minimally acceptable and deficiencies are noted. The portfolio is
   unsatisfactory due to lack of components and failure to meet professional standard. The
   candidate fails to demonstrate competence in seven of the ADEPT Performance Standards.
   In addition, four areas are judged either unsatisfactory or developing competence. The
   candidate will receive credit for the course but will not be recommended for professional
   certification.
F (FAILING)
   The candidate is deficient in the basic requirements of successful completion of the student
   teaching internship. The assessment of professional dispositions reveals overall deficiency.
   This assessment may be based on non-compliance with policies, procedures, and
   requirements as outlined in this Handbook and/or an overall judgment of unsatisfactory on
   the evaluation of ADEPT Performance Standards.

J. Assessment of Program and Personnel
Student teaching interns will complete a ―Program Completers Survey‖ on the School of
Education teacher preparation program. Interns are asked to complete in LiveText the
―Evaluation of College Supervisor,‖ the ―Evaluation of Cooperating Teacher‖ and the ―Candidate
Field Experience Evaluation‖ forms. Samples of the evaluation forms are included in this
handbook.




The Citadel, School of Education               44
                               Section 9: Portfolio Requirements

Student Teaching Intern LiveText Portfolio
All student teaching interns are required to complete a ―Student Teaching Intern‖ portfolio on
LiveText. The portfolio is assessed by the college supervisor. The sections to be included in the
portfolio are listed below, along with a brief description and list of template and forms. Some
sections will also appear as assignments to be submitted to the college supervisor for review. It
is very important to keep the portfolio up-to-date. Details for completing the portfolio will be
explained during the student teaching internship seminars.
1. Introduction
    Word process below OR attach a brief introduction of yourself here. You may choose to
    include an image in this section.
2. Resume
    Copy and paste your resume here or attach a document.
    Attachments:        Teacher Resume Template.doc
3. Teaching Philosophy
    Word process below OR attach your Philosophy of Education in this section.
4. Teaching Schedule
    Attach a copy or complete the attached form, save on your computer, remove blank form,
    and reattach completed form to this section.
    Attachments: Schedule_for_Student Teaching_Internship_Form.doc
5. Student Teaching Internship Weekly Log
    Using the appropriate form, download and save to your computer. As you document your
    daily activities, save update, and reattach updated form to this section.
    Attachments:        08-09_Schedule_for_Student_Teaching_Internship_Form.docx
                        08-09_Physical_Education_Student_Teaching_Internship_Weekly_Log.docx
                        08-09_Secondary_Student_Teaching_Intern_s_Weekly_Log.docx
6. Weekly Cooperating Teacher Evaluations
    Request your cooperating teacher to complete via the computer the ADEPT Weekly Student
    Teaching Internship Evaluation form, save and email to you. Attach the completed form file
    to this section.
    Click on link below to download and save form.
    Attachments:        ADEPT_Weekly_Student_Teaching_Intern_Evaluation_Form.docx
7. APS 1: Long-Range Plans
    Attach a copy of your long-range plan here.
    Click the link download APS 1 -Long-Range Plan Template.
    Attachments: APS_1_Long-Range_Plan_Template.docx




The Citadel, School of Education               45
8. APS 2 & APS 3: Short-Range Planning of Instruction and Assessment (i.e. Unit
   Plans) and Artifacts
    Attach a copy of your Unit Work Sample here. Attach artifacts, such as lesson plans,
    student handouts, power points, student work samples, etc. as evidence. Evidence includes
    APS 4-9.
    Click the links below to view the ADEPT APS 2 & APS 3 Unit Work Sample template and
    lesson plan templates.
    Attachments:        Secondary_Individual_Lesson_Plan_Template.docx
                        Physical_Education_Lesson_Plan_Format.docx
                        APS_2_and_3_Unit_Work_Sample_Template.docx
9. APS 10: Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities
    Attach or scan and attach agendas from professional meetings, teacher meetings, parent
    conferences, etc. Enter evidence into the APS 10 form. (Remember to save each time you
    enter new information.)
    Click the links below to download the ADEPT APS 10 Professional Responsibilities form
    and the Professional Self-Assessment Form.
    Attachments:        APS_10_Professional_Self-Assessment.docx
                        APS_10_Professional_Responsibilities_Form.doc
10. APS 8 & 9: Classroom Management Plan
    Attach a copy of the classroom management plan used during your student teaching
    internship. (You may excerpt classroom management information from ADEPT APS 1:
    Long-Range Plan, paste here and write a reflection on your classroom management plan or
    use template below.)
    Click on links below to view a sample document or download a template.
    Attachments:           Classroom_Expectations.ppt,
                           Classroom_Management_Plan_Template.doc,
                        Classroom_Rules_Example_Guidelines.pdf,
                        Consequences_for_Breaking_Rules.pdf
11. Observation Reports
    Attach complete observation reports here.
    Attachments:        Classroom_Observation_Report_Form.docx
12. ADEPT Midterm Evaluation
     Attach each individual "Adept Midterm Evaluation" form here.
    Click the link to download the ADEPT Midterm Evaluation Form.
    Attachments:        ADEPT_Midterm_Evaluation_Form.docx
13. Internship Summary
    Word process below or attach a 1-2 pages written reflective evaluation of your student
    teaching internship experience. This summary should reflect on the significance of your
    experience in terms of your professional growth and development as a teacher.

The Citadel, School of Education                46
               Section 10: Overview of Teacher Education Certification

CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS
Each state in the United States requires a person to have a certificate or license to teach in its
public school. This requirement protects the students and helps insure that all children in the
United States are taught by highly qualified teachers who have met the established standards of
quality through their teacher preparation program.
The Citadel Teacher Education teacher candidates will be recommended for certification in the
state of South Carolina only if they have met all the School of Education requirements as
outlined in the course catalog or official program of study. Verification of College Preparation
Recommendation for Teacher Certificate is signed by the Dean in the School of Education only
after ALL requirements have been successfully met. This form is sent to the South Carolina
State Department of Education, Office of Educator Certification who then give final approval and
issue the official certification. Typically this process takes from 12 – 15 weeks to be completed.
South Carolina certification status can be accessed through the follow web address:
https://scteachers.ed.sc.gov/apps/mycert/logon.cfm
For teacher candidates considering certification or licensure in another state, a candidate should
obtain his or her South Carolina certificate first. Many states have reciprocity agreements with
South Carolina. These agreements make it possible for a person to be qualified for initial
certification or licensure in those states.
SOUTH CAROLINA TEACHER APPLICATION SYSTEM
The (CERRA) maintains South Carolina’s state-wide teacher application system. This system
allows a teacher who is seeking a teaching position to file one common application on-line, to
learn about job openings throughout the state and to post or activate her or his application for
school districts to view. Creating a profile through the application can be started during the
student teaching internship.
The South Carolina Teacher Application System can be accessed through CERRA at:
http://www.winthrop.edu/scteach https://www.winthrop.edu/scteach
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR SOUTH CAROLINA EDUCATORS
Pursuant to State Board of Regulations 43-58, the State Board of Education has the legal
authority to deny, revoke, or suspend a certificate, or issue a public reprimand, for the follow
causes:
 Incompetence,                                          turpitude,
 Willful neglect of duty,                              Dishonesty,
 Willful violation of the rules and                    Evident unfitness for the position for
  regulation of the State Board of                       which one is employed,
  Education,                                            Sale or possession of narcotics,
 Unprofessional conduct,                               Obtaining or attempting to obtain a
 Drunkenness,                                           certificate by fraudulent means or
 Cruelty,                                               through misrepresentation of material
 Crime against the law of this state or the             facts,
  United States,                                        Failure to comply with the provisions of a
 Immorality, any conduct involving moral                contract without the written consent of



The Citadel, School of Education                47
  the local school board,                                time to complete successfully the formal
 Test security violation,                               evaluation process as an annual contract
 Failure to comply with a court order for               teacher.
  child support, and failure for a second

The State Board of Education may impose any one of the following disciplinary actions on an
educator certificate:
 Permanent revocation,                                 counseling, or treatment; psychiatric
 Revocation with the right to reapply after            testing, counseling, or treatment; or
  three years,                                          other conditions appropriate to the facts
 Suspension for a specified period of time,            of the case;
 Suspension for a specified period of time,           Public reprimand.
  upon satisfaction of certain conditions
  such as drug or alcohol testing,

The process for taking disciplinary action on an educator certificate:
1. The Department of Education may learn of possible grounds for disciplinary action on an
   educator certificate from a school district superintendent pursuant to State Board of
   Education Regulation 43-58.1, other states, the media, and individual complaints.
2. Once the Department of Education learns of conduct that may constitute just cause for
   disciplinary action, The Department will notify the educator of pending disciplinary action
   and of the educator’s right to a hearing. The educator has fifteen days from the receipt of
   the notice to make a written request for a hearing.
3. If the educator fails to request a hearing within this time frame, he or she will waive the
   right to a hearing and the State Board may impost disciplinary action based on the
   information present by the Department.
4. If the educator requests a hearing, a hearing will be conducted before the Board or a
   hearing officer, pursuant to State Board of Education Rule BACK, Procedures for Educator
   Certification Hearings.
South Carolina educators have had disciplinary action taken on their certificates for
 Pursuing a personal, inappropriate                   Sending or receiving prurient emails;
  relationship with a student;                         Violating test security;
 Touching a student inappropriately;                  Violating state or federal laws involving
 Engaging in a physical altercation with a             drugs or alcohol or other illegal behavior;
  student;                                             Embezzling public funds;
 Supplying alcohol or drugs to a student;             Committing breach of trust; and
 Using a school computer to view or                   Breaching a teaching contract.
  download pornography;

Applicants for certification in South Carolina have had their applications for certification denied
because they have serious criminal records and, in some cases, failed to fully disclose their
criminal records.
Notice of the denial, suspension or revocation of an educator’s certificate is sent to all districts
in South Carolina and to the National Association of State Directors of Teacher Education and
Certification (NASDTEC) Clearinghouse. Notice of a public reprimand is sent only to the schools
districts.


