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					                    Mustang/Burro Newsletter

                                 7/31/09




             Questions/Comments: Cindy Lawrence cblawrnc@aol.com

                     www.wildhorseandburroexpo.com

       Western States Wild Horse and Burro Expo – August 21-23, 2009

               Please help us support our corporate sponsors;




A newsletter supported by Mustang and Burro Owners for anyone
                who loves Mustangs and Burros



   Mustang/Burro Owners helping to guide others with their
                     Mustangs/Burros


                                                                       1
                     Table of contents

Subject                                             PAGES

From Cindy …………………………………………………………                    3

Questions/Answers
Question 1: Rattlesnakes and Horses…………..…….…… 4-10
Question 2: Saddle sores – Ouch………………….…….…… 11-12
Question 3: Deer Flies – anything work to repel them?. 13

Events………………………………………………………………..                     14-

Wild Horses that will be available at Expo……………..    15

Walking with Winnie……………………………………………                 16-19

Mustangs for Sale …………………..………..……………….              20-21

Question from Mustang Family folks…………………            21

A tribute to our first Mustang (From Cindy)…………..    22

Mustang Makeover…………………………………………….                   23-24

This weeks Humor…………………………………………………                  25




                                                             2
From Cindy (CbLawrnc@aol.com):

Next Friday (August 7th) is our Kids and Mustangs Program at Bartley Ranch. We have (4) 4th
grade classes, and (3) 6th grade classes attending. We could use some help…

We NEED:
  1) One person to watch the clock and blow a whistle every ten minutes (A signal for the classes to
     rotate to the next station)

   2) Bodies for the roping stations. The roping station is the kids FAVORITE station, but we need
      more bodies to help. We have had people help with this station that have NEVER roped….so
      don’t be afraid – we can teach you very quickly how to help the kids. ……

   3) We could use some more roping dummies too…..

   4) We have a few Mustangs and Burros coming – but, wouldn’t mind more if you want to attend.

   Here is what we are doing – The kids will arrive at 9:45. Terri Farley is talking to the kids from 9:45
   – 10:15. At 10:20 the rotation through the stations will begin….
                                    Mr.
                          Metzger             Kirsch    Ernst     Armentrout Mrs. Coney Jaureguito
                                    Coney


                          Station   Station   Station   Station   Station     Station      Station
Round 1   10:20 - 10:30        1         2         3         4          5           6           7
Round 2   10:31 - 10:41        2         3         4         5          6           7           8
Round 3   10:42 - 10:52        3         4         5         6          7           8           1
Round 4   10:53 - 11:03        4         5         6         7          8           1           2
Round 5   11:04 - 11:14        5         6         7         8          1           2           3
Round 6   11:15 - 11:25        6         7         8         1          2           3           4
Round 7   11:26 - 11:36        7         8         1         2          3           4           5
Round 8   11:37 - 11:47        8         1         2         3          4           5           6


Station 1: Main Arena - A variety of Mustangs - Will talk to the kids about their versatility
Station 2: Little Fenced Area - Attached to the Main Arena - Two Orphan Foals
Station 3: Roping
Station 4: Roping
Station 5: BLM Burro and Horse
Station 6: Two Burros
Station 7: Small Arena (Mustang and Domestic Horse) - Will compare a domestic horse to a Mustang
Station 8: BLM Round up Game

We will probably combine Station 1 and Station 7, because we just found out we have
someone to do the Wild Horse Annie Station.

If you want to attend – email me cbLawrnc@aol.com or call me 775 853-4182




                                                                                                             3
QUESTION 1: I've had a couple of different people ask me if a rattlesnake
strike can kill a horse. Obviously, it's more deadly in the face, but.............Do
people ever get shots for their horses (like some do for dog) to make the
strike less effective until you can get to a vet?

From EquiSearch
http://www.equisearch.com/horses_care/health/first_aid/s
nakebite051103/

How to Treat Snakebite

A snakebite--particularly on the nose--can be a life-threatening event for your horse.
Here's what to do.

