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									                                       ASUC SENATE MEETING

                                           November 28, 2007

                                            Fourteenth Week




This regular meeting of the ASUC Senate was called to order by Taylor Allbright at 7:03 p.m. in the
ASUC Senate Chamber.

Ms. Allbright said they would begin with a presentation by Chancellor Robert Birgeneau.


Presentation by Chancellor Birgeneau


Chancellor Birgeneau said it was great to see all of them again. He‟d try and spend most of his time
responding to questions. He thought he‟d tell them about a committee he was chairing for the UC Sys-
tem as a whole and talk about some of challenges they face and what they were thinking of to address
those challenges. A couple of students were on this committee, one from Santa Cruz and one from
UCLA. He‟d like to get some Berkeley feedback.

Chancellor Birgeneau said the challenge that the committee was addressing was one that Senators will
recognize, and one that was pretty important. As most of them knew, Berkeley, as well as the UC Sys-
tem as a whole, took considerable pride in the large number of students they have who come from fami-
lies with incomes of about $40,000. These were students who were on federal Pell Grants. As many of
them knew, although probably not all of them, that among the premier universities in the country, say, the
top 100 in the country, UCLA and UC Berkeley have, by far, the largest number of students from finan-
cially disadvantaged backgrounds compared to any other universities. That was really a significant
accomplishment of the University of California System.

Chancellor Birgeneau said that about 33% of their undergraduate students come from financially disad-
vantaged backgrounds, compared to 8% at Harvard; 9% at the University of Virginia; 12% at the Univer-
sity of Michigan; and similar numbers at the University of Colorado. So Berkeley really was qualita-
tively different in a very positive and important way compared to other universities.

The reason for this was twofold. One reason was that about 90% of their undergraduate body was from
the State of California, meaning that the school basically took very talented Californians no matter what
Presentation by Chancellor Birgeneau (cont'd)                                                            -2-


their financial background was, as long as they were talented, ambitious, etc. Other universities, like
Michigan and Virginia, for better or for worse, because of State disinvestments, have essentially replaced
poor State students who need a lot of aid, with well-to-do out-of-State students who could pay high fees.
Those schools wouldn't say it that way, and would say it very differently, and would say they had a much
broader student body. But empirically, they've replaced poor students from their State with wealthier
out-of-State students. That was socially regressive, but it has enabled those Universities to maintain their
pre-eminence. Clearly, that was not the direction any of them in the room would like to take the Univer-
sity of California and Berkeley.

Chancellor Birgeneau said that so far, this has remained stable in California because they have quite a
robust financial aid system. Many of them knew this, but for those who didn't, the way the financial aid
system worked approximately was students whose family income was $20,000 a year receive a federal
Pell Grant, a Cal grant, and then they receive financial aid from the University, from Berkeley. A sig-
nificant percentage of that came from the fee set-aside. When students pay fees, for undergrads about
$7,100, one-third of that money went into a financial aid package that was then used to enable people
from modest backgrounds to meet the financial challenge of attending Berkeley. And these three com-
ponents were equally important.

The total cost to attend Berkeley for one year, for a typical student, was about $25,000. That total came
from a combination of fees, medical, and just the expensive cost of living in the Bay Area. This actually
was, he thought, the most expensive area to go to college in the country. That was one of their
challenges.

So the total cost for every student was $25,000. For a student with a family income of $25,000, the
financial aid package, combining everything, came to about $17,000. That left $8,000 that the student
had to manage, one way or another. Typically, that $8,000 was managed by a combination of loans, say
at the $4,000 level, and then Work Study, for the other $4,000. Combined, that left $8,000, and meant
that a student from a poor family would graduate with a debt in the order of, say, $16,000. So students
one way or another had to try and figure out how to manage that $8,000 a year in a combination of loans
or Work Study. And of course some students manage this by going to community college for two years
and then transferring for their final two years. In fact, a student transferring from a community college
was twice as likely to be from a poor family as a student coming there directly out of high school. So a
disproportionate number of their students on Pell Grants were transfer students from community colleges.
And one reason some of them went to community colleges was because those programs were much less
expensive.

But nevertheless, Chancellor Birgeneau said the situation was approximately stable. And the one-third
fee set-aside, from the one-third of students whose families could afford to pay that fee, was a critical
part of the financial aid package. If they didn't have that set-aside, poor students wouldn't be able to
come to Berkeley and wouldn't be among their classmates.

Chancellor Birgeneau said the challenge was that they had a pretty good idea of what federal Pell Grants
will be in five years, what the trajectory was for Cal Grants, could estimate what fees will be, and knew
the rate at which the cost of living was going up in California. So for the whole System, not just for
Berkeley, they project that in four years, the self-help level, instead of being $8,000 a year, will be about
$12,500.
Presentation by Chancellor Birgeneau (cont'd)                                                           -3-


So now they could imagine coming from a family whose family income was $20,000 a year. The student
has overcome barriers that poor people often had to overcome in order to be admitted to a place like
Berkeley, and they get a letter saying, “Congratulations, you‟ve been admitted to Berkeley. We‟re going
to do whatever we can to make it possible for you to attend. But by the way, over the next four years,
one way or another, you‟re going to have to provide $50,000 on their own.” That‟s not how the letter
would be worded, but a person receiving it would figure out immediately that was basically what the let-
ter was saying. Chancellor Birgeneau said that was the reality the University projects for 2012-13.

So someone from that kind of background might very well think, “I just can't imagine this. My family
income is $20,000, and having to come up with two loans and work to come up with $50,000 over the
next four years was just not something I can meet. So I‟ll just go to Cal State,” which was within bicycle
distance, or such. So one way or another, Chancellor Birgeneau said they'll have to find significant
amounts of money, several thousand dollars for a year, for about 7,500 students. That was the number of
students in this category. This had to be recognized Systemwide and was not unique to Berkeley. And
frankly, it was a daunting challenge.

Chancellor Birgeneau said he was chairing a committee to think about strategy. He was the only Chan-
cellor on the committee, which was comprised mostly of people from the staff side, as well as some stu-
dents from each University. This committee was thinking about strategy, and they had three strategies so
far. Chancellor Birgeneau said he would welcome any ideas, because the committee was short on ideas.

Chancellor Birgeneau said the first idea they had was something he actually suggested, and was com-
pletely obvious. They currently set aside one-third of fee money from students who could afford to pay
the full fee. So the suggestion was to progressively increase that by 1% a year, so that in seven years, it
would be to 40%. That would mean that 40% of fees would be fed back through needs-based financial
aid. However, it turns out that would not help nearly as much as one would hope.

Chancellor Birgeneau said he was glad that Vice Chancellor Brostrom was present, because the commit-
tee‟s second idea dealt with finances. One oddity in every university‟s financial budget was that at any
given time, every university or corporation had some amount of money that was sitting there waiting to
be spent. And the amount was relatively constant. This would be money from the federal government
for research grants, or money from fees that got paid at the beginning of the semester, from which sala-
ries would progressively be paid. And the amount of this money was surprisingly large. For Berkeley it
was $600 million. So at any given time, there was $600 million on deposit, every penny of which was
designated for something. So it wasn't as though this was $600 million that by itself could be used for
financial aid since the entire amount was already budgeted to be spent. But these funds were spent over
time, and the total got replenished continuously. This was called “the float.” It's money that was just sit-
ting there at the present time but would be spent for prescribed purposes.

Chancellor Birgeneau said the philosophy of the UC System, imposed from above, was to invest these
funds very conservatively, by putting it in a bank, yielding very low interest, 4%, typically 5%. So with
Vice Chancellor Brostrom coming to Cal, with more financial acumen, they're now advocating that since
this money didn't vary much, they‟d invest it more aggressively and generate a larger yield. One percent
of $600 million was $6 million. So they could easily, if they got a yield of several percent more, generate
$10-20 extra million a year, which was basically free money.

Chancellor Birgeneau said that since they've been developing these ideas, this extra money has been
“spent” ten times over. But the suggestion he was advocating for on this committee was that 20-25% of
Presentation by Chancellor Birgeneau (cont'd)                                                           -4-


this money, which was genuinely new money, coming from simply better investments of their cash flow,
be dedicated that to needs-based financial aid for poor students.

Chancellor Birgeneau said the third option was something a few of them have heard before, and finally
making some progress. This idea came from his experience as President of the University of Toronto.
The financial aid structure in Ontario was essentially identical to that in California. And the make-up of
the student population was similar, although there were fewer poor students, with about 20% of students
were from poor backgrounds. At Berkeley that number was 33%. Berkeley had a big challenge. Inter-
estingly, at the time he was President at UC Toronto, the provincial government was far to the right of
Arnold Schwarzenegger. So even though Canada was basically a socialist country, the socialists basi-
cally held power for an extraordinary length of time but had a disaster in terms of its budget. There was a
strong backlash and a very far-right government was elected, which was unusual in Canada. But the
interesting feature was that these conservatives, who generally were not very nice to the University,
mostly came from hardscrabble backgrounds, and remembered where they had come from. So they pro-
posed a new, innovative program, from a conservative government, not from the University or from the
students.

The program the government proposed was that if someone well-to-do would donate $10,000, let‟s say,
to support poor students, then the government would match it. They'd create new money that they'd give
to the University permanently as an endowment. Canada was not a very philanthropic country relative to
the United States. Many of them may not realize it, but the United States was the most philanthropic
culture on earth, by far, compared to any other country. There was no comparison in terms of generosity
of people in the US, although it might not seem like that at times. Canada was second in the world in
philanthropy; and Canadians give 40% of what Americans gave to charity.

But it turned out, however, that people loved the idea that the government would match their donations.
People who would not have given a penny were giving large amounts of money to support poor students,
if the government was going to match it. So with this mechanism and others, the University of Toronto
actually raised half a billion dollars, which was completely and totally dedicated to financial aid for poor
students. That actually solved the problem sufficiently so that self-help levels, which was $7,000, got
locked in at $7,000, because there was a lot of new money coming in.

So having had this experience, and with it having been very successful, Chancellor Birgeneau said he
spent a lot of time in Sacramento trying to talk to people in the Assembly and the Senate about an add-on
to the budget for this, a fund dedicated to poor students in the State of California. This would just be for
the UC System, not the Cal State System or community colleges, for this to be successful. This was a
seven-year plan, and the government, over the next seven years, would have to put up $1 billion, with the
University to raise $1 billion privately, through philanthropy. That would then provide for an endow-
ment. Some of it would be for the System, and some would be for individual campuses, $2 billion. That
would generate $100 million in financial aid for poor students. And by having good investment policies,
that would go up continuously, and would go up more rapidly than the cost of attending Berkeley. That
was part of the goal of the plan. So that was idea number three.

Chancellor Birgeneau said that last year he had talked State Assembly Speaker Núñez into actually start-
ing a program, and Speaker Núñez put $25 million into the budget for that purpose. If people haven't
heard about this, as it turned out, the other campuses didn't support it, for complicated reasons, but mostly
because Berkeley was the only campus that gives financial aid to undergraduates, and gives that its high-
est priority, more of a priority than at other campuses. So it fell off the table, unfortunately.
Presentation by Chancellor Birgeneau (cont'd)                                                            -5-


Chancellor Birgeneau said that at the Council of Chancellors meeting two meetings ago he got unani-
mous endorsement from all of the other campuses that this would be high priority for every campus this
year and going forward. So he was hopeful about this as a possible solution.

Chancellor Birgeneau said there were other ideas, but none that he could think of that were politically
realistic and that would work. This matching program had an advantage in that Republicans liked it
because they like public and private partnerships, and Democrats liked it because it helped poor people,
and was social welfare, social justice policy. So the response he‟s gotten has been bipartisan. But he has
not yet gotten the response they need from the Governor and his staff because this was expensive. It
would require an add-on to the UC budget of $150 million a year for the next seven years, a pretty big
commitment. But the fact was, this actually had to get solved. If it didn't get solved, then it was going to
become progressively more difficult for people from poor backgrounds to attend Berkeley.

Chancellor Birgeneau said that was his pitch. He‟d be really interested in their responses, and in any
ideas they might have.

Ms. Allbright said they had about seven minutes for questions and she‟d take questions from elected offi-
cials only. She called for any questions.

Mr. Rhoads said the Chancellor mentioned talking to the Senate and Assembly about the last plan, but
he‟d assume the other two proposals were those bodies‟ issues. Chancellor Birgeneau said that was cor-
rect, and they were internal. He thought the Regents would have to agree. But the current Chair of the
Regents was really committed to student access. The Chair asked the President‟s office to set up this
committee and Chancellor Birgeneau said the Chair asked him to chair the Committee, because he‟s
spent a lot of time thinking about these issues. So the Chair was committed, and Chancellor Birgeneau
said he thought the Regents would support the increase in the percentage of the set aside. But it was dis-
appointing when doing the arithmetic because this doesn't generate enough money to have a big effect on
student loans. As for the first proposal, he could ask Mr. Brostrom to talk about that. He was working on
that, and it was an internal decision, the percentage of those new funds they'd devote to financial aid.

Mr. Brostrom said they were actually moving in the direction of the change to investments starting
December 1. It will take probably two or three years to fully phase in, and at that point they should be
getting 2.5-3% more. Chancellor Birgeneau said that would be $18 million if it was 3%, in new money.
But not all of that would go to financial aid. However, they'll make sure some of it was put towards
financial aid. The real aid, i.e. the matching program, was the only idea they had that looked like it could
generate enough money to really have a big enough effect.

Ms. Patel asked how much influence the committee he chaired had on the Governor and the Assembly, to
influence. Chancellor Birgeneau said the only real political person on the committee was actually him-
self. It was mostly made up of people who were experts on financial aid from the different campuses. So
the influence would have to come through the Regents and then through University Government Rela-
tions, working sort of one by one. He had four Assembly people for dinner at the house two weeks ago
and went through this with them. They‟re all new and all vowed they'd support it. Actually, one just
called him back about an hour ago. It was one thing to support it and another thing to actually vote for
the budget, and actually have that money appear in the budget.

Mr. Wu asked how the University was going to decide how to invest the money, and perhaps Vice Chan-
cellor Brostrom could answer. Mr. Brostrom said they invest it short-term at the OP. There was a total
Presentation by Chancellor Birgeneau (cont'd)                                                          -6-


of $8 billion. The OP had a Chief Investment Officer who has been looking at a number of alternatives.
One thing he would slightly modify what the Chancellor said was that they currently invest primarily for
liquidity, so it wasn't as though they were moving into riskier investments. In fact, the candidate portfo-
lio that has been identified actually had lower volatility than the current portfolio the University had.
What they invest for now was to be able to, if UC wanted all $8 billion, to be able to get it out within a
matter of days. Frankly, the UC System didn't need that much. So they're moving it further out on the
yield curve, longer-term investments, and also into some corporate bonds and other investments.

Chancellor Birgeneau said that this was one of the mixed assets that has been part of the system, for tax
purposes, but it also constrained them. Of that $8 billion, $600 million was associated with Berkeley. If
they controlled it, he would be prepared to be much more aggressive in how this money was invested, to
get a much larger differential in yield. Of course, they'd be taking a slight chance. But on average, it
would generate resources that would take them much further along in addressing this problem.

Chancellor Birgeneau said he also should have mentioned that the focus of the committee has been
largely on the most disadvantaged students. But he was sure this applied to a number of students there.
It was pretty shocking that he hasn't even understood himself until chairing this committee that once a
family got up to about $80,000, that financial aid ramped rapidly down towards $0. So as costs went up
rapidly, middle class families were very challenged as well. So that was also an issue that they had to
figure out how to address. Currently the focus was primarily on people from really poor backgrounds, to
make sure they had access.

Ms. Allbright said they had time for one more short question.

Ms. Winston asked if there's been a decrease in the number of poor students attending Berkeley due to
increases in student fees, and also, asked if the money they were talking about would be free money for
students, like grants and scholarships. Chancellor Birgeneau said last year, a year ago, there was no
increase in fees, and that increased the debt burden to students. So not increasing fees made it worse for
poor students. That‟s because the one-third set aside more than offset the increase in fees. This was a
standard misunderstanding. People think that fees and debt burden were connected, but they were actu-
ally connected inversely. So the worst thing for poor students at that time would be to freeze fees,
because that would decrease the financial aid available to them. That‟s what actually happened a year
ago. Fees were frozen and that really hurt poor students. He realized that was counter-intuitive. They
have not seen any decrease in the number of students from poor families. But if they were to have a
rapid increase, and the self-help level were to go up, in five years, to $12,500 a year, he‟d predict that
would really inhibit students from poor backgrounds.

Ms. Allbright said it was time for them to end the presentation. She would like to thank Chancellor
Birgeneau for attending the meeting. (Applause)


Roll call was taken for attendance.
Presentation by Chancellor Birgeneau (cont'd)                                                          -7-
Guest Announcements


MEMBERS LEGALLY PRESENT:

       Rebecca Coleman                      Christian Osmeña                     Gabe Weiner
       Danielle Duong                       Dave Rhoads                          Roxanne Winston
       Corey Jackson                        Maurice Seaty                        Chris Wong
       Philip Kim                           Nadir Shams                          Albert Wu
       Jason Louie                          Grace Shen

MEMBERS PRESENT:

       Chad Kunert                          Lisa Patel                           Gabriela Ureña
       Winnie Kuo                           Scott Silver

MEMBERS ABSENT:

       Daniel Galeon

Ms. Allbright noted that Sen. Kuo‟s absence was excused.

Ms. Allbright said the Chair would entertain a motion for a two-minute recess. It was so moved and sec-
onded by Mr. Jackson and Ms. Winston and passed with no objection. This meeting was recessed.

Back in session, Mr. Rhoads moved to go into Guest Announcements. The motion was seconded by Mr.
Seaty and passed with no objection.


GUEST ANNOUNCEMENTS


Ms. Allbright said the first Guest Announcement was from Duane DeWitt, regarding student fee
increases. Mr. DeWitt said he was a graduate student there in the Department of City Planning. He
wanted to thank Senators for all the hard work they do. He knew it was difficult being elected officials
while at the same time being students. It was fortuitous he attended that evening as didn't expect the
Chancellor to be there, and didn't expect the Chancellor to talk about the difficulties of poor students
from a disadvantaged background. The Chancellor mentioned “hardscrabble,” and Mr. DeWitt said that
was pretty much what he was “hardscrabble.” He came to Cal late in life, and when he was Senators‟
age, he was a soldier. After he got out he messed around a bunch and didn't get to Cal as an undergradu-
ate until about 2000. He did undergraduate work there and now he was finishing up graduate school.
The only way he could do it was because this school paid attention to the fact that that financially disad-
vantaged people needed some assistance.

Mr. DeWitt said that as elected officials, the Senate could help to get more of that assistance. He didn't
think they understood just how much strength they could exert in this discussion. He wanted to thank
them, before pointing out to them that he thought it was more important for them to work on student fees
than on international relations. He could appreciate that they've got a big picture, and he knew it was a
Guest Announcements -- Duane De Witt (cont'd)                                                           -8-


wide world, but he would really like for them to work on the issues there in California. Right now, they
had some serious problems happening with the economy, and there will be more difficulties for people of
disadvantaged backgrounds.

Mr. DeWitt said he lived in South Berkeley, and it was harder for a kid from South Berkeley to get to Cal
than it was for a rich kid from another country. And they have plenty of rich kids from other countries
here. That gave the school the diversity that it needed, he felt. But he would really like to see a whole
bunch more Californians who were from financially disadvantaged backgrounds get into this University,
which was a land-grant school for Californians. It was about California and they should help out Cali-
fornians. There was nothing wrong with that. Senators, as elected officials, could take that message and
help the Chancellor. The Chancellor just gave them the opening that could make really good things hap-
pen, not just for people at the school at that time, but for the future as well. As elected officials, they
should contact other elected officials, their State Assemblywoman, their State Senators, and tell them
students would like to help make sure there was financing for disadvantaged students who wanted to
come there in the future.

Mr. DeWitt said he was leaving, and he‟d get to graduate. He was deeply in debt, but that was the nature
of the gamble. He took it on and he‟ll try and pay it back. What he was hoping was that the Senate
would spend more of its time, especially because they worry about how much time a person spoke, and
were very interested about time, trying to get more financing for those disadvantaged students at the
school there, and spend their time by going out to Sacramento, by lobbying with the Chancellor and oth-
ers, and by doing their elected responsibility, if they will, representing students in the budget discussion,
to make sure that they got the best possible package. Every time the faculty asked for a raise, students‟
financial aid should also get increased.

Mr. DeWitt said he appreciated the time people spend and he definitely was very glad they've taken on
this burden of being elected officials. He wished all the best to them in the future. Ms. Allbright said she
would like to thank Mr. DeWitt. Ms. Winston moved to extend speaking time by two minutes. The
motion was seconded by Mr. Jackson and passed with no objection.

Ms. Winston asked if he had any specific campaigns he was putting on, or if he was just recommending
that they go to Sacramento and lobby. Mr. DeWitt said the fees have increased every year he‟s been
there. Currently, the budget may not be good for the State. Even in times of great prosperity, they
weren't prudent and didn't set aside the money to make sure there wouldn't be fee increases. So now, in
times of difficulty, people need to be a lot more prudent and patient. The biggest investment they could
make was in the 18-year-olds who will be there in the future. So Mr. DeWitt said he would say that they
should give their support to any initiative the Chancellor was trying to work on, as long as it was fair.
They had to be careful whenever anybody said “free money,” and had to think about it, and look for the
string that had to be there somewhere.

Mr. DeWitt said he just hoped they understand they're good folks doing a good job. They've got an
opportunity to help in the future, and kind of pay forward. With that in mind, each of them had their own
interests, and something wouldn't attract them unless it interested them personally; so he would suggest
working on the thing that they thought was fun and helpful, and then go with it.