The Citadel, School of Education                48
                                       The Citadel
                                   School of Education




                          GUIDELINES
                             FOR
                 STUDENT TEACHING INTERNSHIPS

                                     APPENDICES


                                              For
                                   Student Teaching Interns
                                     Cooperating Teachers
                                      College Supervisors




[Rev. Ed.: July 2008]


The Citadel, School of Education              49
The Citadel, School of Education   50
                                   APPENDICES
                        Section A. Student Teaching Intern Forms




The Citadel, School of Education           51
                                     The Citadel
                          The Military College of South Carolina
                                    171 Moultrie Street
                                  Charleston, SC 29409

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION                                                      PHONE (843) 953-5097
                                                                         FAX (843) 953-6797


                           LIABILITY INSURANCE WAIVER


I understand that for my own protection I need to carry Professional Liability Insurance
during my teaching internship tenure in the event that there is an accident or injury
related to my supervision of students. The School of Education recommends that I
select the insurance package through a professional organization. I also have the
option of choosing alternative insurance.

I have indicated below my decision regarding Professional Liability Insurance:

_____     I have purchased Professional Liability Insurance through:

         Palmetto State Teachers Association

         Student-South Carolina Education Association

         Other: ________________________________________________


_____ I choose not to purchase liability insurance, and I understand the possible
consequences.

_______________________________________                    __________________________________

Print Name                    Signature

_______________________________________ __________________________________
Social Security       Date


***Note: Form due prior to first day of Teaching/Counseling Field Work Experiences/
         Internship.




The Citadel, School of Education                    52
                                   The Citadel School of Education
                         Schedule for Student Teaching Internship

Student Teaching Intern: ________________________ Phone: ______________________
E-Mail Address: ________________________________________________________________
School: __________________________________              School Phone: ______________________
Cooperating Teacher: _______________________ College Supervisor: ____________________

                                    SCHEDULE OF CLASSES

Teacher Arrival Time:         ___________________ A.M.
School Begins at:             ___________________ A.M.
Classes End at:               ___________________ P.M.
Teacher Departure Time:       ___________________ P.M.

Period          Period         Room        Grade         Level of    Subject          Indicate
Begins          Ends           Number      Level(s)      Class                        class you
                                                                                      expect to
                                                                                      teach first




NOTE:
1.    Please include lunch, homeroom, and recess periods at the proper place in the
      schedule.

2.       Title and save document, email copy to your college supervisor and Ms. Habhegger, and
         attach a copy to your LiveText Portfolio.




The Citadel, School of Education                 53
                                   The Citadel School of Education
                Physical Education Student Teaching Internship Weekly Log
                                 with Teacher Comments

Student Teaching Intern’s name ____________________ Dates ____________Week # ______

School ___________________ Cooperating Teacher _________________

MONDAY-



Teacher’s Comments:


TUESDAY-




Teacher’s Comments:


WEDNESDAY-



Teacher’s Comments:


THURSDAY-



Teacher’s Comments:


FRIDAY-



Teacher’s Comments:




The Citadel, School of Education                 54
                                    The Citadel School of Education
                       Secondary Student Teaching Intern’s Weekly Log


Student Teaching Intern’s Name: _________________________Week of _________________

School: ____________________________ Cooperating Teacher: _______________________

Describe what occurred during the day, including reflective comments.

MONDAY



TUESDAY



WEDNESDAY



THURSDAY



FRIDAY




The Citadel, School of Education                  55
                                 Physical Education Lesson Plan Format

Lesson Plan#      Lesson Name         Unit   .

Grade(s)       School        .

Intern     Cooperating Teacher          Date reviewed     .

Date/Times to teach         .

Equipment needed (and how many of each item):

Cognitive objective and SC standard numbers:

Affective Objective and SC standard numbers:

Psychomotor objective and SC standard numbers:

Safety considerations:

Assessment activities/procedures:

The following ―block‖ form of the daily lesson plan may be done in portrait or landscape format.
Complete the lesson plan on a computer so you can have space needed for each portion of the plan.

CONTENT (include any        TIME      CLASS                METHODS.                  TEACHING CUES AND
or all of these needed      (in       ORGANIZATION/        STRATEGIES,               POINTS OF EMPHASIS
for each lesson)            min)      FORMATION            PROCEDURES                (include information
                                                           (include explanations,    about giving feedback)
                                                           demonstration, and
                                                           practice opportunities)
Warm-up/Intro
Activities/Set
Induction/etc
Safety lecture/
Preview/Review/etc
List major tasks
for the lesson, with
appropriate headings,
in as many sections
as needed.

Conclusion/closing

Accommodations
For different learning
rates




The Citadel, School of Education                   56
                                         The Citadel School of Education
                               Secondary Individual Lesson Plan Template

  Name:                                                                Date:

  Unit Topic:                                  Lesson Title:                   Lesson # :

 Objectives for the lesson        Instructional procedures                        Assessment of each
                                                                                  objective
S.C. Standards:                   Review:




The student will be able to:                                                      Assessments:




The student will be able to:                                                      Assessments:




The student will be able to:                                                      Assessments:




Materials:                        Accommodations for learning disabilities:       Homework:




  Career connections:




  The Citadel, School of Education                     57
                                   The Citadel School of Education
                                    Student Teaching Intern
                               CLASSROOM OBSERVATION REPORT


Name: ________________________________________Date:___________________________

School: ______________________________________Level of Class/Grade________________

Teacher Observed: _____________________________________________________________

Subject Presented: _____________________________________Number of Students: ______

Equipment Used/Method or Materials for Lesson ______________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________

Topic Summary:




Student Responses:




Apparent Lesson Objectives: ________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________
Objectives met?  All  Some  None

How were objectives met?

How was the learning assessed?

Your Opinion:




The Citadel, School of Education                 58
                                           TT1: Long-Range Plan
                        (to be completed and attached in your LiveText Portfolio under APS 1)

Student Teaching Intern’s Name:

School:

Grade level(s)/Subject area(s):

                         Section I: Student Information (Key Element 1.A)

 Describe the student information that you feel will have the most impact on the
    way you plan and deliver instruction.
    (Check one of the following two options.)
          The student information is described in a separate document. (Note: A copy of this
          document must be included in the dossier.)
        The student information is described in the table below.

  Important Student Information (Key Element 1.A)                           Source(s) of Information




 Reflect on the student information (Key Element 1.A): (1) Why do you feel that this
    student information is of primary importance, and (2) how did and will you use this student
    information to guide the development of your long- and short-range plans?


    Section II: Long-Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals (Key Element 1.B)

 Describe the long-range learning/developmental goals that you have established
    for your students in the subject/course.
    (Check one of the following two options.)
          The long-range learning and/or developmental goals are described in a separate
          document. (Note: A copy of this document must be included in the dossier.)
        The long-range learning and/or developmental goals are described in the table below.




The Citadel, School of Education                      59
                      Long-Range Learning and/or Developmental Goals
                                     (Key Element 1.B)




 Reflect on the long-range learning and/or developmental goals (Key Element 1.B):
    Of the long-range learning and/or developmental goals you have established, which goals
    do you believe are the most important for all students to achieve, and why?

                         Section III: Instructional Units (Key Element 1.C)
 Describe the instructional units, in sequence, for this course.
    (Check one of the following two options.)
        The instructional units are described in a separate document. (Note: A copy of this
        document must be included in the dossier.)
        The instructional units are described in the table below.

                                                                              Unit Length
                      Unit Topic or Description
                                                                      (i.e., approximate number
                          (Key Element 1.C)
                                                                               of lessons)




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 Reflect on the instructional units (Key Element 1.C): How did you determine your
    instructional sequence and the amount of time to be spent on each unit of instruction?

              Section IV: Assessment of Student Performance (Key Element 1.D)
 Describe how you will explain to the students and their parents the primary ways
    in which overall student progress and achievement will be determined (i.e.,
    assessed, scored, weighted) and reported for this subject/course.
    (Check one of the following two options.)
        The procedures for determining and reporting overall student progress and achievement
        are described in a separate document. (Note: A copy of this document must be included
        in the dossier.)
        The procedures for determining and reporting overall student progress achievement are
        described below.

 Reflect on student performance (Key Element 1.D): (1) How did you determine that
    your major assessments are appropriate for evaluating student progress and achievement,
    and (2) How did you determine that your reporting of progress and achievement is
    understood by students and their parents?

                       Section V: Classroom Management (Key Element I.E)

 Describe how you will communicate to the students and their parents your
    expectations for student behavior in the classroom.
    (Check one of the following two options.)
        The explanation for student classroom behavior during instruction and during
        noninstructional routines is described in a separate document. (Note: A copy of this
        document must be included in the dossier.)
        The explanation for student classroom behavior during instruction and during
        noninstructional routines is described below.

 Reflect on classroom management (Key Element 1.E): What are the most important
    considerations in managing the classroom to maximize instructional time, and why do you
    believe them to be important?