By Karen Hayes, DVM, MS

What You See
Your horse's muzzle is severely swollen. A thin trickle of blood runs from each nostril. You can see two
small holes or bloody spots on his face, about inch apart.

There's a bruiselike discoloration, plus pinpoint-size red marks on the light-colored area inside his lips.
This area seems sore, because he resents having you touch it.

What Should You Do?
1. Call your veterinarian immediately.
Why: Your horse appears to have suffered a poisonous snakebite. The swelling is part of his reaction to
the venom's toxin and can impair his breathing if his nostrils swell closed. The sooner he gets
appropriate treatment, the greater his chance of avoiding more severe symptoms such as fainting and
suffocation, or life-threatening problems such as laminitis or heart arrhythmia (an irregular heartbeat).

2. Confine your horse and keep him quiet.
Why: The less he moves, the less toxin he'll absorb into his bloodstream.
How: Halter your horse, and stay with him until your vet arrives. Don't move him or do anything that
would make him raise his head; gravity helps keep the toxin from spreading. If he's hot, sponge cool
water over his body. Avoid touching his face -- the area is sore and vulnerable to infection, and he's likely
to raise his head if you try.

3. Avoid "snakebite-lore" techniques. Why: The "remedies" listed below won't help your horse-and could
harm him.

      Avoid cutting the snakebite wounds or applying suction. If done at all, these measures should be
       handled only by experienced hands, within 3 minutes of the bite. Otherwise, they may increase
       your horse's risk of infection and probably won't help him.
      Avoid applying ice or heat to the wounds. Both could further irritate the affected area, causing
       additional swelling and the risk of tissues rupturing or dying.

4. Look up the date of your horse's last tetanus toxoid vaccination. (This isn't the same as an antitoxin
shot, which has been linked to a potentially fatal liver disease.)
Why: Just like any contaminated puncture wound, a snakebite invites tetanus.

                                                                                                              4
How: Check your horse's vaccination records. Report the date of his last tetanus toxoid booster to your
vet. If it's been 12 months or longer since his last booster, your horse will need another one.

5. Identify the snake, if you can do so without endangering yourself.
Why: Knowing the type of snake may help your vet formulate a treatment plan.
How: If the snake is visible, memorize its markings, if you can do so without getting within striking range.
Report them to your vet.

Prognosis
Guarded to good. Only about one-half of horses bitten by poisonous snakes are actually envenomated
(that is, injected with enough venom in the right place to cause life-threatening symptoms). Up to 25
percent of those horses envenomated die, depending on the type of snake.

Most deaths are caused by severe symptoms during the horse's initial reaction to the snakebite (heart
and/or breathing problems), or chronic, secondary conditions (laminitis, diarrhea, pneumonia, paralysis of
muscles that govern swallowing, and wound complications).

Your vet will treat your horse's pain, swelling, and any other symptoms. He or she will also clean the
wound to reduce risk of infection, possibly prescribe antibiotics, and bring your horse's tetanus
immunization up-to-date.

Your vet may also perform a blood test to determine whether your horse has been envenomed and to
see if he'd have an adverse reaction to the antiveninan antitoxin that neutralizes the venom's effects.

If your horse has been envenomated and won't have a reaction to the antivenin, your vet may inject it
intra- venously and around the bite site. Some of your horse's severely swollen facial tissues may die
and slough off, requiring 2 to 3 weeks of treatment as an open wound.

This article first appeared in the July 1998 issue of Horse & Rider magazine. For information on treating
wounds, refer to the book Hands-On Horse Care from the publisher of Horse & Rider, available at
HorseBooksEtc.com.




http://www.horses-and-horse-information.com/articles/0100reptilian.shtml

Protect Your Horse from the Effects of a Snake Bite
If you live in an area where snakes have their habitats, the odds or your horse’s being struck by a snake
bite are good. Quite often these bites occur on the nose, neck or legs. It is impossible to predict when
                                                                                                            5
this encounter may happen, but the tell-tale signs of breathing difficulties, swellings, lameness, pain, and
tissue damage cannot be ignored. Would you know what to do if your horse was affected by a snake
bite?