If he could just use up his last bit of time with a comment, Mr. DeWitt said they'd be surprised how much
influence they'd have by just starting to bug their own Assemblywoman in whatever town they were
Guest Announcements -- Duane De Witt (cont'd)                                                              -9-
                    -- Vice Chancellor Brostrom


from. Just start there, with their own elected officials. They should start letting those representatives
know who they were and how they‟d be the State‟s future. Students were looking to make a better State,
and representatives will reach out to them too, because politicians, which Senators haven't become yet,
thank goodness, were always looking at how to get re-elected, and the things they've got to do in order
for that to happen. And if a student was a good person working on a positive thing, politicians will want
to lead their parade. Mr. DeWitt asked if they heard the story about starting a parade only have a politi-
cian lead it. And the other one was “planning is politics.” So it's all about getting in there, starting to talk
with them, and making good things happen.

Mr. DeWitt said he has asked the Chancellor to do a grad student forum at the College of Environmental
Design about diversity, because they don't have any black students up there, hardly, and they only had
one or two black instructors. And yet, the neighborhoods they're trying to deal with are where black
folks lived. Ms. Allbright said speaking time had expired. Mr. DeWitt said he would like to thank them
so much for their time. Once again, he appreciated their hard work. He wanted to wish them good luck
with whatever they did.



Vice Chancellor Brostrom said he wanted to express his appreciation for the Senate Resolution that they
passed in support of the High Performance project. He knew they spent a lot of time on it in careful
deliberation, and the campus really appreciated it. He wanted to give the Senate a brief update on where
they stood.

Mr. Brostrom said that as they probably knew, the campus was waiting for Judge Miller‟s ruling on the
case. The campus was fairly confident that it will prevail, but obviously, they're committed to abide by
the law, regardless of the outcome. Unfortunately, it was clear that the people sitting in the trees have not
expressed a reciprocal commitment and have even ignored the injunction that Judge Miller ruled against
them. Regardless of the outcome, the campus will move to end the illegal occupation of the trees after
the court has ruled. It was an increasingly dangerous and unhealthy situation, both in terms of public
safety, but also public health. And frankly, it was a very poor use of campus resources when they start to
tally how much they have expended on this situation.

Mr. Brostrom said their overarching goal in all of this, of course, will be to achieve this with a minimum
of injury, both to police officers, to people in the trees, and to all the people involved in the situation.
Mr. Brostrom said he just wanted to update the Senate on that, and if people had any questions on the
matter, he‟d be happy to entertain them.

Mr. Weiner asked what he thought of the ASUC trying to get involved to ensure that this could be han-
dled in the best possible way, to try and get the tree sitters to peacefully leave the trees. Mr. Brostrom
said the campus would greatly appreciate that. He was personally meeting with several students from
Free Speech, Free Trees, in order to try and adjudicate a peaceful resolution. He was meeting with them
again later that week. He thought anything the Senate could do to influence them and have this end as
peacefully as possible would be in the best interests of everybody involved.

Mr. Rhoads asked if he knew how many students were actually in the trees. Mr. Brostrom said that to his
knowledge, he didn't think there were any students in the trees. There were students who were support-
ing them, and at this meeting, there were five of them.
Guest Announcements -- Vice Chancellor Brostrom (cont'd)                                                   - 10 -


Ms. Ureña said that when he said he wanted to get the tree sitters down with “minimum injury,” she
asked what process would be taken. Mr. Brostrom said that was a good question. A lot of it would be
very fluid, and they'll have to decide as they go, based on the response of the people in the trees. As
Senators probably knew, the campus has erected a double fence in order to keep people out and bring
people down. As soon as the judge rules, they‟ll close that off and bring in police officers, and hopefully
people will come down peacefully. Otherwise there were a number of techniques. Frankly, the campus
didn't know what will have to be used to get people down from the trees. Ms. Allbright said speaking
time had expired. Mr. Jackson moved to extend by five minutes. The motion was seconded by Ms.
Winston and passed with no objection.

Mr. Silver asked if there was a timeline for the judgment coming out, and any deadline, and after that,
what timeline they had moving forward. He asked if they were taking about this being cleared up by the
summer. Mr. Brostrom said the judge had 90 days to rule, from the end of the court date, the end of
October. So she had until the end of January. The campus anticipated that she‟ll rule prior to that. In
fact, they were anticipating that she would have ruled by this time. She‟s told all sides that she‟ll give
48-hours notice, recognizing how volatile the situation was. But assuming that the campus prevailed,
they would clear the site and start construction immediately, and not wait until the summer.

Mr. Silver asked what would happen with an appeals process, and with the injunction continuing. Mr.
Brostrom said the only thing that could stop them from going forward with construction was for the judge
to have given an injunction against construction when she took the case on. Otherwise, they could have
moved forward, since this was a CEQA case. All that did was delay the construction. The campus
assumed that in the event of an appeal, that injunction would not hold. An appeal was likely, probably
not from the City, but from the other two parties.

Mr. Osmeña asked what the cost to the University has been so far with this whole process. Mr. Brostrom
said that was a good question, and the campus was in the process of tallying it. He would say that the
cost, from a legal aspect, just for the tree sitters, the police, and the additional fencing, was close to half a
million dollars. The additional cost in terms of construction was really hard to gauge. They've been
seeing construction inflation of about 1% a month. That has slowed down somewhat, because it was
delayed a year, but even if it were 5-6%, that would mean an additional $5-6 million in costs for the pro-
ject itself.

Ms. Patel asked what process was used to put up the second fence, and if the ASUC were to play a bigger
part in trying to have the tree sitters come down, if they'd be informed before other techniques were used,
or how they would be part of the process. Mr. Brostrom said the process with the fencing was really a
decision by Public Safety and the police. A lot was in response to a late-night incident, where 30 or 40
people went up and tried to storm the fence. As a result, it was decided to put up a second fence. It was
also decided to put up barbed wire, which frankly, they had said they wouldn't use. But after that inci-
dent, the campus deemed that it was necessary for their own safety and the safety of the people there.
Mr. Brostrom said he would inform the ASUC of anything public. But sometimes the Police Chief will
have to do things. She‟ll often let him know ahead of time.

Mr. Seaty said that if and when the tree sitters were removed from the trees, he asked if the University
will have a conversation or discussion with the tree sitters on possible compromises, or coming to a deci-
sion about whether the Student Athlete Center could be placed by the trees or at a different location. Mr.
Brostrom said they've been having those conversations throughout. The people in the trees were not
Guest Announcements -- Vice Chancellor Brostrom (cont'd)                                            - 11 -


interested in that kind of dialogue. And frankly, through their action, have given up any right to be part
of that dialogue. But the campus has had that conversation and has had ongoing discussion with students,
community members, and people in the Panoramic Hill Association. He thought the campus has done a
very strong job of showing why this was the best site, given all the things that the campus was consider-
ing. Frankly, if the tree sitters wanted to come down at that time, before this was adjudicated, he would
be happy for that to happen.

Mr. Seaty said that he mentioned students, and asked if there were particular groups of students involved
in this discussion, or if it was just student athletes. Mr. Brostrom said he most recently had a meeting
with a group called Free Speech, Free Trees, which had some association with the people in the trees. In
fact, one of person in the group had been arrested. Mr. Brostrom said he‟s been meeting with them peri-
odically. Ms. Allbright said that speaking time had expired. Ms. Coleman moved to extend by two min-
utes. The motion was seconded by Mr. Wong and passed with no objection.

Ms. Coleman asked if the boundary of the most recent fence coincided with the boundary for construc-
tion of the Student Athlete Center. Mr. Brostrom said it didn't. It was just placed there by the police,
when they decided what would be needed to stage taking eventual action to secure the construction site.
The construction site itself would actually extend further north and south than the Stadium, and would
not extend down to Gayley Road, as it now did. Ms. Coleman asked about the east part of the site. Mr.
Brostrom asked if she was referring to the Stadium itself. Ms. Coleman asked if the fence was not part of
the construction. Mr. Brostrom said the current fence was not part of the construction site. The con-
struction site was obviously within it, but would extend north and south. They'll have to put up another
fence for construction.

Mr. Brostrom said he would like to thank the Senate. He would appreciate any efforts the ASUC could
do. The campus obviously wanted to do this in the most peaceful way possible. So anything the ASUC
Senate could do would be greatly appreciated. He wanted to thank them very much.


Mr. Shams moved to extend time for Guest Announcements by two minutes. The motion was seconded
by Mr. Seaty and passed with no objection.


Sally introduced herself and said she was part of the Nikkei Student Union, the Japanese-American cul-
tural interest club, and she was there to tell the Senate about the club‟s annual Culture Show that was
coming up on Sunday. She had some fliers to distribute.

To give the Senate some background on the Nikkei Student Union, they're a relatively new organization.
This was the NSU‟s fifth year, and this was their Fifth Annual Culture Show. So in relation to other
Culture Shows, they were pretty new. They started off pretty small, off-campus, and then moved into
155 Dwinelle, and then to Zellerbach Playhouse, and this year they're in Wheeler. They went from an
audience of 50 people to 700 for this year. Their club has grown as well. Their Culture Show was just a
way of showing their presence on campus and in the greater community. They're doing hip-hop, cultural
and traditional dances, and will also doing various monologues. Cal Taiko will perform and also people
from other dance groups. A lot of people involved in the production were also involved with other cul-
tural groups on campus. So even within their members of NSU, there were a lot of different people from
diverse backgrounds involved in the production. Hopefully, Senators could make it. Tickets were from
Guest Announcements -- Vice Chancellor Brostrom (cont'd)                                          - 12 -
Approval of the Minutes
New Business


$5-10, on a sliding scale. They're tabling on Sproul every day that week from 10:00 to 2:00. People
could stop by a table to buy tickets. She wouldn't recommend waiting until the day of the performance to
buy tickets because they might sell out. She hoped they could all make it.


APPROVAL OF THE MINUTES


Ms. Allbright called for any corrections to the minutes from the November 14 meeting. Seeing none, Ms.
Allbright said the minutes were approved. THE MINUTES FROM THE NOVEMBER 14, 2007 MEET-
ING WERE APPROVED WITH NO OBJECTION.


NEW BUSINESS


Ms. Allbright referred the following bills to committee:

SB 112, In Support of Phi Delta Epsilon (PhiDE) at Berkeley, to the Finance Committee
SB 113, In Support of the Count Me In! Campaign, to the Finance Committee
SB 114, In Support of the Southeast Asian Student Coalition‟s Intercollegiate Summit: (re) Evaluating
        and (re) Acting to Our “Problems,” to the Finance Committee
SB 115, To Amend SB 54, In Support of Turkic Students Association at Berkeley (TSAB), to the Finance
        Committee
SB 116, In Support of few Bangladesh Cyclone Relief, to the Finance Committee
SB 117, In Support of Student Participation in Faculty Hiring Committees, to the University and External
        Affairs Committee
SB 118, In Support of the Movement Showcase, to the Finance Committee
SB 119, In Support of the December Convocation Relocation, to the University and External Affairs
        Committee
SB 120, In Support of the Californians Student Group as they Transition to ASUC Sponsorship, to the
        Finance Committee and the Constitutional and Procedural Review Committee
SB 121, In Support of Lettuce Turnip the Beets, to the Finance Committee
SB 122, Urging the Metropolitan Transportation Commission to Provide Adequate Funding to AC Transit
        In Order to Promote Environmental Justice and Combat Global Warming, to the University and
        External Affairs Committee
SB 123, In Support of the Cal East Bay Community Scholarship Fund (Cal EBCSF), to the Finance
        Committee
SB 124, In Support of Tikvah: Students for Israel (SFI), to the Finance Committee
New Business (cont'd)                                                                                  - 13 -
Approval of the Agenda
Report from the Chancellor's Designee


SB 125, In Support of UC Education Abroad Programs (UC EAP) to the Philippines and Israel, to the
        University and External Affairs Committee
SB 126, In Support of Bears Breaking Boundaries, to the Finance Committee
SB 127, In Support of the American Medical Student Association, to the Finance Committee

Ms. Allbright called for any changes to New Business, and seeing none, said New Business was
approved.


APPROVAL OF THE AGENDA (Dec. 5)


Ms. Allbright called for any changes to the agenda for next week. Ms. Coleman said that under Repre-
sentative to the ASUC Reports, the “University Students Cooperative Association” should be the
“Berkeley Student Cooperative.” Ms. Allbright said she would like to thank Ms. Coleman for that note
and would apologize for the error. Ms. Allbright called for any other corrections or changes to the
agenda, and seeing none, said the agenda was approved. THE AGENDA FOR THE DECEMBER 5
MEETING WAS APPROVED WITH NO OBJECTION.


REPORTS FROM REPRESENTATIVES TO THE ASUC


Report from the Chancellor‟s Designee


Dean Poullard said he had a report to distribute. He first wanted to bring to their attention, in case people
weren't aware, there was a fire that occurred at 2438 Warren, which used to be the OZT fraternity house.
It was an electrical fire. Forty students lived in that house and have been displaced. The campus was
working really hard to find accommodations for those students. They just put a call into Mr. Permaul to
find out if the ASUC had any kind of emergency funding they could be offered to these students. But to
date, that‟s not how the ASUC was set up. Mr. Poullard said the campus will meet with these students on
Thursday night at 8 o'clock to give them all the information about what kinds of grants and loans were
available to them if they needed assistance, such as with purchasing things. Luckily, only one student
had everything destroyed, and everyone else had a little bit of water damage. But they were able to go
and secure their possessions with friends and family. Mr. Poullard said they have now placed 17 students
in temporary assignments within the residence halls. So he thought they were at that point where they've
sort of gotten them settled.

Mr. Poullard said he thought it would be a really good idea, if he could, to forward a list of the names to
Ms. Allbright and Mr. Nguyen and perhaps ask them to send a letter out on behalf of the ASUC to these
students, letting them know they were thinking about them, especially during this time of high anxiety,
getting ready for finals, etc. Mr. Poullard said the campus was very happy that no one was hurt, because
Report from the Chancellor's Designee (cont'd)                                                         - 14 -


only four people were there when the fire actually began. But students who lived there were struggling
with the anxiety of the fire, plus all the drama as well as trying to finish their exams. So if Senators knew
of these students, Mr. Poullard said he thought it would be really good for them to reach out to their con-
stituents and ask if there was any way to support them during this difficult time.

Mr. Poullard said he had a phenomenal meeting that day about dance policy with Mr. Nguyen, Mr.
Krishnamurthy, Oscar, who was part of Mr. Nguyen‟s office, and two people from the AAA student
organization. It was a really good meeting and they sort of worked through some of the critical issues
affecting the ability to host good dances on campus. They sort of delineated four main areas, including
access to dances, costs associated with security, and the ridiculous and very long, drawn out process of
having to do the paperwork. Those were things that they'll work on over the course of the Spring
Semester. Mr. Poullard said he was very proud of student participation and their input. It was very con-
structive, and they'll move forward.

Lastly, Mr. Poullard said he sent Senators an e-mail at around 5:30 that day about a new course being
offered through the Office of Student Development and Campus Life and Leadership, entitled “Inclusive
Leadership for a Multicultural World.” The class will be given that spring, 2008, on Wednesday, 3:00 to
5:00, pass/not pass, for 2 units. Mr. Poullard said he sent the entire syllabus to Senators. Just to go over
a little bit about what the course will cover, it will really look at increasing awareness of self and mem-
bers of various social groups to learn more about one‟s own cultures, history, and experiences and to
explore the common knowledge and differences across boundaries of social groups, as well as to develop
effective leadership skills, increase communication competence, resolution skills, identify action to create
a socially just community, understand negative effects, and apply inclusive practices to individual and
group leadership. Senators could take part in this course and get the word out to their constituencies.
Class organizers really wanted as part of this course a very broad cross-section across racial perspectives,
gender perspectives, philosophic perspectives, and gender and political perspectives, in order to have a
really fruitful dialogue. The class will happen during the spring, and Mr. Poullard said he would encour-
age Senators to help him to help the staff to get this course advertised.

Mr. Poullard said that since there was a question the last time he was there about Cal Secrets, he would
yield time to Rachel Luna to talk about that. Ms. Luna said she had an update on Post Secrets. They had
about 25 boxes out during October to collect people‟s secrets. They have since scaled back some of
those. They're getting a lot of responses and they still have boxes up in the res halls and at CLL offices
for people who want to submit something. They'll leave them up until the end of the semester. Over
Winter Break they'll continue to scan them and get them up on the CLL Web site.

Mr. Poullard called for any questions.

Ms. Winston asked about the course, Inclusive Leadership for a Multicultural World, and asked if he was
familiar with a similar class, Dave Stark‟s “From All Perspectives” class, and asked if there was any
overlap. Mr. Poullard said Dave Stark‟s class was only about issues of identity and racial ethnicity.
Inclusive Leadership was a take-off on a class that was done last year in connection with Office of Stu-
dent Development, but they expanded it. One thing they may know about Dave Stark‟s class was that
there were always more folks who wanted to be in the class than could be accommodated. So it was a
question of how they could provide more opportunities in order to have fruitful dialogue.

Mr. Silver asked about the fire, and if there was another fraternity there. Mr. Poullard said it was an old
ZPT house, and became a regular apartment house. He had several meetings with the City and had met
Report from the Chancellor's Designee (cont'd)                                                        - 15 -


on Friday with City officials and the American Red Cross. One issue was that this building was only
zoned for 17 rooms, and had 28 rooms. It's uncertain whether or not the electrical fire was caused by
poor wiring or from putting up walls. Several rooms in the facility had a square footage that was too
small to be a room, and shouldn't have been used for that. Also, in the walk-through by the City, they
discovered that rooms in the basement lots of mold. This was really in some ways a very poorly man-
aged building in terms of its safety. He thought it was really inexpensive for students to live there, but
that was not always the best case. He thought that by the this was all over, the building would have seri-
ous renovations done to it.

Mr. Poullard said one of the other big issue was with how to help these students, starting on Thursday, to
identify other places to live during the spring, since the building could not be occupied for at least six
weeks, going well into the beginning of the spring term.

Mr. Shams asked Mr. Poullard what his thoughts were about what the Chancellor had to say. Mr.
Poullard said he‟s talked to the Senate before about the whole notion of access for low-income students.
CLL was a part of that campaign as well, for Student Affairs. He believed he told the Senate last week or
the week before that the campus was in a $3.3 billion campaign, and the vast majority of that money
being raised was for scholarships. This was about how they make the campus accessible from an eco-
nomic standpoint. The Chancellor was very much committed to that, and there were a number of people
on campus also committed to these goals. Mr. Poullard said he was very glad the Chancellor was taking
the helm and was being very steadfast. Mr. Poullard said he thought it's taken a long time to convince
others, particularly in the State Legislature, to move in this direction, because it will be costly. It will
need a reprioritization of what they value in the State, and how high up the food chain education was in
the State. This campaign would allow students to have a better experience and would help education to
be affordable.

Ms. Ureña asked if a student could still enroll in the Inclusive Leadership course if they've already taken
Dave Stark‟s course. Mr. Poullard said most definitely they could. He thought the more opportunities
there were for students to be engaged in dialogue that will continue to enhance their skills and under-
standing, the better. He thought that when they see the syllabus and read it, and if they read Mr. Stark‟s
syllabus, they'd see some big differences. Some things would be very similar and some would look very
different.

Mr. Shams said that when the Chancellor was speaking, he thought a very important point he made,
which tied into the point Mr. Poullard made about the fire and the housing situation, the cost of living in
Berkeley. This was something they‟ve talked about previously. He asked what was being done to attack
the cost of living there, particularly because he felt it was a major focus that was kind of being over-
looked by the campus, the housing supply, so students wouldn't have to live in such difficult conditions
was found at the Warring building. They have to pay increasing costs because the price of living in this
area was going up. Mr. Poullard said that was actually what his office was doing specifically with the
City of Berkeley. The City had a Housing Board, a controlling unit that kind of examined and looked at
how these houses were rated. He thought it was inevitable for housing costs to increase, and on average,
rent went up between 3-4% a year. That was kind of the national average. Of course, that average was
increased in Berkeley, or California, because rents were already high. So the issue becomes not really
having control over a landlord‟s decision as to how much they'll charge a student, and landlords will
charge what the market will bear. It's not like there was rent control, like there was in San Francisco
neighborhoods, where people pay what their rent was for umpteen years. So if they know these increases
Report from the Chancellor's Designee (cont'd)                                                         - 16 -
Report from the Graduate Assembly President


were going to happen, the issue became how to make sure they have the resources to give to students to
adjust for, or account for, those increases. For example, students affected by this fire were paying about
$600 a month for rent, which he thought was still too high for that poor living condition. But when they
live on campus, it will cost about $780 to live in the residence halls from now until December 21. Luck-
ily, the City of Berkeley had a contingency fund that will replace the difference between what these stu-
dents were paying and what they'll have to pay to live in the res halls. But not everyone had access to
those resources for emergencies. So the issue was how to raise additional revenue so that whatever the
cost was to students, those costs were met, including books, housing, transportation, food, and tuition.
Ms. Allbright said speaking time had expired. She wanted to thank Mr. Poullard for his report.


Report from the Graduate Assembly President


Mr. Daniels said it was good to see them all. He hoped they had a very nice Thanksgiving, whether they
were in Berkeley, or at home, or visiting friends and family.

Mr. Daniels said he had good news on the Judicial Council front. Just to back check a little, he had
brought the name of Kiesha Oliver to the Senate a little while ago. It turned out that he couldn't officially
nominate her because the time since the previous grad student resigned from the J-Council was over the
limit for him to make a nomination; so a Senator had to do that. And he believed one of them will do so
that evening. Sikina Jinnah, who was the only remaining grad student on the J-Council, resigned. So in
her place, Mr. Daniels said he would like to nominate Ailien Tran, a graduate student in Public Policy.
Mr. Daniels said he knew Ms. Tran personally and she was awesome.