                             Section VI: Additional Comments (optional)




The Citadel, School of Education                61
                                        TT2: Unit Work Sample
                        (to be completed and attached in your LiveText Portfolio under APS 2)

Student Teaching Intern’s Name:

School:

Grade level(s)/Subject area(s):

Course

Unit title and/or description

Dates of unit         from                      to                     Number of lessons in unit


                     UWS Section I: Major Unit Objectives (Key Element 2.A)
 Describe the major objectives of the unit.
     (Check one of the following two options.)
          The major unit objectives are described in a separate document. (Note: A copy of this
          document must be included in the dossier.)
         The major unit objectives are described in the table below.

                                         Major Unit Objectives
                                           (Key Element 2.A)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

 Reflect on the unit objectives (Key Element 2.A): How did you craft these objectives so
     that the students understand both the objectives and their relevance?

                             UWS Section II: Unit Plan (Key Element 2.B)
 Describe your instructional plan—that is, the sequence of steps that you need to follow
     if your students are to achieve the unit objectives—including the key activities or strategies
     and resources (e.g., materials, technology).
     (Check one of the following two options.)
          The instructional plan for the unit is described in a separate document. (Note: A copy of
          this document must be included in the dossier.)
         The instructional plan for the unit is described in the table below.



The Citadel, School of Education                      62
                                   Instructional Plan for the Unit
                                          (Key Element 2.B)




 Reflect on the instructional plan for the unit (Key Element 2.B): How does this
    instructional plan establish a balance between grade-level academic standards and
    expectations and the needs, abilities, and developmental levels of individual students?



                       UWS Section III: Unit Assessments (Key Element 3.A)
 List the key unit assessments.
                                                                Type of Assessment
                                                           (Check one for each assessment))
                                                          Teacher-Made
              Key Unit Assessments
                                                       (Note: A copy of each
                (Key Element 3.A)                           teacher-made       Commercially
                                                        assessment must be       Available
                                                           included in the
                                                               dossier.)




 Reflect on the unit assessments (Key Element 3.A): How did you determine that your
    unit assessments are valid and reliable for all students?



The Citadel, School of Education                 63
             UWS Section IV: Analysis of Student Performance (Key Element 3.B)
 Reflect on the analysis of student performance (Key Element 3.B): How did you
    analyze your assessment data for formative purposes in order to (1) increase your
    understanding of individual students’ strengths and weaknesses and (2) determine specific
    aspects of instruction that need to be modified?

              UWS Section V: Response to Formative Analysis (Key Element 2.C)
 Reflect on the findings of the formative analysis (Key Element 2.C): Did you need to
    adjust your unit plan, or do you foresee the need to make adjustments to future unit plans
    for these students? Why or why not?


                    UWS Section VI: Summative Feedback (Key Element 3.C)
 Reflect on the summative feedback (Key Element 3.C): How did you determine the
    relationship between student performance data and the grades (or other performance
    indicators) that you assigned to the students?




The Citadel, School of Education             64
                     TT3: Reflection on Instruction and Student Learning

Student Teaching Intern’s Name:

School:

Grade level(s)/Subject area(s):

Course                                               Date of observation

This lesson was part of which unit?

At what approximate point in the unit did this lesson fall?            Beginning
                                                                       Middle
                                                                       End


Instructions: Please reflect on teaching and learning that occurred while you were being
observed. Responses to each of the following nine sets of questions should average
approximately 100 words or less. Examples may be attached, if appropriate and available.

1. What were the objectives of this lesson? How well do you think your students understood
    the overall purpose and relevance of the lesson? (APS 4.A–C)

2. What effect did your teaching strategies have in terms of promoting student learning and
    keeping your students meaningfully engaged? (APS 5.A–C)

3. Why was the content of the lesson appropriate for the students, and how effectively did you
    organize the content? (APS 6.A–C)

4. How did you assess student learning during the lesson? What were the results? (APS 7.A)

5. Did you need to make any adjustments during the lesson? Why or why not? (APS 7.B)

6. What types of feedback did or will you provide to the students regarding their performance,
    and why?(APS 7.C)

7. In what way(s) and to what extent did the classroom environment impact your instruction
    and student learning, either positively or negatively? (APS 8.A–C; APS 9.A–C)

8. What decisions did you make regarding subsequent instruction for these students, and
    why?(APSs 4-9)

9. What did you learn as a result of teaching this lesson?(APSs 4-9)




The Citadel, School of Education                65
                                   TT4: Professional Self-Assessment
                        (to be completed and attached in your LiveText Portfolio under APS 10)

Student Teaching Intern’s Name:

School:

Grade level(s)/Subject area(s):


Instructions to the student teaching intern: Please reflect on your professional performance (APS
10.E). Responses to each of the following four sets of questions should average approximately 100 words
or less.


1. In terms of the ADEPT Performance Standards, what are your professional strengths? How have you
   built on these strengths so far, and how do you plan to do so in the future?



2. In terms of the ADEPT Performance Standards, what are your professional challenges? How do you
   plan to address these challenges?



3. Describe your students’ overall progress and achievement. What insights have you gained into ways
   to improve student progress and achievement?



4. Based on your professional self-assessment, what do you think would be an important professional
   goal for you to establish and address, and why?




The Citadel, School of Education                       66
                                    APPENDICES
                               Section B. Cooperating Teacher Forms




The Citadel, School of Education               67
                                      The Citadel School of Education
                  ADEPT Weekly Student Teaching Intern Evaluation Form

Student Teaching Intern: __________________________________ Date: ________________

Cooperating Teacher:___________________________________________

Directions: Cooperating teacher: Complete this form weekly and use it during your weekly formal meeting with your
student teaching intern. Provide your student teaching intern with a copy of this form for his or her LiveText
Portfolio. This form may be completed on the computer, saved and emailed to your student teaching intern.


1. What successful application of instructional techniques, methods, classroom management,
   assessment, and/or planning did you observe during the week?


2. What suggestions do you have for growth/development needed by the intern?


3. Based on ADEPT APS 10, describe the quality of the intern's participation in
   non-instructional activities (i.e., lunchroom supervision, chaperoning events, participation in
   staff meetings, interaction with parents).




The Citadel, School of Education                       68
                               The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                           English Content Area Indicators Evaluation
                              (To be completed by cooperating teacher on LiveText)

Student Teaching Intern: ___________________________________Date: _____________________
Cooperating Teacher: _________________________ College Supervisor: _________________________
3 = Acceptable without reservation, 2 = Acceptable but needs more work, 1 = Unacceptable with major
improvement needed, NO = Not Observed

The Teacher Candidate:

                   Key Element                                    Evidence/Comments                   3   2   1   NO
1) Demonstrates knowledge of the central concepts
   and tools of inquiry of the field.

2) Demonstrates and applies structures of the field
   delineated in professional, state, and institutional
   standards through inquiry, critical analysis and
   synthesis.
3) Follows a curriculum that meets appropriate
   performance assessments for English Language
   Arts teachers.

4) Creates and sustains an inclusive and supportive
   learning environment in which all students could
   engage in learning.
5) Integrates knowledge of students’ language
   acquisition and development into instruction and
   assessment designed to enhance their learning.
6) Demonstrates knowledge of the practices of oral,
   visual, and written literacy.


7) Demonstrates knowledge of the reading process.


8) Demonstrates knowledge of different composing
   strategies necessary to generate meaning and
   understanding.

9) Demonstrates knowledge of and use for an
   extensive range of literature.

10) Demonstrates knowledge of the range and
    influence of print and non print media and
    technology in his or her teaching.
11) Demonstrates knowledge of research theory and
    findings in English Language Arts.

12) Demonstrates dispositions and skills needed to
    integrate knowledge of English and Language
    Arts to the students.

The Citadel, School of Education                      69
                             The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                        Mathematics Content Area Indicators Evaluation
                              (To be completed by cooperating teacher on LiveText)

Student Teaching Intern: _____________________________________Date: _____________________
Cooperating Teacher: _________________________ College Supervisor: _________________________
3 = Acceptable without reservation, 2 = Acceptable but needs more work, 1 = Unacceptable with major
improvement needed, NO = Not Observed
The Teacher Candidate:

                    Key Element                                   Evidence/Comments                   3   2   1   NO
1) Demonstrates knowledge of the central concepts
   and tools of inquiry of the field.
2)
3) Demonstrates professional judgment appropriate
   for the field through inquiry, critical analysis and
   synthesis.
4) Provides opportunities for students in problem
   solving.

5) Provides opportunities for students to make and
   evaluate mathematical conjectures and
   arguments.

6) Provides opportunities for students to develop
   and extend his or her mathematical
   understanding..

7) Provides opportunities for students to
   demonstrate an understanding of mathematical
   relationships across the disciplines and the
   connection within mathematics.
8) Encourages full participation in mathematics by
   ALL students.

9) Uses appropriate technology to support the
   learning of mathematics.

10) Uses formative methods to determine students’
    understanding of mathematics to monitor her or
    his effectiveness.

11) Uses formative assessment to monitor student
    learning and adjusted instructional strategies
    and activities as needed.

12) Uses appropriate summative assessment to
    determine student achievement and to evaluate
    the mathematics program.




The Citadel, School of Education                      70
                                The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                      Physical Education Content Area Indicators Evaluation
                                (To be completed by cooperating teacher on LiveText)
  Student Teaching Intern: _________________________________               Date: _____________________
  Cooperating Teacher: _________________________ College Supervisor: _________________________
  3 = Acceptable without reservation, 2 = Acceptable but needs more work, 1 = Unacceptable with major
  improvement needed, NO = Not Observed

  The Teacher Candidate:

                         Key Element                                          Evidence/Comments         3   2   1   NO
1) Demonstrates knowledge of the central concepts and tools of
   inquiry of the field.