Quite often owners will panic, and in the first scary moments waste precious time that could help them
save their horses from pain and further damage. First and foremost, find out what kind of snake has
attacked your horse. Do not assume it is poisonous simply because it is a snake, but at the same time do
exercise caution if the animal is still nearby. If you are not certain if your horse was bitten by a snake or
another animal, look for swelling and the fang marks that will be at the center of the swelling.

Fortunately, even a poisonous snakebite does not automatically mean that your horse will be in dire
straits, but if you wait before seeking treatment and an anti-venom cannot be given quickly, your horse
may sustain severe tissue damage. Fatalities in horses do occur if a venomous snake bite to the neck or
nose occurs since this may obstruct the airways to such an extent that the animal suffocates.

The best course of action to take is to keep the horse calm so that the poison will not travel through the
body any faster than necessary. Do not remount your horse to ride it back to the stable since this, too,
will get the blood pumping faster than is good. Instead, slowly walk your animal back to its trailer or
stable. If at all possible, see if a veterinarian can meet you on the riding trail. Some riders swear by
carrying six inch portions of a cut up garden hose that they will lubricate and insert into the horse’s
nostrils after a snake bite to allow the animal to keep breathing as the swelling sets in. If your animal is
bitten on the leg, you should place a wide band around the affected limb to compress the veins but not
the arteries. By opening and re-closing the band every 15 minutes, you will slow down the spread of the
poison while preventing damage to the tissues.

Clean the bite wound with soap and water but do not resort to the method of cutting open the bite wound
to suck out the poison. While this is a staple of the old Western movies, it only makes matters worse.
Similarly, you should stay away from compresses since these, too, have shown to accelerate the
damage. Instead, your veterinarian will be able to apply anti-inflammatory drugs, anti-venom and also a
tetanus booster to keep the horse healthy.




From eHow http://www.ehow.com/how_2090049_treat-
snakebite-horse.html

How to Treat a Snakebite on a Horse

       Contributor
By eHow Contributing Writer
Article Rating:             (1 Ratings)

        Most snakebites in the United States are from nonpoisonous snakes, but any snakebite,
         particularly one on your horse's muzzle, should be taken seriously. A snakebite can be life-
                                                                                                               6
         threatening, so don't panic but act quickly. While your vet will handle most of your horse's
         treatment, there are steps you can take to make your horse more comfortable and to help slow
         down the spread of any venom.

Difficulty: Challenging
Instructions

Things You'll Need:

        Cold water and sponge
        6-inch piece of garden hose

1.        Step 1 Restrict your horse's movements and try to keep her quiet. Movement increases blood pressure and
     will speed up the distribution of any venom throughout her body. Keep your horse relaxed, and if the bite is on
     her muzzle, lower her head. Gravity will also help the toxin spread, so don't do anything that will cause her to
     lift her head.
2.        Step 2 Sponge your horse off with cool water if she's hot. Run it over her body, but avoid the wound since
     it will be sore. Running water over it may cause her to move about.
3.        Step 3 Check the date of your horse's last tetanus shot. When your vet arrives, he will clean the wound and
     treat any swelling, pain and other symptoms. If necessary, he will prescribe antibiotics and update your horse's
     tetanus toxin immunization. Like any puncture wound, a contaminated snakebite is an inviting environment
     for tetanus. If it has been a year or more since your horse's last tetanus booster, your vet will give her another.
4.        Step 4 Look for and identify the snake--if it is possible for you to do so without putting yourself in
     jeopardy. If you find the snake or it was already visible, memorize the snake's markings and shape. Your vet
     will be able formulate a better plan of action and treatment if he knows what type of snake bit your horse.
5.        Step 5

     Insert a 6-inch piece of garden hose gently into your horse's nasal passage. This is a last resort to
     keep her airways open if your vet is still on the way and the swelling becomes so severe that it
     inhibits your horse's breathing.