Mr. Daniels said that going back to the question that was asked of him a few weeks ago, Ms. Tran was
very smart and very thoughtful, and she went to the Public Policy School, so she was very analytical in
her approach. But she did not know a whole lot about the ASUC. She will certainly do her homework in
preparing for the position, but she will not be as knowledgeable as a typical undergrad about how the
Judicial Council worked. So Mr. Daniels said he would implore the Senate, in making sure they find her
suitable, if they were comfortable with this, to focus on her analytic qualities and on her thoughtfulness,
rather than her fundamental knowledge about the ASUC, or how many Senators there were, and things
like that. She will do the homework and write good, thoughtful opinions; and he could guarantee that.
But she may not have the baseline knowledge Senators might expect candidates to have.

Mr. Daniels said there was one other student who has expressed interest in the Judicial Council, and Mr.
Daniels said he was hoping that he‟d have responded with a yes or no that evening; but unfortunately he
has not. Hopefully, by next week, Mr. Daniels said he‟ll have a positive response for the Senate. But if
Kiesha Oliver worked out, and if Ms. Tran worked out, and if this other gentleman works out, then that
would be three graduate student J-Council members, and that would make the Judicial Council full. Mr.
Daniels said that was the good news.

Mr. Daniels said there will be a Delegate Assembly meeting next Thursday, December 6. He would
encourage Senators to come. The question about rents certainly applied to graduate students, since they
live off-campus a lot.
Report from the Graduate Assembly President (cont'd)                                                  - 17 -


Mr. Daniels said he‟d give an update of Albany Village and on policy that was moving forward. Albany
Village had student families, a lot of graduate students and some undergraduates. Single parents or inter-
national students with spouses had a single income. Spouse couldn't officially work because of visa
issues, since a spouse couldn't work if their spouse was in the country on a student visa. That was against
the law. So all these people were either single-parent student families or international student families
whose spouses couldn't work. So there's a single income, and for that matter, it's a single graduate stu-
dent income, trying to support the cost of housing.

Mr. Daniels said the housing at Albany Village was rebuilt because it was in such a dilapidated condition.
But that meant the rent was increased, because the renovation had to be paid for. The GA has been
working with the Graduate Division and the Chancellor to use some of the proceeds of that land to subsi-
dize or to offer scholarships to those student families most in need. They're hoping to use this as a model
for other campus-based housing. This wouldn't apply to off-campus housing, but it might apply to cam-
pus-based housing such as Albany Village or Smyth-Fernwald, although that was being torn down in a
few weeks.

Mr. Daniels said he didn't know if Senators were familiar with this, but there was a debate about density
going on at that time in the Downtown Area Plan Committee, with the final meeting on Thursday night.
This was a huge issue in Berkeley, and one he‟s talked about himself. More units meant an increase in
supply, which would lower costs. They live in a capitalist society, and that‟s how it would work. They
could debate whether that‟s good or bad, but since that‟s how it was at that moment, that‟s how it
worked. One of the ways to lower rents for students or for residents of Berkeley generally was to
increase the number of units available to rent. However, that meant higher density. Some residents of
Berkeley were uncomfortable with that, and for good reason. And some really supported it, and for good
reason. So if Senators were really interested in making this happen, he would encourage them to go to
the DAPAC meeting on Thursday night and would encourage them to talk to City Council members, talk
to the Planning Commission, and voice their thoughts about this, as a representative themselves, because
that‟s really the way in which rents will be affected.

Mr. Daniels said the other thing to note was that once the housing market crashes, everyone will flood
into rental housing. So the demand will go up and the cost will go up. So there were external conditions
outside what UC Berkeley could do and what the City of Berkeley could do to make rents cheap, or even
affordable, for both undergraduates and graduate students.

Mr. Daniels said he has been bothered over the past few months about setting up a GA Delegate/ASUC
mixer. Someone in the ASUC has been very polite about bothering him and asking him what was going
on with that, and Mr. Daniels said he has not done his part in coming back with a date. But he would like
to officially extend invitations to all of them, and to the Officers, for Thursday, in the middle of finals,
December 13, when the GA will host an end-of-the-year shindig at Anthony Hall from 4:00 to 6:00.
People who will be there include Delegates, GA Executives, Project Coordinators, and all GA staff. If
Senators were in the middle of stressing out for finals and they wanted to come and have a good time,
and eat some food and have some drinks, they were most welcome to come, and he would love to see
them all there, even if it was just to stop by and say hello. He would apologize for not having a separate
event, but the GA would love to see them all there. They also still want to do a specific event in the
spring. Mr. Daniels said he should warn Senators that there will be alcohol at the reception, and for those
who weren't 21, obviously they could not have any of that. The GA will be carding, and he would ask
them to put that out there, in case they wanted to prepare. Ms. Allbright said she would like to thank Mr.
Daniels for his report. Mr. Daniels said he would like to thank them.
Report from the ASUC Store Operations Board                                                             - 18 -


Report from the ASUC Store Operations Board


Mr. Permaul said he hoped they had as nice a Thanksgiving as he had, with curry and roti on one side and
turkey and stuffing on the other side. It was delicious.

Mr. Permaul said he wanted to report on the meeting with the Haas School of Business. They invited
representatives of Haas to meet with the Auxiliary to look at the possibility of bringing the School‟s
entrepreneurship program to the ASUC and to the Student Union. The School liked the location very
much and would like to expend its dollars on the campus, and at the ASUC, rather than on rental property
in the community. But after going through the preliminary walk through with them, the Auxiliary was
interested in finding out what the cost-benefit analysis would be for the students. The School was willing
to pay market rate for that space, equivalent to what the Auxiliary was currently getting from rentals of
that space. The analysis would determine how this might affect student access to the 4th floor if Haas
was to obtain that space. The Auxiliary will do an analysis, before bringing the matter to the SOB, and
he‟d share that information with the Senate as well. But it was a very positive meeting, and Haas was
very excited about bringing a new student constituency to the ASUC.

Regarding textbook adoption, Mr. Permaul said the Associate Director, Tom Spivey, met with the mem-
bers of the Academic Senate‟s Student Affairs Committee, at invitation of the Chair, of Mr. Permaul, and
met in his absence. Members of the faculty expressed concern about how the Follett adoption online
process worked. Mr. Permaul said he brought the Assistant Director of the Store to his office and they
went through the online adoption process step-by-step, and Mr. Permaul said he showed the AD what he
thought some of the problems were. The Associate Director was committed that Follett will make sure
that it was easier to process for faculty. But Mr. Permaul said he also found out that faculty have abso-
lutely no idea that the ASUC Bookstore brought money in to the students. They thought it was a corpo-
rate entity that was completely separate from the campus, and that it had no connection with students at
all. It was very clear that the faculty were not very well educated about the ASUC. Mr. Permaul said
that led him back to why they want to launch the newsletter, both for the students and for the Auxiliary.

Regarding Web development, Mr. Permaul said the design of the ASUC Auxiliary Web site was com-
plete, and they have a fully functional content management system that can now be decentralized to
users. The new Cal Lecture Notes Online Web site will be available by next semester. The new GA
Web site, the new Reservations Web site, the new Art Studio Web site, the new Blue & Gold Web site,
and the new ASUC Auxiliary Web site will be operational. Their next goal was to develop a “My
ASUC” for students, a Cal Lodge page, a student organization Web site, and the possibly of a Bear's Lair
food court Web site. These new sites, and improving the Art Studio, will involve some type of financial
operations, such as check requests or purchasing a commodity, and as such, they have the ability to do
online transactions. It will be a very robust Web site, and they hope a very active one.

Mr. Permaul said he attended the Student Union Directors meeting at UC Irvine two weeks ago and met
with his colleagues on Friday, November 14, to the 16th. He was given a tour of the new Student Union
at UC Irvine and he‟ll have pictures of that facility to share with the Senate. He also saw presentations
on the new Student Union developments at UC San Diego and UC Riverside. These three school have
new student unions. And UC Davis was in the process of planning its new Student Union. He has asked
for a video presentation of the Irvine and UC Riverside facilities in order to present that to the Senate, so
they could see what revitalized student unions could look like.
Report from the ASUC Store Operations Board (cont'd)                                                   - 19 -


Regarding communications and marketing, Mr. Permaul said he mentioned at his last meeting with the
Senate that the Auxiliary was going to launch an e-mail-based newsletter. They're having a meeting on
Thursday of representatives of ASUC government to talk about a collaboration for this newsletter. He
was delighted the ASUC has decided to join them and look at ways to bring this together.

Regarding progress of the technology work group, Mr. Permaul said he‟s mentioned to the Senate on
several occasions that there was a group assessing technology sales on campus. They met again and
decided that it would be prudent to look at several options for sales of computers to students, faculty,
staff, and the community. Currently, The Scholar's Workstation does not sell to the community. But the
City of Berkeley has specifically indicated to the Auxiliary that if a computer sales operation came to the
ASUC, it would be helpful to provide sales to the local community. One option being considered was to
bring in a third-party vendor to make a proposal to the SOB to sell all types of electronic hardware, com-
puters, software, peripherals, music, and game options. Another option would be for the Auxiliary to
exercise its clause in the Follett contract and have Follett provide computer sales, along with software,
peripherals, and supplies. Follett currently sells software, peripherals, and supplies to the tune of a half
million dollars at that time. The model of Follett having computer sales operation was the model used at
both Stanford and Sacramento State. Last year the margins on peripherals and software added $2.2 mil-
lion to the commissions of the Stanford store, and that would increase revenue by several hundreds of
thousands of dollars. So the Auxiliary was certainly looking at that as one of the options, and will meet
as a technology working group again.

Regarding final exams in Pauley Ballroom, Mr. Permaul said a proposal was advanced by Vice Chan-
cellor Brostrom for the campus to approve floor space in Haas Pavilion by having final exams elsewhere.
Pauley Ballroom was suggested, and the room was available during the exam period. Unfortunately, the
size of Pauley was too small for some exams, and the Registrar was currently looking to hold exams in
gyms of the RSF, much to the chagrin of Rec Sports because that would mean that recreational space
wouldn't be available. The Auxiliary was approaching the Registrar again with the idea of holding some
exams in Pauley. The location was convenient, it's by a 24-hour library, and it's close to things. This
would generate reservations revenue. If it came to pass, he‟d let the Senate know.

Mr. Permaul said he‟d mention a couple of things that came out of reports that evening. With regard to
the whole issue of raising financial aid dollars and student access to the University, he thought that one
thing they had to remember was the issue of the economy of the State of California. The State used to
give 60-70% of funds the University used. It was a completely different economy, and the State at that
time had a blue-collar economy and was heavily industrial. And on top of that, they had a demographic
that was very different in terms of its financial capacity. The State now had a very different demographic
than it had 40 years ago. And even if all the things that the Chancellor talked about came to pass, it was
still going to be a daunting task for the State of California to continue to generate enough revenue to sup-
port the community college system, the California State University System, and a ten-campus quality UC
System. He would ask them to think of any other public university system in the nation that had more
than one leading campus; and California has ten. So it's a daunting task. Mr. Permaul said he was
impressed with the Chancellor‟s desire to work on this issue.

Mr. Permaul said he wanted to say one other thing. The University, from its inception, has been a public
and private collaboration. South Hall has survived as the oldest building in the UC System because it
was the first building constructed of brick and stone. The next building built on campus was North Hall,
built entirely of wood because the State couldn't afford to build another brick building. And North Hall
Report from the ASUC Store Operations Board (cont'd)                                                    - 20 -


burned down within 30 years. So it's always been the case that UC has relied upon public-private col-
laboration. And they were going to very much need that collaboration. They heard the Chancellor talk
about matching funds from the private sector in order to make sure they were able to provide access for
the neediest people of California.

Finally, Mr. Permaul said this was the week of the 110th Big Game and the 25th anniversary of The Play.
He wanted to show the Senate a booklet that was a gift of the Class of 1957 to the California Alumni
Association, which they produced. It had a history of every single one of the songs that were associated
with Cal‟s musical tradition. Next to any other university, no other college university had as many
school songs as UC Berkeley. And all of the songs were produced by the ASUC, through competitions
that were held. Students were invited to write the songs, and in fact, in some years, some songs beat out
others. “The Big C March” defeated another song, e.g., that people would commonly recognize, in the
competition of 1999. The booklet was on sale at the Alumni Association. The Class of 1957 gave it to
them as a fundraising opportunity. It had fabulous photographs and a fabulous history of part of Cal life
and part of ASUC life. As they go down to Palo Alto, and as they hopefully deliver another smarting
blow there, people should take a look at the history.

That week, Mr. Permaul said they'll put out a sign in MLK that will tell the history of The Axe. For the
last 20 years, The Axe has been there at periodic times without any explanation to visitors. And that
week, the Auxiliary will put up a very nice sign explaining the history. Mr. Permaul said that with that,
he‟d yield to questions.

Mr. Osmeña asked when the next SOB meeting will be held. Mr. Permaul said the next meeting will be
extraordinary. It will take place next Tuesday, December 4, at 6 p.m. He will present a conceptual plan
for commercial development, which he distributed at the last meeting, and will hopefully have an oppor-
tunity to present it on Tuesday, with a PowerPoint, and take questions. In addition, Panda Express was
invited to that SOB meeting. Mr. Permaul said he would guess that in closed session, Panda Express will
make a presentation, along with Naia, on a financial model they would like to pursue.

Ms. Duong asked if there were any students on the technology working group. Mr. Permaul said it's
chaired by the campus Information Technology Officer and Associate Vice Chancellor Shelton
Waggener. The group was compromised of himself, the Purchasing Manager of the campus, Associate
Vice Chancellor Coley, and two people from the technology side, and the current Manager of The
Scholar's Workstation. There were no students on this committee because Mr. Waggener was looking at
a business model. But if this were to come to the ASUC, it would have to go to the SOB. And there was
a student presence on the SOB, and that presence was greater than any other presence on the Board.

Mr. Jackson asked about the status of hiring someone for the TGIF fund. Mr. Permaul said he just got a
call from John Stanley that day. The position was listed and they'll get the first responses to the applica-
tion process on December 4. If they have good candidates they'll proceed with interviews and will look
to hire. If they don't hire someone, the position would be open until filled. Mr. Jackson asked if there
was a timeline in place for when someone would be hired, or if it was a rolling process. Mr. Permaul
said it was a rolling process, and they were looking for the best possible candidate.

Mr. Seaty said it was mentioned that California has gone through demographic changes in the last 40
years that affected the capacity of the State to invest in the University. He asked if Mr. Permaul could
explain those demographic changes. Mr. Permaul said the demographic of the State was now much
Report from the ASUC Store Operations Board (cont'd)                                                   - 21 -


poorer than it was 40 years ago. They have a significant, larger immigrant population that was working
for poorer wages. When they look at the tax base of the State, they were no longer an industrialized
economy and the State was taking in far less revenue per capita and in real dollars than they were did
during that past period. Mr. Permaul said that when he was a freshman, the State paid 67% of UC‟s
budget. His freshman tuition in 1967 was $76.50 per quarter. And housing for the year was $1,000. So
they could tell that the War in Vietnam, inflation, and the complete change in the State‟s economy, has
really had a huge impact in the State‟s ability to provide it funding to the University. His wife just gave
him a gift in celebration of their 20th anniversary, getting married in 1979. The tuition at Harvard was
$4,500 a year and now was $40,000 a year. So they could see how dramatic the increase has been in the
cost of living over that time. And in real dollars, the economy hasn't grown that well.

Mr. Shams said that when the Chancellor spoke, he put a lot of emphasis on the prestigious heritage of
Berkeley, something he‟s mentioned before. Because of Mr. Permaul‟s long and prestigious tenure there,
he asked if he had any suggestions of what the University or the ASUC could do better to kind of bring
back that prestigious heritage and that strong community that seems to have been so present in the past
but was seemingly slowly becoming absent. Mr. Permaul said he thought one of the big differences in
the present, compared to the past, was that most of the members of the State Legislature were not gradu-
ates of UC. In 1936, all the way through the middle of the 1970s, most of the people in the State Legis-
lature and in State government were graduates of either Cal or UCLA. But now, because of the change
of demographics as well as term limits, they'll find that many State legislators were graduates of a Cali-
fornia State University. So loyalty to UC as an institution in State government was much less than it
used to be. He also thought that they'd find that people who have come to the State and brought their
wealth there were not necessarily home grown. But the University was an object of public pride, and one
thing they had going for them was that no Governor wanted to reside over the demise of what was proba-
bly the greatest public institution in the world. But the part of the State budget that was discretionary was
shrinking every year, getting smaller and smaller. So there were some real challenges. One thing for
sure was that the students at Cal were the best and the brightest, and those in the ASUC were the next
generation.

Mr. Louie asked about the entrepreneurship training program, and why it might come to the Student
Union. Mr. Permaul said he wasn't at the meeting to hear why they were willing to relocate, although he
was sure it was because their academic programs at Haas were pushing on this particular outreach pro-
gram, and they felt it was a program that should be more closely associated with the students. He thought
that was part of the reason, but he could get a better answer to that question. He thought the entrepre-
neurship program itself was one that helped young graduates at Haas take skills they learned from the
Business School and turn them into businesses of the best entrepreneurs.

Mr. Osmeña asked if he could provide information about the status of the leases in the Bear's Lair. Mr.
Permaul said the Auxiliary was continuing to discuss with the Bear's Lair tenants the renegotiation of
their leases. The Auxiliary fully intended to move forward. They want to bring to the SOB the actual
language of the renewed contracts, because the Board had to approve them before they could be offered
to the tenants. But the Auxiliary was working with the tenants and fully intended to bring the leases
forward.

Mr. Osmeña asked if these would be the same tenants that currently occupy the Bear's Lair, or if there
would be an opportunity for new tenants. Mr. Permaul said that one business, Cheese 'N Stuff, was being
bought out by one of the other businesses, the Coffee Spot. The Auxiliary understood the owner wanted
Report from the ASUC Store Operations Board (cont'd)                                                 - 22 -
Appointments -- Yaman Salahi, ASUC Web master


to sell it to the owner of the Coffee Spot. Mr. Permaul said he walked over to the owner of the Coffee
Spot and said he heard all this talk, but hadn't seen anything in writing, and Cheese 'N Stuff was still
paying the bills. The SOB would approve no change in contracts until he had something in writing. So
they're waiting to hear about that. But other than that, the Taqueria was going strong and was a very
good, effective, business. It was being very competitive, he thought, with Chipotle. Healthy Heavenly
Foods seems to have made a comeback from last year and things seemed to be going pretty well.

Mr. Rhoads asked where the Haas program would be located. Mr. Permaul said it would be on the 4th
floor of the Student Union, in one or two of the rooms upstairs there.

Seeing no further questions, Mr. Permaul said he would like to thank them very much and wanted to say
“Go Bears!”


Ms. Coleman moved to go to Special Committee Reports. The motion was seconded by Ms. Duong and
failed unanimously by voice-vote.

Mr. Jackson moved to go into Appointments. The motion was seconded by Mr. Seaty and passed with no
objection.


Appointments


Ms. Allbright said they would consider the appointment of Yaman Salahi, for ASUC Web master, with a
$1,000 stipend. Ms. Allbright said the stipend would come from the Web master line item in the budget.

Mr. Salahi introduced himself and said he was a third-year. He‟s been working on the ASUC Web site
under EVP Allbright since the second week of October or so. They've worked on bringing the Web site
up to date. It came from a company that had met the contract kind of late, and the site was also not very
strong from the back-end perspective. It was very difficult to update and kind of a hassle to add new
pages. So one of his goals during Winter Break was to bring it up to speed as far as how Web sites are
now designed, with a content management system. As they saw in his e-mail, Mr. Salahi said he also
updated the Senate pages. So there were now Senator profiles, and it would actually be good if they
could all take a look at it to make sure there wasn't any incorrect information, because there were one or
two problems. So he would ask them to let him know if it was all right. Mr. Salahi said that Senators
also got his e-mail about the new ASUC elected officials‟ blog, which was working. He would give peo-
ple information later next week about how to log in and post on it. And of course, feedback was always
welcome.

Mr. Salahi said he knew what he was pretty much doing with this stuff because he spent way too many
days in 7th through 9th grades playing with his computers, and he was also a computer programmer. If
he didn't know how to do something, he could pretty much figure it out. He called for any questions.

Mr. Louie asked what his major was. Mr. Salahi said it was Rhetoric and Middle East Studies.
Appointments -- Yaman Salahi, ASUC Web master (cont'd)                                                  - 23 -
Elected Official Announcements


Mr. Weiner said that with regard to blogs, he understood, since he has discussed this with Mr. Salahi ear-
lier, that the Web site didn't have more support for blogs because of the way it was designed. Mr. Weiner
said he recommended having a blog page, if an elected official wanted one, on their personal page. Then
there wouldn't be any conflict with one person saying something as an individual on the ASUC site. So
in terms of that possibility, and other things in moving forward, he asked how Mr. Salahi would manage
things that required a lot of work and would be very difficult to accomplish, but may be the best in terms
of the Web site. Mr. Salahi said he got Mr. Weiner‟s e-mail, but didn't have time to respond. The thing
about putting blogs on individual Senators‟ pages was that they can't very easily integrate that into the
system. The software that was up was WordPress, and was pretty robust. It had updates or releases on
an almost monthly or bi-weekly basis. So that was an advantage in that it had a lot of features and was
stable. They could have links to each Senator‟s profile page to that Senator‟s post-only page on a blog.
If they go to the blog site right now, there was a list of every elected official. Once an elected official
started posting, that name would actually become a link that they could link on to only post for that par-
ticular author. And then the main page would synch all the profiles together in one place. So students
could see what any Senator or elected official was posting. Of course, all of that could be configured so
that there was no synch page, that was what people wanted. But in terms of integrating some particular
blog into each Senator‟s page, as far as he knew, that couldn't be done easily with this software. Mr.
Salahi said he could develop something, but it wouldn't be as strong, robust, or useful, probably, to stu-
dents, Senators, or elected officials.

