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					1     INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................... 3
    1.1 Welcome statement from Head of School. ................................................ 4
    1.2 Key web pages ..................................................................................... 5
    1.3 Key dates............................................................................................. 5
      1.3.1 Dates for Submission of Thesis and Dissertations ................................ 6
      1.3.2 Lecture timetable for Semester 1....................................................... 7
      1.3.3 Lecture timetable for Semester 2....................................................... 8
    1.4 Key contacts......................................................................................... 9
      1.4.1 Teaching Staff ................................................................................. 9
      1.4.2 Administrative Staff ....................................................................... 10
    1.5 Location of notice boards and pigeonholes.............................................. 11
    1.6 School/University Resources ................................................................. 11
      1.6.1 ISBE Library Facilities .................................................................... 11
      1.6.2 Medical Library .............................................................................. 11
      1.6.3 ISBE Computer Facilities ................................................................ 11
      1.6.4 Stopford Computer Facilities ........................................................... 11
      1.6.5 Social Space and refreshments ........................................................ 11
    1.7 Local Policies on use of phones etc. ....................................................... 12
      1.7.1 Telephone Calls ............................................................................. 12
      1.7.2 Mail ............................................................................................. 12
      1.7.3 Email ........................................................................................... 12
      1.7.4 Photocopying ................................................................................ 12
      1.7.5 Security ....................................................................................... 12
      1.7.6 Health and Safety .......................................................................... 12
    1.8 University facilities .............................................................................. 12
2     PROGRAMME OVERVIEW ........................................................................... 13
    2.1 Aims.................................................................................................. 13
    2.2 Learning Outcomes ............................................................................. 14
3     PROGRAMME STRUCTURE .......................................................................... 16
    3.1 Medical Physics Pathway ...................................................................... 17
      3.1.1 Core units..................................................................................... 17
      3.1.2 Optional units ............................................................................... 17
    3.2 Medical Imaging and Computer Vision Pathway ....................................... 18
      3.2.1 Core Units .................................................................................... 18
      3.2.2 Optional units ............................................................................... 18
    3.3 Biomedical Engineering Pathway ........................................................... 19
      3.3.1 Core Units .................................................................................... 19
      3.3.2 Optional units ............................................................................... 19
    3.4 Health Informatics Pathway .................................................................. 20
      3.4.1 Core units..................................................................................... 20
      3.4.2 Optional units ............................................................................... 20
    3.5 Dissertation requirements .................................................................... 21
      3.5.1 MSc Projects ................................................................................. 21
      3.5.2 Diploma Projects ........................................................................... 21
      3.5.3 Project Arrangements for MSc Students............................................ 21
      3.5.4 Supervision of Theses and Dissertations ........................................... 21
      3.5.5 Further information........................................................................ 22
    3.6 Seminars ........................................................................................... 22
      3.6.1 MSc Seminars ............................................................................... 22
      3.6.2 MSc Lab Introductory Sessions ........................................................ 22
4     COURSE UNITS ........................................................................................ 23
5     STUDENT PROGRESS AND ASSESSMENT ..................................................... 24
    5.1 Progression through programme ........................................................... 24



                                                                                                               1
   5.1.1 Diploma entry and progression ........................................................ 24
   5.1.2 MSc entry and awards of distinction and merit .................................. 25
 5.2 Unfair Practices/Plagiarism ................................................................... 26
 5.3 Attendance requirements ..................................................................... 26
 5.4 Programme regulations:....................................................................... 26
   5.4.1 Submission of Assessed Work ......................................................... 26
   5.4.2 Feedback/return of marks............................................................... 27
   5.4.3 Unsatisfactory progress .................................................................. 27
   5.4.4 Resit arrangements ....................................................................... 27
   5.4.5 Compensation marks ..................................................................... 27
   5.4.6 Special Circumstances.................................................................... 28
   5.4.7 Assessment of dissertations ............................................................ 28
 5.5 The University Regulations for taught masters programmes ..................... 29
 5.6 Appeals.............................................................................................. 29
6 STUDENT SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE ........................................................... 30
 6.1 Personal tutors. .................................................................................. 30
 6.2 Student feedback ................................................................................ 30
 6.3 Student representation. ....................................................................... 30
 6.4 Withdrawing from the programme. ........................................................ 30
 6.5 Complaints. ........................................................................................ 30
 6.6 Student Ill Health. ............................................................................... 30
 6.7 Special needs support. ......................................................................... 31
 6.8 Personal Development Planning. ........................................................... 31
7 PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT ....................................................................... 32
 7.1 Role of the programme committee. ....................................................... 32
   7.1.1 Role ............................................................................................. 32
   7.1.2 Remit ........................................................................................... 32
   7.1.3 Membership .................................................................................. 32
 7.2 Diagram showing how the programme committee fits in with School and
 Faculty committee structure. ........................................................................ 33
8 APPENDICES ............................................................................................ 34
 8.1 Guidance to students on plagiarism and academic malpractice .................. 34
 8.2 Work and attendance of students (Regulation XX) ................................... 37
 8.3 University Regulations for the Degree of Master, Postgraduate Diploma and
 Postgraduate Certificate ............................................................................... 38
 8.4 Sample student feedback questionnaire. ................................................ 44
 8.5 Academic Appeals (Regulation XIX) ....................................................... 47
 8.6 Student Complaints Procedure (Regulation XVIII) ................................... 50
 8.7 Student Ill Health ................................................................................ 54
 8.8 Disability Support Office....................................................................... 58
 8.9 Personal Development Plan Template .................................................... 59
 8.10    Sample Plagiarism Letter................................................................... 64
 8.11    Dissertation Submission FAQs ............................................................ 65
 8.12    Maps .............................................................................................. 68
   8.12.1    Campus map .............................................................................. 68
   8.12.2    Manchester Royal Infirmary ......................................................... 68
   8.12.3    Christie Hospital ......................................................................... 68




                                                                                                             2
                            1 INTRODUCTION


Congratulations on being accepted for the MSc in Physics and Computing in Medicine
and Biology. I hope that you will find your time in Manchester interesting and
enjoyable. This handbook aims to provide you with the information you will need to
progress through the programme. You will also find general information about the
University and what it can offer in the Student Guide and on the University website,
at

http://www.manchester.ac.uk/studyhere/studentlife/

Other key websites are listed in section 1.2.

If there is anything you would like to ask about concerning the programme, I am
usually in my office on the main ISBE corridor, G826A, and the MSc secretary is here
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays in G538B.

Tom Sharpe, Programme Director.




                                                                                  3
1.1    Welcome statement from Head of School.
I would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to the School of Medicine.

The University of Manchester Medical School is one of the largest in the country with
almost 2,000 undergraduates studying for MB ChB, 700 postgraduates and 1,300
staff. The five University Teaching Hospitals Trusts, together with affiliated hospitals
and community practices across the Northwest provide excellent facilities for clinical
training and research. Manchester is highly rated as a place to study medicine and is
consistently placed 1st or 2nd in the national league tables.

The Medical School is a major contributor to the University‟s research profile and
external grant income, with annual expenditure on research in the range £30-35
million per year. This funding is obtained from research councils, medical charities,
the health service and industry. The school was rated 5 in both hospital-based and
community-based clinical subjects at the last RAE. Ready access to a large and
stable patient population, combined with first class staff and facilities, underpins our
research and postgraduate training. Emphasis is on clinical and patient-based
translational research, which is complemented by major laboratory research groups
in cancer, cardiovascular disease and genetics. A number of prestigious national
centres are incorporated within the school, including the ARC Epidemiology Unit,
MRC Biobank project, NHS National Primary Care R&D Centre, Wellcome Trust
Clinical Research Facility and the Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre.

The School has a devolved style of operation and management based on ten
Divisions that are responsible for delivering its research, education and service
commitments. The ten Division Heads report directly to the Head of School, who is
assisted by four Policy Directors responsible for Development, Education, Graduate
Studies and Research.

I very much hope the time spent on your programme in the School of Medicine will
be a valuable educational experience which will boost both your personal and
professional life. This Programme guide has been written and designed for you as a
reference document to provide programme-specific information and I am sure this
will prove useful to you throughout your study. If however, you have questions or
would like some further advice, please do not hesitate to contact the people listed in
this brochure for further help and assistance.

Professor Andy Garner
Head of the School of Medicine




                                                                                      4
1.2   Key web pages

URL                                                 Description
http://www.manchester.ac.uk/policies/               University of Manchester
                                                    general policies
http://www.mhs.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/pg/        Information for postgraduates
                                                    in the Faculty of Medical and
                                                    Human Sciences
http://www.campus.manchester.ac.uk/ssc/             General information for
                                                    students
http://www.isbe.man.ac.uk/                          The ISBE Website




1.3   Key dates

Semester 1          Monday 19 September 2005 - Fri 16 December 2005

Assessment
 Period & Exams     Monday 16 January 2006 - Fri 29 January 2006

Semester 2          Monday 30 January 2006 - Fri 31 March 2006

                    Easter Break (3 weeks)

                    Monday 3 April 2006 – Fri 21 April 2006
Assessment
Period & Exams      Monday 22 May 2006 - Fri 2 June 2006

Bank Holidays Friday 14 April 2006 and Monday 17 April 2006
                     Monday 1 May 2006 and Monday 29 May 2006

The University closes on Bank Holidays and there are no taught classes.




                                                                                5
1.3.1     Dates for Submission of Thesis and Dissertations


 Presentation date              15 Jan    1 April    15 July     8 Sept

 Notice of Presentation to be
 given to the University        1 Nov     1 Feb      1 June      1 August
 Registrar not later than the
 preceding
 Consideration by Examiners
 and Committee including        Jan-Mar   May-June   Jul-Oct     Dec
 Oral Examination

 Publication      of    Award
 (Subject to confirmation by    March     June       October     Dec
 Senate)
 Earliest possible graduation   July      July       Dec         Dec


Late notice may be accepted, a few days after the date shown, subject to
payment of a "Late Fee"




                                                                            6
1.3.2    Lecture timetable for Semester 1

                                Morning               Afternoon
                              10.00 – 1.00            2.00 - 5.00
                Monday

            Tuesday                Java 1
                                Dr T Sharpe
                               Stopford 2.50
           Wednesday        Introductory Maths     Health informatics
                                Dr T Sharpe           Dr T Sharpe/
                               Stopford 2.50          Dr J Rogers
                                                          G824
            Thursday          Human Biology         Instrumentation
                              Dr R Bonshek            Dr J Graham
                              Stopford 2.50             MSc Lab
                                                          G402
                Friday        Clinical Physics       Radiotherapy
                                 Dr D Mott            Dr R Mackay
                             Christie Hospital     Radiotherapy Class
                            Radiotherapy Class           Room
                                   Room             Christie Hospital
                              9.30 – 12.30


    Week   0         19 September – 23 September     Registration week
    Week   1         26 September – 30 September     Teaching begins
    Week   2         3 October – 7 October
    Week   3         10 October – 14 October
    Week   4         17 October – 21 October
    Week   5         24 October – 28 October
    Week   6         31 October – 4 November
    Week   7         7 November – 11 November
    Week   8         14 November – 18 November
    Week   9         28 November – 2 December
    Week   10        5 December – 9 December
    Week   11        12 December – 16 December       Teaching ends

             Christmas Break

Assessment Period and Exams.            16 January - 27 January 2006:

Please see separate Examination timetable.




                                                                         7
1.3.3     Lecture timetable for Semester 2


                                         Morning          Afternoon
                                       10.00 – 1.00       2.00 - 5.00
                   Monday              Mathematical
                                         Methods
                                        Dr T Cootes
                                           G824
                   Tuesday                                    Java 2
                                                           Dr T Sharpe

                 Wednesday         Medical Imaging      Nuclear Medicine
                                     Dr D Buckley         Dr R Shields
                                    Stopford 2.50             MRI
                                    9.30 – 12.30
                  Thursday           Physiological
                                    Measurement
                                      Dr P Beatty
                                         G824
                    Friday         Decision Support      Computer Vision
                                      Alan Rector          Dr N Thacker
                                    Stopford G824         Stopford G824
                                          and
                                       MSc Lab

     Week   1    30 January – 3 February Teaching begins
     Week   2    6 February – 10 February
     Week   3    13 February – 17 February
     Week   4    20 February – 24 February
     Week   5    27 February – 3 March
     Week   6    6 March – 10 March
     Week   7    13 March – 17 March
     Week   8    20 March – 24 March
     Week   9    27 March – 31 March

     Easter Break

     Week   10   24 April – 28 April
     Week   11   1 May – 5 May
     Week   12   8 May – 12 May                       Teaching ends
     Week   13   15 May – 19 May                      Revision Week

Assessment Period and Exams: 22May – 2 June 2006:

Please see separate Examination timetable.