2) Demonstrates and applies structures of the field delineated in
    professional, state, and institutional standards through inquiry,
    critical analysis and synthesis.
3) Content Knowledge: demonstrates an understanding of physical
    education content and disciplinary concepts related to the
    development of a physically educated person.
4) Growth and Development: demonstrates an understanding of
    how individuals learn and develop and provided opportunities that
    supported his/her students’ physical, cognitive, social, and
    emotional development.
5) Diverse Students: demonstrates an understanding of how
    individuals differ in their approaches to learning and created
    appropriate instruction adapted to these differences.
6) Management and Motivation: uses and demonstrates an
    understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to
    create a safe learning environment that encouraged positive social
    interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
7) Communication: The candidate uses and demonstrates an
    understanding of effective verbal, nonverbal, and media
    communication techniques to enhance learning and engagement in
    physical activity settings.
8) Planning and Instruction: uses and demonstrates an
    understanding of planning and implementing a variety of
    developmentally appropriate instructional strategies to develop
    physically educated individuals, based on state and national
    (NASPE K-12) standards.
9) Student Assessment: uses and demonstrates an understanding
    of assessment to foster physical, cognitive, social, and emotional
    development of students in physical activity.
10) Reflection: demonstrates an understanding of a teacher who is a
    reflective practitioner who evaluates the effects of his/her actions
    on others (e.g., student, parents/guardians, fellow professionals),
    and seeks opportunities to grow professionally.
11) Technology: uses and demonstrates an understanding of
    information technology to enhance learning and to enhance
    personal and professional productivity.
12) Collaboration: demonstrates an understanding of fostering
    relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and community
    agencies to support students’ growth and well-being.

  The Citadel, School of Education                      71
                                The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                            Science Content Area Indicators Evaluation
                              (To be completed by cooperating teacher on LiveText)
Student Teaching Intern: _____________________________________Date: _____________________
Cooperating Teacher: _________________________ College Supervisor: _________________________
3 = Acceptable without reservation, 2 = Acceptable but needs more work, 1 = Unacceptable with major
improvement needed, NO = Not Observed

 The Teacher Candidate:
                      Key Element                                  Evidence/Comments                  3   2   1   NO
1) Demonstrates knowledge of the central concepts
    and tools of inquiry of the field.
2) Demonstrates and applies structures of the field
    delineated in professional, state, and institutional
    standards through inquiry, critical analysis and
    synthesis.
3) Content: demonstrates ability to structure and
    interpret the concepts, ideas, and relationships
    in science needed to advance student learning in
    the area of licensure, as defined by state and
    national standards.
4) Nature of Science: engages students in
    activities defining the values, beliefs and
    assumptions inherent to the creation of scientific
    explanations.
5) Inquiry: engages students in science inquiry
    and facilitate understanding of the role inquiry
    plays in the development of scientific knowledge.
6) Context of Science: relates science to the
    daily lives and interests of students and to a
    larger framework of human endeavor and
    understanding.
7) Skills of Teaching: uses diverse and effective
    actions, strategies and methodologies to teach
    science.
8) Curriculum: develops coherent meaningful
    goals, plans and materials and find resources
    appropriate for addressing the needs, abilities
    and interests of students.
9) Social Context: relates science to the
    community and to use human and institutional
    resources in the community to advance the
    education of their students in science.
10) Assessment: uses a variety of contemporary
    assessment strategies to evaluate the
    intellectual, social and personal development of
    the learner in all aspects of science.
11) Environment: designs and manages safe and
    supportive learning environments reflecting high
    expectations for the success of all students.




The Citadel, School of Education                       72
                                     The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                       Social Studies Content Area Indicators Evaluation
                              (To be completed by cooperating teacher on LiveText)

Student Teaching Intern: ____________________________ Date: _____________________
Cooperating Teacher: ____________________ College Supervisor: ______________________
3 = Acceptable without reservation, 2 = Acceptable but needs more work, 1 = Unacceptable with major
improvement needed, NO = Not Observed

The Teacher Candidate:

                   Key Element                                    Evidence/Comments                   3 2 1 NO
1) Demonstrates knowledge of the central
    concepts and tools of inquiry of the field.
2) Demonstrates and applies structures of the
    field delineated in professional, state, and
    institutional standards through inquiry,
    critical analysis and synthesis.
3) Displays an understanding of culture and
    cultural diversity.
4) Provides instruction about time, continuity,
    and change.
5) Displays an understanding, and ability to
    relate knowledge of People, Places, and
    Environment in instruction.
6) Displays an understanding of Individual
    Development and Identity and incorporates
    this in instruction.
7) Displays an understanding of Individuals,
    Groups and Institutions and incorporates
    this in instruction.
8) Displays an understanding of Power,
    Authority and Governance and uses this in
    instruction.
9) Displays an understanding or Production,
    Distribution and Consumption and uses this
    in instruction.
10) Displays an understanding of Science,
    Technology and Society and uses this in
    instruction.
11) Displays an understanding of Global
    Connections and uses this in instruction.
12) Displays an understanding of Civic Ideals
    and Practices and uses this in instruction.




The Citadel, School of Education                      73
                                   The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                                   FINAL GRADE RECOMMENDATION
                                                     For
                                       Student Teaching Interns

                                   Due at the Conclusion of the Internship*


Student Teacher Intern: _______________________________________

Cooperating Teacher: ___________________________

School: ______________________________________

Dates of Internship: _____________________________

Grading System: Please consult Guidelines for Student Teaching.

Graduate Students: A, B+, B, C+, C, or F

Undergraduate Students: A, B, C, D, or F

Physical Education Interns: ____________
Numerical Grade (please consult Physical Education Department)

Please consider the student’s performance in terms of the ADEPT Performance Dimensions, the
Dispositions, and any other data that supports your judgment of a final grade.


Grade for Internship: ____________________

Cooperating Teacher’s Signature: ______________________________________




*Please return this form to the college supervisor following the final evaluation
conference.




The Citadel, School of Education                     74
                                   APPENDICES
                        Section C. College Supervisors Forms




The Citadel, School of Education         75
                                   The Citadel Professional Education Unit
               COLLEGE SUPERVISOR’S Visitation Documentation Form
                             Secondary Education

Teaching Intern: _______________________ School: ________________________________

College Supervisor: ___________________ Cooperating Teacher: _______________________

Semester: _______________ Beginning: _______________ Ending: __________________

      ACTIVITY                                                         DATE
                                                                    Placement
                                                                        1
      Initial Visit
      Long Range Plan (APS 1) Review
      Feedback on APS 1
      Feedback on APS 2 and 3
      Observation 1
      Observation 2

      Midterm Conference
      Observation 3

      Observation 4
      Additional Observations




      APS 10 Review
      Feedback on APS 10
      Final Conference: Placement 2

_______________________________________       ________________
College Supervisor’s Signature      Date Submitted




The Citadel, School of Education                    76
                           The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                  COLLEGE SUPERVISOR’S Visitation Documentation Form
                                K-12 Physical Education


Teaching Intern: _______________________ School: ________________________________

College Supervisor: ___________________ Cooperating Teacher: _______________________

Semester: _______________ Beginning: _____________ Ending: _______________

ACTIVITY                                          DATE         DATE
                                               Placement    Placement
                                                   1            2
Initial Visit
Long Range Plan (APS 1) Review
Feedback on APS 1
Feedback on APS 2 and 3
Observation 1
Midterm Conference:        Placement 1
Observation 2
Final Conference: Placement 1

Observation 3
Midterm Conference:        Placement 2

Observation 4
Additional Observations




APS 10 Review
Feedback on APS 10
Final Conference: Placement 2

_______________________________________       ________________
College Supervisor’s Signature      Date Submitted




The Citadel, School of Education         77
                                   The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                        Student Teaching Internship Remediation Plan

Name _____________________________________ Date ________________________

Objective:




Plan of Action: (Include resources/strategies)




Evidence of Accomplishment:




_______________________________________________                         _______________
Intern’s Signature             Date

_______________________________________________                         _______________
College Supervisor’s Signature      Date

_______________________________________________            _______________
Director of Field Experience & Internship’s Signature Date




The Citadel, School of Education                    78
                                   APPENDICES
                              Section D. Assessment Forms




The Citadel, School of Education          79
                                    The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                            Professional Dispositions Score Sheet
                                         (To be completed on LiveText)


            PROFESSIONAL DISPOSITIONS                                                             RATINGS
The CANDIDATE:




                                                                                                   Somewhat Evident

                                                                                                                      Rarely Evident
                                                                                   Consistently




                                                                                                                                       Not Rated
                                                                                   Evident
                                                                                        3                2                 1             NR
1. Applies reflective practices.

The candidate:
 Engages in productive and insightful reflection through discussion and journaling, resulting in personal
   growth as a professional educator;
 Examines a variety of perspectives and experiences to help improve student performance; and
 Uses reflection to create and/or use alternate strategies that positively impact student learning.
Comments:


2. Demonstrates commitment to a safe, supportive learning
   environment.

The candidate:
 Fosters an educational climate where students feel safe and eager to learn;
 Exhibits the belief that all students can learn by using materials and resources that support students’
  needs;
 Designs experiences that empower all students to be successful as learners; and
 Encourages students to take pride in their work.
Comments:


3. Demonstrates high values and a caring, fair, honest, responsible,
   and respectful attitude.

The candidate:
 Demonstrates a positive, caring attitude toward students, families, and colleagues;
 Respects the rights of others;
 Demonstrates a high level of commitment to the educational profession;
 Exhibits fairness, civility, diplomacy, tact, and sensitivity toward the feelings and opinions of others;
  and
 Displays a high degree of integrity.
Comments:




The Citadel, School of Education                     80
           PROFESSIONAL DISPOSITIONS                                                                            RATINGS
The CANDIDATE:




                                                                                                                 Somewhat Evident

                                                                                                                                    Rarely Evident
                                                                                                 Consistently




                                                                                                                                                     Not Rated
                                                                                                 Evident
                                                                                                      3                2                 1             NR
4. Establishes rapport with students, families, colleagues, and
   community.