Ms. Shen asked if there was any intention to fully renovate the whole Web site. Mr. Salahi said his first
plan was just to renovate the back end, so that any changes that were made to color schemes or layout
could be done much more easily. Two aspects of the Web site were the visual presentation and the data
that was put up there. The problem with the site, as it came from the company, was that those were inte-
grated together in one place. So if you want to change the layout and colors, every single file had to be
changed, every page on the Web site. It could be redone so that all the layouts were managed from a
very small number of files that had to be changed. But at that time, he didn't have plans to change the
layout or colors of the Web site. But he did have plans to change the entire back end of the Web site so
that in the future, if people would like to see the layout or colors changed, it would be a pretty easy proc-
ess and wouldn't require much. And also, it would be easier adapt in future years, with future ASUC
Senates. So the ASUC wouldn't have to hire new companies to do that.

Ms. Allbright said that seeing no further questions or points of debate, the question was automatically
called.

THE MOTION TO APPROVE YAMAN SALAHI AS ASUC WEB MASTER, WITH A STIPEND OF
$1,000, PASSED UNANIMOUSLY BY VOICE-VOTE. Ms. Allbright said she would like to congratu-
late Mr. Salahi.


Elected Official Announcements


Mr. Shams said that seconding what a previous speaker said about the Nikkei Student Union Culture
Show on Sunday, everybody should go. This was the only major Culture Show he was aware of that was
Elected Official Announcements (cont'd)                                                               - 24 -


held in the fall. He thought it was great, and everybody would benefit from seeing it. Secondly, Mr.
Shams said he wanted to make people aware that on December 7 there will be a Bangladesh cyclone
relief event. A bill was going to Fi-Comm that week that he was working on with a couple of Senators.
If they go to the House of Curries restaurant on Durant, a fine Pakistani food establishment in Berkeley,
anytime during December 7, 10% of the profit from those hours will go towards Bangladesh cyclone
relief. And if they go on that date between 2:00 and 6:00, 15% of the profit will go towards relief. There
will also be more events, and he‟ll keep the Senate updated.

Also, Mr. Shams said he would, at that time, like to nominate a graduate student to the Judicial Council,
Kiesha Oliver, a graduate student from the Anthropology Department. He already e-mailed the nomina-
tion to the Chair of Con-Review.

Mr. Rhoads said Friday, for those who didn't know, will be the bonfire rally. It was basically the coolest
event he personally thought the Rally Committee puts on. It was for the entire University and was ASUC
sponsored. The ASUC gave the UC Rally Committee about $33,000 in the past year, so he thought
Senators should probably show up. This was an awesome event, and Mr. Rhoads said he‟d be there,
basically putting wood on the fire, as a pyro. He‟ll be one of the crazy people down where nobody else
could go. He really thought it was awesome. It's a great fun event and will be at 7 o'clock at the Greek
Theatre, for about an hour and a half. It was free, was ASUC sponsored, and was wheelchair accessible.

Ms. Coleman asked what trees he planned to burn. Mr. Rhoads said they're not planning to burn any
trees, and they burn unusable pallets.

Mr. Silver said an event was happening on Thursday at 7:15 in the Tan Oak Room, MLK, the US foreign
policy on Iran and Iraq, a presentation by a Middle East expert and a former officer in the US Army
Reserve, who had a pretty unique perspective. He grew up as an Iraqi Jew, served in Iraq, and would
discuss foreign policy in the Middle East. This talk was being put on by the Berkeley College Republi-
cans and the Federation for the Defense of Democracy. They came in earlier that semester for a religious
ceremony on Sproul Plaza, an event the group sponsored as well. This should be a good event. Mr.
Silver said the other event said he was working on was “Pink Ribbon Poetry,” to fight breast cancer.
They're putting together a really big event, and he hoped for a huge turnout. All the proceeds will to
breast cancer research, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. This will happen next Friday, at 8
o'clock at 105 Dwinelle. He‟ll make another announcement next week and give people a heads up. If
people were his friend on Facebook, he believed he added it to the list of events. He hoped to see them
on Thursday night.

Mr. Louie said his fraternity, Pi Alpha Phi, annually holds a “Jade Ribbon” Support Event. They sell
jade ribbons, pins, and wrist bands. Fi-Comm passed the bill to support this philanthropy event. It‟s to
support hepatitis B awareness and education. So it was for a good cause. They‟ve talked a lot about this
in the Senate in the past few weeks, and he would love his fellow Senators‟ support. They've been on
campus the past two days selling these items and will continue on Thursday. Sales were strong. He
would pass a bag of items around and people could purchase a wristband for $1 or a pin for $2. He‟d use
the honor system. It was for a great cause.

Ms. Shen said she wanted to talk about res hall activities. There was a huge Systemwide event where
residents created T-shirts for things they were grateful for, and on Sunday, they put all the T-shirts on a
clothesline at Crossroads. If people had a chance, she had extra points and could swipe them in, and they
Elected Official Announcements (cont'd)                                                                  - 25 -


could read the T-shirts. It was really meaningful. There were a lot of things people were really grateful
for, and a lot of abstract drawings that people did. Ms. Shen said she also sent an e-mail a while back
about this, but if people were interested in being, or planned to be a Resident Assistant in the res halls,
the application was due on Monday. If they were interested and wanted to make a difference in resi-
dents‟ life, she would ask them to please fill one out. If they'd like her to send it out again, she could do
so.

Mr. Weiner said on Thursday night at 6:30, in the Tan Oak Room, 4th floor, there will be “Israel 360,” a
dynamic, multimedia presentation with a lot of interesting facts about Israel‟s history, geography, and
culture. If people wanted to learn about Israel and get some free Israeli food, they should check it out.

Ms. Winston said the Winter Solstice, hosted by the African American Student Development Offices, in
the MLK, will be on December 6, from 7:00 to 9 p.m. It will celebrate the end of the Fall Semester and
everything they've accomplished, and all the great things they'd done. There will be red velvet cake as
well, and if Senators have never had it, she would ask them to please come out, because it was the best
cake of all time. The event was free. If nothing else, the cake should bring them out. There will also be
high school students there, people they're recruiting. Also, Ms. Winston said Black Women‟s Apprecia-
tion was coming up on Thursday, and hopefully after that evening, it will be an ASUC sponsored event.
It should be fun, and there will be free food there as well. Lastly, Black Campus Ministries is having its
Gospel Choir Fall Concert on Sunday at 5 p.m., and tickets were $5. the Gospel Choir has been around
for two years and was really good, and she would recommend that they come out.

Mr. Seaty said he would like to apologize for missing things, but he was helping his students apply to
college. And he actually didn't want to apologize for that. Like Mr. Silver said, Pink Ribbon Poetry will
occur next Friday, December 7, and he would really encourage people to attend, and to get their constitu-
ents to attend. It will be an awesome event. All proceeds go to breast cancer research. This was some-
thing that affected all of their communities, regardless of where they were from. Also, he has been orga-
nizing an open mic that will happen on December 4, in the temporary MCC, and he hoped to see people
there. It will start at 7 o'clock and people should bring poetry and music. He‟d ask them to please come
out. Also, next week there will be a bill presented to Fi-Comm, SB 114, In Support of the Southeast
Asian Student Coalition‟s Intercollegiate Summit: (re) Evaluating and (re) Acting to Our “Problems.”
Mr. Seaty said this was something he and Sen. Duong were co-organizing. He hoped Senators take a
look at the bill, and if they had any questions, concerns, or comments about the event, he would ask them
to please forward them to him or Sen. Duong. He really hoped people look at it prior to going to Mon-
day‟s Fi-Comm meeting. The event will be held during Winter Break, January 11-12. All Senators were
more than welcome to attend, and he would ask them to please tell their friends. They actually have 120
students already registered to come out. He had fliers for the event he‟d pass out.

Mr. Jackson said that on Thursday there will be a cool event at 5 p.m. in 223 Moses. A UN ambassador
from Denmark will speak about the effectiveness of the United Nations. People should go and tell
everyone to go. It will be great. The event was being put on by the Peace and Conflict Studies
Department.

Mr. Rhoads asked Mr. Jackson how the event went on Monday that he sponsored. Mr. Jackson said he
would thank Mr. Rhoads for asking, and said it went really, really well. The bill will hopefully be passed
that evening.
Elected Official Announcements (cont'd)                                                              - 26 -
Standing Committee Reports


Mr. Weiner said it was really embarrassing, but he did not yet have a ticket to the Big Game. If anyone
knew someone selling a ticket, he‟d really like to go.


Standing Committee Reports


Reporting for the Finance Committee, Mr. Weiner said they met both Monday, November 12, and Mon-
day, November 19. For fee waivers, they tabled SWs 2, 36, 42, 43, and 48. They passed SWs 44, 45, 46,
47, and 49. For bills, they tabled SBs 52 and 89. Fi-Comm proved SBs 90, as amended; 91, as amended;
92, as amended; 93, as amended; 94, as amended; 95, as amended; 96, as amended; 98, as amended; 99,
as amended; 100; 101, as amended; 102; and 104, as amended; 108, as amended; 109; 111, as amended.
SBs 105 and 106 failed. SB 110 was tabled. Fi-Comm approved the appointment of Yaman Salahi for
ASUC Web master, with a stipend of $1,000. Fi-Comm also discussed the carryforward balance. Right
now, they just came up with various ideas, with each Senator having a bunch of ideas. They have not
yet, as a committee, discussed any of those ideas, but they will do so at future meetings. Their next
meeting is that coming Monday, their last meeting of the semester, December 3, at the regular time.

Ms. Coleman moved to resurrect SB 106, In Support of Friends of the Co-ops. The motion was seconded
by Ms. Winston. Ms. Allbright said approval required a majority vote and they'd take a speakers' list.
Mr. Jackson asked if the vote required a majority of the Senate, or a simple majority of Senators present.
Ms. Allbright said it was a simple majority.

Ms. Coleman SB 106 was failed in Fi-Comm on Monday night. The bill asked for $200 to buy two ban-
ners for more visibility for the Co-ops on Sproul. They changed their name to the “Berkeley Student
Cooperative,” and the reason the bill failed was because she wouldn't compromise. As they know, Fi-
Comm had a soft cap for first-year student activity groups of $150, and a hard cap of $200. Ms. Coleman
said she wanted the full allocation, so she allowed the bill to fail. But that was a mistake. She talked to
the Berkeley Student Cooperative External Affairs Committee and they would really like the bill to be
reconsidered, and would like to accept the $150 that Fi-Comm would have given to them. So she would
ask the Senate to please allow the bill to be resurrected.

Ms. Allbright said that seeing no further speakers, the question was automatically called.

THE MOTION TO RESURRECT SB 106 PASSED UNANIMOUSLY BY VOICE-VOTE. Ms.
Allbright said they would consider SB 106 under IC.

Mr. Weiner moved to resurrect SB 105, In Support of a New Senate Chambers Webcam. The motion
was seconded by Mr. Osmeña. Mr. Weiner said the bill was for funding of $100 to go towards a Web-
cam to ensure that the ASUC Senate was accessible, so students who couldn't come to the meetings, or
didn't want to, could easily access the meetings. There was no reason to fail the bill. It was very unfor-
tunate that some members of Fi-Comm did not like the bill, for some reason, and chose to fail it. The
vote was 3-3. He would urge the Senate to bring this back for the purpose of making the ASUC open and
accessible.
Standing Committee Reports (cont'd)                                                                    - 27 -


Mr. Seaty said that some Senators on Fi-Comm decided not to pass the bill because there was no specific
model or Webcam that had been looked at, or considered. They thought there should be research done
before a purchase was brought up to Fi-Comm.

Mr. Weiner said that in discussion in committee, it was stated that research was done. The only possible
issue was that the bill did not state the specific model of what would be purchased. However, research
was done on a number of different Webcams and different devices, such as microphones. This was no
different than many other Senate bills that did not have, for instance, the specific brand name of a variety
of items that were purchased and for which money was allocated.

Ms. Winston said she was not opposed to funding a Webcam, but she would admit she was one of the
Senators who voted against getting a Webcam simply because she felt they needed a budget that was
more specific, and that they knew exactly what they were putting their money towards. One hundred
dollars was a little arbitrary. She would recommend submitting another bill that included the brand and
the make, so the Senate knew exactly what they were buying and so they could go into this with full con-
fidence. That was her sole concern.

Ms. Allbright said that seeing no further pro speakers, the motion was automatically called.

THE MOTION TO RESURRECT SB 105 PASSED BY VOICE-VOTE.

Ms. Allbright said they would consider the bill under Immediate Consideration.

---------------
Begin written report from the Finance Committee

ASUC Senate Finance Committee
Voting Members: Kim, Seaty, Shen, Ureña, Weiner, Winston, Wong
Non-voting Members: President Nguyen, EVP Allbright

OFFICIAL REPORT
Meeting 11 and 12
Monday, November 12, 2007 and Monday, November 19
9:10 PM Senate Chambers, Eshleman Hall

Chair: Senator Weiner
Vice Chair: Senator Shen

IN ATTENDANCE: Kim, Seaty, Shen, Ureña, Weiner, Winston, Wong
ABSENT: President Nguyen, EVP Allbright

FEE WAIVERS:
SW 2, Facility Use Fee Waiver: RHA Dance and Casino Night: Tabled
SW 36, Finance Rule Waiver: Campaign to End Death Penalty: Tabled
SW 42, Facility Use Fee Waiver: ASCE: Tabled
SW 43, Facility Use Fee Waiver: Berkeley Ballroom: Tabled
SW 44, Finance Rule Waiver: SLUgS: Passed; $60
Standing Committee Reports (cont'd)                                                           - 28 -


---------------
Written report from the Finance Committee (cont'd)

SW 45, Facility Use Fee Waiver: Alpha Phi Alpha: Passed; $504
SW 46, Facility Use Fee Waiver: Team HBV/FAST: Passed; $575
SW 47, Finance Rule Waiver: ASUC EVP: Passed; $85.60
SW 48, Finance Rule Waiver: Student Advocate‟s Office: Tabled
SW 49, Finance Rule Waiver: Jewish Student Union: Passed; $1200

BILLS:
SB 52a, In Support of the Run for Peace: Tabled
SB 89, In Support of the Greek Opportunity Fund: Tabled
SB 90, In Support of Spring Welcome Week: Passed; $6000 Commercial Revenue Holding Fund
SB 91, In Support of Black Women‟s Appreciation: Passed with amendment; $850 O.F.
SB 92, In Support of the International Affairs Journal at Berkeley: Passed with amendment; $575 C.F.
SB 93, In Support of the Medical School Fair hosted by Pre-Medical Honor Society: Passed with amend-
ment; $220 C.F.
SB 94, In Support of the European Student Union: Passed with amendment; $200 C.F.
SB 95, In Support of Kappa Gamma Delta‟s Dodgeball Tournament: Passed with amendment; $640 C.F.
SB 96, In Support of Rock the Jade Charity Fashion Show: Passed with amendment; $650 C.F.
SB 98, In Support of Coming Together: Concert for the Conscious: Passed with amendments; $750 Carry
Forward
SB 99, In Support of Pi Sigma Alpha: Passed with amendment; $185 C.F.
SB 100, In Support of the ASUC Grants Program: Passed; $30,000: $12,000 Academic Opportunity
Fund; $5,000 Culture Show Fund; $5,000 Educational Enhancement Fund; $8,000 Intellectual Commu-
nity Fund
SB 101, In Support of the First Annual Alpha Epsilon Pi Greek Family Feud: Passed with amendment;
$450 O.F.
SB 102, In Support of Electrochemical Society (ECS) at Berkeley: Passed
SB 104, In Support of IMAGES OF INDIA: Passed with amendment; $350 C.F.
SB 105, In Support of a new Senate Chambers Webcam: Failed
SB 106, In Support of Friends of the Co-ops: Failed
SB 108, In Support of Pink Ribbon Poetry: A Night of Poetry to Fight Breast Cancer: Passed with
amendment; $290 C.F.
SB 109, In Support of Pi Alpha Phi‟s Hepatitis B Awareness (Jade Ribbon Campaign) Philanthropy
Event: Passed; $500 O.F.
SB 110, In Support of the Iranian Students‟ Cultural Organization (ISCO): Tabled
SB 111, In Support of the ASUC Bookswap: Passed with amendment; $400 C.F.

*All amendments are to allocation amounts except for SBs 95 and 98
Standing Committee Reports (cont'd)                                                                - 29 -


---------------
Written report from the Finance Committee (cont'd)

APPOINTMENTS:
Yaman Salahi, ASUC Webmaster, EVP: Passed; $1000

OTHER:
We discussed the Carry Forward Balance. We came up with a preliminary list of funding options. We will
continue discussion at upcoming meetings.

NEXT MEETING:
Monday, December 3, ASUC Senate Chambers, Eshleman Hall

ATTACHED:
SBs 95a, 98a and minutes

End written report from the Finance Committee
---------------

---------------
Begin minutes of the Fi-Comm meeting

ASUC Senate Finance Committee
Members: Senators Kim, Seaty, Shen, Ureña, Weiner, Winston, and Wong
Non-Voting Members: President Nguyen and EVP Allbright
Finance Officer: Nathaniel Chaney

Minutes Meeting 11 and 12
9:00 PM, Monday, November 19, 2007 and November 26, 2007
Senate Chambers, Eshleman Hall

Chair: Senator Gabe Weiner
Vice Chair: Senator Grace Shen

   I.       Roll Call at 9:25 PM : Senators Seaty, Shen, Ureña, Weiner, Winston and Wong Present
            EVP Allbright Absent
            President Ngyuen Absent
            Senator Kim Absent for first roll call
II. Unfinished Business: Waivers and Bills
        a. SW 2, Facility Use Fee Waiver: RHA Dance and Casino Night
        Tabled
        b. SW 36, Finance Rule Waiver: Campaign to End Death Penalty
        Tabled
        c. SW 42, Facility Use Fee Waiver: ASCE
        Tabled
        d. SW 43, Facility Use Fee Waiver: Berkeley Ballroom $575
        Passed
Standing Committee Reports (cont'd)                                                         - 30 -


---------------
Fi-Comm minutes (cont'd)

       e. SB 52a, In Support of the Run for Peace (Shams) $250
       Tabled

III. New Business:
       a. Waivers (ordered by sign-in sheet)
       SW 44: Finance Rule Waiver: SLUgS $60
       Passed
       SW 45: Facility Use Fee Waiver: Alpha Phi Alpha $504
       Passed
       SW 46: Facility Use Fee Waiver: Team HBV/FAST 1,248.90
       Tabled (Nov. 19th)
       Passed with Amendment (Nov. 26) $575
       SW 47: Finance Rule Waiver: ASUC EVP $85.60
       Passed (Nov. 26)
       SW 48: Finance Rule Waiver: Student Advocate‟s Office $27
       Tabled
       SW 49: Finance Rule Waiver: Jewish Student Union $1200
       Passed
       b. Appointments
       Yaman Salahi $1000 for ASUC Webmaster
       Passed

       c. SBs 91-96, 98-102, 104-106, 108-111
             a. SB 102, In Support of Electrochemical Society (ECS) at Berkeley (Kuo) $0
             Passed
             b. SB 105 In Support of a new Senate Chambers Webcam (Patel) $100
             Motion to table: Failed
             Motion to vote: Failed
             c. SB 106, In Support of Friends of the Co-ops (Coleman) $200
             Motion to amend to $150: Failed
             SB 106: 3 to 3: Failed
             d. SB 99, In Support of Pi Sigma Alpha (Silver) $400
             Motion to amend to $250: Passed
             Motion to amend to $185: Passed
             SB 99a: Passed
             e. SB 94, In Support of the European Student Union (Wong) $450
             Motion to amend to $200: Passed
             SB 94: Passed
             f. SB 108, In Support of Pink Ribbon Poetry: A Night of Poetry to Fight Breast Cancer
                (Silver) $470
             Motion to amend to $290: Passed
             SB 108a: Passed
             g. SB 109, In Support of Pi Alpha Phi‟s Hepatitis B Awareness (Jade Ribbon Campaign)
                Philanthropy Event (Louie) $500
             SB 109 Passed
Standing Committee Reports (cont'd)                                                          - 31 -


---------------
Fi-Comm minutes (cont'd)

              h. SB 111, In Support of the ASUC Bookswap (Lee) $500
              Motion to amend to $400: Passed
              SB 111a: Passed
              i. SB 93, In Support of the Medical School Fair hosted by Pre-Medical Honor Society
                 (Wong) $510
              Motion to amend to $220: Passed
              SB 93a: Passed
              j. SB 101, In Support of the First Annual Alpha Epsilon Pi Greek Family Feud (Weiner)
                 $571.46
              Motion to amend to $450: Passed
              SB 101: Passed
              k. SB 92, In Support of the International Affairs Journal at Berkeley (Shams) $700
              Motion to amend to $575: Passed
              SB 92a: Passed
              l. SB 104, In Support of IMAGES OF INDIA (Patel) $800
              Motion to amend to $350: Passed
              SB 104a: Passed
              m. SB 110, In Support of the Iranian Students‟ Cultural Organization (ISCO) (Shams)
                 $800
              Tabled
              n. SB 96, In Support of Rock the Jade Charity Fashion Show (Shen) $800
              Motion to amend to $650: Passed
              SB 96a: Passed
              o. SB 98, In Support of Coming Together: Concert for the Conscious (Jackson) $1,290
              Motion to amend the fourth whereas clause to include updated budget sent by Senator
              Jackson: Passed
              Motion to amend final resolve clause to say: “that the ASUC allocate $750 from Carry
              Forward”: Passed
              SB 98a: Passed
              p. SB 91, In Support of Black Women‟s Appreciation (Winston) $1,300
              Motion to amend final resolve clause to say: “ that the ASUC allocate $850 from the
              Greek Opportunity Fund and $150 from the Senate Contingency Fund to Alpha Phi
              Alpha‟s…”: Passed
              Motion to amend final resolve clause to say completely “that the ASUC allocate $750
              from the Greek Opportunity Fund to Alpha Phi Alpha‟s…” : Passed
              Motion to amend $750 to $850: Passed
              SB 91a: Passed
              q. SB 95, In Support of Kappa Gamma Delta‟s Dodgeball Tournament (Wong) $1,500
              Tabled (Nov. 19th)
              Motion to amend to $400: Failed
              Motion to amend to $640: Passed
              SB 95a: Passed (Nov. 26)
              r. SB 100, In Support of the ASUC Grants Program (Galeon) $30,000
              Passed
Standing Committee Reports (cont'd)                                                                     - 32 -


---------------
Fi-Comm minutes (cont'd)

IV. Unfinished Business: Other
       a. Commercial Revenue Holding Fund Allocations
              a. SB 89, In Support of the Greek Opportunity Fund (Osmeña) $10,000
              Tabled (Nov. 19)
              Tabled (Nov. 26)
              b. SB 90, In Support of Spring Welcome Week (Osmeña) $10,000
              Tabled (Nov. 19)
              Motion to amend to $4000: Failed
              Motion to amend to $4500: Failed
              Motion to amend to $6250
              Motion to amend the amend to $6000: Passed
              SB 90a: Passed
       b. Carry Forward
           Excel sheet attached

IV. Roll Call and Adjournment
3:35 AM (Nov. 19th)
1:30 AM (Nov. 26)

ATTACHED: SB 52a

End minutes of the Fi-Comm minutes
---------------


Mr. Osmeña said the Constitutional and Procedural Review Committee has not met since the last Senate
meeting.