                                                                           8
1.4     Key contacts

1.4.1     Teaching Staff

 Name            Role                     Location                   Phone        Email Address
                                                                     Number
 Astley S M      Senior lecturer          G526B, ISBE                275 5162     Sue.Astley@man.ac.uk
 Beatty PCW      ML Physiological         G551, ISBE                 275 5714     Paul.Beatty@man.ac.uk
                 Measurement
 Bonshek R E     ML Human Biology         Ophthalmology, MREH        276   5568   Richard.Bonshek@man.ac.uk
 Buckley D       ML Medical Imaging       G727, ISBE                 275   5759   David.Buckley@man.ac.uk
 Budgell G       Hon lecturer             Medical Physics/Christie   446   3536   Geoff.Budgell@Physics.cr.man.ac.uk
 Cootes T F      ML Mathematical          G539, ISBE                 275   5146   Tim.Cootes@man.ac.uk
                 Methods
 Ellis B         Hon Lecturer             Nuclear Medicine/MRI       276   8759   Bev.Ellis@man.ac.uk
 Gleave B        Elec workshop manager    G603, ISBE                 275   5172   Barry.Gleave@man.ac.uk
 Graham J        ML Instrumentation       G527, ISBE                 275   5150   Jim.Graham@man.ac.uk
 Hastings D L    Hon Lecturer             Medical Physics/Christie   446   3546   David.Hastings@Physics.cr.man.ac.uk
 Hufton A        Hon lecturer             Medical Physics/Christie   446   3535   Alan.Hufton@Physics.cr.man.ac.uk
 Julyan P        Hon Lecturer             Medical Physics/Christie   446   3078   Peter.Julyan@Physics.cr.man.ac.uk
 Lawson R S      Professor                Nuclear Medicine/MRI       276   4785   Richard.Lawson@man.ac.uk
 Mackay R I      ML Radiotherapy          Medical Physics/Christie   446   3542   ranald.mackay@physics.cr.man.ac.uk
 McElduff P      ML Biostatistics and     Biostatistics, Stopford    275   5953   patrick.mcelduff@man.ac.uk
                 epidemiology
 Mott D J        ML Clinical Physics      Medical Physics/Christie   446 3892     David.Mott@physics.cr.man.ac.uk
 Prescott M C    Hon lecturer             Medical Physics/MRI        276 4782     mary@nucmed.cmht.nwest.nhs.uk
 Rector A        Professor, ML Decision   Computer Science           275 6188     Alan.rector@manchester.ac.uk
                 support
 Ribbands M      Hon lecturer             Medical Physics/Hope       787   4875   MRibbands@gen.srht.nwest.nhs.uk
 Rose M          Hon lecturer             Medical Physics/Christie   446   3948   Marge.Rose@physics.cr.man.ac.uk
 Sharpe T C      Programme Director       G526A, ISBE                275   5051   Tom.Sharpe@man.ac.uk
 Shields R A     ML Nuclear Medicine      Nuclear Medicine/MRI       276   4784   Robert.Shields@man.ac.uk
 Taylor C J      Head of Research         G534, ISBE                 275   5130   Chris.Taylor@man.ac.uk




                                                                                                                        9
    Testa H J        Hon lecturer                Medical Physics/MRI         276   4781   Tito.Testa@man.ac.uk
    Thacker N A      ML Computer Vision          G522, ISBE                  275   5147   Neil.Thacker@man.ac.uk
    Williams P C     Professor                   Medical Physics/Christie    446   3530   Peter.Williams@physics.cr.man.ac.uk
    Williams S R     Head of Teaching            G529 , ISBE                 275   5148   Steve.Williams@man.ac.uk



1.4.2       Administrative Staff

     Name             Role                         Location                   Phone        Email
                                                                              Number
     A Castledine     CAG/Division Secretary       G533, ISBE                 275 5130     Angela.Castledine@man.ac.uk
     S Stedman        Graduate Secretary           G534                       275 5131     Shelagh.Stedman@man.ac.uk
     J Akister        MSc Secretary                G538B                      275 5325     June.Akister@man.ac.uk

IBSE – Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering,
MRI – Manchester Royal Infirmary
MREH – Manchester Royal Eye Hospital

    University numbers (beginning 275) can be dialled internally by dialling 5 followed by the last 4 digits of the number e.g.
     55051 for Dr Sharpe.


    The „man‟ domain will in future change to „Manchester‟.




                                                                                                                                   10
1.5     Location of notice boards and pigeonholes.

Notice boards are situated on the ISBE main corridor and pigeonholes in G545, Stopford
Building.

1.6     School/University Resources


1.6.1     ISBE Library Facilities

The Division has a reference library and a lending library containing specialist books and
journals in the Division‟s areas of interest. MSc students may use the reference library
and may borrow one book at a time from the lending library.

1.6.2     Medical Library

The medical library is situated on the third floor of the Stopford Building. It contains a
large collection of general books and journals in medicine and biology.

1.6.3     ISBE Computer Facilities

The Division provides a wide variety of hardware for research and teaching. There is a
dedicated computer laboratory for MSc students in room G402 equipped with 10-12 PC‟s.
The room is accessed by student library card. Students must get their library card
validated by a member of the ISBE administration staff in order to use the computer lab,
departmental library and seminar rooms. For support arrangements, please visit

http://www.isbe.man.ac.uk/internal2/support.html


1.6.4     Stopford Computer Facilities

The computing facilities available to all students in the Stopford Building comprise 4
Microlabs. The microlabs are networked and have full access to the Internet. All students
have individual e-mail accounts and a small amount of private file space on the e-mail
systems. For further details and support arrangements, please refer to

http://www.mhs.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/computingservices/


1.6.5     Social Space and refreshments

There are limited facilities for making tea and coffee in the Division. Taught course
students are welcome to use the tea/coffee room G545 off the main Imaging Science
and Biomedical Engineering corridor and should provide their own tea and coffee; a
contribution of £6 per quarter can be paid for milk. Postgraduate students are
encouraged to make use of this room to meet both staff and other students. There is
also a coffee bar on the first floor of the Stopford Building.




                                                                                       11
1.7     Local Policies on use of phones etc.

1.7.1     Telephone Calls

Student phones are for internal calls only; external callers can reach you by dialling 0161
275 5325 or 5131. Outgoing or personal calls can only be made with the agreement of
your supervisor or the Programme Director.

1.7.2     Mail

Mail is delivered twice a day. Circulars from staff, mail and telephone messages
will be put into student pigeon holes in room G545.
You are advised to check your pigeon hole regularly.

1.7.3     Email

Students can self-register for email in the Microlabs, please advise the MSc course
secretary of your email address as this is a quick and efficient way of communicating
important messages.
Please check your email regularly.


1.7.4     Photocopying

MSc students will be given a small allocation and may use the photocopier in room G533
subject to availability. Photocopying can be done in the John Rylands Library at your own
expense.

1.7.5     Security

It is in your own interests to ensure that you do not leave money and valuables
unattended whilst in the Stopford Building. Students may be given special permission to
work during evenings and weekends but must sign in and make sure that they know how
to contact security staff in the event of an emergency.

1.7.6     Health and Safety

Please see separate Health and Safety Handbook available in G534.

  Please note that all postgraduate students must register with a Doctor (GP)
              locally to where they are living during their course.


1.8     University facilities

Please refer to the Student Guide and to the web pages at

http://www.manchester.ac.uk/studyhere/studentlife/




                                                                                        12
                       2 PROGRAMME OVERVIEW
The programme specification may be found on the web at

http://www.isbe.man.ac.uk/courses/msc

2.1     Aims

The programme aims to:

  01.   Produce graduates with a systematic understanding of the application of physics and
        computing principles and techniques to the solution of problems in medicine and
        biology
  02.   Meet the needs of employers in the health service and multinational corporations for
        responsible and innovative graduates to perform a lead role both in service provision
        and research and development
  03.   (Medical Physics) Produce graduates with a systematic understanding of principles
        and practice of medical physics, to enable them to participate in service provision,
        research and development in medical physics
  04.   (Medical Imaging and Computer Vision) Produce graduates with a systematic
        understanding of (a) the major medical imaging modalities (b) image processing
        and use of statistical methods to interpret images to enable them to participate in
        the technical aspects of service provision, research and development related to
        these techniques.
  05.   (Biomedical engineering) Produce graduates with a systematic understanding of the
        acquisition and processing of physical signals to enable them to participate in
        biomedical engineering practice, research and development
  06.   (Health Informatics) Produce graduates with a systematic understanding of the
        knowledge, skills and tools which enable information to be used effectively in health
        care, to enable them to participate in health informatics practice, research and
        development.
  07.   Equip students with the knowledge, skills and critical awareness to make a
        significant contribution to the research of the department, particularly in imaging,
        both at MSc level and beyond. (MSc only)
  08.   (Medical Physics and Medical Imaging) Satisfy the academic requirements of the
        IPEM training scheme for hospital physicists (MSc only)




                                                                                       13
2.2    Learning Outcomes

 A. Knowledge & Understanding
 Students should be able to:
 A1.      Demonstrate a systematic understanding of experimental design and
          quantitative methods of analysis
 A2.      Show a conceptual understanding of the environment and culture in
          which medicine is practised and how this relates to the role of the clinical
          scientist both in supporting clinical services and supporting research
 A3.      Demonstrate sufficient knowledge of mathematics physics and biology
          and their application to study advanced topics in physics and computing
          related to medicine
 A4.      Demonstrate systematic understanding of computational methods and
          the ability to apply these to answer research questions in biology and
          medicine
 A5.      (Medical Physics) Display comprehensive knowledge of the principles,
          practice and clinical issues necessary to practise as a hospital physicist
 A6.      (Medical Imaging and Computer Vision) Demonstrate systematic
          knowledge of techniques for acquiring, manipulating and interpreting
          medical images
 A7.      (Biomedical Engineering) Show critical understanding of how biological
          knowledge interacts with engineering knowledge to produce engineering
          solutions to healthcare problems
 A8.      (Health Informatics) Demonstrate critical understanding of current
          strategies and issues in managing information in health care
 A9.      Show critical understanding of current issues in at least one area of
          medical research where physics or computing is involved (MSc only)



 B. Intellectual Skills
 Students should be able to:
 B1.      Integrate scientific theory with medical or biological applications
 B2.      Read and critically evaluate scientific papers in physics or computing in
          medicine
 B3.      Predict or explain the behaviour of a complex system by means of an
          appropriate physical or mathematical model
 B4.      Analyse a medical problem and integrate engineering, computing and
          physical sciences knowledge to produce systems capable of addressing
          the original medical problem (MSc only)
 B5.      Design and evaluate a complex experiment integrating physics or
          computing with biology or medicine (MSc only)




                                                                                14
C. Practical Skills
Students should (please delete as appropriate) be able to:
C1.     Safely and competently carry out a range of advanced skills in a
        controlled environment
C2.     Use conventional and electronic resources to collect, select and organise
        complex scientific information
C3.     Communicate ideas in the subject clearly in written and oral form to a
        peer group
C4.     (Medical Physics) Work safely and professionally with advanced
        equipment in a clinical environment
C5.     (Medical Imaging and Computer Vision) Independently plan, acquire and
        analyse an MR image using a state-of-the-art scanner
C6.     (Biomedical Engineering) Analyse risk so as to maintain patient safety
C7.     (Health Informatics) Evaluate a specific project or a wider initiative to
        introduce a technological solution to an area of health care
C8.     Design an instrument (either physical or intellectual) to carry out a piece
        of research (MSc only)



D. Transferable Skills and Personal Qualities
Students should be able to:
D1.     Independently manage time and resources effectively to meet a deadline
D2.     Communicate complex ideas clearly orally and in writing
D3.     Demonstrate a professional and responsible attitude to work
D4.     Show appreciation of the way in which legislation, standards and quality
        management interface with normal working life
D5.     Manage a research project autonomously and efficiently (MSc only)




                                                                             15
                       3   PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The emphasis of the taught part of the course is on understanding principles and
acquiring the skills necessary to apply them. The taught programme is planned around
an academic year consisting of two semesters each of which have 12 weeks of teaching
and a two-week examination period) There is then a four-month research project period.
A total of six taught units (worth 15 credits each) must be taken together with a
research project (90 credits for MSc or 30 for Diploma) in order to complete the
programme. Students should undertake the equivalent of two months preparatory work
for the dissertation project during the second semester.

Students should follow the choice of units appropriate to their chosen subject area and
notify the Programme Director of the list of units chosen on the appropriate document as
early as possible in the first semester. Each of the four pathways summarized in the
following pages has between one and three compulsory units and candidates can choose
the remaining units from within specified topic areas.

There is also a named course tutor who will advise you on your unit choice. The six units
are chosen from the four topic areas shown below. Units are either Level 1 or Level 2
and at least two level 2 units must be taken.

Students may be advised by the Programme Director to take Introductory Maths, a Level
0 unit. This units can however only be selected with the agreement of the Programme
Director.

Full time students are advised to study 4 taught units in the first semester and 2 taught
units in the second semester and spend some of their available time in the second
semester starting the research project. Part time students taking the degree in 2 years
should take 2 taught units in each semester of the first year and the remaining 2 units in
the first semester of the second year; they should use the first summer period to select
their project and do background reading and devote semester two of the second year
and remainder of the time to the research project.

You will notice that some units have pre-requisites. If you cannot meet these
pre-requisites and wish to attend the unit you must discuss this with the unit
leader before the unit starts and get his/her agreement.