From Willis Lamm
http://www.whmentors.org/saf/snakes.html

When on excursions into areas frequented by pit vipers (also called crotalids, including rattlesnakes), it is
prudent to consider some basic precepts concerning bites. Approximately 20-60% of bites are "dry" or
defensive type of bites with little or no venom injected by the snake. These are bites that do not swell much
within 10 to 15 minutes of being bitten and are not overly painful. It is difficult to ascertain whether a bite is
dry, so assume envenomation (injection of venom) and proceed to obtain veterinary care. Rapid swelling and
pain suggest venom injection. Venom has a Super Glue-like consistency and is absorbed rapidly from the bite
site within 30 seconds to several minutes. Cutting an incision on the bite and suction is not recommended; icing
of the bite is not a good idea, nor is a tourniquet.


Most bites occur on the muzzle in curious horses, and application of a dry absorbent wrap is not possible.
Things to consider bringing on such excursions would be:


        Wrap material (dry sheet cottons);
                                                                                                                       7
       Vetrap, two rolls;
       Two 12-inch sections of three-quarter-inch or one-inch diagonal gauze;
       Garden hose or taped 35-cc syringe casings with the ends bored out to insert into nostrils of horses with
        rapidly increasing muzzle swelling from a facial strike; and
       Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (prescription from your veterinarian).


If a horse is bitten, time is of the essence and prompt evacuation for veterinary care is recommended even
though death is rare in adult horses. Complications days or weeks later are often responsible for adult horse
deaths from rattlesnake bites. Asphyxiation from massive throat swelling might necessitate a tracheotomy in
rare cases. A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory can minimize swelling and pain. Walking, not running, is
recommended to avoid elevation of blood pressure and venom absorption.


Leg and torso bites are especially troublesome, and the bitten limb can be promptly wrapped to compress tissue
and minimize swelling and absorption of toxin into general circulation. Antibiotics (likely injectable) should be
considered once veterinary care is secured due to the "dirty" nature of snake fangs and infection potential.
Maintain a current tetanus vaccination.


In summary, minimize swelling and venom absorption, maintain nostril airflow, and seek veterinary assistance
immediately. These steps should allow most horses to recover without antivenin (antitoxin active against
venom) administration. Do not incise, ice, or apply a tourniquet to snake bites.


From The Horse.com http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=6165

When on excursions into areas frequented by pit vipers (also called crotalids, including rattlesnakes), it is
prudent to consider some basic precepts concerning bites. Approximately 20-60% of bites are "dry" or
defensive type of bites with little or no venom injected by the snake. These are bites that do not swell much
within 10 to 15 minutes of being bitten and are not overly painful. It is difficult to ascertain whether a bite is
dry, so assume envenomation (injection of venom) and proceed to obtain veterinary care. Rapid swelling and
pain suggest venom injection. Venom has a Super Glue-like consistency and is absorbed rapidly from the bite
site within 30 seconds to several minutes. Cutting an incision on the bite and suction is not recommended; icing
of the bite is not a good idea, nor is a tourniquet.


Most bites occur on the muzzle in curious horses, and application of a dry absorbent wrap is not possible.
Things to consider bringing on such excursions would be:


       Wrap material (dry sheet cottons);
       Vetrap, two rolls;
       Two 12-inch sections of three-quarter-inch or one-inch diagonal gauze;
       Garden hose or taped 35-cc syringe casings with the ends bored out to insert into nostrils of horses with
        rapidly increasing muzzle swelling from a facial strike; and
       Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication (prescription from your veterinarian).


If a horse is bitten, time is of the essence and prompt evacuation for veterinary care is recommended even
though death is rare in adult horses. Complications days or weeks later are often responsible for adult horse

                                                                                                                     8
deaths from rattlesnake bites. Asphyxiation from massive throat swelling might necessitate a tracheotomy in
rare cases. A non-steroidal anti-inflammatory can minimize swelling and pain. Walking, not running, is
recommended to avoid elevation of blood pressure and venom absorption.


Leg and torso bites are especially troublesome, and the bitten limb can be promptly wrapped to compress tissue
and minimize swelling and absorption of toxin into general circulation. Antibiotics (likely injectable) should be
considered once veterinary care is secured due to the "dirty" nature of snake fangs and infection potential.
Maintain a current tetanus vaccination.