The candidate:
 Builds relationships with students, teachers, colleagues, families, the community, and other school
   personnel;
 Makes positive contributions to group interactions through sharing ideas and materials; and
 Invites and is invited by members of the school or community to engage in collaborative partnerships
  to improve student achievement.
Comments:


5. Values diversity and exhibits sensitivity to and respect for cultures.

The candidate:
 Respects students as valued individuals by ensuring their learning needs are addressed through
   culturally responsive experiences and environments; and
 Exhibits, through personal interactions, an understanding of and respect for diversity in the
   community, schools, families, and individuals including a variety of cultures, ethnicity, race,
   exceptionalities, gender, languages, religion, sexual orientation, geographical and socioeconomic
   backgrounds, and histories.
Comments:


6. Exhibits prompt regular attendance, wears professional attire, and
  communicates in standard English.

The candidate:
 Demonstrates professional demeanor through conduct, attendance, dress and punctuality;
 Articulates ideas clearly in speaking and writing; and
 Applies conventions of standard written and oral English.
Comments:



     Adapted from Dispositions Forms from York College of the City University of New York and Eastern Carolina University.




The Citadel, School of Education                             81
                                    The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                                    ADEPT Midterm Evaluation
Person completing form please check appropriate box:
  Teaching Intern (Self-Evaluation)
  Cooperating
 Teacher, College Supervisor

Date Completed: _________________________

Student Teaching Intern: ________________________________________________________

Cooperating Teacher: ___________________________________________________________

College Supervisor: ____________________________________________________________

School: _______________________________________________________________________

Courses Taught/Grade Level(s): ___________________________________________________

Directions:

Evidence is to be collected that supports the development of the student teaching intern’s skills in each of
the ten ADEPT Performance Standards (APS). This evidence is based on the ADEPT Performance
Standards descriptions, the competent performance descriptions, the ADEPT Evidence Documentation
Questions (for use by Cooperating Teacher and College Supervisor only), the Cooperating Teacher’s
ADEPT Weekly Student Teacher Evaluation Forms, the College Supervisors ADEPT Data Collection Forms,
and information from Evaluation Team discussions. Evaluation results must be appropriately documented
to protect interns, cooperating teachers and college supervisors of arbitrary decisions. Written
documentation also provides the intern with meaningful information to improve or enhance performance.
In addition to the written documentation, measurements regarding the intern’s progress for each APS
should be indicated by circling the appropriate level (3) Competent, (2) Developing Competence, and
(1) Unsatisfactory.

A Midterm Evaluation Conference is required all student teaching interns. (Physical Education interns
have two placements and each placement has a midterm and final evaluation.) During the conference,
attended by the entire evaluation team (Cooperating Teacher, College Supervisor, and Student Teacher
Intern), the intern should be provided with written documentation of the evaluation results (ADEPT)
Midterm Evaluation Forms). These results should include rationales for the decisions, a summary of
supporting evidence, and suggestions for enhancing or improving performance. If necessary, interns
should receive a formal plan for the remediation of identified deficiencies. Once the conference has been
completed, a copy of the Midterm results, and, if appropriate, the remediation plan should be provided to
the Director of Internships & Field Experiences.

Assessment Scale:
3 - Competent - Evidence demonstrates meeting or exceeding the dimension.
2 - Developing Competence - Evidence demonstrates meeting some of the dimension.
1 - Unsatisfactory - Little or no evidence that demonstrates meeting the dimension.



The Citadel, School of Education                     82
                                        APS 1: Long Range Planning
 An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by establishing appropriate long-range learning goals
and by identifying the instructional, assessment, and management strategies necessary to help all
students’ progress toward meeting these goals.
Comments/Evidence:




________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                    (1) Unsatisfactory

                                 APS 2: Short Range Planning of Instruction
An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by planning appropriate learning objectives; selecting
appropriate content, strategies, and materials for each instructional unit; and systematically using student
performance data to guide instructional decision making.
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                    (1) Unsatisfactory

                              APS 3: Planning Assessments and Using Data
An effective teacher facilitates student achievement by assessing and analyzing student performance and
using this information to measure student progress and guide instructional planning.
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                    (1) Unsatisfactory




The Citadel, School of Education                    83
                 APS 4: Establishing and Maintaining High Expectations for Learners
An effective teacher establishes, clearly communicates, and maintains appropriate expectations for student
learning, participation, and responsibility.
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                   (1) Unsatisfactory

                    APS 5: Using Instructional Strategies to Facilitate Learning
An effective teacher promotes student learning through the effective use of appropriate instructional
strategies.
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                   (1) Unsatisfactory

                                 APS 6: Providing Content for Learners
An effective teacher possesses a thorough knowledge and understanding of the discipline so that he or she
is able to provide the appropriate content for the learners.
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                   (1) Unsatisfactory



The Citadel, School of Education                   84
                        APS 7: Monitoring, Assessing, and Enhancing Learning
An effective teacher maintains a constant awareness of student performance throughout the lesson in
order to guide instruction and provide appropriate feedback to students.
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
     (3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                    (1) Unsatisfactory

                    APS 8: Maintaining an Environment That Promotes Learning
An effective teacher creates and maintains a classroom environment that encourages and supports student
learning.
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                    (1) Unsatisfactory

                                    APS 9: Managing the Classroom
An effective teacher maximizes instructional time by efficiently managing student behavior, instructional
routines and materials, and essential non-instructional tasks .
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                    (1) Unsatisfactory

                            APS 10: Fulfilling Professional Responsibilities
An effective teacher is an ethical, responsible, contributing, and ever-learning member of the profession.
Comments/Evidence:




_______________________________________________________________________________
(3) Competent                      (2) Developing Competence                    (1) Unsatisfactory




The Citadel, School of Education                    85
                                 Domain 1: Planning
                     ADEPT APS 1: LONG-RANGE PLAN RUBRIC
 Candidate Name: ____________________________________________________
 Evaluator: _________________________________________Date: _________________
 3 = Competent*        2 = Developing Competence 1 = Unsatisfactory
 *Rating is based on ability to be a beginning teacher following student teaching internship.

                    Key Elements                                                Evidence
1A Information on students is obtained,                                                         3   2   1
   analyzed and used to help determine the
   learning needs of all students and guide
   instructional planning.
The student teaching intern:
 identifies appropriate student information;
 gives a sound explanation of the relevance of the
   student information to student learning; and
 shows insight into the use of the student
   information to guide planning.
1B Appropriate standards-based long-range                                                       3   2   1
    learning and developmental goals for all
   students are established.
The student teaching intern:
 identifies long-range goals that are accurate and
   appropriate; and
 provides a sound explanation to support conclusions
   regarding the most important goals for all students
   to achieve.
1C Instructional unit is identified and                                                         3   2   1
    sequenced to facilitate the accomplishment
    of the long-range goals.
The student teaching intern:
 identifies instructional units that are appropriate to
   the context; and
 presents a sound explanation for the unit sequence
   and timeline.
1D A process is developed for the evaluation and                                                3   2   1
    recording of student progress and
    achievement.
The student teaching intern:
 describes appropriate procedures for assessing
   scoring, and weighting assessments;
 present solid evidence for determining the
   appropriateness of the assessments in terms of
   measuring student progress and achievement; and
 presents a sound explanation f the methods for
   communicating the assessment information to
   students and their parents.
1E Appropriate procedures for managing the                                                      3   2   1
   classroom have been developed.
The student teaching intern:
 presents an appropriate description of the
   expectations for student behavior during instruction
   and during noninstructional routines; and
 presents a sound explanation of the most important
   considerations for maximizing instruction time.




 The Citadel, School of Education                          86
                                        Domain 1: Planning
                              ADEPT APS 1: LONG-RANGE PLAN RUBRIC

  Key Elements                      Competent                    Developing Competence                 Unsatisfactory
                                       3                                   2                                 1
1A Information on          Describes students including          Demonstrates a basic              Does not convey an
students is obtained,    knowledge of students’                 knowledge of students’             understanding of students’
analyzed and used to     backgrounds, needs, and ability        backgrounds, needs and ability     backgrounds, needs, and
help determine the       levels.                                levels but requires additional     ability levels
learning needs of all                                           information                          Lacks evidence of
students and guide         Uses student information in           Uses some of the                student information used
instructional            long-range planning.                   information on students to guide   to develop long-range
planning.                                                       instruction                        planning


1B Appropriate            Identifies and states specific     Identifies some of the         Does not identify goals
standards-based          objectives and developmental goals appropriate goals and addresses or address the state
long-range learning                                         some of the state curriculum    curriculum standards
                          Identifies South Carolina State
and developmental                                           standards
                         Curriculum Standards and/or South
goals for all students
                         Carolina Career Focus Standards
are established.
                         where appropriate.