                                                                                       16
3.1      Medical Physics Pathway



3.1.1          Core units

Code        Level Title                       Unit          Teaching            Assessment
                                              Leader        methods             methods
DJ          1            Clinical Physics1    David Mott    Lectures and        MCQ and written
5061                                                        tutorials           papers
DJ          1            Human Biology        Richard       Lectures and        MCQ paper
5051                                          Bonshek       discussion
DJ          1            Radiotherapy1        Ranald        Lectures and        Practicals, review
5161                                          Mackay        practicals          and written
                                                                                paper
DJ          1            Instrumentation      Jim           Lectures,           MCQ and written
5151                                          Graham        tutorials and       papers
                                                            practicals

3.1.2          Optional units

Choice of two units from

Code       Level          Title                Unit        Teaching              Assessment
                                               Leader      methods               methods
DJ         2              Nuclear Medicine2    Robert      Lectures              Coursework and
5082                                           Shields     practicals and        written paper
                                                           demonstrations
DJ         2              Medical Imaging2     David       Lectures,             Coursework and
5182                                           Buckley     practicals and        written paper
                                                           discussion
DJ         2              Computer Vision3     Neil        Lectures and          Coursework and
5192                                           Thacker     practicals            written paper
DJ         2              Physiological        Paul        Lectures and          Coursework
5102                      Measurement4         Beatty      demon-strations




1
    Prerequisite   :   A first degree in the physical sciences or equivalent.
2
    Prerequisite   :   The Clinical Physics unit
3
    Prerequisite   :   A-level maths or equivalent
4
    Prerequisite   :   The Instrumentation unit


                                                                                                     17
3.2      Medical Imaging and Computer Vision Pathway


3.2.1           Core Units


Code        Level     Title                 Unit         Teaching           Assessment
                                            Leader       methods            methods
DJ          1         Clinical Physics1     David        Lectures and       MCQ and written
5061                                        Mott         tutorials          papers
DJ          1         Human Biology         Richard      Lectures and       MCQ paper
5051                                        Bonshek      discussion
DJ          1         Instrumentation       Jim          Lectures,          MCQ and written
5151                                        Graham       tutorials and      papers
                                                         practicals
DJ          2         Medical Imaging2      David        Lectures,          Coursework and
5182                                        Buckley      practicals         written paper
                                                         and
                                                         discussion
DJ          2         Computer Vision3      Neil         Lectures and       Coursework and
5192                                        Thacker      practicals         written paper

3.2.2           Optional units

One chosen from

Code        Level     Title                Unit        Teaching              Assessment
                                           Leader      methods               methods
DJ          1         Radiotherapy1        Ranald      Lectures and          Practicals,
5161                                       Mackay      practicals            review and
                                                                             written paper
DJ          1         Java 1               Tom         Lectures              Coursework and
7001                                       Sharpe      practicals and        written paper
                                                       demonstrations
CY          1         Biostatistics and    Patrick     Web-based self-       Coursework
6001                  Epidemiology         McElduff    study




1
    Prerequisite : A first degree in the physical sciences or equivalent.
2
    Prerequisite : The Clinical Physics unit
3
    Prerequisite : A-level maths or equivalent


                                                                                              18
3.3      Biomedical Engineering Pathway

3.3.1          Core Units

Code       Level          Title                 Unit         Teaching           Assessment
                                                Leader       methods            methods
DJ         1              Human Biology         Richard      Lectures and       MCQ paper
5051                                            Bonshek      discussion
DJ         1              Instrumentation       Jim          Lectures,          MCQ and written
5151                                            Graham       tutorials and      papers
                                                             practicals
DJ         2              Physiological         Paul         Lectures and       Coursework
5102                      Measurement4          Beatty       demon-
                                                             strations

3.3.2          Optional units

Choice of three from

Code       Level          Title                Unit        Teaching              Assessment
                                               Leader      methods               methods
DJ         1              Clinical Physics1    David       Lectures and          MCQ and written
5061                                           Mott        tutorials             papers
DJ         1              Java 1               Tom         Lectures              Coursework and
7001                                           Sharpe      practicals and        written paper
                                                           demonstrations
CY         1              Biostatistics and    Patrick     Web-based self-       Coursework
6001                      Epidemiology         McElduff    study
DJ         2              Medical Imaging2     David       Lectures,             Coursework and
5182                                           Buckley     practicals and        written paper
                                                           discussion
DJ         2              Computer Vision3     Neil        Lectures and          Coursework and
5192                                           Thacker     practicals            written paper
DJ         2              Java 25              Tom         Lectures              Coursework and
7002                                           Sharpe      practicals and        written paper
                                                           demonstrations
DJ         2              Mathematical         Tim         Lectures and          Coursework and
5072                      Methods              Cootes      problem-solving       written paper




1
    Prerequisite   :   A first degree in the physical sciences or equivalent.
2
    Prerequisite   :   The Clinical Physics unit
3
    Prerequisite   :   A-level maths or equivalent
4
    Prerequisite   :   The Instrumentation unit
5
    Prerequisite   :   The Java 1 unit


                                                                                                   19
3.4      Health Informatics Pathway

3.4.1          Core units

Code       Level     Title                Unit        Teaching         Assessment
                                          Leader      methods          methods
DJ         1         Health Informatics   Tom         Lectures and     Coursework and
9991                                      Sharpe      discussion       written papers
CY         1         Biostatistics and    Patrick     Web-based        Coursework
6001                 Epidemiology         McElduff    self-study
DJ         2         Clinical Decision    Alan        Lectures,        Coursework and
5172                 Support              Rector      practicals       written papers
                                                      and demon-
                                                      strations

3.4.2          Optional units

Choice of three from

Code       Level     Title                Unit       Teaching           Assessment
                                          Leader     methods            methods
DJ         1         Java 1               Tom        Lectures           Coursework and
7001                                      Sharpe     practicals and     written paper
                                                     demonstrations
DJ         1         Introductory         Tom        Tutorials and      Written test and
5031                 Maths                Sharpe     problem classes    written exam
DJ         1         Instrumentation      Jim        Lectures,          MCQ and written
5151                                      Graham     tutorials and      papers
                                                     practicals
DJ         1         Human Biology        Richard    Lectures and       MCQ paper
5051                                      Bonshek    discussion
DJ         2         Computer Vision3     Neil       Lectures and       Coursework and
5192                                      Thacker    practicals         written paper
DJ         2         Java 25              Tom        Lectures           Coursework and
7002                                      Sharpe     practicals and     written paper
                                                     demonstrations
DJ         2         Mathematical         Tim        Lectures and       Coursework and
5072                 Methods              Cootes     problem-solving    written paper
DJ         2         Physiological        Paul       Lectures and       Coursework
5102                 Measurement4         Beatty     demonstrations




3
    Prerequisite : A-level maths or equivalent
4
    Prerequisite : The Instrumentation unit
5
    Prerequisite : The Java 1 unit




                                                                                           20
3.5     Dissertation requirements

3.5.1     MSc Projects

All MSc projects are required to contain some element of original work. The work does
not have to contribute significantly to knowledge in the subject area as a whole, but
must at least contribute to local knowledge. The main types of project are an experiment
or an implementation (e.g. of a computer program or a method in medical physics). In
all cases the project must have clearly defined objectives and evaluation must form an
integral part of the project. In Physics and Computing in Medicine and Biology, research
projects usually stem from a problem related to a scientific or organisational aspect of
medical practice.

The dissertation project carries half of the credits for the course (90 out of 180) and
represents six months full time study. It represents a substantial investment of effort
and both experimental work and write-up are expected to be of a high standard.

3.5.2     Diploma Projects

A diploma project carries one quarter of the credits for the course (30 out of 120) and
represents two months full-time study. A diploma project is a non-trivial piece of
scientific work which has not been carried out before, but it does not have to stand on its
own as a piece of independent research in the same way as an MSc project. However the
student must still show understanding of the context of the work. Whilst the volume of
work required for a diploma project is correspondingly smaller than for an MSc project
and the project tends to be less open-ended, the project and write-up follow the same
form as for an MSc project and a high standard is still expected.


3.5.3     Project Arrangements for MSc Students

Students can be allocated a project from an approved list; which will be done by taking
into account the preferences, interests and qualifications of the student. However, an
individual student may be allowed to nominate the topic for his or her project, provided
that this topic gives adequate scope for demonstrating originality, is relevant to the
course of study and that supervision is available. Students wishing to nominate a topic
should discuss an outline informally with an appropriate member of the programme
teaching staff, in the first instance and then approach the Programme Director with a
project outline. Supervisors for the projects for full-time students taking one of the
taught MSc.‟s will be allocated during the first term (for part-time students at the end of
the second semester), as far as possible taking into account the interests of each
individual student. During the second semester students should devote 50% of their
time to project work. This time may be spent on a literature review or familiarisation
with tools and techniques appropriate to the project. Other activities may be specified by
the project supervisor. A report on this initial activity is required in time for the
examiners' meeting at the end of the second semester.
Each MSc/Diploma project will have a supervisor who will meet the student at regular
intervals to provide guidance.

3.5.4     Supervision of Theses and Dissertations

The supervisor will be a member of Academic Staff of the University or a senior member
of the University Research team experienced in supervising and directing the work of
students and/or junior members of staff. During the research period students will meet
with their supervisors an average once per week. A note will be kept of content of



                                                                                        21
meeting and progress made. There will be a formal meeting with the Programme
Director to discuss progress during each semester for MSc students. The results of your
research project are written in the form of a dissertation (for MSc‟s) which will be
marked by two internal examiners and may be moderated by an external examiner and
must be bound, at your expense, in accordance with university regulations.

It is possible for a student to ask for a change of supervisor. You should discuss this with
either your supervisor or your advisor in the first instance who may then refer the
matter to either or the head of your research group, the head of teaching or the head of
the department. In the majority of cases changes of supervisor or alternatively inclusion
of an additional supervisor can be arranged without difficulty but all such changes should
be reported to the Programme Director since they involve changing centrally held
records.

3.5.5      Further information

Information about assessment of dissertations can be found in section 5.4.

FAQs explaining procedures for submission of dissertations can be found in appendix
8.11.
.
3.6     Seminars

3.6.1      MSc Seminars

There is a series of five special MSc seminars on the following days given by Dr Sue
Astley.

       6 October             -      Report Writing and Avoiding Plagiarism
      13 October             -      Time Management
      17 November            -      Research; choosing your project
      2 March                -      The thesis - organisation
      9 March                -      The thesis – writing

All five seminars will last about 1 hour and will start promptly at 1.00 pm in G50.

All full-time students are expected to attend.

3.6.2      MSc Lab Introductory Sessions

An introductory session for the MSc lab will be held on Thursday 22 September 10.00 –
12.00 in room G402 Stopford Building and repeated on Friday 23 September 10.00 –
12.00 room G402 Stopford Building. Students will be allocated to one or other of the
sessions.




                                                                                         22
                               4 COURSE UNITS
In general units use a mixture of continuing assessment and end-of-unit examinations to
measure learning outcomes. Where the main aim of the unit is to develop knowledge
and understanding, the assessment will mainly be by examination. This will apply to
some level 1 units. Where practical skills and transferable skills are emphasized, much of
the assessment will be by coursework. This will apply to some level 1 and all level 2
units. Where there is a requirement for students to explicitly demonstrate a sound
knowledge of basic underlying principles exams will be closed book. Where the emphasis
is on reasoning from a broad knowledge base, they will be open-book.

In addition to the learning outcomes stated for each unit, all units which include
coursework will prepare students to:-
     Use conventional and electronic resources to collect, select and organize complex
       scientific information
     Independently manage time and resources effectively to meet a deadline
     Communicate complex ideas clearly orally and in writing




Course unit outlines may be found on the web at
http://www.isbe.man.ac.uk/courses/msc




                                                                                       23
                        5 STUDENT PROGRESS AND ASSESSMENT

        5.1      Progression through programme


        5.1.1          Diploma entry and progression6

                                    Enter programme




                                    Assessment in first
                                    four modules




                                Y                         N
    Re-register as                                                   Continue as Diploma
    MSc student                          Reach                       student
                                         MSc
                                         standard?



    Assessment in final                                                Assessment in final
    two modules                                                        two modules



                            N                                 N
                                     Resit required OR
            Success-                 exit with lower                        Success-
            ful?                     award                                  ful?

                                                                                             Y
Y


Carry out MSc project                                             Carry out Diploma
                                                                  project




        6
         Similarly, MSc students not meeting the required standard after four modules have
        been assessed may be advised to proceed at diploma level


                                                                                                 24
       5.1.2         MSc entry and awards of distinction and merit7



                                Enter programme




                                Assessment in                        Resit required OR exit
                                taught course                        with lower award




                            Y                         N

 Continue to                          Pass?
 Project                                                             Resubmission required
                                                                     OR exit with lower
                                                                     award



                                                                                          N


                            N                             N
       Distinction                    Merit in                             Pass in
       taught &                       taught &                             taught &
       project?                       project?                             project?



   Y
                                                 Y                                    Y


Award of distinction            Award of merit                  Award of MSc




       7
        Diploma entrants progressing at MSc standard are also eligible for merit and distinction
       awards


                                                                                              25
5.2     Unfair Practices/Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the theft or use of someone else's work without proper
acknowledgement, presenting the material as if it were one's own. Plagiarism
is a serious academic offence and the consequences are severe. Please refer to
Appendices 8.1and 8.10 for further details.


5.3     Attendance requirements

In general postgraduate students are expected to be in attendance during term-time for
the taught course and outside term-time for their project. The departmental policy is
that Postgraduate students are entitled to about six weeks holiday during the year,
including public holidays. All students must agree acceptable times for holidays with
their project supervisors.

In particular it is the student’s responsibility to ensure that he/she is available
for examination of taught units during the examination period at the end of
each semester.

Special arrangements can only be made in the case of serious ill health or bereavement
or where the examination period covers religious festivals.

Persistent unsatisfactory attendance creates difficulties for all concerned. If this occurs,
an attempt to resolve the problem will be made in discussions with the head of the
research group or the Programme Director before any formal action will be considered.
You are encouraged at all times to make known any difficulties with the course you may
have to your personal tutor, supervisor, unit leader (or the Programme Director or Head
of Department).

On taught MSc courses it is expected that all lectures will be attended, although it is
realised that there are sometimes unavoidable reasons for absence. It is your
responsibility to make sure that the MSc course secretary is informed
immediately in cases of absence through illness (ext 5325) in order that unit
organisers/lecturers can be informed. A register will be taken at each lecture.

Please refer to appendix 8.2 for further information.


5.4     Programme regulations:

5.4.1      Submission of Assessed Work


Coursework must be submitted by the set date unless written permission for late
submission has been given by the course tutor prior to the set date. Otherwise students
submitting a piece of work late will have 10% of their mark deducted for each week or
part of week up to two weeks after the set date; after two weeks the work will not be
marked. Provisional coursework marks and comments will be made available to the
student within three weeks of the submission date. Coursework is sent to the external
examiner at the end of the unit and will therefore be retained by the unit organiser.
Students are reminded that work handed in as part of the continuous
assessment for an individual should be substantially the work of that individual.




                                                                                         26
5.4.2      Feedback/return of marks

Coursework will be returned to students within three weeks of submission wherever
possible. A standard feedback sheet will be provided to indicate how far the student has
achieved the learning outcomes of the assignment, and what areas need improvement.
Provisional exam marks will be communicated to students on request as soon as possible
after examinations. while confirmed marks will be available after the examiners‟
meetings approximately one month after the examination period.

5.4.3      Unsatisfactory progress

Students‟ progress will be reviewed at the examiners‟ meetings held after each
examination period. Students will then be informed of their progress to date. Where
possible students who have failed a single unit will be encouraged to resit. Students who
are not making satisfactory progress may be advised to consider an alternative award
(certificate or diploma) or in the worst case when there is no possibility of further
progress, to exit the programme.

If there are personal, health or other circumstances likely to affect a student‟s progress,
the student should inform a member of staff at the earliest opportunity.