In summary, minimize swelling and venom absorption, maintain nostril airflow, and seek veterinary assistance
immediately. These steps should allow most horses to recover without antivenin (antitoxin active against
venom) administration. Do not incise, ice, or apply a tourniquet to snake bites.


From HorseRing.com

http://www.horsesring.com/forums/general-
discussions/20748-recommendations-on-rattlesnake-bite-
management.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMzvUW6XO-o (Warning: Don’t watch
while eating, this show the how much pressure, fluid, infection and heat
can build up in a (abscess) from a snake bite)
  A friend of mine's stallion was once bitten by they suspect a rattle snake. He was bitten in the back
leg and he swelled all the way up to his testicals. He was rather lethargic and swollen for a couple of
weeks and weak after wards for about 6 weeks. This was years ago and there was no vaccine available
at that time to counter act the effects of the venom.



Horses usually can survive a bite, but they do need vet attention. If bitten in the face the swelling can
cause suffocation and brain damage.

   Rattlesnake venom attacks the circulatory system. Generally, the bigger the animal, the
better off; that is why horses are not prone to die from a rattlesnake bite. There is enough
volume in their blood for the venom to be "diluted" enough not to cause heart stoppage. In
fact, during the past (I don't know about current antivenins)
the human antivenin was derived from horse blood and those that were allergic to horses
couldn't use it.
If a horse is bitten on the leg, you want to reduce the swelling, the pain, and get as much venom
out as possible. That is NOT done by slicing a big X and sucking it out. That causes more
tissue damage. There are kits out there with chemicals that have drawing power that you
would pack in the bite. If bitten on the nose, you should always carry a couple of lengths of
plastic tubing to insert into the nostrils to allow the horse to breathe because it is the swelling of
the nasal cavities that will kill the horse due to inability to take in air, not the venom itself. I can't

                                                                                                                    9
imagine a good snake bite kit out there for use on humans that couldn't be used on a horse. In
my area, the brown recluse spider is prevelant; ER doctors say their venom is worse than a
rattlesnake (which we have too along with copperheads). So I bought a Brown Recluse kit.
The instructions say you can use it on pets and for snake bites too although they don't advertise
it for snake venom. Our hay supplier got bitten by a recluse about 3 months ago and the tissue
damage, like a snake bite, is awful. I'd scan the internet for a good, reputable snake bite kit and
keep plastic tubes on hand and ask your vet for anything else that you can do, like cold packs
and pain killers and anti-swelling drugs.
   Yes it can. Depends on the horses metabolism,size,amount of venom, where it strikes and
how fast you get treatment. We have lanced and drained venom in the past and given
antihistimine shots when out in a remote area trying to get back to civilization for treatment.
We have lost 2 horses to snake bites. Both were in pasture and were not found in time to treat.
One was bitten on the nose. We found him dead. The other was bitten in the leg. He was put in
winter pasture in the early fall and was not with the other stock when spring round-up came. We
found him dead with a very enlarged front leg, (like a calcium build up in a persons hand with
arthritis only much bigger). My dad said it was from a snake bite. He looked like it had gotten
infected and maybe he died from that. We may have saved him had he been where we could
see him.
We had a couple pack horses and a dude-string horse get bitten in the leg and we cut and
drained the bites. We put a poultice on one. Just washed the others with cold water. All 3 had a
hole and then healed with an enlarged, hard area where the bite happened.
This is just life experience information that you might find interesteng. I'm getting "older" so I am
also curious if there is a shot or other ways to treat a bite I'd not heard of. We just did what we
grew up with. Not fancy but it usually worked. I'd love to learn possibly more effective ways to
treat a bite.I do carry the little kit when I ride but have not had to use it. Thanks for thinking of
this good question.. Living in NV we should all know as much as we can about this subject.
   At home and trail riding I carry a small rubber tube - like 7 to 9 inches long and diameter
about 2 inches, firm but flexible rubber to insert in the nasal passage in case the horse is bitten
by a rattler in the nose. Most likely this is the most common place they get bit (while in pasture)
and so it will allow them air if their nose closes up, and enough time for the vet to arrive. You
can get a snake bite kit from the vet or talk to him about what you should carry (make your own).
   Horses have a very good snake bite survival rate, unless they are bitten in the nose, then
they often die of suffocation, not from the actual rattlesnake poison. The vaccine that is being
given to dogs had a very small test group. Very small. As in not to be relied upon small.




