TIBET, INDIA, ANTELOPES AND THE DALAI LAMA by gfc19530

VIEWS: 12 PAGES: 3

									Newsletter November 2009 

mailto : claude.levenson@gmail.com 

 

                         TIBET, INDIA, ANTELOPES AND THE DALAI LAMA 

        A heated argument continues to run its course between New Delhi and Beijing; who will have 
the last word? Petty bickering? No, not really, perhaps less derisory, an argument over frontiers 
polarized by the recent announcement of   the Dalai Lama’s visit to Arunachal Pradesh.  For the 
last few weeks, Beijing has continued to multiply its protests and reproofs, accompanied by re‐
iterated claims of pretended sovereignty over an Indian territory, from now on qualified as 
“disputed”. To the point of being finally put in their place with exquisite diplomacy by the Indian 
Prime Minister, replying to the Chinese wailing, that the Dalai Lama is “an honoured guest” and 
that in consequence, he was free to come and go at will all over the country.  Without appearing 
to be, an elegant way of giving an example that others would be well advised to follow. 
 
        For all that, the dispute is not anodyne; it rests upon the definition of a former frontier 
between Tibet and India (then British), the so‐called McMahon line,  agreed upon during a 
tripartite conference in Simla in 1914, which China had at the time accepted by signing the 
Convention,  nevertheless without ratifying it afterwards.   And as a result, Beijing pulled a card 
from its sleeve, under the pretext that “Tibet is part of China” and that the Himalayan valley 
where the Monastery of Tawang has existed for more than three centuries was always under 
Tibetan influence...its goes without saying that the (Indian) state of Arundal Pradesh of course 
belongs to China. QED.  Not so simple though, especially since the laborious negotiations on this 
matter, for a long time frozen, between the governments of two Asian giants, still do not produce 
results, the Chinese authorities camping on their position and going so far as to protest not only 
about a journey of the Dalai Lama, but also shortly before the electoral campaign of the Indian 
Prime Minister in the region, provoking annoyance in New Delhi. The Indian leaders nevertheless 
prefer not to throw oil on the fire, minimising the frictions in the hope that their partner would 
return to less noisy sentiments.   
        And as if to be better heard, adding to the grievances, the APL (The Chinese Army of so‐called 
Liberation) multiplied its more or less furtive incursions at the other end of the Himalayas, in 
Ladakh, as well as in Kashmir; nearly 300 “incidents” were reported in 2008, marked out with 
empty beer cans and rocks daubed in red paint.Enough to preoccupy strategists and military 
experts who warned political officials in New Delhi, and called for vigilance and reinforcement of 
monitoring of the Eastern frontiers of the country. The American and Anglo‐Saxon press are not 
taken in, they follow events with an attentive eye, both the journey of the Dalai Lama to Arunchal 
for teaching and for the inauguration of a hospital, and the first visit of the American President to 
Beijing, after this pastoral tour that Washington supported through the voice of its Representative 
for Tibetan Affairs at the State Department.  
         
        Nevertheless, some in the Tibetan community in exile are worried about Beijing’s growing 
determination to dictate its will all over the place, and its equally growing propensity to bend the 
backbone of numerous governments all over the world.  In this way, Beijing obtained the 
interdiction of an exhibition of photographs on the exile of Tibetans in a private gallery in Dacca, 
Bangladesh, the very day of its private viewing. Others have not ceased to ask questions about 
the remarkable silence of Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, two recognized NGOs, 
normally very prompt to denounce any breach of human rights, concerning the recent execution 
of young Tibetans in Lhasa, supposed to have participated in the protests of March 2008. And to 
think that we had to wait until November before the French Parliamentary Study Group on Tibet 
reacted; this was done without waiting by the official British, American and European (in the 
name of the European Union) spokespersons, to name but a few.  The spokesperson of the 
Chinese Ministry for Foreign Affairs was moreover in a hurry to express his “strong discontent and 
our resolute opposition to the communiqué of the European Union”, and what is more, 
recommending the latter “not to interfere in this dossier”. 
        A message apparently well received at the quai d’Orsay, where the present tenant probably 
had a moment of forgetfulness about a certain 25 May 1991, concerning Tibet precisely – “we are 
once again a little late (on a non‐meeting with His Holiness). It is a shame for our country” ‐ 
before adding “it is not a question of a government of left, right or centre”. It is true that at the 
time, the person in question was only Secretary of State for Humanitarian Action and that the 
party in power (it was not the right) had not signed the memorandum with the Chinese 
Communist Party, which was already in power in Beijing and firmly intended to stay there. 
 
        And as if to put up a smokescreen, or to divert attention, the Chinese press (at least in French 
and in English) carried along by the very official Xinhua agency, let it be known that the number of 
tourists (Chinese?) was in constant progression in Tibet, and told the touching story of a little 
Tibetan girl who  dressed in all her finery (photos to prove it) to go and see her friends the Tibetan 
antelopes in the Hoh Xil reserve in Qinghai (Amdo) where her father was employed full time to 
look after them. So much for the protection of animal life and prevailing milieu... 
        Better still, at the beginning of November the agency told a story still more moving, that of a 
great‐niece of the Dalai Lama; who became a member of the Communist Party after two failed 
attempts, and declared with fervour: ‐“This is the best day of my life”. We should like to believe 
this, but when she  expressed “the hope that the Dalai Lama will come and visit his native village 
in the Amdo, ‐ sorry, in Qinghai in the North West of China” – an unfortunate reflection of the 
official propaganda slides into the words, thus articulated: ‐ “the Dalai Lama left his village at five 
years old, he came back once when he was 18 years old. Now, he is an old man, and old people 
often have nostalgia for their place of birth. I wish that he could come to visit”. One asks oneself 
what is stopping him! A coded message, or a manoeuvre of pure propaganda on the eve of the 
visit to Tawang – it is for the reader to decide. 
        In a recent reflection,* the poet Woeser is not mistaken.  Commenting on the “56 brightly 
coloured massive pillars of national unity erected for the 1 October celebrations” intended to 
symbolize the equality, unity and harmony of 56 nationalities, she revealed that they were 
erected because of frequent problems with minorities. And also observed that “They can in no 
way hide the desire of the authorities to obstruct reality, on the contrary, they throw extra light 
on a real crisis.  To go too far is as bad as not going far enough; the more one tries to hide 
something, the more it becomes exposed, and the more  one tries to be clever, the quicker one 
goes straight into the wall”. 
        “China has never been able to assimilate Tibet – said an Indian analyst in the magazine 
Outlook – and Beijing blames India for this setback, because in welcoming the Dalai Lama, it has 
kept alive the political and cultural identity of Tibet.” Perhaps. At the end of a half century of exile 
and six decades of occupation, maintained in the best way possible, the little flame shines brightly 
all around. Even more reason to persevere and not to allow the flame to go out, the world – and 
every one of us – have great need of it. 
                                                              C.B.L. 
 
 
 *www.highpeakspureearth.com 
 

								
To top