5.4.4      Resit arrangements

Students may, at the discretion of the examiners, be permitted to resit a unit next time
it is given, which is usually the following year. Only in exceptional circumstances will the
examiners seek the agreement of the Graduate School Programme Committee and the
external examiners to a special resit paper to be taken at the end of the next semester.
A resit is allowed for one failed unit only and a mark of 50% is the maximum that can be
carried forward.

5.4.5      Compensation marks

To be awarded an MSc students must obtain an overall mark of not less than 50%, no
more than 2 units must be below 50% and no unit must be less than 40%. Where an
individual unit has a written and practical component, a student must obtain at least
40% in each component.

To be awarded a Diploma students must obtain an overall mark of not less than 40%,
no more than 2 units must be below 40% and no unit must be less than 30%. Where an
individual unit has a written and practical component, a student must obtain at least
30% in each component.

To be awarded a Certificate students must obtain an overall mark of not less than
40%, no more than 1 unit must be below 40% and no unit must be less than 30%.
Where an individual unit has a written and practical component, a student must obtain at
least 30% in each component.

Diploma students who have attained marks consistent with an MSc after being assessed
on at least four of the taught units may, at the discretion of the examiners, be offered
the opportunity to transfer to an MSc. MSc students who have not attained marks
consistent with an MSc on the taught units may be advised to transfer to a Diploma.




                                                                                         27
5.4.6      Special Circumstances

If the student knows of circumstances that are likely to affect their performance in an
examination, they must inform the programme director in writing as soon as possible. At
the examiners‟ discretion, the student may be offered additional resits, but still with the
proviso that a maximum mark of 50% for the relevant units may be carried forward.

In cases of genuine difficulty during the taught course, a student may request an
interruption. If granted, this means that they may be examined at a later date than
normal without penalty.

In the case of genuine difficulty during the project period, a student may request an
extension. If granted, this means that they may submit at a later date than normal
without penalty. Normally, dissertations have to be submitted on time to be considered
for the award of distinction.

Only in exceptional circumstances will a case be made to the University for a student to
repeat a year or part of a year.

5.4.7      Assessment of dissertations

Assessment of the dissertation will be undertaken by two internal examiners (one of
whom will normally be the project supervisor) in the first instance. A selection of
dissertations are sent for moderation to an external examiner. MSc students will not
normally be given an oral examination, but where the dissertation is borderline or of
distinction standard the external examiner may request an oral. The present mark
scheme (under review following changes in University guidelines) is as follows:-

     Generic marks

Regardless of the nature of the project, 30% of marks are given divided between (a)
the value of the project (impact, originality and difficulty) and (b) the presentation of the
report (grammar, spelling, clarity of description and visual appearance).

     Specific marks

The remaining 70% of marks are allocated to specific sections of the project as
documented in the report. For a piece of experimental work, they will include

   Abstract

A short (250 words) description of the background, aims and objectives of the thesis,
and a brief summary of the methods, results and conclusions.

   Introduction

Clear hypothesis or research question; adequate background; full literature review; clear
aims and objectives.

   Materials and methods

Good overall design; clear description of methods available; valid reasons for choice of
method(s) used; adequate explanation of method(s) used.




                                                                                          28
    Results

Complete and accurate results; good quality tables and figures, appropriate statistical
methods; clearly-explained tests and calculations.

    Discussion

Careful interpretation of results; well-argued discussion of results in relation to
hypothesis; concise summary placing whole work in wider context.

    References

Sufficient references to cover topic area; references contain no errors or omissions.


5.5     The University Regulations for taught masters programmes


You are advised to familiarize yourself with the general regulations. Full details are
included in appendix 8.3.

5.6     Appeals
If a student is dissatisfied with any decision on their progress reached by the Programme
Director, he/she has the right to appeal to the Head of Department identified in the
course documentation. To make an appeal the student should provide in writing:

a)      a summary of their participation in the course including a list of units attempted
        (or partially attempted), coursework submitted and exams taken;
b)      a list of any required coursework not submitted or exams not taken for any of the
        units attempted, together with an explanation of why they were not;
c)      a statement of the grounds for appeal, referring to the criteria for appeal set out
        in appendix 8.5.

Once an appeal has been lodged in this way, the Head of Department (or his/her
Deputy) will offer to interview the student and will provide a written response within one
week (or such other time as may be agreed with the student). If the student is not
satisfied with this response, he/she has the right to appeal to the Academic Secretary of
the University as set out in appendix 8.5.




                                                                                        29
               6 STUDENT SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE

6.1    Personal tutors.
Postgraduate Students on both taught and research degree programmes are allocated an
advisor during the first two weeks of the first semester. The personal tutor‟s role
includes:-

   Meeting at the student‟s request to discuss any issues or problems connected with
    study or likely to have an impact on progress.

   Helping the student produce a personal development plan

   Arranging at least two meetings with the student to discuss progress at key points
    during the academic year


6.2    Student feedback

To help with the quality assessment procedure students are asked to complete a
questionnaire at the end of each taught unit. The questionnaires are completed
anonymously and the analysis will not seek to identify individual students.
Questionnaires can be obtained from your course representative and should be handed
back to the unit tutor or Programme Director. A copy of the feedback from is included in
appendix 8.4.

6.3    Student representation.

A student liaison committee, to which all students are invited and which is chaired by the
Programme Director, meets once a semester to discuss any issues which students would
like to raise concerning the delivery of the programme.

The Programme Committee meets once a semester. Taught course students are strongly
encouraged to elect a representative who has the right to attend for unreserved
business.

6.4    Withdrawing from the programme.

Students must inform the programme director in writing if they wish to withdraw from
the programme.

6.5    Complaints.

If you feel that you have been unfairly treated in the assessment of your work or in any
other way you should first discuss this with your personal tutor or unit organiser and if
necessary, the Programme Director or Head of Teaching. The majority of problems can
be resolved within the Division but if not then students may follow the complaints
procedure described in appendix 8.6.

6.6    Student Ill Health.

Please inform a relevant member of staff immediately of any illness which is affecting
your studies or attendance. Procedures for certification of ill health are described in
appendix 8.7.



                                                                                          30
6.7    Special needs support.

A summary of support arrangements is given in appendix 8.8. The contact in the Division
is Angela Castledine.

6.8    Personal Development Planning.

Personal development plans encourage reflection on your personal learning goals and
career development. They also serve as a focus for discussion with your personal tutor.
A template for the PDP document is given in appendix 8.9.




                                                                                      31
                     7 PROGRAMME MANAGEMENT

7.1     Role of the programme committee.

7.1.1       Role

The Programme Committee acts as a Curriculum Development Team for the Programme.

The Programme Committee will report to a School or Department or Faculty level
committee.

The Programme Director is responsible for the management of the programme, and the
Programme Committee is established to support the Programme Director in the carrying
out of his/her responsibilities.

7.1.2      Remit

       Oversee the teaching assessment and examining arrangements;
       Monitor cohort progression including failure rate, withdrawal rate;
       Evaluate the extent to which the learning outcomes are achieved by students;
       Monitor, maintain and enhance standards of all aspects of the programme;
       Evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum and of assessment in relation to
        programme learning outcomes;
       Evaluate the effectiveness and relevance of the teaching and learning methods
        employed;
       Review and revise the programme in the light of any relevant QAA benchmarks,
        any other relevant external and/or professional requirements and developing
        knowledge in the subject area;
       Receive, consider and respond to feedback from students, employers and
        external examiners;
       Where the need for change is identified, effect the changes quickly and
        efficiently;
       Produce an annual review;
       Produce reports for the five-year review and participate in the panel meeting;
       Produce relevant information for any QAA review;
       Review programme documentation, eg, programme handbooks, programme
        specifications, promotional literature
       Ensure suitable and efficient arrangements are in place for recruitment, admission
        and induction.

7.1.3      Membership

The programme director
Representatives of teaching staff on the programme
Representative(s) of all partners in joint provision




                                                                                       32
7.2    Diagram showing how the programme committee fits in with
      School and Faculty committee structure.


The programme is managed and operated in accordance with the policies, principles,
regulations and procedures of the University of Manchester.


                                 Programme Director
                                Physics & Computing
                                in Medicine & Biology




                        The University of Manchester Research
                         and Graduate Education Committee



                        Physics & Computing in Medicine &
                        Biology Postgraduate Programme
                        Committee




                                       School
                                  Postgraduate (T)
                                     Committee




                        Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences
                            Masters/Diploma Panel (MDP)




                        Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences
                          Postgraduate Teaching Committee
                                         (PGT)




                                                                                     33
                                 8 APPENDICES

8.1    Guidance to students on plagiarism and academic malpractice


Introduction
1. As a student, you are expected to cooperate in the learning process throughout your
programme of study by completing assignments of various kinds that are the product of
your own study or research. For most students this does not present a problem, but
occasionally, whether unwittingly or otherwise, a student may commit what is known as
plagiarism or some other form of academic malpractice when carrying out an
assignment. This may come about because students have been used to different
conventions in their prior educational experience or through general ignorance of what is
expected of them.
2. This guidance is designed to help you understand what we regard as academic
malpractice and hence to help you to avoid committing it. You should read it carefully,
because academic malpractice is regarded as a serious offence and students found to
have committed it will be penalized. At the very least a mark of only 30% would be
awarded for the piece of work in question, but it could be worse; you could be awarded
zero (with or without loss of credits), fail the whole unit, be demoted to a lower class of
degree, or be excluded from the
programme.
3. Academic malpractice includes plagiarism, collusion, fabrication or falsification of
results and anything else intended by those committing it to achieve credit that they do
not properly deserve. In addition to the advice that follows, your School will give you
advice on how to avoid academic malpractice in the context of your discipline. It will also
design assessments so as to help you avoid the temptation to commit academic
malpractice. Finally, you should take note that work you submit may be screened
electronically to check against other material on the web and in other submitted work.
Plagiarism
4. Plagiarism is presenting the ideas, work or words of other people without proper, clear
and unambiguous acknowledgement. It also includes „self-plagiarism‟ (which occurs
where, for example, you submit work that you have presented for assessment on a
previous occasion), and the submission of material from „essay banks‟ (even if the
authors of such material appear to be giving you permission to use it in this way).
Obviously, the most blatant example of plagiarism would be to copy another student‟s
work. Hence it is essential to make clear in your assignments the distinction between:

essential to make clear in your assignments the distinction between:

the ideas and work of other people that you may have quite legitimately
exploited and developed, and

the ideas or material that you have personally contributed.

5. To assist you, here are a few important do’s and don’ts:

Do get lots of background information on subjects you are writing about
to help you form your own view of the subject. The information could be
from electronic journals, technical reports, unpublished dissertations,
etc. Make a note of the source of every piece of information at the time
you record it, even if it is just one sentence.




                                                                                        34
Don’t construct a piece of work by cutting and pasting or copying material written by
other people, or by you for any other purpose, into something you are submitting as
your own work. Sometimes you may need to quote someone else‟s exact form of words
in order to analyse or criticize them, in which case the quotation must be enclosed in
quotation marks to show that it is a direct quote, and it must have the source properly
acknowledged at that point. Any omissions from a quotation must be indicated by an
ellipsis (…) and any additions for clarity must be enclosed in square brackets, e.g.
“[These] results suggest… that the hypothesis is correct.” It may also be appropriate to
reproduce a diagram from someone else‟s work, but again the source must be explicitly
and fully acknowledged there. However, constructing large chunks of documents from a
string of quotes, even if they are acknowledged, is another form of plagiarism.

Do attribute all ideas to their original authors. Written „ideas‟ are the product that
authors produce. You would not appreciate it if other people passed off your ideas as
their own, and that is what plagiarism rules are intended to prevent. A good rule of
thumb is that each idea or statement that you write should be attributed to a source
unless it is your personal idea or it is common knowledge. (If you are unsure if
something is common knowledge, ask other students: if they don‟t know what you are
talking about, then it is not common knowledge!)
6. As you can see, it is most important that you understand what is expected of you
when you prepare and produce assignments and that you always observe proper
academic conventions for referencing and acknowledgement, whether working by
yourself or as part of a team. In practice, there are a number of acceptable styles of
referencing depending, for example, on the particular discipline you are studying, so if
you are not certain what is appropriate, ask your tutor or the course unit coordinator for
advice! This should ensure that you do not lay yourself open to a charge of plagiarism
inadvertently, or through ignorance of what is expected. It is also important to
remember that you do not absolve yourself from a charge of plagiarism simply by
including a reference to a source in a bibliography that you have included with your
assignment; you should always be scrupulous about indicating precisely where and to
what extent you have made use of such a source.
7. So far, plagiarism has been described as using the words or work of someone else
(without proper attribution), but it could also include a close paraphrase of their words,
or a minimally adapted version of a computer program, a diagram, a graph, an
illustration, etc taken from a variety of sources without proper acknowledgement. These
could be lectures, printed material, the Internet or other electronic/AV sources.


8. Remember: no matter what pressure you may be under to complete an assignment,
you should never succumb to the temptation to take a „short cut‟ and use someone
else‟s material inappropriately. No amount of mitigating circumstances will get you off
the hook, and if you persuade other students to let you copy their work, they risk being
disciplined as well (see below).
Collusion
9. Collusion is any agreement to hide someone else‟s individual input to collaborative
work with the intention of securing a mark higher than either you or another student
might deserve. Where proved, it will be subject to penalties similar to those for
plagiarism. Similarly, it is also collusion to allow someone to copy your work when you
know that they intend to submit it as though it were their own and that will lay both you
and the other student open to a charge of academic malpractice.
10. On the other hand, collaboration is a perfectly legitimate academic activity in
which students are required to work in groups as part of their programme of research or
in the preparation of projects and similar assignments. If you are asked to carry out such
group work and to collaborate in specified activities, it will always be made clear how
your individual input to the joint work is to be assessed and graded. Sometimes, for
example, all members of a team may receive the same mark for a joint piece of work,
whereas on other occasions team members will receive individual marks that reflect their


                                                                                        35
individual input. If it is not clear on what basis your work is to be assessed, to avoid any
risk of unwitting collusion you should always ask for clarification before submitting any
assignment.
Fabrication or falsification of results
11. For many students, a major part of their studies involves laboratory or other forms
of practical work, and they often find themselves undertaking such activity without close
academic supervision. If you are in this situation, you are expected to behave in a
responsible manner, as in other aspects of your academic life, and to show proper
integrity in the reporting of results or other data. Hence you should ensure that you
always document clearly and fully any research programme or survey that you
undertake, whether working by yourself or as part of a group. Results or data that you
or your group submit must be capable of verification, so that those assessing the work
can follow the processes by which you obtained them. Under no circumstances should
you seek to present results or data that were not properly obtained and documented as
part of your practical learning experience. Otherwise, you lay yourself open to the
charge of fabrication or falsification of results.
Finally…
12. If you commit any form of academic malpractice, teaching staff will not be able to
assess your individual abilities objectively or accurately. Any short-term gain you might
have hoped to achieve will be cancelled out by the loss of proper feedback you might
have received, and in the long run such behaviour is likely to damage your overall
intellectual development, to say nothing of your self esteem. You are the one who loses.