Mr. Wu said the next meeting of the University and External Affairs Committee will be on December 3
at 9 p.m. in the June Jordan Room.


Reporting for the Standing Committee on the Advocacy Agenda, Ms. Allbright said that due to schedul-
ing difficulties, what they'll do in lieu of a meeting will be to have individual check-ins with Standing
Committee chairs. It's been a little difficult because of situations with finals and things. But they'll have
check-ins before the end of the semester and hopefully some regular meetings in the spring.

Reporting for the Advocacy Agenda Committee on Diversity and Inclusion through the MCC, Mr. Shams
said they met. There was no update to report. They've been in contact with the University-side of the
delegation to renew the MOU and a student coalition has been discussing the MOU and its renewal. The
coalition was made up of three twLF members, two Executives, the current Chair of the Committee,
which was himself, and Sen. Ureña. The Committee hasn't met since the last meeting. The meeting will
be planned for December 2, 13, or 16. That was still being decided.
Standing Committee Reports (cont'd)                                                                  - 33 -
Report from the Attorney General


Reporting for the Advocacy Agenda Committee on Academic Services, Mr. Jackson said the Committee
as a whole has not met. But business was still moving forward. They should be launching a postcard
campaign for students to say they‟d like to have Moffitt Library open twenty-four hours earlier sooner
into the semester, both in the spring and the fall. Twenty-four hours in the fall would begin when stu-
dents come back from Thanksgiving break.

Mr. Osmeña said that he would like to add to the Con-Review report that the Committee will meet at
9:30 in the Senate lounge.

Mr. Shams said that if he could go back to his report, and said the Advocacy Agenda Committee on
Diversity and Inclusion through the MCC met two weeks ago and all Senators were present except for
Sen. Kim. He believed that notice was required in the By-laws. Ms. Allbright said that saved Sen. Ureña
from an absence.


Ms. Allbright said the Chair would entertain a motion for a two-minute recess. It was so moved and sec-
onded by Mr. Seaty and Ms. Coleman and passed with no objection. This meeting was recessed. Back in
session, Mr. Weiner moved to extend the recess by four minutes. The motion was seconded by Ms.
Duong and passed by voice-vote. This meeting was recessed.

Back in session, Ms. Allbright said they didn't have enough Senators present at that time to consider the
Consent Calendar.

Mr. Jackson said that in the agendas, he asked if there should be an item for a report from the Finance
Officer. Ms. Allbright said that was a typo on her part, and she was going to act as if it were there.

Mr. Shams moved to go to Appointed Official Reports. The motion was seconded by Mr. Jackson and
passed unanimously by voice-vote.


Report from the Attorney General


Mr. Kozak said he was still waiting for the Advisory Opinion from the Judicial Council. Also, he should
apologize, but he has not had a chance to approve the updated Constitution and By-laws. He was going
through the minutes from a few years ago and verifying that there was a section in the Constitution that
was apparently was not in the Constitution. Along with a draft from a GA meeting, there was a constitu-
tional update that was allegedly passed, and he had to go through the minutes and verify that it was
passed, and that it was in the correct form, after which he‟d put it in the Constitution. That‟s why there
hasn't been an update of the Constitution and By-laws in the packet. He also had to go through the min-
utes and verify By-law changes as well. He called for any questions. Seeing no questions, Ms. Allbright
said she would like to thank him for his report.


Report from the Finance Officer
Report from the Finance Officer                                                                        - 34 -
Report from the Judicial Council


Mr. Cheney said he didn't have anything to report. He was still trying to gather all the information he
needed and trying to put everything involved with the position in place. He‟ll have everything together
for next week. He‟ll present a report to Fi-Comm as well as to the Senate, and will present hard copies to
Senators. In the past month he‟s met with Lavonia Wade, Millicent Morris-Chaney, and Jan Crowder,
and talked to them about all the accounts, looked at all the numbers, and went through all the reports. He
met with Jillian Hagan, and she informed him of everything else. He was meeting with Ms. Hagan on
Monday to talk about the bills that have been approved. He‟ll have everything presented next
Wednesday.

Mr. Jackson asked if attending Fi-Comm meetings will be a regular thing, or if that was a priority to him.
Mr. Cheney said it will be a priority in the future. Last week‟s meeting was during Thanksgiving, so that
was difficult. But in the future he will attend those. He hasn't been very useful at meetings so far
because a lot of time he didn't know about the procedures the Committee was going through. So he‟s
been trying to educate himself so he could be as helpful as possible.

Ms. Shen asked if he could say briefly what would be in his presentation to Fi-Comm. Mr. Cheney said
it will consist of what was currently in all of the accounts, mainly the Contingency Fund, the Greek
Opportunity Fund, Capital Improvements, and other accounts. And hopefully he‟ll meet with the previ-
ous Finance Officer, Mr. Desai, between now and next week to talk about how carryforward was done in
the past. So Mr. Cheney said his presentation will also include helpful suggestions on how to continue
with carryforward in terms of where the accounts were, if any accounts were overdrawn at that time or
were looking strong in terms of their holdings. He‟ll assess things and present how much money they
need to carry on for the rest of the year. Seeing no further questions, Ms. Allbright said she would like to
thank Mr. Cheney for his report.


Report from the Judicial Council


Ms. Feng said that last week the two cases they had were settled, Duarte v. Jackson and Duarte v. Kunert.
She checked in the J-Council mail box and she had the form for Mr. Jackson. Mr. Kunert‟s wasn't there,
and she would ask him to please submit that by Friday.

Ms. Feng said the Judicial Council met last night to consider the Attorney General‟s request for an Advi-
sory Opinion. The Opinion will be out by next Tuesday at the latest. She called for any questions.

Mr. Wu asked how the new justices were fitting in. Ms. Feng said she wanted to make a point about that.
She wanted to thank the Senate for having made the appointments. It was good to see all six of them
there. She hasn't had that many Justices since last semester. They were all doing really well. It was all
part of the learning process. Justices learn while they experience cases. For the settlement, she invited
any Justice who was interested and available to attend the informal settlement discussions that she facili-
tated in the Duarte cases, and one did show up. All Justices were available and all were prepared, with
having read the Constitution and By-laws, so that the Council could go straight into discussion. She
thought that overall, the conversation was definitely productive. She was personally pleased with the
new appointments.
Report from the Judicial Council (cont'd)                                                            - 35 -
Report from the President


Mr. Shams asked if the new J-Council Justices‟ input would be included in the Advisory Opinion. Ms.
Feng said that was correct. All six undergrads were present for the Advisory Opinion and all six were
also present to participate in the approval of the settlement agreements. Seeing no further questions, Ms.
Allbright said she would like to thank Ms. Feng for the report.


Mr. Shams moved to go to Executive Officer Reports. The motion was seconded by Ms. Winston and
passed with no objection.


Report from the President


Mr. Nguyen said he e-mailed a report thinking he wasn't going to be at the meeting, but realized he had
an appointment to make. He hoped they had a good break and had the opportunity to go home. He and
some Senators seemed to have some turkey hangover. He hoped they enjoyed their well-deserved break.

Mr. Nguyen said he had some updates. On Thursday, he, Mr. Daniels, and Executive VP Allbright, will
meet with Cathy Koshland, the Assistant Vice Provost, to talk about a potential funding strategy for the
Lower Sproul redevelopment project. Mr. Nguyen said he talked about this in his last report. On Thurs-
day they'll discuss the feasibility of getting $700,000 to further the planning and hear some of Ms.
Koshland‟s input on what they need to do to strengthen their presentation to the Vice Chancellor‟s
Administrative Council.

Mr. Nguyen said a meeting was held that day regarding dance policy. Student Advocate Krishnamurthy
was there, as were a couple of other students. They talked about the barriers student groups had in put-
ting on a dance in Pauley, Heller, or anywhere on campus. Students were concerned with safety in terms
of access issues to Pauley for dances, and with buying tickets. But the University was really the one that
was the most concerned about safety issues, and it was the campus that imposed a set fee to pay the costs
of UCPD officers to patrol dances over the course of the year. But this has led to a deep decrease in the
number of dances put on in Pauley, and a consistent move to Oakland and San Francisco for dances that
students put on. That wasn't necessarily bad, but the dance policy was restrictive.

Mr. Nguyen said that one policy he recommended was to see if the University could have a fund for
police officers to work at the dances and to pay for that cost, because it was so enormously high, and only
a certain number of student groups could afford to potentially put on dances.

Mr. Nguyen said the MCC Oversight Board met that day and they authorized spending for the Multicul-
tural Center by the Board, for the physical improvement of Heller Lounge. Some of those include the
purchase of a cabinet to store some of their A/V and sound equipment and equipment for food, a lectern,
things of that sort. They authorized about $7,500 of improvements.

Mr. Nguyen said he wasn't sure if Senators read the Daily Cal or saw the press releases, but last week the
UC Office of the President authorized some of the requests for the Count Me In! Campaign that UC
Berkeley and a number of other UC campuses were able to push forward. It was very, very exciting to be
Report from the President (cont'd)                                                                     - 36 -


able to have an impact like that on a Statewide level, in his opinion. He thought the Senate, since it took
a stance on this particular issue, should be very proud of itself for taking such a principled stand on a
Statewide policy. So he would like to congratulate them. He thought it was a very good victory for
students.

Finally, Mr. Nguyen said he would like to appoint a Director for the From All Perspectives Shown,
Meghana Dhar.

Mr. Nguyen called for any questions.

Mr. Jackson asked if the printer in his office was the printer for which $1,000 for a printer was taken
from Capital Improvements. Mr. Nguyen said it was. The printer in his office was supposed to be used
by the entire ASUC. The reason it was in his office was in terms of access, at a central location. The
only thing was, it needed to be networked through the 2nd floor. They asked David Fullmer to network
it, and it worked for about 30 minutes, and then stopped working. So right now, the only way to use it
was for people to bring their own laptop and hook it up to the printer, or one of the OP computers.
They're talking to Mr. Fullmer about getting some technical assistance. But that printer was supposed to
be used for the entire ASUC.

Mr. Jackson asked if he thought it was appropriate that ASUC resources like the computer and the printer
were used to put materials of a political nature, specifically referring to campus politics. Mr. Nguyen
said he would need to have more context in order to give an answer, and he would be happy to talk to Mr.
Jackson off the floor. Mr. Jackson said he saw materials for a particular political party on campus in the
printer. So he just wanted to know if Mr. Nguyen was aware that ASUC resources were actually being
used for that purpose. Mr. Nguyen said no, he didn't think that was appropriate.

Mr. Weiner said he wanted to ask about the issue of the illegal occupation of the trees in front of the Sta-
dium. There's been talk about the ASUC getting involved in trying to get the tree sitters to safely come
down. He asked if there was any update on that. Mr. Nguyen said there was. That past Monday there
were a number of conversations between people from a coalition, Free Speech, Free Trees, and people
from the University, including Dan Mogulof and Nathan Brostrom. Mr. Nguyen said he was „cc‟d on the
conversation. They used the meeting he had called as some leverage to ask for a meeting with the Vice
Chancellor on Monday. So the meeting was granted, with the conversation facilitated by someone from
the Conflict Resolution Center. They were able to talk about where the University and people who sup-
port the tree sitters were at. It was a broad, hour-long conversation that really had no solutions attached
to it. The University agreed to meet again.

Mr. Nguyen said that one major concern that he could discuss at the Senate meeting was that even though
the physical occupation of the trees has been deemed illegal by the injunction, there was also an issue that
tree sitters should have access to food and water. They can't control the tree sitters who were up there,
and Mr. Nguyen said he certainly couldn't control them. But they could control whether or not the tree
sitters will be able to get food. That was the principled stance the coalition has taken. It was kind of a
point of contention at the meeting. But they were able to hold that meeting, which he thought was posi-
tive. And discussions were at least continuing. He would be happy to update the Senate further on this.

Mr. Wu said that going back to Sen. Jackson‟s point, he asked Mr. Nguyen if he was aware that there was
political party material in the printer. Mr. Nguyen said he wasn't. Ms. Allbright said that printer was not
Report from the President (cont'd)                                                                      - 37 -
Report from the External Affairs Vice President


Mr. Nguyen‟s and was not in his office as that room was not allocated to the President‟s office. Mr. Wu
objected. As a point of order, Ms. Allbright said she was answering a question that was asked. On a
point of personal privilege, Mr. Wu said he would ask Ms. Allbright treat Senators with more respect.

Mr. Kim said that next time, if there were printers available to the entire Senate, he asked if they could be
notified, so they knew they were available. Mr. Nguyen said that for anything on the 2nd floor, even
things in his office, Senators were more than welcome to use. That‟s because it's been paid for by the
ASUC and it wasn't his material. So for anything in the office, he would ask them to please feel free to
use. Ms. Allbright said speaking time had expired. Mr. Nguyen said he wanted to thank them.


Report from the External Affairs Vice President


Mr. Montes said he hoped everybody was doing well and hoped they had a good and relaxing break. He
wanted to give people an update on some stuff that was going on with him. He had a very busy week
ahead him, with two 20-page papers due, one on Tuesday and one on Wednesday, so that‟s where he‟ll
be spending most of his time. School was really getting to him at that time, and he was sure that was the
case for Senators as well.

Mr. Montes said that weekend there will be an electoral action training at UC Santa Cruz. He‟d pass
around a sign-up sheet. He‟s talked about this for the past couple of weeks. There were 23 spots, and
hopefully a couple of Senators could attend. This was a Statewide electoral action training. It will start
off with an introduction and then go into introduction of power; understanding the concept of power; how
much power students have; voter identification and registration; and building coalitions. They'll have
lunch and then have role-laying exercises. For example, they'll practice knock on doors and practice
approaching people and giving a 10-second blurb, a 30-second message, or a minute. They'll also learn
how to do class raps for voter registration. There will be workshops on messaging, volunteer manage-
ment for community leaders, and get-out-the-vote campaign planning. Two of these trainings will be
held Statewide, at UC Santa Cruz for the Northern California schools, which include UCSF, Berkeley,
Hastings, Santa Cruz, and Merced. There will also be training for the Southern California schools at UC
Santa Barbara. Max Reyes, the Lobby Corps Director for the ASUC, and the Campus Organizing
Director for the External Affairs VP‟s office, will organize the trip for the Berkeley students who want to
go. They were the ones in charge of the trip, including recruiting, logistics, and planning.

Mr. Montes said he would strongly encourage all Senators to attend the electoral action training, if they
had the time. It was really important, especially because a lot of exercises they do would be good to
bring back to their student groups. He knew there might be conflicts because of the Big Game, which
was a tradition that they've had for the last 110 years. But to him personally, he felt that being part of the
electoral process was far more important than a game that Berkeley was already destined to win. Mr.
Montes said he himself will not be in Santa Cruz because he was an EA trainer and he will facilitate
training at UC Santa Barbara. So Max Reyes, Jeffrey Boortz, and Chief-of-Staff Dionne Jirachaikitti will
be in Santa Cruz organizing that. Mr. Montes said he will do the training with a student from the Univer-
sity of Oregon.
Report from the External Affairs Vice President (cont'd)                                               - 38 -
Report from the Student Advocate


Mr. Montes said he would suggest that people on the committee that was evaluating the UCSA also
attend this training session, since this training would set the groundwork for the voter registration cam-
paign and the get-out-the-vote campaign for the UCSA next semester.

Mr. Montes said that for some random national news, the House Education and Labor Committee unani-
mously passed the Higher Education Act, which was currently known as the College Opportunity and
Affordability Act. It includes provisions for federal grant aid, regulations on hate crimes, supporting
prepatory programs, codes of conduct, and private loan lenders. The Act only needed support from the
House to be passed.

Mr. Montes said he spoke with Caro Jauregui, the UC Berkeley rep to the Student Advisory Committee
to select a new UC President, and she asked if he could give the Senate an update, as she couldn't be there
at that time. She said the Committee met at the last Regents meeting earlier that month and they talked to
UCOP administrators on having students actually interview the potential president of the University, to
make sure that students had a more active role in the selection process. But UCOP told the Committee
that the Student Regent, Ben Allen, was enough, and to work closely with him. The next time the Com-
mittee will meet will be at the January Regents meeting. He called for any questions Ms. Allbright said
that seeing no questions, she would like to thank Mr. Montes for his report.


Report from the Student Advocate


Mr. Krishnamurthy said he wanted to apologize for his somewhat sporadic attendance at Senate meetings
that semester. It wasn't a sign of disrespect nor due to a lack of progress, but due to his schedule. Given
that it was almost the end of the first semester, he wanted to provide some concrete metric of how far the
SAO has come in terms of completion of goals he set up at the beginning of the semester, and what they
still had to do for next semester. One thing he‟s said over and over again was that he felt that his main
priority was to make the office more viable on campus, and he thought in that regard, they've been pretty
successful. They‟ve actually had around a 20% increase in the number of cases, which was pretty sig-
nificant. If that trend continued for two semesters, it would be around 60-70 cases, which was a lot.

The biggest increase in cases by far was the number of financial aid/residency cases. He wasn't sure
about the reason for that, but the SAO has used a couple of new outreach techniques that might have been
more effective than what was done in the past. He thought the most effective thing they've done was to
target outreach as far as himself and the Chief-of-Staff going out and making sure that other support ser-
vices on campus knew who the SAO was and began to trust them as someone they could refer students to
go to with problems.

Mr. Krishnamurthy said that as for other things they've done, they've done a lot of tabling at Crossroads
that semester, which he thought has been really important in terms of establishing themselves and being
viable on campus, and letting students know the SAO was there.

One new thing the office has done was to put out Daily Cal articles on certain topics. That had a dual
purpose. Besides getting the SAO‟s name out a little more, it also served as a preventative measure,
making students aware of specific rules and what the issues were regarding those rules.
Report from the Student Advocate (cont'd)                                                              - 39 -


As far as what they'll do next semester for outreach, Mr. Krishnamurthy said that he‟d like to create a
formalized system of notification letters. They have that with the Office of Student Conduct, and he‟s
touched on that with administrators in the Financial Aid and Residency Offices. They were worried
about liability issues and they were worried that a formalized letter might be seen as a sign of endorse-
ment. Also, they were dealing with financial matters that were not disconnected to UC, but were con-
nected to the UC as a whole. They felt that might be problematic. Mr. Krishnamurthy said he was trying
to get it touch with earlier Student Advocates to see what things they did to try to get that formal notifi-
cation procedures established. That‟s something they'd do next semester.

The next item for next semester was the Code of Conduct revision process. As he‟s mentioned before, it
seemed like this will be a slow process. The last time it happened, three or four years ago, it took almost
two years. Right now they're still getting information from faculty, especially about academic
dishonesty.

Mr. Krishnamurthy said he had a number of goals. The main goal was to restore guaranteed representa-
tion. If Senators had questions about any of these goals, they should feel free to ask questions after his
report or to talk to him outside the Senate.

The office has also done a number of internal things that were not readily apparent, but will increase
their. The first was a database tracking case outcomes. That was really important especially with Con-
duct violations, since they're adjudicated based on precedent. So if they had a clear record, that would
help the SAO call out the Office of Student Conduct if it did something wrong.

The next item dealt with training sessions. They've held sessions with a number of administrators on
sexual assault, harassment, Conduct violations, financial aid, and residency. Mr. Krishnamurthy said the
final thing was a pretty big push they did that semester, which would also hold true for next semester.

Finally, as to what he still needed to do for next semester, the first was to continue outreach. He thought
they've done a good job that semester in terms of increasing cases. They made themselves more viable
on campus and they'll continue to do that; and he welcomed Senators‟ input and help on that, because
they contact a much larger number of people than he did. There was one notable thing that he didn't
know how to approach. He wasn't sure how familiar Senators were with lawsuits about file sharing that
have been filed. In a couple of cases, a university, most notably the University of Oregon, said it would
not turn over student records. Such a stance was not really obstruction of anything, and the school was
just saying that if companies wanted to go after students, they should do that themselves rather than hav-
ing the University help them. Currently, the Berkeley campus was turning over those records, and he
would like to explore changing that and exploring liability issues. He wasn't sure if there was any room
for movement, but that was something they'd explore. He called for any questions.