1C Instructional unit     Identified instructional unit is    Provides a list of                  Does not provide a list
is identified and        appropriate.                        instructional units addressing        of instructional units that
sequenced to               Develops a timeline that is      some major topics and/or does         address major topics
facilitate the           appropriately sequenced and         not provide an appropriate            and/or does not provide an
accomplishment of        suitable for unit and developmental sequence                              appropriate sequence
the long-range goals.    levels of students.                   Provides a timeline for              Does not provide a
                                                             completing the instructional          timeline for completing the
                           Selects and lists materials and
                                                             units but may not be                  instructional units
                         resources that assist in the
                                                             appropriate for the content or
                         accomplishment of the long-range                                            Does not provide a list
                                                             the students’ ability levels
                         instructional goals.                                                      of materials and resources
                                                               Provides a list of materials
                                                                                                   and/or a plan for obtaining
                                                             and resources but is incomplete
                                                                                                   the materials and
                                                             or non-specific
                                                                                                   resources
1D A process is            Identifies types of formal and        Provides an evaluation plan       Does not include
developed for the        informal assessments in the long-      but is deficient in identifying    major assessment
evaluation and           range plan that aligns with learning   major assessment strategies        strategies or criteria for
recording of student     goals and instructional content/       and/or criteria for evaluating     evaluating student
progress and             skills.                                student progress                   progress
achievement.               Includes major assessment
                         strategies with criteria for
                         evaluating student progress.
                                                                  Identifies a process for          Does not identify a
                           Identifies organization,
                                                                maintaining records but lacks      process for maintaining
                         technology, and maintenance
                                                                organization or ease of            student records
                         process of student records.
                                                                interpretation
1E Appropriate             Develops a plan for managing          Develops a plan for              Does not develop a
procedures for           student behavior that is age-          managing student behavior that     plan for managing student
managing the             appropriate, stated in positive        includes two of the following:     behavior and classroom
classroom have been      terms, and consistent with             age-appropriate, stated in         operations
developed.               school/district policies               positive terms, consistent with
                           Develops a plan for routine         school/district policies             Does not have a plan
                         communication with parents that          Identifies a plan for           for communicating with
                         includes the nature and frequency      communication with parents         parents
                         of the communication                   when the need arises


The Citadel, School of Education                           87
                                Domain 1: Planning
            ADEPT APS 2: SHORT RANGE PLANNING OF INSTRUCTION RUBRIC

Candidate Name: _____________________________________________________________
Evaluator: __________________________________________ Date: __________________
3 = Competent* 2 = Developing Competency                1 = Unsatisfactory
*Rating is based on ability to be a beginning teacher following student teaching internship.


                   Key Elements                                                Evidence
 2A Unit objectives facilitate student                                                         3   2   1
    achievement of academic standards
    and long-range learning and
    developmental goals.
 The student teaching intern:
    identifies appropriate unit objectives: and
    gives a sound explanation of the relevance of
     these objectives to student learning needs and
     interests.



 2B Instructional plans include content,                                                       3   2   1
    strategies, materials and resources
    appropriate for the students.
 The student teaching intern:
    presents an appropriate, logically sequence
     instructional plan for the unit; and
    provides a sound explanation of factors that
     must be considered in balancing grade-level
     standards/expectations and individual students’
     needs, abilities, and developmental levels.




 2C Student performance data is used to                                                        3   2   1
    guide short-range planning of
    instruction.
 The student teaching intern:
    makes appropriate determinations regarding
     the need to make adjustments to the
     instructional plans; and
    presents a solid rationale for making these
     determinations.




 OVERALL
                                                                                               3   2   1




The Citadel, School of Education                          88
                                       Domain 1: Planning
                   ADEPT APS 2: SHORT RANGE PLANNING OF INSTRUCTION RUBRIC

                                       Competent               Developing Competency                   Unsatisfactory
     Key Elements
                                             3                              2                                 1
 2A Unit objectives         Appropriate Unit:                 Unit is adequate for the          Unit shows no
 facilitate student        Unit fulfills the requirements     content area and/or grade          evidence of alignment to
 achievement of            for the content area and grade     level and shows evidence of        standards and do not
 academic standards and    level and is aligned to state      aligned to state standards.        appear to be appropriate
 long-range learning and   standards.                                                            for content area and/or
 developmental goals.                                                                            grade level.
                            Appropriate Objectives for        Objectives are somewhat           Objectives are not
                           the grade level and content        appropriate for the content        appropriate for the
                           area.                              area and/or the grade level.       content area and grade
                                                                                                 level.
                            Observable Objectives are         Observable objectives
                           stated in the learner outcomes     are stated in the learner           Objectives are not
                           and can be easily measured         outcomes but are not easily        stated in observable
                           and evaluated.                     measured and/or evaluated.         learner outcomes and
                                                                                                 cannot be measured.
                            Student Involvement               Objectives require
                           Objectives require students to     students to have some               Objectives indicate
                           be actively involved in the        active involvement in the          students are passive
                           learning process.                  learning process.                  recipients of knowledge.
                            Matched to Skills Objectives      2 or 3 of the objectives
                                                                                                  One or none of the
                           All objectives have been           have been accurately
                                                                                                 objectives have been
                           accurately matched with the        matched with the required
                                                                                                 matched with the required
                           required skills to master the      skills to master the
                                                                                                 skills to master the
                           objective.                         objective.
                                                                                                 objective.
 2B Instructional plans     Appropriate/ Accurate             Content is accurate and           The content is not
 include content,          Content for the instructional      somewhat appropriate for           accurate or appropriate
 strategies, materials     area and grade level is evident    the instructional area and/or      for instructional area
 and resources             Content is aligned to state        grade level. Content               and/or grade level.
 appropriate for the       standards.                         demonstrates some                  Content is not aligned to
 students.                                                    alignment to state standards       state standards.
                            Matching Materials Each           Each lesson plan                  Materials lists are
                           lesson plan contains a             contains a materials list.         either not available or are
                           comprehensive materials/                                              incomplete.
                           resource list.
                                                               Each objective contains           Each objective does
                            Logically sequenced
                                                              less than two appropriate          not contain appropriate or
                           strategies including at least 2
                                                              instructional strategies that      logically sequenced
                           instructional strategies per
                                                              may or may not be logically        instructional strategies.
                           objective
                                                              sequenced.
                            Logically sequenced
                           strategies provide opport-          Lesson plans incorporate          Lesson plans do not
                           unities for students to reflect    limited opportunities for          incorporate any
                           on their learning process.         students to reflect on their       opportunity for students
                           Students communicate in some       learning process. The              to reflect on their learning
                           form about what they learned,      reflection activity is informal.   process.
                           how they learned it, and how
                           they plan to use the
                           information.




The Citadel, School of Education                         89
                                   Competent                Developing Competency                Unsatisfactory
    Key Elements
2B Instructional plans    Logically sequenced               Lesson plans                   Lesson plans do not
include content,         strategies promote an              demonstrate how language        clearly demonstrate the
strategies, materials    understanding of the purpose       and/or content information      purpose and use of the
and resources            and use of content information     are used but do not indicate    content information
appropriate for the      and/or language.                   a clear purpose of the          and/or language.
students. continued                                         information and/or
                                                            language.
                          Strategies promote active                                         Instructional strategies
                         engagement of students              Instructional strategies      offer few or no
                         through problem solving/           are creative and offer some     opportunities for the
                         creativity.                        opportunities for the           students to become
                                                            students to become actively     actively involved.
                                                            involved.
                          Strategies for collaboration/     Instructional strategies       Instructional strategies
                         independent learning/ varying      provide minimal                 do not provide
                         group sizes. Instructional         opportunities for the teacher   opportunities for the
                         strategies provide opportunities   to work with whole class,       teacher to work with
                         for the teacher to work with       small groups and/or             whole class, small groups
                         whole class, small groups          individuals including           and/or individuals
                         and/or individuals including       collaboration and               including collaboration and
                         collaboration and independent      independent learning.           independent learning.
                         learning.
                                                             Unit plans demonstrate         Unit plans lack
                          Incorporation of
                                                            the use of technology to        evidence supporting the
                         Technology. Unit plans
                                                            promote learning.               use of technology to
                         demonstrate the use of
                                                                                            promote learning.
                         technology in an effective
                         manner to promote learning.
                          Connections to other              Unit and lesson plans          Lesson plans do not
                         content areas and career           could be associated with        integrate other subject
                         pathways. Unit and lesson          other content area              area standards or career
                         plans integrate other subject      standards and/or career         pathways into the
                         area standards and career          pathways, but the               instructional unit.
                         pathways into the instructional    connections are not clearly
                         unit.                              explained.
2C Student                Strategies focus on student       Lesson plans partially         Lesson plans do not
performance data is      learning. Lesson plans focus       focus on the student but fail   take into account the age
used to guide short-     on the needs of students and       to take into account all        or grade level of the
range planning of        incorporate strategies for extra   required learner needs.         student or accommodate
instruction.             practice, challenges, choices                                      for learner needs.
                         for different intelligences and
                         learning modes.
                          Strategies accommodate for        Lesson plans document          Lesson plans do not
                         specific learning differences      minimal modifications for       document modifications
                         among the students                 specific learning differences   for specific learning
                         Lesson plans document              among individual students.      differences among
                         modifications for specific                                         individual students.
                         learning differences among
                         individual students.




The Citadel, School of Education                       90
                                 Domain 1: Planning
           ADEPT APS 3: SHORT RANGE PLANNING, DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF
                               ASSESSMENTS RUBRIC

Student Teaching Intern’s Name: ________________________________________________

Evaluator’s Name: _________________________________ Date: _____________________

3 = Competent*        2 = Developing Competency          1= Unsatisfactory
*Rating is based on ability to be a beginning teacher following student teaching internship.

                Key Element                                               Evidence
 3A A variety of appropriate assess-
    ments are developed/selected and                                                           3   2   1
    administered.
 The student teaching intern:
    develops and/or selects appropriate key
     unit assessments; and
    presents sound evidence that these
     assessments are valid and reliable for all
     students.