The University of Manchester Policy and Procedures Website 2005-2006




                                                                                          36
8.2    Work and attendance of students (Regulation XX)

Regulation XX - Work and Attendance of Students
[Note: the set of units, practical work and projects required for a degree or other award
of the University is referred to as a programme of study (the „Programme‟). Each such
Programme is normally the responsibility of a School (which may also be acting on
behalf of a group of Schools), which appoints a body to organise the syllabus, and the
teaching and assessment of students. In this Regulation, this body is designated by the
term „Programme Committee‟, recognising that the exact form and title will vary across
the University.]
1. The following scheme has been approved by the Senate to determine, subject to the
provisions of Regulation XII.9, whether or not a student is working on and attending a
Programme satisfactorily for the purposes of Statute XXI.4, and to set out the penalties
for failure to work and attend satisfactorily.
2. Individual Schools shall determine the requirements for the work and attendance of
students on the Programme to be judged satisfactory. A clear statement of the specific
and compulsory requirements for satisfactory work and attendance on the Programme
must appear in the Programme Handbook for students, accompanied by a statement of
the consequences of failing to meet such requirements.
3. Requirements for work and attendance may include attending lectures, seminars,
laboratory classes, field trips, academic and personal tutorials, and other events or
meetings concerned with the conduct of the course and progress of students, as well as
meeting the specified due dates for the submission of work for comment or assessment,
and attending examinations, tests, or other forms of assessment. Schools may rule that
students who are late for lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical and other classes may
be refused admission to those classes, and that persistent lateness may be deemed to
be unsatisfactory attendance.
4. Absence from compulsory classes must be authorised by the appropriate School
authority and students are required to provide appropriate certification for absence
caused by illness.
5. The Programme Committee shall keep under continuous review throughout the
academic year the work and attendance of students for whom it has responsibility under
this Regulation.
6. As part of this review, the Programme Committees shall:
(a) obtain evidence on the progress of students by means of examinations, tests,
coursework, reports or such other means of assessment as it considers appropriate; and
(b) monitor the attendance of the students by such means that it considers to be
appropriate.

The University of Manchester Policy and Procedures Website 2005-2006




                                                                                       37
8.3     University Regulations for the Degree of Master, Postgraduate
       Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate
                                      THE UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER


      ORDINANCES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREES OF MASTER, POSTGRADUATE
                     DIPLOMA AND POSTGRADUATE CERTIFICATE


ORDINANCES
 1.        The University may award the following degrees in accordance with the regulations:

                                                Master of Arts (MA)
                                            Master of Business (MBus)
                                     Master of Business Administration (MBA)
                                         Master of Dental Science (MDSc)
                                            Master of Education (MEd)
                                            Master of Enterprise (MEnt)
                                               Master of Laws (LLM)
                                  Master of Music in Composition (MusM) (Comp)
                                  Master of Music in Performance (MusM) (Perf)
                                          Master of Optometry (MOptom)
                                            Master of Planning (MPlan)
                                  Master of Population Health Evidence (MPHE)
                                           Master of Psychology (MPsy)
                                            Master by Research (MRes)
                                             Master of Science (MSc)
                                           Master of Theology (MTheol)
                                         Master of Town Planning (MTPI)
                                          Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip)
                                        Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert)
                                   Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
                                                Advanced Diploma.


2.       Regulations for the degrees of Master of Philosophy (MPhil) and Master of Surgery (ChM) are
         published separately.

3.       Students for the above degrees will pursue satisfactorily an approved programme of
         advanced study, as either a full or part-time student.

4.       These ordinances and regulations provide a general framework for all taught
         postgraduate degrees listed above, and should be read in conjunction with detailed
         notes for guidance and programme specific regulations.

5.       Regulations for student complaints and appeals are provided in the University’s General
         Regulations, XVII and XIX respectively.

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                                                                                                                    38
REGULATIONS

1.   Admission to the programme

a)   Applicants for admission to the Master and Postgraduate Diploma degrees will normally have:

     i)        a first degree (equivalent to a UK Honours Bachelors degree) or equivalent
               qualification from a recognised institution; or

     ii)       evidence of previous advanced study, research or professional experience, which the
               University accepts as qualifying the applicant for entry.

b)   Applicants for admission to the Postgraduate Certificate will normally have:

     i)        evidence of academic qualifications or work experience which meets the approval of
               the University and allows them to be registered onto a Certificate programme or
               individual postgraduate course units.

c)   All applicants must meet the minimum English language requirements of their chosen
     programme, as described by the University’s Postgraduate Admissions Policy.

d)   Students may be registered initially for the Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate.
     After successfully completing the required assessment, they may be permitted to progress to
     the Masters or Postgraduate Diploma degrees respectively.

e)   Students awarded the Postgraduate Certificate may subsequently use the credits awarded to
     count towards a Postgraduate Diploma or a Masters degree but only on the condition that the
     award of the Postgraduate Certificate is rescinded.             In these circumstances, for a
     Postgraduate Diploma degree students will normally be required to complete the programme
     three academic years after they originally registered for the Postgraduate Certificate, or five
     academic years after initial registration for a Masters degree.

f)   Students awarded the Postgraduate Diploma may subsequently use the credits awarded to
     count towards a Masters degree but only on the condition that the award of the Postgraduate
     Diploma is rescinded. In these circumstances, students will normally be required to complete
     the Masters programme five academic years after they originally registered for the
     Postgraduate Diploma.

2.   Period of Programme

a)   A Masters degree will normally equate to 45 teaching weeks and the date for the end of the
     programme and submission of the dissertation will be published in the programme handbook.

b)   A part-time Masters student will complete the programme over a more extended period of
     time which will be published in the programme handbook, but will not exceed five academic
     years.

c)   A Postgraduate Diploma shall be a full-time or part-time programme that shall normally
     extend over not less than two academic semesters and not more than three academic years.

d)   A Postgraduate Certificate shall be a full-time or part-time programme that shall normally
     extend over not less than one academic semester and not more than two academic years.

3.   Credits

a)   A Masters degree will consist of 180 credits, of which at least 150 will be at Masters level. A
     maximum of 30 credits may be enhanced Honours level credits.

b)   A Postgraduate Diploma degree will consist of 120 credits, of which at least 90 will be at
     Masters level. A maximum of 30 credits may be enhanced Honours level credits.



                                                                                                 39
c)   A Postgraduate Certificate degree will consist of 60 credits, all of which will be at Masters
     level.

d)   All course units will normally be of 15 credits, or multiples thereof. A Masters degree will
     normally include a dissertation of at least 60 credits and a Postgraduate Diploma which may
     include a project or extended essay of no more than 30 credits. The Postgraduate Certificate
     will not normally include a dissertation or project element.

4.   Accreditation of Prior (Experiential) Learning (AP(E)L)

a)   A student may be permitted to receive an award of credits on the basis of demonstrated
     learning that has occurred at some point in the past. The award of credits can be based upon
     learning for which certification has been awarded by an educational institution or another
     education/training provider (APL) or uncertificated learning gained from experience (APEL.).

b)   All AP(E)L applications will be approved in line with the University’s overall policy on the
     award of AP(E)L, as follows:

     i)      A Masters degree will normally allow a maximum of 60 AP(E)L credits.           AP(E)L
             credits will not count towards the dissertation or project components.

     ii)     A Postgraduate Diploma degree will normally allow a maximum of 30 AP(E)L credits.
             AP(E)L credits will not count towards the dissertation or project components.

     iii)    A Postgraduate Certificate degree will normally not allow any AP(E)L credit.

5.   Progression and Assessment

a)   Regulations for work and attendance are outlined in the University’s General Regulations, XX.

b)   Students for the degrees of Master, Diploma or Certificate will present themselves for
     assessment of their progress as required in the programme handbook.

c)   Students will normally successfully complete the taught component of the Masters degree
     before they can progress to the dissertation, and must successfully complete the taught
     component before submission of the dissertation.

d)   A student who fails to satisfy the Examiners in any assessment of taught units may be
     permitted to resubmit the assessment or retake the examination on one further occasion, up
     to a maximum of 45 credits (see m) below). The student will take this opportunity during the
     next available University examination period or within a period as published in the programme
     handbook.

e)   The maximum mark to be awarded for resubmitted coursework or retaken examination will
     normally be 50% for the Masters degree and 40% for the Postgraduate Diploma.

f)   All Masters degrees will have exit points for the award of a Postgraduate Certificate and a
     Postgraduate Diploma. These will be clearly defined in terms of level of achievement and will
     correspond to 60 and 120 credits respectively. Students who do not achieve the required
     pass mark in the taught element for a Masters degree, but who do achieve the required pass
     mark for a Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate, may be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma or
     Certificate, as appropriate, provided they have successfully completed the requisite number of
     credits.

g)   Any student who submits a piece of assessed coursework (including the dissertation) after the
     submission deadline, without being granted an extension, will receive a mark of zero.

h)   Students may, in exceptional mitigating circumstances, and with prior permission of the
     Faculty, be allowed to re-take the entire programme subject to all outstanding fees being paid.



                                                                                                 40
i)   A compensated pass for the failure of taught components of a Masters programme will be
     applied if the student has an overall average of more than 50%, but no mark below 40%. If a
     student fails more than 30 credits, no compensation can be applied.

j)   A compensated pass for the failure of taught components of a Postgraduate Diploma
     programme will be applied if the student has an overall average of more than 40%, but no
     mark below 30%. If a student fails more than 30 credits, no compensation will be applied.

k)   A compensated pass for the failure of taught components of a Postgraduate Certificate
     programme will be applied if the student has an overall average of more than 40%, but no
     mark below 30%. If a student fails more than 15 credits, no compensation will be applied.

l)   Programmes may employ stricter compensation rules, as approved by the Faculty, for
     example where professional bodies require it.

m)   The maximum allowable cumulative failure of course units in a Masters programme at the first
     attempt is 45 credits of the taught component of the programme. A student whose failures at
     the first attempt exceed 45 credits will be deemed to have failed the programme.

n)   Students who fail more than 45 credits at Masters level will be judged against the
     requirements for a pass on the Postgraduate Diploma programme. If this results in their failing
     less than or equal to 45 credits at Postgraduate Diploma level, the student may resit those
     units failed at Postgraduate Diploma level to obtain the award of a Postgraduate Diploma.

o)   Students who fail to satisfy the requirements for Postgraduate Diploma may be awarded the
     Postgraduate Certificate if they pass 60 credits at 40% subject to the compensation
     regulations stated in k).

6.   Dissertation

a)   Dissertation or project submission dates will normally be 51 weeks after the start of the
     programme. Submission dates for part-time students will reflect the length of the programme
     (pro-rata compared to a full-time programme).

b)   The dissertation will be submitted within the period of programme in order for a student to be
     eligible for the award of distinction.

c)   A programme may require all students to submit the dissertation by the end of the programme
     period unless an extension for extenuating circumstances has been granted. This must be
     clearly stated in the programme handbook.

d)   For programmes which allow students to register for attendance beyond prescribed
     programme (ABPP), the maximum period for an extension to submit a dissertation will
     normally be four months for a full-time programme and eight months for a part-time
     programme. All students must register for ABPP and pay the relevant registration fee.

e)   At the recommendation of the Board of Examiners, students will normally be allowed one
     resubmission of a failed dissertation or project and this will normally be within four months of
     the date of the publication of the result. The Board of Examiners, in agreement with the
     External Examiner may, exceptionally, decide not to allow resubmission and the Faculty will
     agree that the grounds for not allowing a resubmission are justified.

f)   Students who achieve a dissertation mark of between 40-49% may accept the award of
     Postgraduate Diploma with no further work required or resubmit the dissertation on one
     occasion, at the discretion of the Examination Board. A student achieving a mark below 50%
     for a resubmitted dissertation will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.

g)   The maximum mark to be awarded for resubmitted dissertations or projects will normally be
     50% for the Masters degree and 40% for the Postgraduate Diploma.



                                                                                                  41
h)      A student may exceptionally be required to attend an examination, orally or otherwise, in the
        subject of their dissertation or project report, or a related matter.

7.      Examination Board and External Examiners

a)      There will normally be a minimum of two Examination Board meetings for each programme
        each year, one at which the marks for the taught components are confirmed, and one where
        the marks for the dissertation/project are confirmed and the final awards recommended.
        Normally, all staff who have been involved in the assessment of the course units shall be
        present at the Examination Board meetings. The External Examiner will be present for at least
        one meeting per year and preferably at both, will confirm all the marks agreed at Examination
        Board meetings and be consulted when decisions on awards and classifications are made.