                                                                                                  10
Question 2: This is an embarrassing question. This year, I’m riding more
then any time in the past. I’m having a BLAST…but my “Bottom” has
developed a little sore right on that little bone that you sit on… It’s only on
one side, but it’s pretty tender. I guess this is what a “saddle sore” is on a
human. Am I riding incorrectly – or do I just need to toughen up my posterior
(bottom)?

 I would suggest getting some bicycle shorts for riding till you heal up, they have cushioning in that
area. I think you are right on with the ideal you are placing more weight on one side than the other. What
may be causing you to do this? Physical challenges? Poor fitting saddle? You are lucky because you
have physical feedback about your riding, so you know what to work on!! Maybe get a friend to stand
behind you and help you sit balanced?
   When you're riding everyone tells you to sit up straight on your 'crotch', this actually makes riding
very uncomfortable for you and your horse because you are pinching his sides. Next time you get on
your horse sit back in the saddle so you can place your palm flat on your horse's hip/rump area. Now
keep your body in that position when you ride. You'll be sitting on your balance point which will make the
ride more comfortable for both of you by protecting your bum, and making you less stiff, and opening
your legs to five your horse more freedom of movement. Happy riding!!
   Ride Time! -- could be saddle or pants you are wearing (seam ?), wear thicker underwear, wear
shorts under pants, duct tape a piece of foam or padding to seat for a while.
     I just broke a shoulder from a fall in the house, SO, I ENVY your riding so much! If you are a little
off center causing your saddle sore, you are going to compensate by changing your position off balance
again and your horse will feel this (as well as your back and hips). There are great cushions out there,
very reasonable, to protect your tush in the saddle that go right on top of your saddle seat and should
provide you with enough relief to straighten up your seat. Have another BLAST for me.
   Get a gel seat pad and put it on your saddle seat. Also since your sore spot is off center, :) it is
possible you need to ride acey-deucy, one stirrup a little shorter. Sometimes, it is just the way our bodies
are, especially over time. The main thing for both your horse's comfort and for yours, is to have your
weight evenly distributed on each side of the backbone and under your pelvis etc. I have not found
adjusted stirrup length on one side, to negatively affect that, if anything it helps, and can lessen knee
pain too. This from a gimpy 61 year old rider who won't give up.
    It's highly likely the jeans, not the saddle. I've had multiple students with this problem but found that
it didn't occur with all riders. What my conclusion in these situations was....If the jeans ride up in the
errr...front...or like...a lower body... ahhhh...opening???You will get a sore spot! Try different or stretch
jeans that fit differently in the waist, hip, crotch area.
The other thing that lends itself to this situation is your posture in the saddle. If your jeans have a normal
jean size seam and your butt sticks out backwards when you ride or if you are forward in the
saddle...Tuck your butt and sit on your butt bones, relax your body and "ride easy" as we would say. If
your jeans fit correctly for your body this should resolve the issue.
Possibly that is not the reason so another thing I do if I'm working horseback (I had many years of 12 to
14 hours a day in the saddle) is to wear 2 under layers. This is an absolute remedy for most raw sore
spots on the mid body and inner legs. In the winter I'd wear tights and in the summer nylons. Yes I'm a
gal but most of my cowBOY friends and family also wore nylons. Our favorites were with spandex like
support hose because they deflect more friction & last longer. You'd think it would be to hot but we didn't
find that so and the overall comfort was worth it. We usually wore chaps or shotguns also and it does a
bit of the same thing but not much for that area. Welllll...That was different than any question I've
answered in public before!
   Toughen up your butt, or buy a gel seat, they come in English or Western models. My very thin
husband needs one to ride his horse, or else he gets serious bedsores. This on top of a Crosby SoSoft
seat!



