The Books Campaign Every Child a Reader and Writer

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					The 25 Books Campaign Every Child a Reader and Writer
To fully develop their reading and comprehension skills, students need to read widely and consistently beyond the required reading in class. Students need to read or have developmentally appropriate books red to them as follows: • Pre-K and K: 4-6 books read to them a day • 1st Grade: 4-6 books a day, read to them, read independently, read with assistance • 2nd Grade: 1 book a day • 3rd Grade: 30 books a year • 4th to 6th Grades: 25 books a year Students in Grades K through 2nds ca maintain a record of their reading on sheets appropriate to their level. They will also be encouraged to create reading response cards that can be posted on the Readers’ Response Wall. They will also participate in the “best seller” lists and tally of total books read. For students in Grades 3rd through 6th , the “25 Books Campaign” is as follows: • Students will commit to reading 25 books (30 “short” books for 3rd graders) before the end of the school year by signing a contract contained in their “Book Log.” Students will choose a “reading buddy” or “reading buddies” to help them achieve their goal. Reading buddies can be parents older sisters or brothers, other relatives, upper-grade students, and volunteers. Reading buddies commit to reading the books the students are reading, talking with the student about the books, and signing off in the Book Log when a book is completed. Each student will receive a Book Log to keep a record of reading. Book Logs will be kept in the classroom on a “log board” or a “log box” that is easily accessible. Students will be encouraged to write on a 5” X 7” card their reactions to, opinions, criticisms, or recommendations about a book they have read. Cards will be posted on the Readers’ Response Wall.

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Students will receive a book or a certificate to obtain a book after completing a certain number of books. (This could be up to 3 or 4 books per student per school year.)

The following activities are designed to support the “25 Books Campaign”: • Reviewing the Book Logs: Principals and other school leaders visit classrooms and look through the book logs on the log board or log box. On each visit, they, as fellow readers, chat with selected students about their reading. The Readers’ Response Wall: An attractive layout is created and maintained on a wall to display cards with the students’ responses to books. Each classroom has a designated place on the wall. The goal is to have a student’s response posted long enough to be read, but to have a classroom’s responses updated frequently enough to have all students posted at least 4 times a school year. The “Best Seller” List: About once a month, each classroom submits to a designated compiler (front office staff, librarian, liaison, parent volunteer) the title and author of the most read book for their class during the previous month. A “best seller” for each grade level will be chosen and the “Best Seller Lists” can be published in a variety of ways, for example: framed and posted on the Readers’ Response Wall, announced from the principal’s office, included in a school newsletter, and copied and distributed to each classroom for posting. Tally of Total Books Read; About once a month, each classroom submits to a designated compiler (front office staff, librarian, liaison, parent volunteer) the tally of the total number of books read by students during the previous month. The monthly tally is added to an attention- getting, centrally located display or graphic that shows the increme ntal growth of the number of books read for the school. Book Drives and Book Exchanges: Organizing periodic book drives to augment classroom libraries ensures that students have access to a great variety of books more of the time. Organizing book excha nges enables students to extend the variety of books they own. Organizing these activities can involve a cross-section of school staff and school volunteers. Major “Book” Events: The school can organize an event that involves the community at large to highlight the importance of the reading campaign. One example is holding a book or literacy fair that not only has displays related to reading and writing, but uses multiple art forms to showcase books and the reading experience.

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The 25 Books Campaign Every Child a Reader and Writer Principals “To Do” Checklist
Early in the school year: • Introduce the 25 Book Campaign by: o personally visiting each 3rd through 6th grade classroom to campaign for reading 25 books; o explaining what each student needs to do; o distributing book logs or contracts to each student during the presentation and reviewing with them how they are to be kept and posted; o explaining how students will be able to tell other students what they think and recommend their favorite books and stories on the Readers’ Response Wall; o motivating students to pursue the goal of reading 25 books (30 books for 3rd graders) before the end of the school year. • Introduce reading goals to the lower grades by: o talking to each K through 2nd grade classroom about setting and achieving reading goals; o distributing level-appropriate reading record sheets to K-2 students and reviewing with them how they are to be kept; o explaining how students will be able to recommend their favorite books and stories on the Readers’ Response Wall; o motivating students to pursue their reading goals throughout the school year. Oversee the creation of the Readers’ Response Wall by: o coordinating its formatting, construction and maintenance with the school Literacy Team, other school staff and volunteers; o designating the person or persons responsible for updating student responses; o Setting the example and inviting the school community to visit the “wall” to read what students are sharing about books. Coordinate with the Literacy Team how to format, process, and publish “best seller” list and tally of total books read in school.

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Throughout the school year: • Visit each classroom as frequently as possible to review Book Logs and to talk to individual students informally about the books they are reading • Oversee and promote major school-wide events, such as a book fair or a parent reading night, to support the literacy program • Maintain and support the high literacy environment in the school