8.      Recommendation for award

Pass Marks

a)      To obtain a pass for a Masters programme will require the student to obtain both an average
        of 50% on the taught element, and 50% on the project/dissertation element.

b)      To obtain a pass for a Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate will normally require the student to
        obtain an average of 40%; if there is a project element of more than 30 credits, a mark of 40%
        or more on the project element is also required to pass. A pass mark of 50% may be required
        for some professionally accredited diploma programmes.

c)      Students admitted to the Postgraduate Diploma or Certificate programme who achieve
        average marks of 50% or more, after completing a predetermined number of course units
        (normally 60 credits), may progress to the Masters programme.

d)      The Faculty shall, on report from the Examiners, recommend to Senate the award of the
        degree of Masters or Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate for those students
        who have completed all requirements of the regulations and satisfied the Examiners. The
        awarding certificate will include the title of the programme.


Distinction

e)      A distinction may be awarded to a student who has consistently achieved excellence in the
        assessments of a Masters or Postgraduate Diploma programme.

f)      The student will have satisfied the following criteria in order to be awarded a distinction:

        i)      An average at first assessment of 70% or more in the taught component of t he
                programme with no mark below 50% in any compulsory course unit.

        ii)     A mark of 70% or more for the dissertation (for Masters programmes).

        iii)    A Pass at first assessment in components of the programme where only a Pass/Fail
                is recorded.

        iv)     Submission of the dissertation by the end of the period of programme.

Merit


g)      Merit may be awarded to a student who has consistently achieved good marks in the
        assessments of a Masters or Postgraduate Diploma programme.



                                                                                                       42
h)   The student will obtain the following in order to be awarded a merit:

     i)      An average at first assessment of 60% or more in the taught component of the
             programme with no mark below 50% in any compulsory course units.

     ii)     A mark of 60% or more on the dissertation (for Masters programmes).

     iii)    A Pass at first assessment in components of the programme where a Pass/Fail is
             recorded.




                                                                                        43
8.4   Sample student feedback questionnaire.




                                               44
45
46
8.5    Academic Appeals (Regulation XIX)

Regulation XIX - Academic Appeals
[Notes:
(i) The purpose of this Regulation is to safeguard the interests of all students. It may be
used only when there are adequate grounds for doing so (as specified in paragraph 2
below) and may not be used simply because a student is dissatisfied with the outcome of
his or her assessment or other decision concerning their academic position or progress.
(ii) Any reference in these procedures to named officers should be read also as a
reference in each case to a delegated nominee.]
Scope
1. The Procedure set out herein may be used by students who wish to appeal against a
decision of a board of examiners, or a progress committee, or a graduate committee or
equivalent body which affects a student‟s academic status or progress in the University,
including (but not limited to) the following:
(a) a recommendation to the Senate, pursuant to the provisions of Statute XXI.3, that
the student be expelled from the University or be excluded from his or her programme,
or element of programme, of study on grounds of unsatisfactory progress or failure to
meet academic or professional requirements, or arising from unsatisfactory work and
attendance;
(b) a requirement that the student interrupt his or her studies on grounds of
unsatisfactory progress or failure to meet academic or professional requirements;
(c) a requirement that the student transfers to a programme offering a qualification of
lower rank, for example:
(i) Doctor to Master‟s degree;
(ii) Master‟s degree to Diploma;
(iii) Honours degree to Ordinary degree;
(d) a decision not to allow the student to progress from Diploma to Master‟s degree or
from a Master‟s to a Doctoral degree;
(e) a decision not to award a postgraduate qualification and, if appropriate, not to allow
resubmission of a thesis or dissertation for a Doctor or Master‟s degree;
(f) the result of a formal assessment or the award of a particular degree classification.
Grounds for Appeal
2. An appeal may be made only on grounds alleging:
(a) that there exists or existed circumstances affecting the student's performance of
which, for good reason, the board of examiners or committee may not have been made
aware when the decision was taken and which might have had a material effect on the
decision
[Note: if students wish to appeal on such grounds, they must give adequate reasons why
this information was not made available prior to the decision being made.];
(b) that there had been a material administrative error or procedural irregularity in the
assessment process or in putting into effect the regulations for the programme of study
of such a nature as to cause significant doubt whether the decision might have been
different if the error or irregularity had not occurred;
(c) that there is evidence of prejudice or bias or lack of proper assessment on the part of
one or more of the examiners;
(d) that the supervision or training of the student in respect of research for a dissertation
or thesis or equivalent work was unsatisfactory to the point that his or her performance
was seriously affected. An appeal which questions the academic or professional
judgement of those charged with the responsibility for assessing a student‟s academic
performance or professional competence shall not be permitted.
Procedure
3. Before initiating an appeal, a student is strongly advised to discuss the matter with his
or her personal tutor, supervisor, programme director or other appropriate person in the
School. If the matter remains unresolved, the student may invoke the formal appeal
procedure. The student may seek advice and guidance in preparing the appeal from the


                                                                                          47
Students‟ Union Advice Centre, or from his or her Faculty or School Office, or from the
Office of Student Support and Services.
4. A student may submit an appeal only on his or her own behalf; an appeal submitted
by a third party shall not be accepted unless accompanied by written authorisation from
the student.
5. An appeal, in the form of a written statement which sets out the grounds of appeal,
must be submitted to the appropriate Faculty Office within twenty working days of
notification of the result or decision. The student should submit with the statement any
documents relevant to the appeal.
[Note: in respect of appeals against refusal to allow a student permission to take an
examination or other form of assessment on grounds of unsatisfactory work and
attendance, the appeal must be submitted within ten working days of notification of that
decision in order to allow sufficient time for the appeal to be considered.]
6. On receipt of the appeal, a nominated member of staff in the Faculty Office shall
initially consider whether it is made on one of the grounds specified in paragraph 2
above. If this test fails, the student shall be notified within ten working days of the
appeal being received that the appeal has been rejected, with reasons given. There shall
be no opportunity for the student to appeal against this decision within the University.
7. If the appeal is shown to have been made on one or more of the grounds set out in
paragraph 2, then the Faculty Officer shall obtain comments on the appeal from the
Head of School, Programme Director, Supervisor or other appropriate person. [Note: if,
at any time during these initial enquiries, the School or other appropriate body decides,
on the basis of the information contained in the appeal, to reconsider the matter about
which the appeal has been made and to substitute an alternative outcome, the student
shall be notified accordingly and the appeal procedure shall cease.] The student shall be
sent a copy of the comments obtained by the Faculty Officer and invited to submit a
response. The appeal shall then be considered by the Dean of the Faculty and a senior
administrative officer in the Faculty who may determine:
(a) that the appeal does not have substance within the accepted grounds as set out in
paragraph 2, in which event the student shall be informed of this decision in writing,
normally within twenty working days of the appeal having been received. The student
shall be given reasons for the decision. The student has the right of appeal against that
decision and may do so in writing to the Registrar and Secretary. The Registrar and
Secretary shall review the documents relating to the case in order to determine whether
the case has been handled properly and the decision is reasonable in the light of the
available evidence. The decision of the Registrar and Secretary shall be final;
(b) that the appeal has identified relevant matters that were not known to those making
the original decision or that there had been procedural or administrative errors which
might have affected that decision, in which event the case shall be referred back to the
original board of examiners or committee for reconsideration taking into account any
new information, or any guidance from the Faculty officers. The reconvened board of
examiners or committee shall have the power to confirm or alter its original decision.
Where the original decision is confirmed, the student shall be given reasons for that
decision. There shall be no opportunity for the student to appeal against the decision of
the reconvened board of examiners or committee;
(c) that the appeal has raised serious or complex matters which require further
investigation and enquiry, in which event the case shall be referred to an Appeal Panel.
[Note: in situations where the Dean was party to the original decision against which the
student is appealing, his or her role in considering the appeal shall be taken by another
senior academic officer in the Faculty or, if necessary, from another Faculty.]
Appeal Panel
8. The Appeal Panel shall have the following composition, the members being appointed
by the Senate and being drawn from Faculties other than those in which the appellant is
or has been registered:
A Dean of a Faculty or an Associate Dean (in the Chair);
A chair of a Graduate Committee, a Research Degrees Committee, or an Undergraduate
Committee, or equivalent as appropriate;


                                                                                       48
One other member of academic staff drawn from a panel of such staff appointed from
time to time by the Senate.
9. The student shall be given ten working days notice of the date and time of the Appeal
Panel meeting and shall be invited to attend the meeting of the Appeal Panel to present
his or her case. Where the student decides not to attend, the Panel may proceed in his
or her absence. The student may be accompanied at the meeting by a fellow student, a
member of staff or a Students‟ Union Officer. The student shall be sent copies of all
documents to be made available to the Appeal Panel. The Appeal Panel is empowered to
call members of staff with knowledge of the case to attend the meeting to give evidence
and to correspond with external examiners. The student and the accompanying person
shall be permitted to speak and to question any persons giving oral evidence to the
Panel.
10. Having considered the evidence, the Appeal Panel may:
(a) reject the appeal, in which case the student shall be given reasons for the decision. If
the appeal is rejected, there is no further right of appeal within the University; or
(b) refer the matter back to the original board of examiners or committee for
reconsideration taking into account the new information or any guidance from the Appeal
Panel. The reconvened board of examiners or committee shall have the power to confirm
or alter its original decision. Where the original decision is confirmed, the student shall
be given reasons for that decision. There shall be no opportunity within the University for
the student to appeal against the decision of the reconvened board of examiners or
committee; or
(c) revoke the original decision of the board of examiners or committee and, as
appropriate, require the appropriate School to allow the student a further opportunity to
satisfy the requirements for continuation on the programme or element of the
programme; or
(d) revoke the original decision not to award a postgraduate research degree or not
allow resubmission for a Doctor or Master‟s degree and to direct that the examiners
reconsider their decision for reasons stated; or direct that a fresh examination be held
with new examiners to be appointed in accordance with new procedures; or direct that
the student be given permission to resubmit the thesis for examination following
revision.
Conclusion of the Appeal Process
11. There are no other appeals procedures beyond those detailed above. Students who
believe that their case has not been dealt with properly by the University or that the
outcome is unreasonable may be able to complain to the Office of the Independent
Adjudicator for Higher Education (OIA) if the complaint is eligible under its rules and
once all internal procedures have been concluded.
[Note: information about the role of the OIA and the procedure for submitting complaints
can be obtained from the Office of Student Support and Services, from the Students‟
Union Advice Centre or from the OIA website: www.oiahe.org.uk.]
Annual Report
Each year, the Registrar and Secretary shall prepare a report for the Senate on the
number and nature of appeals, identifying any general issues that may have arisen.
The University of Manchester Policy and Procedures Website 2005-2006




                                                                                         49
8.6    Student Complaints Procedure (Regulation XVIII)

Regulation XVIII
Student Complaints Procedure
Introduction and Principles
1. As part of its commitment to ensuring the standard and quality of its programmes of
study, services, and facilities, the University has established this Procedure to deal with
complaints from students. (For the purposes of this Procedure, the term “student” shall
include also those who have recently been registered as a student at the University.)
Complaints provide useful feedback information from students and, where appropriate,
will be used to improve services and facilities.
2. The Procedure comprises a number of stages, both informal and formal. Students who
have a complaint to make should raise it directly with the staff concerned at the earliest
opportunity, as matters that are dealt with informally at an early stage have the best
chance of being resolved effectively. Only where the informal procedures have been
completed and the complainant remains dissatisfied should the formal stage be
instituted. It is recognised however that there may be occasions where an informal
approach is not appropriate and the student may wish to proceed directly to a later
stage in the procedure, giving reasons for doing so. In such situations, the recipient of
the complaint should decide at which stage in the procedure the complaint should most
appropriately be considered, taking account of its particular nature and circumstances.
In respect of particularly serious complaints, the student may write directly to the
Registrar and Secretary without having followed the informal and formal stages of this
procedure set out below. In such cases, the Registrar and Secretary shall decide whether
to refer the complaint for consideration by a Complaints Panel or whether it should more
appropriately be referred to an earlier stage in the procedure.
3. Complaints should be made as soon as possible, and in any case within eight weeks,
of the events or actions (or lack of actions) which have prompted the complaint. The
University will not normally consider complaints made after this period, unless there is
good reason for the delay.
4. Every reasonable effort will be made to deal promptly and efficiently with all
complaints, to investigate them thoroughly and objectively and to seek to resolve them
satisfactorily. Complaints will be dealt with positively and constructively. If a complaint is
upheld, the University will seek to provide an appropriate response and will correct any
mistakes or misunderstandings and will take any other action as appropriate. If a
complaint is not upheld then reasons for that decision will be given.
5. All complaints will be dealt with in confidence with the proviso that enquiries will have
to be made to investigate the matters that are the subject of the complaint. Also, an
individual against whom a complaint is made has the right to be supplied with a copy of
the complaint and to comment on it. If this presents a problem for a student who wishes
their complaint to be given complete confidentiality, he or she is advised to discuss how
the complaint might be addressed with an appropriate officer in his or her Faculty (such
as the Head of Faculty Administration or the Dean of the Faculty) or in the Office of
Student Support and Services.
6. The University will treat all complaints seriously and will deal with them without
recrimination. Where, however, a complaint is shown to be frivolous, vexatious or
motivated by malice, disciplinary action may be taken against the complainant under the
provisions of the Regulation on Conduct and Discipline of Students.
7. The effectiveness of any complaints procedure depends on the University being able
to collect appropriate information from the parties involved in order to investigate the
matter properly. For this reason, anonymous complaints will not be dealt with under this
Procedure. It is at the discretion of the member of staff receiving an anonymous
complaint to determine how the matter is handled.
8. The time limits set out in this Procedure will normally be followed. However, where,
for good reason, this is not possible, the complainant will be kept informed of progress.