Mr. Wu asked how many RIAA lawsuits there have been, and what the outcome has been. Mr.
Krishnamurthy said he didn't know how many there were. Two have come to the office that semester.
As far as he knew, they usually didn't really deal with legal issues, and usually the outcome was a settle-
ment, with standard settlements being between $3-7,000, usually $3,000. seeing no other questions, Ms.
Albright said she would like to thank Mr. Krishnamurthy for his report.


Ms. Shen moved to go to Appointed Official Announcements. The motion was seconded by Mr. Seaty
and passed with no objection.
Report from the Public Relations Director                                                               - 40 -


Ms. Allbright noted that the report from the Public Relations Director wasn't on the agenda. Unless Title
I indicated that a report was required to be given, she didn't add that report to the agenda every week, in
accordance with the By-laws for this item.


Report from the Public Relations Director


Mr. Lam said that on Thursday he‟ll meet with Dr. Permaul and other people in the ASUC Auxiliary to
discuss proposals regarding the events for the berkeley.edu Web site. He was sure most Senators were
familiar with how events at berkeley.edu worked. It was now open to student groups to put events
online. One topic they'll discuss was that when a student posted an event online, it didn't go directly on
the site, and first had to be moderated, with someone making sure it was filtered out, with appropriate
content, and that there wasn't anything included that didn't accurately reflect the mission of the ASUC
and the University. He believed the ASUC Auxiliary wanted the ASUC to help out with the moderation
part, and perhaps have students work with tech people to do that type of moderation. So they'll discuss
how the ASUC could help out with that.

Mr. Lam said the other thing, of course, was publicity for events, and getting the word out to students so
more groups use that resource as a replacement for paper fliers. In that way they'd save trees, and it was
also a good investment for the long term. Mr. Lam said he‟d give another report next week and let the
Senate know about the results of the upcoming meeting, and if specific things were requested from the
ASUC.

Secondly, once again, Mr. Lam said he was a resource for Senators. If they had any bills or legislation,
particularly external bills that they wanted him to write a press release about, he‟d be more than happy to
do so. He e-mail a press release application form available to everyone and believed a hard copy was
available on the 2nd floor. People could also e-mail him and they could talk about their event and get
their press release out. He called for any questions.

Mr. Osmeña asked if the ASUC logo was used on press releases, and if so, if there were regulations on
the types of things that were allowed. Mr. Lam said there were restrictions on logos, which he found out
the hard way, when he used the University logo, because the ASUC didn't have an established logo.
University regulation states that they can't just use UC Berkeley‟s logo. However, if Mr. Osmeña was
referring to the ASUC logo, Mr. Lam said he has published the ASUC logo and used that to create a very
generic press release that didn't have UC Berkeley‟s seal. He believed that worked. Mr. Osmeña asked if
that logo was included on the press release. Mr. Lam said it was, along with basic facts, telephone num-
bers, etc. He had that template, and if Senators wanted to use it, they should let him know.

Mr. Osmeña asked if there were regulations on the types of things Mr. Lam would write press releases
about on behalf of the Senate or the ASUC. Mr. Lam said that a Senator would usually submit an appli-
cation on what they want written. He would then have a sit-down meeting with them and other relevant
people involved, and they‟d all agree on something that was representative of the ASUC Senate. He‟d
then write the press release, give it to Senators to read to see if it was accurate, and then submit it. Most
of the time he didn't write anything by himself, and most material had to go through various checks. Mr.
Lam said Senators were present at debates and meetings and should have input on what the press release
said.
Report from the Public Relations Director (cont'd)                                                    - 41 -
Report from the Executive Vice President


Mr. Wu asked if Mr. Lam could send out the application to the Senate again. Mr. Lam said he would.

Mr. Shams asked about the expected turnaround time for a press release. Mr. Lam said it would be great
if people could send him information and the context or background of what they wanted the press
release on before the day it was considered, prior to the meeting he‟d hold. He usually gets them out the
next day or the day after meeting with Senators.

Mr. Osmeña asked if press releases were only written about bills passed by the Senate. Mr. Lam said that
was not necessarily the case, although in the past that‟s what it has been. That‟s what he‟s been asked to
do, with one exception. He would write press releases for any sorts of large event for Senators‟ constitu-
encies. If a group was holding a large event with a large number of students, it might be worth sending
out a press release or setting up a press conference, and he‟d be happy to assist with that. But most of the
time, press releases have dealt with external bills that involved advocacy. Seeing no further questions,
Ms. Allbright said she would like to thank Mr. Lam for his report.


Mr. Osmeña moved to return to Executive Officer Reports. The motion was seconded by Ms. Coleman
and passed with no objection.


Report from the Executive Vice President


With Ms. Shanbhag chairing the meeting. Ms. Allbright said she hoped people enjoyed their break. She
was in Berkeley but couldn't stay in her apartment, at 2450 Warring, near the fire that Dean Poullard
spoke about. Her apartment smelled like smoke all weekend and she couldn't breath. So she stayed with
friends. It wasn't fun. She was sure most of them were currently in the middle of final exams or projects,
as she was, and she hoped they were patient and considerate with one another during these next couple of
weeks. If they weren't seeing someone around the ASUC a lot, it was probably because they were doing
their homework. That was true for herself. During these difficult academic weeks, she hoped they're
patient with one another. They were all students.

Ms. Allbright said next week was the last Senate meeting of the fall, concluding the Fall Semester. Per
the By-laws, no business could be continued into the Spring Semester. So if there was anything they
needed to do that they didn't finish by next Wednesday do, they'd need to either call a Special Meeting or
write a new bill in the Spring Session. The next round of bills were due Tuesday, January 22 at 9 a.m.

As for updates, Ms. Allbright said the Web master already talked about everything regarding the Web
site. Based on a bill on a Webcam that the Senate will consider that evening, she asked the Web master
to send out all the research he‟s done up to this point, and that was e-mailed out. She could answer any
questions when they consider the bill, and could recuse herself as Chair to provide some context from the
EVP‟s office on that topic.

Ms. Allbright said she would ask Senators to please send in their statements of intent, which the By-laws
require to be on the Web site. They just need 100 words or so stating their intent as an elected official.
Also, people should get more information soon about the blogs.
Report from the Executive Vice President (cont'd)                                                     - 42 -


Ms. Allbright said they got a new bulletin board and new white boards for the Senate lounge and the little
conference room. They should be up in the next couple of days. They're still working on recycling bins
and trash cans.

Ms. Allbright said she wanted to thank Fi-Comm for approving the waiver for the end of the semester
EVP social/internship training event. They appreciate that, and hopefully the Senate‟s action that eve-
ning. They'll make a Facebook group for the Multicultural Center which will be up at the beginning of
next semester. She wanted to thank the Academic Affairs Office for taking the lead on ASUC T-shirts,
which were hopefully being ordered soon. They were developed by all of the internal chairs of all of the
Executive Offices.

Ms. Allbright said they‟ve been working to coordinate follow-up meetings with diversity trainers and
also with Campus Life and Leadership trainers for the January 19-20 Senate Training. The training will
probably focus on these follow-ups, because the people who did the training in the fall would only work
if there was a follow-up, because of the way these types of training were designed. This training session
will be primarily designed to give their second and final training, and also just to get everyone on the
same page and excited about their last semester, since that was a time where people might need a chance
to revisit and re-evaluate their goals for their remaining months in office.

Ms. Allbright said they're working on getting new tables and a projection screen for the Senate Chamber,
which would be paid for out of capital improvements. The Wednesday of Spring Welcome Week tenta-
tively will have a focus on the MCC. There would be a showcase on Sproul with different performers
and speakers to talk about the MCC and also showcase some of the different performance groups on
campus that would benefit from a third phase MCC. They'll do some sort of teach-in event in the eve-
ning, which looked like it will be a screening of the documentary about the 1999 strikes, and then proba-
bly a panel discussion. They're working with Sen. Duong‟s interns on a plan for a sort of leadership coa-
lition event, a leadership forum her interns wanted to work on. That would be held in February or March.

Ms. Allbright said the EVP‟s office was also continuing with its outreach to organizations to give infor-
mation about the ASUC. They've also started to work on the From All Perspectives Show. It will hope-
fully be the culmination of a week of events focusing on the current and potential diversity of the cam-
pus, and also the need for an MCC on the campus. Ms. Shanbhag called for any questions.

Mr. Weiner asked how much she‟s spent from the Capital Improvements account so far that year. Ms.
Allbright said she had the budget summary upstairs. She authorized purchase of the printer, the bulletin
boards and the white boards, the furniture for the 2nd floor. The doors were done without authorization
from the ASUC. She believed that was it. She could e-mail the exact numbers to the Senate.

Mr. Osmeña asked which computers on the 2nd floor of Eshleman Senators could use for Senate busi-
ness. Ms. Allbright said that according to Title I, Senators have access to all of the equipment on the 2nd
floor, in all of the Executive Offices. So they could use any of them. The EVP has a guest account that
didn't need a password. Academic Affairs requested that Senators not use their printer very much
because they were running low on money. The Chief-of-Staff sent that request to her, and Ms. Allbright
said she forgot to mention it.

Ms. Allbright said they were working to develop 213 Eshleman into a computer room, and they should
purchase computers soon. It would be a computer room for everybody. The room next to it would be a
Report from the Executive Vice President (cont'd)                                                      - 43 -
Elected Official Announcements (cont'd)
Report from the Academic Affairs Vice President


meeting lounge area. These were also meant to be communal spaces. Historically, they've been intern
rooms, and they kept that title in the most recent space allocation. When the rooms were improved, she
planned to rename them as a computer room and a meeting room.

Mr. Wu asked if computers could be taken out of the capital budget. Ms. Allbright said that was the plan.
They wouldn't be the fanciest computers.

Ms. Winston asked who the computers belong to that were in the Antechamber. Ms. Allbright said she
understood that room was used for storage by the Elections Council Chair. But technically, the room
wasn't authorized for anyone. She could do some research on that, but her guess was that the computers
were probably broken. That room was not locked, and she didn't think people would put working com-
puters in there. There was a lot of broken equipment, and there were policies about how to dispose of e-
waste. The Auxiliary had a room full of e-waste, so maybe that‟s what was in that room.

Mr. Wu said that over the summer there were some working computers in the Senate lounge. He asked if
she knew what happened to those. Ms. Allbright said one computer was in good working condition and a
couple were not of good quality. For the one that worked, when Building Operations cleaned out the
room for carpeting, the office asked them to return it to that little computer room. She could check if
they did that, but that was the request. The idea was that the room would be a computer workspace for
everyone, and the lounge would be more of a hang out space. Ms. Shanbhag said that seeing no further
questions, she would like to thank Ms. Allbright for the report.


Ms. Winston moved to go back to Elected Official Announcements. The motion was seconded by Ms.
Duong and passed with no objection.


Elected Official Announcements (cont'd)


Ms. Winston said she wanted to apologize to Senators. She missed her office hours on Tuesday due to a
scheduling conflict. She had to talk to a professor and it ran into her time for office hours. That was irre-
sponsible on her part and was not intentional.


Ms. Allbright said the Chair would entertain a motion for a two-minute recess. It was so moved and sec-
onded by Ms. Coleman and Mr. Jackson and passed with no objection. This meeting was recessed.


Report from the Academic Affairs Vice President


Mr. Lee said that applications were due that day for the Mentorship Program. A speaker said there were
about 70 undergraduates and 50 or 60 graduate students. Mr. Lee said he would urge students to save
Report from the Academic Affairs Vice President (cont'd)                                             - 44 -
Consent Calendar


their books and utilize the Bookswap next semester. They'll have it the first week back from school.
Also, for Bears Breaking Boundaries, a bill was submitted for that upcoming Fi-Comm meeting. Tom
Kalil, the Assistant to the Chancellor, will do a Special Order next Wednesday about that. Because of
timing, Mr. Kalil couldn't present before the Fi-Comm meeting. If people had questions, he‟d attend.

Mr. Lee said the Grants period has closed for the semester, so if any groups come to Fi-Comm, or Sena-
tors know of any groups that wanted grant money, they should tell the groups to apply in the spring.
Requests could not be considered for retroactive applications after the Grants period closed. The office
was looking to create a Public Service Fund and will probably submit a bill for that next semester. This
would help groups coming in for Grants money that didn't fall under any current Grants. Sen. Coleman
has expressed interest in working on this, and the office will contact her. If anybody else was interested
in working on this, Mr. Lee said they should contact him or Ray Rui Zhang. He called for any questions.

Ms. Winston asked when padfolios will come in. Mr. Lee said he hoped to have them before the end of
the semester.


CONSENT CALENDAR


Ms. Allbright said that as they had 16 Senators present, they were under the consideration of the Consent
Calendar.

The following bills and waivers were up for consideration that evening under the Consent Calendar:

SWs 44, 45, 46, 47, and 49, and SBs 90, as amended; 91, as amended; 92, as amended; 93, as amended;
94, as amended; 95, as amended; 96, as amended; 98, as amended; 99, as amended; 100; 101, as
amended; 102; 104, as amended; 105, 106, as amended; 108, as amended; 109; and 111, as amended.

The following bills were removed from the Consent Calendar: SBs 90, as amended; 105; and 106, as
amended.

The following bills and waivers remained under the Consent Calendar: SWs 44, 45, 46, 47, and 49, and
SBs 91, as amended; 92, as amended; 93, as amended; 94, as amended; 95, as amended; 96, as amended;
98, as amended; 99, as amended; 100; 101, as amended; 102; 104, as amended; 108, as amended; 109;
and 111, as amended.


Ms. Allbright called for any other changes to the Consent Calendar, and seeing none, said the Consent
Calendar was approved.

THE CONSENT CALENDAR WAS APPROVED WITH NO OBJECTION: SB 91, AS AMENDED;
SB 92, AS AMENDED; SB 93, AS AMENDED; SB 94, AS AMENDED; SB 95, AS AMENDED; SB
96, AS AMENDED; SB 98, AS AMENDED; SB 99, AS AMENDED; SB 100; SB 101, AS
AMENDED; SB 102; SB 104, AS AMENDED; SB 108, AS AMENDED; SB 109; AND SB 111, AS
AMENDED; AND SW 44, SW 45, SW 46, SW 47, AND SW 49,
Consent Calendar -- SB 91, In Support of Black Women‟s Appreciation                                - 45 -
                 -- SB 92, In Support of the International Affairs Journal at Berkeley


The following Resolution, SB 91, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Cedric Morris and Ms. Winston and was co-sponsored by Mr. Seaty:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF BLACK WOMEN'S APPRECIATION

WHEREAS, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. develops leaders, promotes brotherhood, and academic
         excellence, while providing service and advocacy for our communities; and

WHEREAS, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., Alpha Epsilon Chapter, was charted on the campus of UC
         Berkeley on January 17th, 1922 and since its inception 85 years ago, has supplied voice and
         vision to the struggle of African-Americans and people of color on and off the Berkeley
         campus; and

WHEREAS, Alpha Phi Alpha is a well-established seventh-year Student-Initiated Service Group; and

WHEREAS, Alpha Epsilon Chapter has received Western Region Chapter of the Year four times in a row
         and has won National Chapter of the year twice; and

WHEREAS, Alpha Phi Alpha has been a staple in the community and operates as a unifying factor
         among students on campus and people in the surrounding neighborhoods; and

WHEREAS, there are few events on campus that celebrate the integrity, diversity, strength, and grace of
         Black women; and

WHEREAS, for the past seven years the Fraternity has hosted Black Women's Appreciation as a means of
         creating campus community and uplifting a group of women on campus that are often
         neglected and marginalized; and

WHEREAS, during the event the organization recognizes women who actively work to uplift people of
         color and sacrifice themselves for the betterment of the Black community both on the UC
         Berkeley campus and in the greater Bay Area; and

WHEREAS, the event is in integral part of the Cal Black community and is attended by over 300 Berke-
         ley students and community members and is scheduled to take place November 29, 2007;
         and

WHEREAS, the Budget for Black Women's Appreciation is as follows: Total Expenses: $6,800.00;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $850 (eight hundred and fifty dollars) from
        Greek Opportunities Fund to Alpha Phi Alpha's Seventh Annual Black Women's
        Appreciation.



The following Resolution, SB 92, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Alex Haskell and Mr. Shams:
Consent Calendar -- SB 92, In Support of the International Affairs Journal at Berkeley (cont'd) - 46 -
                 -- SB 93, In Support of the Medical School Fair Hosted by Pre-Medical Honor Society


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS JOURNAL AT BERKELEY

WHEREAS, the International Affairs Journal (IAJ) at Berkeley is an independent first-year publication;
         and

WHEREAS, it is recognized that the mission of the IAJ at Berkeley is comprised of articles and research
         by students with a range of multi-disciplinary perspectives on issues of concern in the inter-
         national arena; and

WHEREAS, the IAJ at Berkeley is published quarterly, along with a bi-weekly international update made
         available online and will maintain stringent levels of quality, scholarship, and
         professionalism; and

WHEREAS, the goal of the IAJ at Berkeley is to bring insightful analysis of international issues to the
         UC Berkeley campus; and

WHEREAS, given Berkeley's reputation as the premier public university in the world, with an emphasis
         on internationalism, they believe that this is an important and worthy goal; and

WHEREAS, this first-year publication will impact a wide cross section of the student body and especially
         students in the Political Science, History, and International and Area Studies Departments;
         and

WHEREAS, they hope their bi-weekly updates online will reach a larger number of UC Berkeley
         students; and

WHEREAS, they hope to expand from 200 issues initially printed to 500; and

WHEREAS, the publication will be free for all UC Berkeley students and faculty; and

WHEREAS, the IAJ at Berkeley will also give students the opportunity to share their opinions in a public
         forum and gain valuable experience in writing and publishing; and

WHEREAS, the prospective budget is: 8"x 5" 100-page booklets, $2,000;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC recognizes the International Affairs Journal at Berke-
        ley as a first-year ASUC-sponsored publication group (PUB).

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that the ASUC Senate allocates $575 (five hundred and seventy-five
          dollars) to the International Affairs Journal at Berkeley from the Senate Contingency Fund.



The following Resolution, SB 93, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Mr. Wong and was co-sponsored by Mr. Lee:
CC -- SB 93, In Support of the Medical School Fair Hosted by Pre-Medical Honor Society (cont'd) - 47 -
   -- SB 94, In Support of the European Student Union


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE MEDICAL SCHOOL FAIR HOSTED BY PRE-MEDICAL
HONOR SOCIETY

WHEREAS, the Pre-Medical Honor Society (PMHS) is a student organization in which pre-medical stu-
         dents who have achieved academic excellence can further enhance their understanding of the
         study and practice of medicine through open forums, medical school seminars, and
         research/clinical internships; and

WHEREAS, the Pre-Medical Honor Society is an organization dedicated to assisting pre-medical stu-
         dents; and

WHEREAS, the Medical School Fair is the largest PMHS event of the year; and

WHEREAS, this event is a unique opportunity for UC Berkeley students to hear directly from medical
         school admissions representatives from across the country; and

WHEREAS, there are eight medical schools presenting at this fair, including UCLA, UCSF, and Baylor
         Medical Schools; and

WHEREAS, the budget for this fair is as follows: Total, $510.00;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC Senate recognize the Medical School Fair as an
        ASUC-sponsored event.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the ASUC Senate allocate $220 (two hundred and twenty dollars)
          from the Senate Contingency Fund to the Medical School Fair hosted by the Pre-Medical
          Honor Society.



The following Resolution, SB 94, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Mr. Wong and was co-sponsored by Mr. Lee:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE EUROPEAN STUDENT UNION

WHEREAS, the European Student Union (ESU) is an organization dedicated to revealing and fostering
         the incredible diversity of European cultures and all that they have to offer here at Berkeley;
         and

WHEREAS, ESU's vision is "to promote and share European culture through a variety of social and aca-
         demic events such as cultural festivals, exchanges with other student groups, movie nights,
         dinners, debates, speaker panels, and parties; and

WHEREAS, ESU also wants to help welcome new European students at Cal by holding social events and
         answering any questions they might have about our University, the State, or the country; and
Consent Calendar -- SB 94, In Support of the European Student Union (cont'd)                       - 48 -
                 -- SB 95, In Support of Kappa Gamma Delta's Dodgeball Tournament

RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE EUROPEAN STUDENT UNION (cont'd)

WHEREAS, their budget for the 2007-2008 academic year is as follows: Total, $504.00;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC Senate recognize the European Student Union as a
        third-year Student Activities Group (SAG).

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocates $200.00 (two hundred dollars) from the Senate
          Contingency Fund to the European Student Union.