 3B At appropriate intervals, student
    performance data is gathered and                                                           3   2   1
    accurately analyzed to guide
    instructional planning.
 The student teaching intern appropriately
 analyzes the assessment data for formative
 purposes in order to determine:
    individual students’ strengths and
     weaknesses; and
    specific aspects of instruction that need
     to be modified.


 3C Assessment data used to
    determine grades that accurately                                                           3   2   1
    reflect student progress and
    achievement.
 The student teaching intern establishes
 summative evaluation criteria that:
    align with the unit objectives, the unit
     assessments, and the ability levels of the
     students; and
    accurately reflect student progress and
     achievement.


 Overall                                                                                       3   2   1




The Citadel, School of Education                          91
                              Domain 1: Planning
         ADEPT APS 3: SHORT RANGE PLANNING, DEVELOPMENT AND USE OF
                             ASSESSMENTS RUBRIC

                                                                     Developing
        Element                     Competent                                                     Unsatisfactory
                                                                     Competency
                                          3                                 2                              1
 3A A variety of              Varied Assessments                Assessments provide           Assessments do not
 appropriate assessments    that provide opportunities for     some opportunities for         provide opportunities for
 are developed/selected     students to use a variety of       students to use a variety of   students to use a variety
 and administered.          intelligences and learning         intelligences and learning     of intelligences and
                            modes to demonstrate their         modes to demonstrate their     learning modes to
                            knowledge.                         knowledge.                     demonstrate their
                                                                                              knowledge.
                              Appropriate for Students          Assessments are
                            including for the grade level      appropriate for the grade        Assessments are often
                            and take into account              level but minimally consider   inappropriate for the grade
                            learning differences within        learning differences within    level and do not consider
                            the class.                         the class.                     learning differences within
                                                                                              the class.
                              Appropriate for                   Assessments
                            Objectives The assessments         demonstrate mastery of           Assessments do not
                            demonstrate mastery of             some of the stated             demonstrate mastery of
                            stated objectives.                 objectives.                    stated objectives.
                             Appropriate for Content            Development and use of        Development and use
                            Development and use of             assessments in the content     of assessments in the
                            assessments in the content         area is adequate and           content area is minimal
                            area is comprehensive and          aligned with state             and is not aligned with
                            aligned with state standards.      standards.                     state standards.
                              Appropriate for                   Development and use of
                                                                                                Development and use
                            Strategies. Development            assessments demonstrates
                                                                                              of assessments
                            and use of assessments             some correlation to the
                                                                                              demonstrates no obvious
                            demonstrates a direct              varied instructional
                                                                                              correlation to the varied
                            correlation to the varied          strategies used.
                                                                                              instructional strategies
                            instructional strategies used.
                                                                                              used.
                                                                Some of the criteria
                             Appropriate Criteria All                                          Criteria used to assess
                                                               used to assess a unit are
                            of the criteria used to assess                                    a unit are inappropriate
                                                               appropriate and                and not measurable.
                            a unit are appropriate and
                                                               measurable.
                            measurable

 3B At appropriate            Analysis of Assessments          Teacher candidate             Teacher candidate
 intervals, student         Results. Teacher candidate         occasionally analyzes and      does not analyze and/or
 performance data is        regularly analyzes and uses        uses assessment results to     use assessment results to
 gathered and accurately    assessment results to              monitor, modify and/or         monitor, modify and/or
 analyzed to guide          monitor, modify and/or             enhance learning.              enhance learning.
 instructional planning.    enhance learning throughout
                            the unit.
 3C Assessment data           Record Keeping System             Teacher candidate             Teacher candidate
 used to determine          Teacher candidate                  generally utilizes a formal    does not regularly utilize a
 grades that accurately     consistently utilizes a formal,    record keeping system for      formal record keeping
 reflect student progress   clearly defined record             assessment.                    system for assessment.
 and achievement.           keeping system for
                            assessment.




The Citadel, School of Education                          92
                               Domain 2: Instruction & Domain 3: Environment
                                  ADEPT OBSERVATION INSTRUMENT
                                              ADEPT APS 4-9
Student Teaching Intern’s Name: ___________________Evaluator’s Name: _______________________
Subject: _______________________________ Lesson Title: ___________________________________
Date: __________________                                       Time: ______________
3 = Competent * 2 = Developing Competency 1= Unsatisfactory NO = Not Observed
*Rating is based on ability to be a beginning teacher following student teaching internship.

                Key Elements                                           Evidence
APS 4 – Establishing and maintaining
                                                                                               3   2   1   NO
        high expectations for
        learners
The student teaching intern:
4A Establishes, communicates, and maintains
high expectations for student achievement.
4B Establishes, communicates, and maintains
high expectations for student participation.
4C Helps students assume responsibility for
their own participation and learning.



APS 5 – Using instructional strategies
                                                                                               3   2   1   NO
        to facilitate learning
The student teaching intern:
5A Uses appropriate instruction strategies.
5B Uses a variety of instruction strategies.
5C Uses instructional strategies effectively.




APS 6 – Providing content for learners                                                         3   2   1   NO

The student teaching intern:
6A Provides appropriate content.
6B Demonstrates a thorough command of the
discipline that he or she teaches.
6C Structures the content to promote
meaningful learning.




The Citadel, School of Education                          93
                             Domain 2: Instruction & Domain 3: Environment
                                ADEPT OBSERVATION INSTRUMENT
                                            ADEPT APS 4-9

Student Teaching Intern’s Name: _______________________________________Date:______________

              Key Elements                                Evidence
APS 7 – Monitoring and enhancing                                               3    2    1   NO
        learning

The student teaching intern:
7A Continually monitors student learning
during instruction by using a variety of
information and formal assessment
strategies.
7B Enhances student learning by using
information from information and formal
assessments to guide instruction.
7C Enhances student learning by providing
appropriate instructional feedback to all
students.


APS 8 – Maintaining an
                                                                               3    2    1   NO
        environment that learning
The student teaching intern:
8A Creates and maintains the physical
environment of his or her classroom as a
safe place that is conducive to learning.
8B Creates and maintains a positive
affective climate in his or her classroom.
8C Creates and maintains a culture of
learning in his or her classroom.




APS 9 – Managing the classroom                                                 3    2    1   NO

The student teaching intern:
9A Manages student behavior appropriately.
9B Makes maximal use of instructional time.
9C Manages essential noninstructional
routines in an efficient manner.




The Citadel, School of Education                  94
                               Domain 4: Professionalism
              ADEPT APS 10: FULFILLING PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBLITIES

Candidate Name:
College Supervisor:

              Competent                          Developing Competence                          Unsatisfactory
                 3                                         2                                          1
 The candidate documented participation      The candidate documented                 The candidate documented
 in all of the types of activities listed    participation in 4 of the key elements   participation in 3 or fewer of the
 below.                                      listed below.                            types of activities listed below.
******Evidence to be entered by teacher candidate******
                                                                                                                  Check box
 The key elements of this standard include the ability and disposition of the teacher candidate to:                     if
                                                                                                                   fulfilled*
 10A The teacher candidate is an advocate for students. Demonstrates the start of establishing
 relationships with other agencies, businesses, and community groups that support and promote the growth
 and well-being of students. Works at establishing cooperative and productive relationships with other
 professionals in the school (e.g., other teachers, library media specialists, counselors, etc.)
 Evidence:


 10B The teacher candidate works to achieve organizational goals in order to make the entire school a
 positive and productive learning environment for the students. Attend and participate in collegial activities
 (e.g., departmental, faculty, and parent organization meetings, etc.)
 Evidence:




 10C The teacher candidate is an effective communicator. Communicates and works cooperatively with
 staff, coworkers, parents and guardians of students.
 Evidence:




 10D The teacher candidate exhibits professional demeanor and behavior. (e.g. dress, attendance,
 punctuality, professionalism.)
 Evidence:




 10E The teacher candidate is an active learner. Demonstrates an interest in continued professional
 development as opposed to just meeting requirements. Seek out and participate in staff development
 activities that promote continued growth as an aspiring professional, including observing in other classes in
 the assigned school.
 Evidence:




The Citadel, School of Education                          95
                                                The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                              ADEPT Performance Standards Final Evaluation
                                      (To be completed by college supervisor on LiveText)

Student Teaching Intern:
Cooperating Teacher:
College Supervisor:
Course: EDUC 499, EDUC 520, PHED 499, HESS 620


                                                                                               Competent Developing   Unsatisfactory
                                                                                                         Competency
Domain 1: Planning

APS 1 - Long-range plan

1A Obtains, analyzes, and uses student information to determine the learning needs of all
   students, and guide instruction.
1B Establishes appropriate standards-based long-range learning and developmental goals
   for all students.
1C Identifies and sequences instructional unit to facilitate the accomplishment of the long-
   range goals.
1D Develops appropriate processes for the evaluation and recording of student progress
   and achievement.
1E Plans appropriate procedures for managing the classroom.
APS 2 -Short-range planning of instruction

2A Develops unit objectives that facilitate student achievement.

2B Develops instructional plans that include content, strategies, materials and resources.

2C Uses student performance data to guide short-range planning of instruction.

APS 3 - Planning assessments and using data

3A Develops/selects a variety of appropriate assessments.
3B Gathers and accurately analyzes student performance data to guide instructional
   planning.
3C Uses assessment data to determine grades that accurately reflect student progress and
   achievement.
Domain 2: Instruction

APS 4 - Establishing and maintaining high expectations for learners

4A Establishes, communicates, and maintains high expectations for student achievement.

4B Establishes, communicates, and maintains high expectations for student participation.

4C Helps students assume responsibility for their own participation and learning.

APS 5 - Using instructional strategies to facilitate learning

5A Uses appropriate instruction strategies.