                                                                                           50
9. Students seeking help in using this procedure, or if they are uncertain as to whom
their complaint should be referred, should seek advice from any of the following:
(a) the Student Handbook;
(b) the Central Academic Advisory Service;
(c) the appropriate Faculty Officer or School Secretary;
(d) the Office of Student Support and Services;
(e) the Students' Union Advice Centre.
Definition and Scope of the Procedure
10. The University defines a complaint as „an expression of dissatisfaction which merits a
response‟.
11. The Procedure is designed for complaints in respect of the student‟s experience at
the University related to:
(a) the provision of programmes or parts of programmes of study, services or facilities
by the University;
(b) the actions or lack of actions by the University or its staff.
12. The Complaints Procedure does not cover the following, for which separate
procedures exist (as noted in parentheses):
(a) appeals relating to examinations or assessments or to academic progress or against
expulsion or exclusion on academic grounds (Academic Appeals procedure);
(b) complaints involving an allegation of misconduct by a student (Conduct and
Discipline of Students Procedure);
(c) complaints involving an allegation of harassment by a student or member
of staff (Policy and Procedure on Harassment);
(d) complaints against the Students‟ Union (Code of Practice on the Students‟ Union).
Information about these separate procedures can be obtained from the Students' Union
Advice Centre or the Office of Student Support and Services. 13. This Procedure is
available for students registered for programmes of study of the University. It is not
available for students registered in a partner organisation on recognised programmes of
study, or on programmes of study approved or accredited for that purpose. These
students should use the mechanisms and procedures for considering complaints which
are in place within the partner organisation.
14. This Procedure can be used by students for both individual or collective complaints.
It is expected that the student(s) concerned will pursue the complaint personally;
complaints submitted by a third party will not be accepted unless accompanied by
written authorisation from the student(s). Complaints by a group of students are often of
a general nature where it is usually more appropriate for the students to raise the matter
with a student representative on the relevant School or service committee in the first
instance. Complaints may then be made by the group of students if the relevant
representation system has not achieved a satisfactory outcome, or if this is not thought
to be an appropriate route.
Informal Stage – Local Resolution
15. Most complaints can be resolved informally and where practicable a complaint should
be dealt with as close as possible to the point at which it arises. The complaint should
therefore be made initially to the appropriate member of staff who seems best placed to
deal with the matter (eg Personal Tutor, Programme Director, Head of School, Adviser or
Tutor in the Hall of Residence, local service provider, or Head of the office concerned in
the central administration). A student should normally expect to receive a written or
verbal acknowledgement within five working days and a full response within fifteen
working days of receipt of the complaint.
Formal Procedure
16. If the student is not satisfied with the response at the informal stage, he or she may
initiate a formal complaint by completing a Complaints Form and submitting it to the
Faculty Office. Copies of the Complaints Form may be obtained from School or Faculty
Offices, the Students‟ Union, the Office of Student Support and Services and from the
student intranet on the University website. The information to be given on the
Complaints Form is as follows:



                                                                                        51
(a) details of the complaint;
(b) a statement of the steps already taken to try to resolve the complaint informally and
why the response has not been considered to be satisfactory;
(c) the form of resolution or redress sought.
The Faculty Office will acknowledge receipt of the Complaints Form within five working
days and will determine whether the complaint should be dealt with in the Faculty or
whether the complaint should more appropriately be investigated by the head of a
service provider (eg a Head of Residence, the Director of Information Systems, the
Librarian or the Director of an administrative office). In the event that the complaint is
referred to the head of a service provider, the student will be informed accordingly.
17. The person dealing with the formal complaint must be independent of the source of
the complaint and will attempt resolution of the complaint by a means appropriate to its
nature and circumstances. Such means may include:
(a) correspondence between the parties;
(b) negotiation with the student or with appropriate members of staff or with both;
(c) facilitation of a conciliation meeting between the student and the staff concerned;
(d) or, if both parties agree, referral for mediation.
If a meeting with the student takes place, the student may be accompanied by a fellow
student, a Students‟ Union officer or a member of staff.
18. It is expected that the formal procedure should normally be completed and a written
response sent to the student within twenty working days of receipt of the completed
Complaints Form. The possible outcomes at this stage include:
(a) a resolution, reached in co-operation with the School or service provider, or following
mediation if appropriate;
(b) provision to the student of information in explanation of the circumstances which led
to the complaint;
(c) referral of the matter to the Complaints Panel if the complaint raises serious or
complex matters which require further investigation and enquiry;
(d) dismissal of the complaint as being without foundation, with reasons given to the
student in writing.
19. If the student is not satisfied with the outcome of the formal complaint and believes
that his or her complaint has not been handled properly or fairly according to these
procedures, the student may request a Review (see paragraphs 26-27).
Complaints Panel
20. A complaint may be referred to the Complaints Panel by the person dealing with the
formal complaint (as set out in paragraph 18), or by the Reviewer (as set out in
paragraph 27) or by the Registrar and Secretary (as explained in paragraph 2).
21. Where the matter is referred to a Complaints Panel, the Panel should convene to
hear the complaint within twenty working days of the referral. All members chosen to
serve on the Panel will be independent of the source of the complaint and the University
staff and student will be from a School not related to the complaint. The Complaints
Panel shall consist of:
A Vice-President or former Vice-President (in the Chair);
A Head of School;
One member of academic staff, drawn from a panel appointed from time to time by
the Senate;
A representative of the Students‟ Union.
22. The student will be entitled to attend the meeting and to be accompanied by a fellow
student, a Students‟ Union officer or a member of staff. The School or service
department that is the subject of the complaint may be represented by up to two
members of staff. If the complaint relates to the actions of an individual member of staff
rather than a School or service department, that individual has the right to be informed
of the substance of the complaint and to attend and be accompanied by a fellow member
of staff or Trade Union representative.
23. The Complaints Panel will consider both the substance of the complaint and also the
way in which the complaint had been handled in the earlier stages of the procedure.
24. The outcomes of the Complaints Panel may include:



                                                                                        52
(a) if the complaint is upheld:
(i) recommendations to the Dean of Faculty, Head of School or Head of
Service Provider;
(ii) recommendations to University or Faculty committees in respect of relevant quality
assurance issues or other procedures or policies;
(iii) appropriate redress to the student which may include payment of compensation and
reasonable expenses;
(b) if the complaint is not upheld, the student will be informed in writing with reasons for
its dismissal.
25. The conclusions and recommendations of the Complaints Panel should be notified in
writing to the student and other involved parties within five working days of the meeting.
If there is a delay in reaching a conclusion because of, for example, the need for
clarification of matters with either party or for further information, all parties will be kept
informed of progress and explanations will be given.
Review
26. If, once a final decision on the complaint has been given, the student believes that
the complaint has not been handled fairly or properly in accordance with these
procedures, the student may request a review by writing to the Registrar and Secretary
within ten working days of receipt of the formal response. The request should include
details of why the student remains dissatisfied and what resolution the student is
seeking, and should include copies of correspondence exchanged during the preceding
stages, and any other relevant papers.
27. Receipt of the request for Review will be acknowledged in writing within five working
days. The Registrar and Secretary, or his or her delegated nominee, (hereafter called
„the Reviewer‟) will then review the case on the basis of the documentation provided by
the student and that made available by the person or Panel who dealt with the formal
complaint. The Reviewer may decide to seek further information from the student and/or
from others concerned. Taking account of the substance of the complaint and the
previous attempts at resolution, the Reviewer will then decide on an appropriate course
of action, which may include:
(a) specific action to resolve the matter
(b) referral to the Complaints Panel or to a new Complaints Panel;
(c) dismissal of the complaint as being without foundation, in which case reasons will be
given to the student in writing. The student should be notified of the Reviewer‟s decision
within twenty working days of receipt of the request for Review.
28. If the Reviewer dismisses the complaint as being without foundation, there shall be
no further opportunity for the complaint to be pursued within the University (see the
footnote to these procedures).
Annual Report
29. Each year, the Registrar and Secretary shall prepare a report for the Senate on the
number and nature of complaints, identifying any general issues that may have arisen.
[Note: students who believe that their case has not been dealt with properly by the
University or that the outcome is unreasonable may be able to complain to the Office of
the Independent Adjudicator for Higher Education (OIA) if the complaint is eligible under
its rules and once all internal procedures have been concluded. Information about the
role of the OIA and the procedure for submitting complaints can be obtained from the
Office of Student Support and Services, from the Students‟ Union Advice Centre or from
the OIA website:
www.oiahe.org.uk.]
The University of Manchester Policy and Procedures Website 2005-2006




                                                                                            53
8.7       Student Ill Health

Student Ill-Health
a)       It is a requirement of your registration with the University of Manchester that you register with
      a local general practitioner. A list of GP practices can be obtained from the student Health
      Centre, any University hall of residence or a local Pharmacy. According to guidance issued by
      the General Medical Council it would not be regarded as good practice for a family member to
      be the registered GP or to offer treatment except in the case of an emergency.

b)       You should always consult your GP (or for emergencies the Accident and Emergency
      Department of a hospital) if your illness is severe, if it persists or if you are in any doubt about
      your health. You should also consult your GP if illness keeps you absent from the University for
      more than 7 days including week-ends. If you do consult a GP and they consider that you are
      not fit for attendance at the University, then you should obtain a note from the doctor to that
      effect or ask them to complete Part III of the University form 'Certification of student Ill Health'
      copies of which are available at local GP surgeries. You should hand this certificate to your
      programme director, tutor, departmental office or degree programme office as appropriate at the
      earliest opportunity.

c)        If your condition is not sufficiently serious to cause you to seek medical help, then the
      University will not require you to supply a doctor's medical certificate unless you are absent from
      the University due to illness for more than 7 days (in which case see b. above). You must
      however contact your department or degree programme as soon as possible and self-certify
      your illness (that is complete and sign the "Certification of student Ill Health" form to state that
      you have been ill) as soon as you are able to attend your department. You should do this if your
      illness means you are absent from the University for any period up to 7 days (see d.i) or if you
      are able to attend the University but your illness is affecting your studies (see d. ii and iii).

d)       The following sub-paragraphs explain what you should do if your illness affects your
      attendance at compulsory classes or if you consider that your performance in your
      studies/examinations has been impaired:

      -          If you are unwell and feel unable to attend the University to take a compulsory class,
          assessment or examination then you must seek advice by contacting your department or
          degree programme immediately, in person, through a friend or family member, by telephone
          or by email. This is to ensure that you understand the implications of being absent and the
          consequences for your academic progress, which might be quite serious. You must do this
          as soon as possible so that all options can be considered and certainly no later than the day
          of your compulsory class, assessment or examination. If you do not do this then you will
          normally be considered have been absent from the class without good reason, or to have
          taken the assessment or examination in which case you will be given a mark of zero. You
          must also complete and hand in a "Certification of student Ill Health" form on your return.

      -          You may be unwell but are able to proceed with an assessment or examination and
          yet you feel that your performance will have been impaired. If you wish this to be taken into
          account as an extenuating circumstance, you must inform your department or degree
          programme about this on the day of the assessment or examination and hand in to your
          department or degree programme a completed "Certification of student Ill Health" form. If
          you leave this until later it will not normally be possible to take your illness into account when
          assessing your performance.

      -          You may be under occasional and ongoing medical attention which affects your
          studies. If so, you should obtain a letter from your physician which should be given to your
          department or degree programme before the end of the January, May/June or
          August/September examination period, as appropriate, if you wish your condition to be taken
          into account as an extenuating circumstance.




                                                                                                        54
     -           The Government Department employs 2 criteria when deciding whether to alter the
         mark of a student who has been ill or suffered other external interference: a. evidence of
         such illness or external interference and b. evidence that the student would have performed
         better in the absence of such external interference.

e)   Notes:

     - Certification of student Ill Health forms are available in all departments and halls of residence.

     - Your department or degree programme will give you guidance on the effect of any absence
        from your studies or if you consider your illness has affected your studies. If you have
        repeated episodes of ill health which is affecting your studies, your department or degree
        programme may refer you to the student Health Centre.

     - If you are found to have been deceitful or dishonest in completing the Certification of student
         Ill Health form you could be liable to disciplinary action under the University's General
         Regulation XX: Conduct and Discipline of students.

     - The use of the "Certification of student Ill Health" forms by GPs as described above has been
        agreed by the Manchester Local Medical Committee. A GP may make a charge for
        completing the form.




                                                                                                      55
                        THE UNIVERSITY of MANCHESTER
                CERTIFICATION OF STUDENT ILL HEALTH
This form may be used:
i)   For Self Certification by the student (complete Part I only)
ii) To record advice by a tutor or other appropriate member of staff (complete Part I & II)
iii) For Formal Certification by a Medical Practitioner (complete Parts I and III)
NB: It is not part of your GP's duties to provide routinely certification for short term illness. If
asked to do so, the GP may charge a fee.

Part I:            To be completed by the student
Name _____________________________________                        Date of Birth _________________________
Student    Registration No _____________________                  Programme _________________________

Details of Medical Condition including times and dates:




Way in which work is affected:




I declare that the above statement is an accurate, complete and honest representation of the
facts.
Signed by student __________________________                      Date _______________________________

Part II:           To be completed by a member of staff
(To record advice given and/or that the student appeared to be unfit to attend and/or to perform to his/her potential)




Signed by member of staff____________________                     Date _______________________________

Part III:          To be completed by Medical Practitioner

Name of Doctor: ____________________________
The above named student is registered with my practice/is or was under my professional care (delete as
appropriate) He/she consulted me in relation to the medical condition described on (dates/times, etc):

Further Comments:




Signed _______________________________ Practice Stamp __________________________
Date _________________________________


                                                                                                                    56
              CERTIFICATION OF STUDENT ILL HEALTH - GUIDELINES
These guidelines set out the procedures to be followed by students who fall ill and are absent
from the University for brief periods and/or who believe their illness may have affected their
academic performance. students are reminded that they must register with a local GP and
must visit their GP for treatment of ill health where necessary.

Studentsshould always consult their GP if their illness is severe, if it persists or if they are in
any doubt about their health.

1. Self-Certification - THIS WILL NORMALLY BE THE USUAL PROCEDURE

    i)   You should use self-certification to explain absences through illness for up to one week
         (i.e. seven days including the weekend). You should complete Part I of this form to give
         the exact dates of the absence and a clear explanation of the reason for it. The form
         should be handed in to the appropriate office or person in the department immediately
         after the absence.

    ii) You should do all you can to inform your department at the time of your illness and to
        seek advice. Although you may feel too ill to attend classes or you believe your illness
        is affecting your performance, you may be able to visit your department. You should
        give this form to your tutor or other appropriate member of staff and they can use Part
        II to record the advice given to you and/or that you appeared to them to be unfit to
        perform to your potential.