The following Resolution, SB 95, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Leah Hong and Mr. Wong, and was co-sponsored by Mr. Lee:

RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF KAPPA GAMMA DELTA'S DODGEBALL TOURNAMENT

WHEREAS, Kappa Gamma Delta Premedical Sorority plans to hold its annual Dodgeball Tournament on
         November 18th, 2007: and

WHEREAS, Kappa Gamma Delta seeks to invigorate the student body with a novel and exciting way to
         raise thousands of dollars for charity; and

WHEREAS, in the past, up to 450 people participated in the Dodgeball tournament, including teams from
         various campus organizations; and

WHEREAS, the event was and will be publicized all over the Bay Area through the radio station WILD
         94.9, listserves, flyering, posting in buildings, as well as newsletters; and

WHEREAS, last year the event raised over $1,000 for the GLIDE foundation, a non-profit human
         services agency in San Francisco, as well as over $4,000 to past organizations, such as
         Women‟s Cancer Research Fund and Red Cross Hurricane Katrina; and

WHEREAS, this year Kappa Gamma Delta plans to raise money and donate all of it to the Leukemia and
         Lymphoma Society; and

WHEREAS, Kappa Gamma Delta is concurrently applying for ASUC grants; and

WHEREAS, Kappa Gamma Delta hopes to make the Dodgeball Tournament as well known here at Cal as
         it is at UCLA, where it has been a staple campus event for a number of years; and

WHEREAS, the budget for Kappa Gamma Delta's Dodgeball Tournament is as follows: Total, $2,150.00;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC Senate recognizes the Dodgeball Tournament as an
        ASUC-sponsored event.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the ASUC Senate allocates $640 (six hundred and forty dollars)
          from the Senate Contingency Fund to Kappa Gamma Delta.
Consent Calendar -- SB 96, In Support of Rock the Jade Charity Show                                 - 49 -


The following Resolution, SB 96, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Denis Lam and was co-sponsored by Ms. Shen, Ms. Duong, Mr. Kim, and Mr. Lee:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF ROCK THE JADE CHARITY FASHION SHOW

WHEREAS, Asian and Pacific Islanders are facing a health care crisis from hepatitis B infections and
         liver cancer as follows:

            a.) 1 out of 10 APIs has chronic HBV.
            b.) HBV is 100 times more infectious than HIV.
            c.) 80% of liver cancer is caused by HBV.
            d.) 1 in 4 APIs living with chronic HBV will die from liver disease or liver cancer.
            e.) Due to lack of symptoms, awareness and testing, most APIs are unaware of their
                infections.
            f.) APIs are 100 times more likely to have chronic HBV than whites (1 out of 10 for APIs 1
                out of 1,000 for whites).
            g.) APIs have the highest rates of liver cancer for any racial/ethnic group.
            h.) The greatest health disparity between Asian Americans and white Americans is liver
                cancer.
            i.) Up to 23,000 women in the United States who give birth each year have chronic HBV
                infection, and 70% of them are API.
            j.) Liver cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in Asian men living in the
                US .
            k.) Over half of chronically infected HBV Americans are API.
            1.) The incidence of HBV is highest among Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, Laotian and
                Vietnamese Americans; and

WHEREAS, the American Cancer Society recently found that HBV-related liver cancer continues to
         affect Asian American and Pacific Islanders with consistently high incidence rates in the
         Greater San Francisco Bay Area; and

WHEREAS, the health care crisis posed by HBV is largely preventable as follows:

            a.) 70% to 80% of all liver cancers in Asians can be prevented by a HBV vaccination.
            b.) HBV is a vaccine-preventable disease.
            c.) HBV-related liver cancer is a vaccine-preventable cancer.
            d.) The HBV vaccine was declared the first anti-cancer vaccine.
            e.) The HBV vaccine is safe and has been given to over 500 million people in the world; and

WHEREAS, screening (testing) is also necessary to address the HBV health crisis for the following
         reasons:
Consent Calendar -- SB 96, In Support of Rock the Jade Charity Show (cont'd)                         - 50 -
                 -- SB 98, In Support of Coming Together: Concert for the Conscious


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF ROCK THE JADE CHARITY FASHION SHOW (cont'd)

            a.) To identify individuals who have chronic HBV infection so they can receive appropriate
                medical management..
            b.) To identify those who are unprotected so they can be vaccinated.
            c.) To avoid unnecessary vaccination and help reduce costs, since vaccination is not benefi-
                cial for individuals already chronically infected with HBV or already immune.
            d) Individuals born before 1991 have a high chance of not receiving vaccinations at birth
                because federal guidelines recommending universal HBV immunization of infants,
                regardless of the mother's HBV status, were implemented in 1991; and

WHEREAS, the Asian Liver Center at Stanford University and the AsianWeek Foundation have recently
         worked with a network of Bay Area community and healthcare organizations to launch a
         citywide campaign entitled "SAN FRANCISCO HEP B FREE," to turn San Francisco into
         the first hepatitis B free city in the nation within the next two years; and

WHEREAS, Rock the Jade Fashion Show, a two-hour long fashion show will feature student and inde-
         pendent designers and makers, intertwined with performances by various spoken word disc-
         jockies and musical talents, and will be hosted by ASUC-sponsored organizations Team
         HBV and Fashion and Student Trends (FAST) on Sunday, December 9, 2007 at Pauley Ball-
         room (ASUC wheelchair accessible) for the following purposes:

            a.) To showcase students' creativity and self-expression in the spirit of furthering activism
                and philanthropy embodied by the Berkeley community.
            b.) To create public awareness about the prevalence of hepatitis and liver cancer among the
                Berkeley community.
            c.) To fundraise for the Asian Week Foundation solely for use in SF Hep B Free; and

WHEREAS, the role of AsianWeek Foundation in SF Hep B Free is as a founding member of the Steer-
         ing Committee, with specific responsibilities for community organizing, advocacy, public
         outreach and fundraising. All funds received by AWF for the SF Hep B Free campaign
         would be used as part of a media and outreach campaign; and

WHEREAS, the budget for the Rock the Jade Fashion Show is as follows: Total Projected Expenses,
         $2,800;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $650 (six hundred and fifty dollars) from the
        Senate Contingency Fund to Team HBV and FAST to support Rock the Jade Fashion
        Show‟s publicity efforts.



The following Resolution, SB 98, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Mr. Jackson:
Consent Calendar -- SB 98, In Support of Coming Together: Concert for the Conscious (cont'd)      - 51 -
                 -- SB 99, In Support of Pi Sigma Alpha


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF COMING TOGETHER: CONCERT FOR THE CONSCIOUS

WHEREAS, on Monday, November 19th, 2007 there will be a fundraising event on Lower Sproul that
         will bring together many of the campus' progressive student groups; and;

WHEREAS, the event will act as a forum for social consciousness, an opportunity for coalition building
         among progressive student groups, and a venue for the expression of ideals founded in social
         justice through art and music; and

WHEREAS, individual student groups will have the opportunity to table and fundraise for their respective
         causes, and;

WHEREAS, the current budget for the event is: Total price of the event was over $3,759; and

WHEREAS, proceeds from the event will be donated to Berkeley Stoves;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $750 from the Carry Forward fund.



The following Resolution, SB 99, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Kat Saad and Mr. Silver and was co-sponsored by Ms. Patel, Mr. Shams, and Mr.
Jackson:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF PI SIGMA ALPHA

WHEREAS, the mission of the Iota Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha is to promote to academic achievement,
         service in the community and participation in political activism among students in the Politi-
         cal Science Department; and

WHEREAS, the Iota Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha seeks to offer Political Science students a forum for
         opportunities to volunteer and network; and

WHEREAS, the Iota Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha plans to invite prominent speakers to discuss current
         issues, on-going research at UC Berkeley, graduate school and future career opportunities
         for the benefit of students at UC Berkeley; and

WHEREAS, the Iota Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha plans to create and maintain a database for events perti-
         nent to Political Science on campus, including job fairs, graduate school fairs, and lectures
         by prominent speakers hosted by other departments; and

WHEREAS, the Iota Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha plans to host an annual banquet on campus, inviting stu-
         dents and faculty to participate; and

WHEREAS, the estimated operating budget for the 2007-2008 school year is as follows: Total, $530.24;
Consent Calendar -- SB 99, In Support of Pi Sigma Alpha (cont'd)                                    - 52 -
                 -- SB 100, In Support of the ASUC Grants Program


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF PI SIGMA ALPHA (cont'd)

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC recognize the Iota Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha as a
        third-year Student Activities Group (SAG) in the 2007-08 school year.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $185 (one hundred and eighty-five dollars) from
          the Senate Contingency Fund.



The following Resolution, SB 100, was approved under the Consent Calendar and was authored by Rita
Zhang Mr. Lee and was co-sponsored by Mr. Galeon, Mr. Kim, Ms. Patel, Mr. Shams, and Ms. Ureña:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE ASUC GRANTS PROGRAM

WHEREAS, the ASUC Grants Program awards money to individuals and student organizations for a
         variety of programming to enhance their experience at the University of California,
         Berkeley; and

WHEREAS, these grants provide crucial financial support for various activities, research, trips, forums,
         and classes; and

WHEREAS, in the Fall 2005 Senate Session, SB 150 allocated additional funds to the Academic Oppor-
         tunity Fund and to the Educational Enhancement Fund; and

WHEREAS, in the Fall 2006 Senate Session, SB 97 allocated $11,000 to the Academic Opportunity
         Fund, $3,000 to the Educational Enhancement Fund, and $7,000 to the Intellectual Commu-
         nity Fund; and

WHEREAS, in the Fall 2006 Senate Session, SB 107 allocated $4,000 to the Culture Shows Fund; and

WHEREAS, thus, bringing the grand total for the ASUC Grants Program in the 2006-2007 academic year
         to:

             • $33,885 in the Academic Opportunity Fund
             • $4,000 in the Culture Show Fund
             • $6,980 in the Educational Enhancement Fund
             • $15,955 in the Intellectual Community Fund; and

WHEREAS, currently the Grants Program has:

             • $23,350 in the Academic Opportunity Fund
             • $857.23 in the Culture Show Fund
Consent Calendar -- SB 100, In Support of the ASUC Grants Program (cont'd)                    - 53 -
                 -- SB 101, In Support of the First Annual Alpha Epsilon Pi Greek Family Feud


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE ASUC GRANTS PROGRAM (cont'd)

            • $3,000 in the Educational Enhancement Fund
            • $9,000 in the Intellectual Community Fund; and

WHEREAS, the Grants Program is constantly growing with the needs of the student body and has for the
         past few years seen an increase in the amount of applicants who apply; and

WHEREAS, in order to provide the necessary support to student activities and programs, the grants are in
         dire need of being supplemented by the ASUC Senate in order to sustain its programs and
         continue to serve student needs; and

WHEREAS, in regards to the Educational Enhancement Fund, the DE-Cal Community has grown signifi-
         cantly in the past few semesters. The constraining budget we are currently working with has
         limited us in our ability to fully award qualified applicants their deserved amounts; and

WHEREAS, currently the Culture Show Fund is at less than a quarter of what it was allocated in the pre-
         vious fiscal year. This minimal amount -- at best -- provides us only enough room to allo-
         cate one full grant;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the following amounts be transferred to the following accounts
        from the Carry Forward Holding Fund:

            • $12,000 to the Academic Opportunity Fund
            • $5,000 to the Culture Show Fund
            • $5,000 to the Educational Enhancement Fund
            • $8,000 to the Intellectual Community Fund



The following Resolution, SB 101, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Alpha Epsilon Pi Philanthropy Co-Chair I. Tregub and Mr. Weiner:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE FIRST ANNUAL ALPHA EPSILON PI GREEK FAMILY
FEUD

WHEREAS, the First Annual Epsilon Greek Family Feud endeavors to raise $1,000 to benefit Chai Life-
         line, a benefit that supports Jewish families with terminally ill children and runs a two-week
         summer camp experience for those children; and

WHEREAS, the Greek Family Feud is a one-day event that seeks to bring together the four Greek coun-
         cils and will be heavily advertised in all student communities; and
CC -- SB 101, In Support of the First Annual Alpha Epsilon Pi Greek Family Feud (cont'd)             - 54 -
   -- SB 102, In Support of the Electrochemical Society (ECS) at Berkeley


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE FIRST ANNUAL ALPHA EPSILON PI GREEK FAMILY
FEUD (cont'd)

WHEREAS, Alpha Epsilon Pi is taking steps to seek additional contributions from ASUC grants and
         through corporate and private donations; and

WHEREAS, the stated goal of the Greek Opportunity Fund is to encourage the goodwill conducted by
         UC Berkeley's Greek chapters, which collectively comprise 12% of the student population;
         and

WHEREAS, the budget of the First Annual Alpha Epsilon Pi Greek Family Feud stands as follows (fund-
         able materials are in bold): Total, $1,381.46; Total Requested ASUC Contribution, $571.46;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC recognize the First Annual Alpha Epsilon Pi Greek
        Family Feud as an ASUC-sponsored event.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $450 towards the Alpha Epsilon Pi Greek Family
          Feud from the Greek Opportunity Fund.


The following Resolution, SB 102, was approved under the Ms. Kuo and Penny Gunterman:

RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE ELECTROCHEMICAL SOCIETY (ECS) AT BERKELEY

WHEREAS, the Electrochemical Society (ECS) was founded in 1902 as an international nonprofit, edu-
         cational organization dedicated to advancing the theory and practice of electrochemistry; and

WHEREAS, electrochemistry is the study of fuel cells and batteries that would serve as alternative
         sources of energy; and

WHEREAS, ECS at Berkeley currently consists of 14 members upon their establishment in fall 2007, and
         expects to grow to 50 members projected over the next two years; and

WHEREAS, recruitment is geared toward students enrolled in energy courses and partaking in growth
         efforts, and publicity will be conducted via flyering and tabling at high-profile events such
         as research poster sessions; and

WHEREAS, UC Berkeley currently leads a $500 million energy research consortium, in partnership with
         the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and the University of Illinois; and

WHEREAS, ECS bridges the gaps among academia, research, and engineering to bring people together
         from around the world for the exchange of technical information;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Electrochemical Society at Berkeley be recognized by the
        ASUC as a first-year student activities group.
CC -- SB 104, In Support of Images of India                                                    - 55 -
                -- SB 108, In Support of Pink Ribbon Poetry: A Night of Poetry To Fight Breast
                            Cancer


The following Resolution, SB 104, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Anil Aswani and Ms. Patel:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF IMAGES OF INDIA

WHEREAS, Asha for Education is a globally recognized non-profit organization with over 60 chapters in
         the United States dedicated “to catalyze socio-economic change in India through education
         of underprivileged children"; and

WHEREAS, UC Berkeley's Asha for Education Chapter has been a recognized student activity group
         since 1991; and

WHEREAS, Asha for Education Chapter is holding its 17th annual Images of India: A Night of Food,
         Music, and Dance event on November 17th, 2007; and

WHEREAS, this event raised over $11,000 in revenue and $7,000 in profit that went directly to grass-
         roots schools in India last year; and

WHEREAS, the production of this event is being carried out by over 50 UC Berkeley students this year;
         and

WHEREAS, all proceeds from the show will benefit social ventures in India that are involved in grass-
         roots efforts to further the education of disadvantaged children; and

WHEREAS, all flyers and publicity materials state the event is sponsored by the ASUC; and

WHEREAS, the budget for Images of India is as follows: Total, $3,526;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that Asha For Education receive $350.00 from the Senate Contin-
        gency Fund to fund Images of India.



The following Resolution, SB 108, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Andrew Epstein Mr. Silver and was co-sponsored by Mr. Seaty, Mr. Jackson, Ms.
Duong, and Mr. Wong:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF PINK RIBBON POETRY: A NIGHT OF POETRY TO FIGHT
BREAST CANCER

WHEREAS, spoken word poetry is a long standing tradition on the Berkeley campus; and

WHEREAS, spoken word poetry slams allow for a creative space for self expression; and
CC -- SB 108, In Support of Pink Ribbon Poetry: Night of Poetry To Fight Breast Cancer (cont'd) - 56 -
   -- SB 109, In Support of Pi Alpha Phi's Hepatitis B Awareness (Jade Ribbon Campaign)
              Philanthropy Event


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF PINK RIBBON POETRY: A NIGHT OF POETRY TO FIGHT
BREAST CANCER (cont'd)

WHEREAS, on December 7th, 2007, there will be a collaborative spoken word poetry event titled "Pink
         Ribbon Poetry: A Night of Poetry to Fight Breast Cancer" co-sponsored by two ASUC spon-
         sored groups, Theater for Charity and Cal Slam; and

WHEREAS, all proceeds of the event will be donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, whose
         mission is "to achieve prevention and a cure for breast cancer in our lifetime by providing
         critical funding for innovative clinical and genetic research at leading medical centers
         worldwide, and increasing public awareness about good breast health. A minimum of 85
         cents of every dollar goes to research and awareness programs."; and

WHEREAS, the expected turnout of the event will be 350-400 people with spoken word poetry from over
         12 artists from both the local and UC Berkeley communities; and

WHEREAS, the estimated budget for the event is as follows: Total budget: $470;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that "Pink Ribbon Poetry: A Night of Poetry to Fight Breast Cancer"
        be recognized as an ASUC-sponsored event.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $290 (two hundred and ninety dollars) to "Pink
          Ribbon Poetry: A Night of Poetry to Fight Breast Cancer," from the Senate Contingency
          Fund.



The following Resolution, SB 109, was approved under the Consent Calendar and was authored by Bruce
Chen and Mr. Louie:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF PI ALPHA PHI'S HEPATITIS B AWARENESS (JADE RIBBON
CAMPAIGN) PHILANTHROPY EVENT

WHEREAS, Asian and Pacific Islanders are facing a health care crisis from hepatitis B infections and
         liver cancer as follows:

            a.) 1 out of 10 APIs has chronic HBV.
            b.) HBV is 100 times more infectious than HIV.
            c.) 80% of liver cancer is caused by HBV.
            d.) 1 in 4 APIs living with chronic HBV will die from liver disease or liver cancer.
            e.) Due to lack of symptoms, awareness and testing, most APIs are unaware of their
                infections.
CC -- SB 109, In Support of Pi Alpha Phi's Hepatitis B Awareness (Jade Ribbon Campaign)             - 57 -
              Philanthropy Event (cont'd)


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF PI ALPHA PHI'S HEPATITIS B AWARENESS (JADE RIBBON
CAMPAIGN) PHILANTHROPY EVENT (cont'd)

            f.) APIs are 100 times more likely to have chronic HBV than whites (1 out of 10 for APIs 1
                out of 1,000 for whites).
            g.) APIs have the highest rates of liver cancer for any racial/ethnic group.
            h.) The greatest health disparity between Asian Americans and white Americans is liver
                cancer.
            i.) Up to 23,000 women in the United States who give birth each year have chronic HBV
                infection, and 70% of them are API.
            j.) Liver cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in Asian men living in the
                US .
            k.) Over half of chronically infected HBV Americans are API.
            1.) The incidence of HBV is highest among Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, Laotian and
                Vietnamese Americans; and

WHEREAS, in May 2001 the Asian Liver Center launched the Jade Ribbon Campaign (JRC) to prevent,
         fight, and enhance awareness of this disease to promote a healthier API community; and

WHEREAS, Pi Alpha Phi is the first nationally recognized Asian-American interest fraternity established
         in 1926 with 12 chapters (and growing) in the United States; and

WHEREAS, Alpha Chapter of Pi Alpha Phi at Berkeley, is an officially recognized fraternity by the
         Inter-Fraternity Council; and

WHEREAS, Pi Alpha Phi's five pillars are philanthropy, brotherhood, academics, leadership, and Asian-
         American awareness; and

WHEREAS, Pi Alpha Phi has annually supported JRC by raising donations and promoting the message
         through the San Francisco Chinese New Year Parade; and

WHEREAS, Pi Alpha Phi will collaborate with Team HBV at UC Berkeley, the official chapter of the
         Asian Liver Center, to host a JRC week to inform the Berkeley students about the dangers of
         Hepatitis B; and

WHEREAS, the event shall consist of handing out nationally recognized JRC pins and wristbands in
         return for donations to the Asian Liver Center in an effort to outreach to the Berkeley cam-
         pus and fund hepatitis B educational outreach and prevention programs; and

WHEREAS, the event will take place on November 27,28, and 29, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at Upper Sproul;
         and

WHEREAS, the projected budget for this event is as follows: $500;
CC -- SB 109, In Support of Pi Alpha Phi's Hepatitis B Awareness (Jade Ribbon Campaign)            - 58 -
              Philanthropy Event (cont'd)
   -- SB 111, In Support of the ASUC Bookswap

RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF PI ALPHA PHI'S HEPATITIS B AWARENESS (JADE RIBBON
CAMPAIGN) PHILANTHROPY EVENT (cont'd)

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the ASUC recognize this as an ASUC-sponsored Greek Philanthropic
        Event.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $500 (five hundred dollars) from the Greek
          Opportunity Fund to Pi Alpha Phi's JRC Philanthropy Event.


The following Resolution, SB 111, as amended in committee, was approved under the Consent Calendar
and was authored by Andy Ur, Andrea Kramar, Amy Tran, and Mr. Lee, and was co-sponsored by Mr.
Kunert, Mr. Osmeña, Ms. Patel, Mr. Wong, and Mr. Wu:

RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF THE ASUC BOOKSWAP

WHEREAS, the ASUC Bookswap is an event put on through the Office of the Academic Affairs Vice
         President at the beginning of the Fall and Spring Semesters. The Spring 2008 ASUC
         Bookswap will be held on January 22nd through January 28th; and

WHEREAS, the Fall 2007 ASUC Bookswap received approximately 500 textbooks to be resold and
         saved Cal Students $3,250.00; and

WHEREAS, for all unsold books, students were given the opportunity to pick them up after the event was
         finished. Any books that were not picked up will be donated to "Bridge to Asian" a non-
         profit organization that donates English language teaching and research materials to more
         than 1,000 university libraries and 3,000 reference rooms; and

WHEREAS, this event is a grassroots, student-implemented/run effort to offer Cal students the opportu-
         nity to buy textbooks at reasonable prices and receive the entirety of the profit for books that
         they decide to sell to their peers; and

WHEREAS, while other entities only return a percentage of the book's selling price to the student, the
         ASUC Bookswap allows the seller to get the greatest return. As the cost of education and
         textbooks rise, the Bookswap is a valuable service as it hopes to defray a fraction of this cost
         for both buyer and seller; and

WHEREAS, the program is environmentally friendly as well and has collaborated with REUSE in an
         attempt to bring students reusable course readers in an attempt to make the school more
         sustainable; and

WHEREAS, the budget for the events is as follows: Total $750.00;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC Senate allocate $400 (four hundred dollars) to the
        ASUC Bookswap from the Senate Contingency Fund.
Consent Calendar -- Fee Waivers                                                                           - 59 -
Items for Immediate Consideration, SB 90, In Support of Spring Welcome Week


The following fee waivers was approved under the Consent Calendar:

      SW 44, Finance Rule Waiver: SLUgS: Passed; $60
      SW 45, Facility Use Fee Waiver: Alpha Phi Alpha: Passed; $504
      SW 46, Facility Use Fee Waiver: Team HBV/FAST: Passed; $575
      SW 47, Finance Rule Waiver: ASUC EVP: Passed; $85.60
      SW 49, Finance Rule Waiver: Jewish Student Union: Passed; $1200


ITEMS FOR IMMEDIATE CONSIDERATION


A motion to go to SB 90A was made and was seconded by Ms. Patel and passed by hand-vote 11-5-0.