5B Uses a variety of instruction strategies.

5C Uses instructional strategies effectively.

APS 6 - Providing content for learners

6A Provides appropriate content.

6B Demonstrates a thorough command of the discipline that he or she teaches.

6C Structures the content to promote meaningful learning.




The Citadel, School of Education                                 96
                              ADEPT Performance Standards Final Evaluation


                                                                                            Competent Developing   Unsatisfactory
                                                                                                      Competency
APS 7 - Monitoring, assessing, and enhancing learning

7A Continually monitors student learning during instruction by using a variety of
   information and formal assessment strategies.
7B Enhances student learning by using information from informal and formal
   assessments to guide instruction.
7C Enhances student learning by providing appropriate instructional feedback to all
   students.
Domain 3: Classroom Environment

APS 8 - Maintaining an environment that promotes learning

8A Creates and maintains the physical environment of his or her classroom as a safe place
   that is conducive to learning.
8B Creates and maintains a positive affective climate in his or her classroom.

8C Creates and maintains a culture of learning in his or her classroom.

APS 9 - Managing the classroom

9A Manages student behavior appropriately.

9B Makes maximal use of instructional time.

9C Manages essential noninstructional routines in an efficient manner.

Domain 4: Professionalism

APS 10 - Fulfilling professional responsibilities

10A Is an advocate for students.

10B Works to achieve organizational goals in order to make the entire school a positive
    and productive learning environment for the students.
10C Is an effective communicator.

10D Exhibits professional demeanor and behavior.

10E Is an active learner




The Citadel, School of Education                                97
                                        The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                                 PORTFOLIO EVALUATION SCORE SHEET
                                  (To be completed by college supervisor on LiveText)



                                       PORTFOLIO RUBRIC                                 RATINGS




                                                                                                              Unacceptable
                                                                                                 Acceptable




                                                                                                                             Not Rated
                                                                                        Target
The CANDIDATE:
Content Knowledge:                                                                        3          2             1          NR
1. Demonstrates knowledge of the central concepts and tools of inquiry of the
   field.
Comments:

2. Demonstrates and applies structures of the field delineated in professional,
   state, and institutional standards through inquiry, critical analysis and
   synthesis.
Comments:

Student Learning:

3. Creates positive environments for student learning.
Comments:

4. Understands and builds upon developmental levels of students.
Comments:

5. Understands diversity of students, families, and communities.
Comments:

6. Understands policy contexts in work setting.
Comments:




    The Citadel, School of Education                     98
                                          The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                                              PORTFOLIO RUBRIC

                                          3                                    2                          1
      CONTENT
                                        TARGET                          ACCEPTABLE                 UNACCEPTABLE
     KNOWLEDGE
    Demonstrates           Evidence of applying                 Evidence of knowledge of       No evidence shown.
    knowledge of the        knowledge of central                  central concepts.              Evidence of
    central concepts        concepts.                            Evidence of knowledge of        misunderstanding of
    and tools of           Evidence of knowledge of              tools of inquiry.               central concepts or
    inquiry of the          tools of inquiry.                                                     tools of inquiry.
    field.                 Evidence of analyzing and
                            using data to improve
1                           instruction.

                          Ex. Lesson plan, video of
                              teaching and reflection of
                              lesson includes strengths
                              and weaknesses of
                              lesson and proposed
                              revision.
    Demonstrates and       Applies professional, state,         Demonstrates knowledge         No evidence shown.
    applies                 and institutional standards           of professional, state, and    Evidence of
    professional,           through inquiry, critical             institutional standards.        misapplication of
    state, and              analysis and synthesis.                                               professional, state,
    institutional                                               Ex. State standards               and institutional
2   standards through     Ex. Case study includes                   identified in lesson          standards.
    inquiry, critical         analysis and treatment                plan.
    analysis and              plan
    synthesis.            Ex. References professional
                              codes of ethics, content
                              area standards.
    Creates positive       Observable evidence of a             Observable evidence of a       No evidence shown.
    environments for        positive learning                     positive learning              Negative impact on a
    student learning.       environment.                          environment.                    preexisting positive
                           Observable evidence of               Delineate factors that          environment.
                            maintaining a positive                impact the learning
                            learning environment.                 environment.

3                         Ex. Analyze the environment           Ex. Reflection on the
                              and provide constructive              environment they have
                              feedback for how it can               observed.
                              be improved.                      Ex. Long-range plan
                          Ex. ADEPT APS 8 & 9                        identifies key elements
                          Ex. Reflective writings create             to be used to create a
                              alternate strategies to                 positive environment.
                              impact student learning.




     The Citadel, School of Education                      99
                                         3                                2                           1
      STUDENT
                                       TARGET                       ACCEPTABLE                UNACCEPTABLE
      LEARNING
    Understands          Applies understanding of            Demonstrates knowledge       No evidence shown.
    and builds upon       intellectual, social, and            of intellectual, social,     Evidence shows a
    developmental         personal developmental levels        and personal                  lack of
    levels of             of students.                         development.                  understanding
    students.            Acknowledges background             Acknowledges                  developmental levels
                          influences.                          background influences         of students.
                         Supports belief all students        Supports belief all
                          can learn.                           students can learn.

                        Ex. Provide a classroom              Ex. Document
4                            developmental guidance              psychosocial stages
                             activity on stages of moral         of development.
                             development.                    Ex. Lesson plan identifies
                        Ex. Unit plan identifies a               activities develop-
                            variety of activities                mental appropriate
                            appropriate for a variety of         for age group.
                            developmental levels of          Ex. Document
                            individual students.                 psychosexual stages
                        Ex. Provide an age appropriate           of development.
                             classroom career
                             developmental activity.
    Understands          Evidence of applying                Evidence of knowledge        No evidence shown.
    diversity of          understanding of diversity           of diversity among           Evidence of
    students,             among students, colleagues,          students, colleagues,         misunderstanding
    families, and         families, and communities            families, and                 diversity of students,
    communities.         Evidence of demonstrating            communities.                  colleagues, families,
                          fairness, respect, and              Evidence of                   and communities.
5                         sensitivity toward others.           demonstrating fairness,
                                                               respect, and sensitivity
                        Ex. Provide a staff in-service         toward others.
                            workshop on multicultural
                            populations.                     Ex. Create a bulletin board
                        Ex. Create a calendar with               celebrating cultural
                            activities for cultural              diversity.
                            holidays.
    Understands          Evidence of applying policies       Evidence of knowledge        No evidence shown.
    policy contexts       in the work setting.                 of policies in the work      Evidence of
    in work setting.     Evidence of engaging                 setting.                      misunderstanding
                          community/school                    Evidence of participating     policies in the work
6                         collaboration.                       in community activities.      setting.
                                                                                            Lack of community/
                        Ex. A completed child abuse          Ex. Staff handbook.             school involvement.
                            reporting form.                  Ex. Student handbook.
                        Ex. ADEPT APS 10.




    The Citadel, School of Education                       100
                                      The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                      EVALUATION OF COOPERATING TEACHER Form
                            (To be completed by Student Teaching Intern on LiveText)

Cooperating Teacher’s Name: _____________________________________________________
School Placement Name: _________________________ Subject Area:____________________

Semester/Year: _____________Course: EDUC 499, EDUC 520, PHED 499, HESS 620
Teaching Intern’s Name: _________________________________________________________

Scale: 5 = strongly agree; 4 = agree; 3 = neither agree or disagree; 2 = disagree; 1 = strongly disagree


  The Cooperating Teacher:                                                 5        4        3        2    1


1. Provided orientation to the school building and introduction
   to school personnel

2. Provided orientation to the daily procedures and routines
3. Provided time for specific feedback on performance
   dimensions
4. Provided time for collaboration and discussion

5. Provided for a smooth and gradual transition to teacher
   roles and responsibilities

6. Gave guidance in lesson planning as needed or requested
7. Provided information about student backgrounds when
   requested
8. Provided guidance in course curricula and State Curriculum
   Standards
9. Allowed opportunities in decision making and problem
   solving
10. Allowed for independence when working with students

11. Completed formal observations and written feedback

12. Promoted inclusion in all teacher activities and duties

13. Modeled a high standard of professionalism
14. Provided a supportive environment for the internship
    experience
15. OVERALL – the cooperating teacher contributed to my
    readiness to enter the teaching profession




The Citadel, School of Education                       101
                                      The Citadel Professional Education Unit
                       EVALUATION OF COLLEGE SUPERVISOR Form
                            (To be completed by Student Teaching Intern on LiveText)

College Supervisor’s Name: ______________________________________________________

Teaching Intern’s Name: ________________________________________________________

Semester/Year: ____________Course: EDUC 499, EDUC 520, PHED 499, HESS 620

Scale: 5 = strongly agree; 4 = agree; 3 = neither agree or disagree; 2 = disagree; 1 = strongly disagree


The College Supervisor:                                                    5        4        3        2    1


1. Facilitated an understanding of the requirements for the
   internship experience

2. Provided guidance on maintaining/completing the portfolio

3. Visited and observed on a regular and prescribed basis

4. Gave written and oral feedback on classroom observations

5. Conducted mid-term and final conferences

6. Responded to requests for assistance, promptly

7. Collaborated with the cooperating teacher

8. Demonstrated a commitment to teacher education

9. Respected issues of privacy and confidentiality

10. Adhered to deadlines for completing requirements

11. Demonstrated professional expertise in instruction and
    classroom management (ADEPT)

12. Modeled a high standard of professionalism

13. OVERALL – the college supervisor contributed to my
    development as a teacher




The Citadel, School of Education                       102

								
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