    Repeated self-certification will normally result in the student being referred to the University
    student Health Service for assessment.

2. Medical Certification

    For illness of more than one week the university will accept self-certification, as above, for
    illness of up to one week but if you are ill for longer than this you should obtain a
    consultation with your GP and ask for your illness to be certified using Part III of this form.
    Copies of this form are available in local GP practices.

    When you visit your GP for treatment or because you are concerned about your health as
    stated above, you should always consult your GP if your illness is severe or if you are in
    any doubt about your health. If you do this you may ask your GP to certificate your illness
    and part III may be used for this purpose. Some practices may make a charge for this.

3. Illness prior to/or during Examinations

    If you are ill immediately prior to or during examinations you must inform your Department
    immediately and discuss the situation with your personal tutor or other appropriate person
    in the department. Depending on the circumstances, you may be advised to proceed with
    the examinations or, instead, to sit the examinations at the next opportunity. You may be
    asked to self-certify your illness using this form and the appropriate person in the
    Department will use Part II to record advice given and/or that you appeared to be unfit to
    perform to your potential.
    This should be handed in, or posted, to the appropriate office or person in the department
    as soon as possible.
If you are taken ill during an examination, you should be referred to the University student Health
Centre. The doctor or nurse at the student Health Centre who sees you will, at your request, complete
this form and send it to the department to confirm the visit and the ill health.




                                                                                                  57
8.8    Disability Support Office


Students with Additional Support Needs

The University of Manchester welcomes students with additional support needs arising
from a specific learning difficulty, such as dyslexia, an unseen medical condition, a
mental health difficulty or a disability or impairment.
The University has a central Disability Support Office (DSO) which can offer confidential
advice and organise support. In order to access the full support that the University can
offer, you should contact the DSO to discuss your support requirements, either by

*       email ( <mailto:disability@manchester.ac.uk>
disability@manchester.ac.uk)
*       telephone (0161 275 7512/8518)
*       or just drop into the DSO in Room LG27 on the lower ground floor of
the John Owens Building

where you can speak in confidence to a Disability Adviser about your needs.

If you are a student with support needs and have not yet informed the DSO,
then please contact them in the first instance. In addition to this, each
Faculty and School has a Disability Coordinator, who liaises with the DSO to organise
support in the School - a full list of Disability Co-ordinators is available on the DSO web
pages - <http://www.manchester.ac.uk/disability>
www.manchester.ac.uk/disability. The DSO can also organise screening tests for
students who think that they might have dyslexia.



Contact details
The Disability Support Office (DSO)
Room LG 27
John Owens Building
Oxford Road
Manchester
M13 9PL
tel +44 (0)161 275 7512
minicom +44 (0)161 275 2794
text 07899 658790
fax +44 (0)161 275 7018
email <mailto:disability@manchester.ac.uk> disability@manchester.ac.uk
<http://www.manchester.ac.uk/disability> www.manchester.ac.uk/disability Campus
map reference 48




                                                                                          58
8.9    Personal Development Plan Template

                              Personal Development Plan (PDP)

The PDP is a tool to help you reflect developmentally upon your study performance, skills,
goals and career aspirations. There are two components to the PDP.
 ______________________________________________________________________________

The first component sets an agenda for meetings with your tutor at three key stages in your
programme.

   •   Stage 1 (the beginning – during the first few weeks of your programme)
   •   Stage 2 (midway – after Semester 1 examinations).
   •   Stage 3 (the end – after Semester 2 examinations).

At each of these three stages you can link to tips which have been provided by the Careers
Service as well as information on a research career.
 ______________________________________________________________________________

The second component is a personal record of what you’ve achieved on the programme
(attended, written, or what has interested you).

As well as the record, there are tips on time management and action planning which may
come in handy!
 ______________________________________________________________________________

Diary
    • Enter modules attended.
    • Enter short courses attended.
    • Enter seminars attended.
    • Enter conferences attended.
    • Enter publications.
    • Enter projects.
    • Enter group work.
    • Enter dissertation details.
    • Record of topics that interested you.
 ______________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                              59
Stage 1: Beginning
It is recommended that this form is completed and used to form an agenda for discussions with your
Tutor during the first two weeks of your programme.

(1)         Take time to reflect on the aims, intended learning outcomes, intellectual skills, practical skills,
            transferable and personal qualities which it is intended you will develop during your
            programme.


           Aims of                      Intended                 Intellectual                   Practical                   Transferable
           the                          learning                 Skills                         Skills                      and
           programm                     outcomes                                                                            Personal
           e                                                                                                                Qualities


In relation to the above, are you concerned about any of the expectations that are placed upon you
at the beginning of the programme?

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(2)         At this stage in your education/career, you will have acquired many skills, such as report
            writing, presentation skills, group work skills, self motivation, IT skills, time management, etc. Are
            there any skills in particular that you think you will need to work on to attain greater success on
            this programme?

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Manchester Computing (www.mc.manchester.ac.uk) provide courses and computing services to staff
and students of the University of Manchester. Visit the website to find out more.



(3)         Part of the purpose of the PDP is to reflect on your current career and career aspirations. Are
            there any career issues that you wish to discuss with your personal tutor?

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                                                                     Your Career




                                                                                                                                            60
Stage 2: 2nd Review
It is recommended that this form is completed and submitted to your Personal Tutor immediately after
the end of Semester 1.

It may be useful to revisit Stage 1 of your PDP at this time to refresh your memory.



(1)         Reflecting on Semester 1, what do you think were your strengths and weaknesses? How can
            you build on your strengths and address any weaknesses?

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(2)         What aspects of your performance do you most want to improve in the remainder of the
            programme?

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(3)         Are you developing the skills you need for your future career?

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(4)         Are there any career issues you wish to discuss with your Personal Tutor?

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                                                                     Your Career




                                                                                                                                            61
Stage 2A: Part time students 3 rd review
It is recommended that this form is completed and submitted to your Personal Tutor immediately at the
end of Semester 1 year 2.

It may be useful to revisit Stage 1 and 2 of your PDP at this time to refresh your memory.



(1)         Reflecting on the programme so far, what do you think were your strengths and weaknesses?
            How can you build on your strengths and address any weaknesses?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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(2)         What aspects of your performance do you most want to improve in the remainder of the
            programme?

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(3)         Are you developing the skills you need for your future career?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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(4)         Are there any career issues you wish to discuss with your Personal Tutor?

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                                                                         Your Career




                                                                                                                                            62
Stage 3: End of Programme
It is recommended that this form is completed and submitted to your Personal Tutor immediately after
Semester 2 examinations.




(1)         Are there any aspects of your learning, performance or achievement on the programme that
            you think you could have done better? On reflection, how could you have done this?


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(2)         What skills have you learned from this programme?

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(3)         Are there any career issues you would like to discuss with your Personal Tutor?

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(4)    What career direction are you planning to take, now that you have completed the
programme?

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(5)         What plans do you have to continue your education either now or in the future?

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                                                                         Your Career




For career tips, please refer to

www.manchester.ac.uk/careers




                                                                                                                                            63
8.10 Sample Plagiarism Letter

Dear Student,
In the past few years the numbers of cases of plagiarism being detected in the University
have risen. There may be a number of reasons for this, including the availability of texts
on the internet and the pressures of time that students often have due to increasingly
busy lives. However, plagiarism is an extremely serious offence and nothing that
could be considered as plagiarism should ever appear in your essays. The main reasons
you should never plagiarise are:

      It is theft and you risk extremely serious consequences which will jeopardise your
       academic career.
      Examiners are good at spotting plagiarism – we are aware of the problem and
       vigilant about seeking it out.
      Plagiarism will not give you good marks – usually people who plagiarise „cobble‟
       together quotations or close paraphrases from other‟s work, this results in a
       disjointed narrative that does not provide the reasoned and clear argument we
       are looking for. If a student plagiarises larger sections of a paper or even a whole
       paper, this is usually even easier to spot. If the paper is any good we will know
       it, if it is less good we will still probably know it and your marks (even if the
       plagiarism is undetected at this point) will not be good.
      Using plagiarism in essays is probably at least as hard work as writing the essay
       and likely to result in at least a low mark if not much more serious consequences.
       We offer advice, support and guidance on writing essays and with this you should
       have no problem in producing good, well researched, well-reasoned essays.

What is plagiarism?
In the handbook I have included the University‟s statement on plagiarism. MAKE SURE
YOU READ THIS VERY CAREFULLY. But put in simple language, you must make sure
that anything that is not your work – a direct quotation, close paraphrasing of other
people‟s work, words or ideas must be referenced accordingly (with page numbers
wherever possible). Otherwise you could be considered to be trying to pass this off as
your own, even if this was not your intention.

If you have any queries about this or any other aspect of essay writing or other aspects
of the programme, do not hesitate to ask X, Y or Z.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have read and understand the University‟s document „Guidance to students on
plagiarism‟ and I am aware of the consequences of plagiarism at the University of
Manchester.

Signed: ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------




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8.11 Dissertation Submission FAQs

Submitting Your Dissertation

Some Frequently Asked Questions

         What is ‘giving notice’?

Prior to submitting your dissertation you must give notice by completing a notice of submission form. Giving notice is the
process that starts the ball rolling for the appointment of the two examiners who will examine your dissertation.

You must complete a notice of submission form at least 6 weeks before submitting your dissertation.

         Where do I give notice?

Notice of submission forms are available from the Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences Graduate Office, Room G11 in
the Zochonis Building.

Forms are also available on the Graduate School intranet site at:

          http://www.mhs.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/pg/current/taught/examinations/

Completed forms can either be submitted in person or posted to the Graduate Office.

         Is there any guidance on presentation of my dissertation?

Yes. Guidelines are available on the Faculty’s intranet site at:
         http://www.mhs.manchester.ac.uk/intranet/pg/current/regulations/

         When should I submit my dissertation?

Full time students must submit their dissertations before the end of their period of programme.

Part time students may use the four calendar months immediately after their period of programme has ended as a writing-up
period.

         Where do I submit my dissertation?

You should submit two copies of your dissertation to the Graduate Office, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, Room
G11, Zochonis Building, the University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL.

         What happens when I submit my dissertation?

Your dissertation will be independently marked by two examiners. Some dissertations will be sent to the programme’s
external examiner for moderation.

         How long will it take before I know the result?

Every effort is made to ensure that your dissertation is marked quickly and you are notified of the result as soon as possible.
On average, the turnaround time from submission of notice to result is 2 months.




                                                                                                                             65
         How will I receive my result?

Both examiners’ reports will be returned to the Graduate Office (and if applicable, the external examiners’ moderation form).
The recommendations from these reports will then be considered by the Faculty Masters/Diploma Panel. Once the result
has been ratified by the Panel, the Faculty Graduate Office will notify you of the outcome in writing.

         Who should I contact if I have any queries?

The Graduate Office Examinations Team will provide help and assistance on any matter relating to su bmission of your
dissertation. Email mhspg-submissions@manchester.ac.uk. Tel 0161 275 1437.

         What are the possible outcomes following submission?

Examiners will mark dissertations using the following four criteria and allocate a percentage to each of these:
        Aims/Outcomes/Project Design/Literature Review (30%)
        Results/Interpretation (30%)
        Discussion/Evaluation/Conclusion (30%)
        Presentation (10%)

There are 8 possible outcomes:

90-100%              Excellent (allows           Exceptional work, nearly or wholly faultless for that
                     award of distinction)       expected at Masters level.
                                                 Perfect presentation

80-89%               Excellent (allows           Work of excellent quality throughout.
                     award of distinction)       Excellent presentation

70-79%               Excellent (allows           Work of very high to excellent quality showing
                     award of distinction)       originality, high accuracy, thorough understanding,
                                                 critical appraisal. Shows a wide and thorough
                                                 understanding of the material studied and the
                                                 relevant literature, and the ability to apply the theory
                                                 and methods learned to solve unfamiliar problems.
                                                 Very good presentation
60-69%               Good pass (allows           Work of good to high quality showing evidence of
                     award of merit)             understanding of the research topic, good accuracy,
                                                 good structure and relevant conclusions. Shows a
                                                 good knowledge of the material studied and the
                                                 relevant literature and some ability to tackle unfamiliar
                                                 problems.
                                                 Good presentation
50-59%               Pass                        Work shows a clear grasp of relevant facts and
                                                 issues and reveals an attempt to create a coherent
                                                 whole. It comprises reasonably clear and attainable
                                                 objectives, adequate literature review and some
                                                 originality.
                                                 Presentation is acceptable, minor corrections
                                                 allowed
40-49%               Diploma pass for 90         Work shows a satisfactory understanding of the
                     credit                      research topic and basic knowledge of the relevant
                     dissertation/Referral       literature but with little or no originality and limited
                     for Masters                 accuracy. Shows clear but limited objectives, and
                                                 does not always reach a conclusion.
                                                 Presentation adequate but requires correction
30-39%               Masters fail/Referral       Work shows some understanding of the main
                     for Diploma (for 90         elements of the research topic and some knowledge
                     credit dissertations)       of the relevant literature. Shows a limited level of
                                                 accuracy with little analysis of data or attempt to
                                                 discuss its significance.
                                                 Presentation poor, substantial corrections
                                                 required.
0-29%                Fail                        Little relevant material presented. Little or no



                                                                                                                          66
                                                evidence of understanding of research topic. Unclear
                                                or unsubstantiated arguments with very poor
                                                accuracy and understanding.
                                                Presentation completely unacceptable.


        Where can I find out about the graduation ceremony and degree certificate?

Graduatation ceremonies are organised by the Student Services Centre. If your query is about the logistics of this event
then you should contact the Student Services Centre directly (www.intranet.man.ac.uk/rsd/aro/student/ Tel 0161 275 5000).
Alternatively, if you have a query about your published result and graduating in time to attend the ceremony please contact
the Examinations Team in the Faculty Graduate Office mhspg-submissions@manchester.ac.uk (tel 0161 275 1437).




                                                                                                                        67
8.12 Maps

8.12.1   Campus map

8.12.2   Manchester Royal Infirmary

8.12.3   Christie Hospital




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