Ms. Allbright said the Chair would entertain a motion for a two-minute recess. It was so moved and sec-
onded by Mr. Seaty and Ms. Patel and passed with no objection. This meeting was recessed.

Back in session, the following Resolution, SB 90, as amended in committee, was authored by Misty
Ahmadi, Andrew Adelman, and Mr. Osmeña, and was co-sponsored by Mr. Lee:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF SPRING WELCOME WEEK

WHEREAS, Spring Welcome Week began last year under the leadership of two former ASUC Senators;
         and

WHEREAS, Spring Welcome Week is being organized by the Office of the Academic Affairs Vice
         President and will take place from January 23-26; and

WHEREAS, Spring Welcome Week is seeking funding from a variety of sources, including ASUC
         Grants, the Student Opportunity Fund, New Student Services, and the City of Berkeley; and

WHEREAS, the Week's activities are geared toward both new and returning students; and

WHEREAS, the Week's activities will bring together a large number of student groups, ASUC services,
         and campus departments, including advising and the Career Center;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC Senate move $6,000 from the ASUC Commercial
        Revenue Holding Fund to the ASUC program Spring Welcome Week.

Mr. Osmeña said he thought this was an important project, which the ASUC began last year. It was car-
ried out in the Office of the President. It fit a lot of criteria the ASUC was looking for in that it served a
large number of students, not only new students and transfer students, but it would be an opportunity for
SB 90, In Support of Spring Welcome Week (cont'd)                                                     - 60 -


current students to learn more about the ASUC and to get involved. The Finance Committee requested
doing what other student groups do, and to seek other sources of funding. So the Week was also being
funded by the University New Student Services; the Student Opportunity Fund; ASUC Grants; and the
Greek Pan-Hellenic Council, which has put money into the event. So they‟ve sought other sources of
funding and they're working with a lot of different student groups. They were finding a lot of interest in
Spring Welcome Week. So he would hoped the Senate supports an event that the ASUC developed
itself.

Mr. Seaty said a lot of organizations and events also meet the criteria that Fi-Comm has set. On Monday
a speaker came in on behalf of the bill and talked about the financial need of the event and mentioned
they wanted $5,000 out of that meeting. A large portion of the budget was for performance fees,
$15,000. He thought the budget ran about $21,000. Many Senators at the Fi-Comm meeting mentioned
a lot of groups that were locally based that could have performed for much cheaper. He thought the allo-
cation of $6,500, as the bill was amended, was a little bit much. He saw the importance of the event, but
he didn't think the ASUC should have to pay so much. He thought the University should pay for this
event.

Mr. Weiner asked what allocation came out of Committee. Ms. Allbright said it was $6,000.

Ms. Patel asked Mr. Seaty who stated at the Fi-Comm meeting that $5,000 was needed for the event. Mr.
Seaty said he believed it was AAVP Lee, and Andrew Adelman. A lot of discussion on Monday was
about the performance costs being a little much. Fi-Comm doesn't go through line items or tell each
event how to spend money, but asked if they could cut back on the cost of performance fees, and to fund
them appropriately. He thought speakers on Monday mentioned that whatever they were allocated,
they'd adjust their budget accordingly.

Ms. Patel said Mr. Seaty also mentioned that he believed the University should fund the event. She asked
what aspect he felt the University should fund, and if that was based on precedent. Mr. Seaty said he
thought the University should fund the entire event, if it was for the entire student body. The Senate also
allocated funding for groups that catered to the entire campus, but the University funded Welcome Week
in the fall, and he thought it should fund Spring Welcome Week. He thought it was great that the event
was student initiated, but if it was funded by the University it would also get more publicity and would
get more students out.

Mr. Jackson said he was trying to put on one event, with the Gender Equity Center, and one problem
they've encountered was that they don't have money to allocate to the event. So it was very important
that the event have as much money as possible. To compare it to fall Welcome Week, they didn't even
have $500 to have the funding. They're talking to the University, but the University was having
problems.

Mr. Seaty asked if he know how the actual committee putting on the event was receiving money from the
committee hosting the event. Mr. Jackson said they haven't been able to talk about that because it was
unclear what money was available.

Mr. Shams said he supported the bill. He tried to make every Fi-Comm meeting. He thought $6,000 was
a fair compromise from what‟s been asked for from the beginning. He hoped they'll recognize that they
hope the University will take the reins on such events in the future, maybe not with planning, but with
SB 90, In Support of Spring Welcome Week (cont'd)                                                      - 61 -


funding, because when they compare it to Fall Welcome Week, they hope there will be parity in the
future between the two, and that the burden wasn't solely on the students. Mr. Shams said that one reason
he pulled the bill from the Consent Calendar was because this amount of money he felt needed to be on
the record and public, so student groups could look and see how much was allocated. In Fi-Comm it's
been said that $1,000 represented so many new groups being funded, so he thought it was important to be
on the record. He asked what was being done with to make the University more responsible for this
event in the future, concerning money and outreach, and also asked what outreach has been done to reach
as many groups as possible. Being a spring admit, he wasn't outreached to before he came here, although
that might have been because he was from out-of-State. Also, he asked if people would also work with
Cal-SO, which does its own events for spring admits, as did the Extension program.

Mr. Rhoads said he thought this was an important event. He thought the compromise was reasonable and
thought the Senate should move forward. This event was something the University should support, and
was supporting, with financial backing and other support. But as the ASUC, they were committed to
supporting students, as a whole body. Being out there and showing what they were about would show a
lot about the Association as a whole. This was a good event to prove to the students that the ASUC was
doing a lot for them. The event was important to fund and to do the right thing for the students.

Mr. Seaty asked how criteria for this event compared to other events on campus. Mr. Rhoads said this
was a one-time only event that reached the entire campus. It comes from resources that were a little bit
different than student group events usually get, so it needed to be looked at a little differently. He felt
this type of event was completely geared towards every person on the campus. As a third-year, second
semester, he knew he‟d learn something at this event about the campus that he didn't know about before.
Anybody who has been here one semester or seven semesters could gain something from this. He
thought it would open opportunities for everyone on the campus.

Ms. Winston said she had some hesitation in Fi-Comm about making an allocation to the event. Six
thousand dollars was a bigger sum than they've allocated for an event, but people spoke about how it
would reach a large student population. She hoped the funding got good performers. People on the
committee who spoke to Fi-Comm on Monday showed they've done the background research and done
the work to make this effective. She looked forward to seeing what happens. Also, she would caution
Senators strongly against using the argument that an event will reach out to all students. That statement
was very arbitrary. They don't know which events will reach out to all students. So she would ask
people to please not use that argument. If it's used for some events, they should use it for all events.

Ms. Duong said she was a Cal-SO counselor two years ago and she knew the University did not provide
enough support for spring admits. She had to lead groups of spring admits through a program, and to be
able to tell them there would be a Spring Welcome Week would definitely give them encouragement and
would show they're just as much of a student as those admitted in the fall. She felt the amount of money
the Senate allocated will definitely provide equal opportunity for these students and will also signal to the
University that this was an important program; and hopefully the University will pick up on this and take
leadership on it, and continue to hold Spring Welcome Week as a tradition for the campus.

Ms. Patel moved to call the question. The motion to end debate was seconded and passed unanimously
by voice-vote.

THE MOTION TO APPROVE SB 90, AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE, PASSED UNANIMOUSLY
BY VOICE-VOTE, RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF SPRING WELCOME WEEK.
SB 106, In Support of Friends of the Co-ops                                                       - 62 -


The following Resolution, SB 106, as amended in committee, and as resurrected out of committee, was
authored by Ms. Coleman, Erica Mu, and Johnathan Kelly, and was co-sponsored by Ms. Winston:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF FRIENDS OF THE CO-OPS

WHEREAS, the Berkeley Student Cooperative is a non-profit, student-run and student-owned housing
         organization based on the principles of open and voluntary membership, cooperation,
         democracy, advancement of the common good, and community among its members; and

WHEREAS, the Berkeley Student Cooperative currently provides affordable housing for over twelve
         hundred UC Berkeley students; and

WHEREAS, Friends of the Co-ops (formerly "Friends of the University Students Cooperative Associa-
         tion") is a Campus Life and Leadership sponsored Student Activity Group originally estab-
         lished by co-opers in 2003; and

WHEREAS, the objective of Friends of the Co-ops is to serve as the official link between the Berkeley
         Student Cooperative and UC Berkeley; ensuring that UC Berkeley students are aware of
         affordable housing options by expanding the outreach and recruitment capabilities of the
         Berkeley Student Cooperative and increasing its visibility on the UC Berkeley Campus; and

WHEREAS, although Friends of the Co-ops was established in 2003, it must be considered a first-year
         Student Activity Group because it last received ASUC funding in 2005; and

WHEREAS, the total budget of Friends of the Co-ops is currently $0.00; and

WHEREAS, Friends of the Co-ops' projected budget is: Total cost, $200;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC recognize Friends of Co-ops as a fourth-year ASUC-
        Sponsored Student Activity Group with first-year status.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $200 (two hundred dollars) to the Friends of the
          Co-ops from the ASUC Senate Contingency Fund.

Ms. Coleman said they were requesting $200, the amount of money a first-year student activity group can
request from the Contingency Fund. They'd like to purchase two banners at $100 each. The organization
recently changed it's name from “University Students Cooperative Association” to the “Berkeley Student
Cooperative.” The banners they had on Sproul were obsolete, with the wrong name and the wrong Web
site. The mission of the group was to outreach to the Berkeley campus. They provide a service and this
would let people know about housing options. Members of the BSC External Affairs Committee were
present. The Friends of the Co-ops budget was currently at $0 and the External Affairs Committee also
had $0. So $200 would really help in making the BSC visible on campus. She called for any questions.

Mr. Wong said the $0 budget was for the entire Co-op organization. Ms. Coleman said the amount of
money the BSC allocates to the External Affairs Committee was $0. The student activity group also
SB 106, In Support of Friends of the Co-ops (cont'd)                                                 - 63 -


didn't have money. Only the organization had money. Mr. Wong asked if the External Affairs Commit-
tee was under the organization. Ms. Coleman said it was part of the Berkeley Student Cooperative.

Mr. Wong asked if the BSC had a publicity committee that could pay for the banners. Since there were
so many students in the co-ops, there was probably a publicity committee that could provide this money.
Ms. Coleman said she would defer the question to the External Affairs Vice President. Johnathan Kelly
said the External Affairs Committee was charged with working on visibility and didn't have a budget.
The Berkeley Student Cooperative was an affordable housing organization, so they're always trying to
budget not spend money if they didn't have to. They were undergoing a bunch of other projects, like ret-
rofitting and making buildings ADA accessible. So they have had tons of budget increases in other areas,
and anything they could get from the Senate to create these banners would be very appreciated. He felt
the request was very modest for the size of the organization.

Mr. Wong asked Mr. Kelly what the budget was for the entire Co-op, and how much went towards
External Affairs. Ms. Coleman said the Berkeley Student Cooperative was a non-profit organization. In
order to keep the costs of housing as low as possible, they couldn't spend surplus money on External
Affairs.

Ms. Kuo asked if the BSC did fundraisers. Ms. Coleman said she would defer to the VP of External
Affairs. Mr. Kelly said they have fundraising campaigns organized by professional staff. The biggest
one was their 75th Anniversary, which was coming up. They had a pretty strong alumni base, but most
of the funds they raise go for scholarships. They try and provide students who couldn't afford to come to
Berkeley and live in a campus community because it was so expensive, and offered them an alternative
for people that , more affordable so they could come here and enjoy student housing. Ms. Allbright said
speaking time had expired. Mr. Seaty moved to extend by five minutes. The motion was seconded by
Ms. Kuo and passed with no objection.

Mr. Seaty asked how many students were affected by the BSC. Ms. Coleman said they had 1,200 UCB
students, and theoretically, the bill would benefit all those students, and others who pass by on Sproul
and realize that co-ops exist. Mr. Seaty asked if co-op events were open to the general student body. Mr.
Kelly said any event in a co-op was open to anybody in the student community.

Mr. Weiner moved to amend the final Resolved Clause to allocate $150, instead of $200. The motion to
amend was seconded by Ms. Kuo.

On a point of order, Mr. Osmeña asked if they had to go to filling in the blank when they amend an
amount. Ms. Allbright said they didn't.

Mr. Weiner said the amendment was in accordance with what Sen. Coleman discussed when the Senate
voted to bring the bill back for consideration. The soft cap in Fi-Comm was $150 for every first-year
group. With that limit, they could fund other new groups. He totally supported funding the BSC, but the
amount should be $150.

Mr. Osmeña said Article VI, Section 4.3 states that any amendment to a Resolved Clause was done by
filling in the blank. Ms. Allbright said that was for Fi-Comm.

Mr. Weiner moved to call the question on the amendment. The motion to end debate was seconded by
Ms. Kuo and failed by hand-vote 8-6-0.
SB 106, In Support of Friends of the Co-ops (cont'd)                                                   - 64 -


Ms. Allbright said the Chair would refer Sen. Osmeña‟s point of order to the Senate and asked for a
voice-vote of those in favor and against filling in the blank, and noted that the nays prevailed. Ms.
Allbright said that procedure was in accordance with Robert's Rules, and was something they could do on
a point of order.

Mr. Jackson said before, Ms. Coleman said she wanted $150 rather than nothing. It's a large community
and the ASUC has recognized it was very important to them. There was a Berkeley Student Cooperative
Officer in the ASUC, just like there was a Greek Affairs Officer. They were talking about $50, and he
realized that amount could go a long way. But it was important that people look at the larger context.
The cheapest banner was $97. There were two banners and both needed to be replaced both. This was a
non-profit organization without extra money. The Senate wouldn't be robbing another student group of
the extra $50.

Mr. Wu said he respected the work that Fi-Comm did. He supported the amendment not because of the
dollar amount, but because when the Senate voted to revise the bill, Ms. Coleman said she would be
willing to compromise at $150. Frankly, the request was now $200, and he didn't like being misled. It
was his impending that would be the amount when they decided to resurrect the bill. Ms. Coleman asked
if he was aware that she wasn't the one who objected to Mr. Weiner‟s motion. Mr. Wu said he would
apologize, and didn't recall who it was, but somebody said the bill was being revised because there was
an unwillingness to compromise.

Mr. Seaty said that in Fi-Comm, almost every week they make allocations based on the needs of organi-
zations. Although this was a first-year student activity group, Fi-Comm had hard caps for a reason.
When other groups came in for funding, one expense they generally had was for fliers. But these banners
would be permanent and the BSC needed $200. He didn't think $150 would suffice.

Mr. Shams said he thought all the arguments have been voiced and they all recognize the size of the
organization. He believed the bill should be at $150. He thought that what the Senate was looking for
was equity. This was a first-year group, and $150 was required. Mr. Shams said he was tired of the
whole idea that “it was just $50.” The Senate has funded bills that were more egregious in spending and
they had to be careful how they allocate. If it was a first-year group and needed to be treated as a first-
year group. He understood there were certain contingencies with this group, but it was still a first-year
group.

Ms. Winston said she understood that Ms. Coleman said she would be willing to compromise, but it was
kind of a slap in the face of the Berkeley Student Cooperative because they're such a huge population,
and they requested exactly what they needed. She asked if the Senate wouldn't be willing to meet that
need, of $50. They made allocations that evening of $6,000 for an event that would benefit the same
number of students. The Senate had carryforward and had more money. She didn't think $50 would hurt.
She respected the soft cap, and Fi-Comm has used it religiously, but if they use it as a hard cap, they
might as well write that into the By-laws. It was a soft cap, not a hard cap.

Ms. Kuo said she found a Web site that made banners for $55, so she thought they could be made for
$150 if some research was done. Ms. Coleman asked if she knew the quality of those banners. Ms. Kuo
said she couldn't verify that, but could refer the Web site to Ms. Coleman.

Ms. Allbright said that seeing no further speakers the question was automatically called. THE MOTION
TO APPROVE THE AMENDMENT, $150, PASSED BY VOICE-VOTE.
SB 106, In Support of Friends of the Co-ops (cont'd)                                                - 65 -
SB 105, In Support of a New Senate Chambers Webcam


THE MOTION TO APPROVE SB 106, AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE AND ON THE FLOOR,
PASSED UNANIMOUSLY BY VOICE-VOTE, RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF FRIENDS OF THE
CO-OPS.



The following Resolution, SB 105, as resurrected out of committee, was authored by Ms. Patel and Mr.
Weiner:


RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF A NEW SENATE CHAMBERS WEBCAM

WHEREAS, the ASUC Webcam in the Senate Chambers has not been functional for over a year; and

WHEREAS, Senate meetings held in the Chambers are open to the public and should be viewable by
         those who are unable to attend; and

WHEREAS, Webcam recordings can be made available to those who would like to see meetings that take
         place in the senate chambers but are unable to attend; and

WHEREAS, the ASUC By-Laws mandate that at least 60% of the ASUC Commercial Revenue Holding
         Fund is transferred to the ASUC Capital Improvements Budget; and

WHEREAS, according to Article III, Section 1 of the ASUC Constitution, the ASUC Senate has authority
         over the Capital Improvements Budget; and

WHEREAS, 60% of the carry forward funds is dedicated to Capital Improvements Fund;

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the ASUC allocate $100 (one hundred dollars) from the Capital
        Improvements Budget to fund a new Webcam for the Senate Chamber.

Ms. Allbright said that seeing no speakers, the question was automatically called. THE MOTION TO
APPROVE SB 105 PASSED BY VOICE-VOTE, RESOLUTION IN SUPPORT OF A NEW SENATE
CHAMBERS WEBCAM.


Mr. Osmeña moved to adjourn. The motion was seconded by Ms. Kuo. Mr. Jackson asked if they've
finished their business. Ms. Allbright said they had one more item of business, and committees that don't
report, the chairs will receive absences. Mr. Osmeña asked to withdraw the motion.

Mr. Wu moved to recess. The motion was seconded and failed by voice-vote.


OLD BUSINESS
Old Business, SB 75A                                                                                - 66 -
Special Committee Reports
Reports from ASUC Representatives


Ms. Allbright said the next item was a motion to override the veto of SB 75A, Resolution Affirming the
US-Israel Relationship. Mr. Weiner moved to table until the next meeting. The motion was seconded by
Mr. Shams. THE MOTION TO TABLE UNTIL THE NEXT MEETING THE VETO OVERRIDE OF
SB 75A PASSED BY VOICE-VOTE.


Special Committee Reports


Reporting for the Outstanding Student Recognition Awards Committee, Mr. Shams said he‟s been talking
with CLL about scheduling a meeting to consider the Oskis. The Committee hasn't met.

Ms. Allbright asked if the Committee to Select the ASUC Lawyer has met. Ms. Duong said it hasn't.

Reporting for the Selection Committee for the Berkeley Student Cooperative Affairs Officer, Ms.
Coleman said they would like to nominate Erica Mu, for appointment next week.

Reporting for the Committee to Study UCSA Membership, Mr. Osmeña said he‟s the Chair of the Com-
mittee. They met on Thursday, November 15, at Café Strada. All members were present except for Mr.
Seaty. They also met on Sunday, November 18, at 6 p.m. at Café Strada. All members were present.
They plan to meet on Sunday at 6 p.m. in the June Jordan Room.

Ms. Winston asked what the Committee has discussed so far. Mr. Osmeña said they went through the
Committee‟s charge as stated in the Senate bill and went through what the Committee was supposed to
address. They came up with more specific questions they'd like to ask. They also divided up sections
among committee members.

Mr. Wong moved to adjourn. The motion was seconded by Ms. Coleman. Mr. Wong asked to withdraw
his motion.


Reports from ASUC Representatives


Reporting as the ASUC representative to the Recreational Sports Facility, Mr. Wu said the Rec Sports
Advisory Board was looking for a disabled student to sit on the Board to help make decisions on the
RSF. If Senators knew of any disabled students willing to serve, he would ask them to please let him
know.

Reporting on the Berkeley Student Foundation, Ms. Kuo said they'll meet next Monday, with the location
to be determined.

Reporting on the Inter-Fraternity Council and the College Panhellenic Association, Mr. Osmeña said both
have elected new leadership. If people would like to contact the new leaders in the Greek community, on
which the Senate was making changes, he had contact information.
Reports from ASUC Representatives (cont'd)                                                      - 67 -



Reporting as the ASUC representative to the National Pan-Hellenic Council, Ms. Winston said two fra-
ternities had events coming up. Also, for the BSF, applications were due on Friday. She would ask them
to please encourage students to apply, freshman as well as junior transfers.

Ms. Allbright said that completed their business and the meeting was adjourned.

Roll call was taken for attendance. Members present were:

       Rebecca Coleman                 Jason Louie                         Grace Shen
       Danielle Duong                  Christian Osmeña                    Gabe Weiner
       Corey Jackson                   Dave Rhoads                         Roxanne Winston
       Philip Kim                      Maurice Seaty                       Chris Wong
       Winnie Kuo                      Nadir Shams                         Albert Wu

This meeting adjourned at 11:16 p.m.

                                    These minutes respectfully submitted by,



                                    Steven I. Litwak
                                    Recording Secretary

								
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