                                                                                                           11
 To saddle sore...

You maybe riding on your tailbone rather than your seat bones or you maybe leaning too far
back and not sitting up straight? By stating that you feel it more on one side than the other you
may also be leaning/slouching in that direction. I would examine your saddle and equitation
throughly to find your answer especially if you are a 'self taught' rider. Many self taught people
tend to adjust to what ever saddle they have with their riding habits rather than know what sitting
proper and a proper saddle fit should feel like.

On that note many riders climb aboard and off on the same side. While you may have been
taught it's proper (and it is for the show pen) it's really a double edged sword. It stretches out
your ligiments on one side and that will leave you off balanced in the saddle. I mount and
dismount on different sides all the time to keep my body balanced. You can also do stretching
exercises before you ride and it's a good thing to do if your over the age of 35 since our
bodies aren't as flexible as younger people.

When riding you should have your ear, shoulder, hip, and heel with your shoulders upright not
slouched all in one straight vertical line. You can have a friend take a photo to see. You should
be sitting deep in your seat naturally and on your seat bones, rather than curled 'under' on your
tail bone. You may just need a minor adjustment like shortening or lengthening your stirrups one
or two notches to help achieve proper alignment or you may need a new saddle and or a few
instructed equitation lessons.

For the right saddle fit you should feel like it was made for you, not something that you have
gotten used too. You climb aboard and you just melt into it, it fits like a old glove. To determine
if your saddle is fitting you right, visit a tack store and sit in various saddles of type and size to
see what fits you best. It all depends on your hips, frame and how much 'meat' you have on your
bones. Men in general like a flatter seat with more room, and women with our birthing hips, need
a narrower bulit up padded twist and deeper seat.

Your lucky to have saddle sores, this year I haven't been able to ride long enough to even get
my body stretched out! Between the extremely hot weather, my job, and home repairs, free time
has been so miniscule I'm lucky to get one ride a week! God has Blessed you for sure. Cotton
panties and cortizone cream will help with the healing.




                                                                                                     12
Question 3: Deer Flies – OUCH! I’ve just recently encountered Deer Flies.
They have a horrible bite to horses and humans. Fly spray does nothing to
repel them. Does ANYONE know ANYTHING that can be used to deter Deer
Flies?


   We have found that Deep Woods Off works well when we go into the mountains to help repel
the deer flies, horse flies and other nasty bugs!
   Deer flies are common in the mountains where we lived for 30 years and we found that
anything with "Deet in it will keep them away from most anything.
   Bacon Grease, I also have some other fly spay mixes on my horseman tips page:
www.thinklikeahorse.org
   Absorbine Ultrashield EX is the only spray I have found that really works for
repelling horseflies and deerflies. Use it a couple of times in one week like the bottle says,
building up a base, then only once every week or so. If your horse stands out in the rain,
reapply. You can also use a fly mask with ears (both the pasture safe type and the lighter
weight ones designed to wear with the bridle). Realize that with the spray, the flies will still
buzz, but you will immediately notice that they no longer light and bite. I wipe it on muzzles and
noses with a sponge. Reapply as needed. We use fly masks with ears daily to keep bugs out
of ears and eyes. This product can be sprayed on dogs for flea and tick control, but absolutely
not cats. Also don't let the wet sprayed dog rub against a cat. This spray lasts in my heavy
tick area as well as the topical drops and I have had no reactions or burns like with the
topicals. Don't you just wonder why we have to have so many different annoying blood sucking
insects?
   There are several stronger chemical repellent rub ons that repel deer flies. Check labels and
ask at a good livestock supply store for options. I don't use them except when I have to
preferring natural "stuff" that does not work on deer flies.
   I am not familiar with deer flies, but the best stuff I found for any type of biting thing is Fly
Die. Pretty smelly stuff, but it does work and actually does last a while.
   If you don't mind a dirty horse, try an oil based fly spray. The one we used to use in PA went
by the brand name C Um Die, or some such. It will cause your horse to pick up a lot of dirt when
he rolls though. Deep Woods Off, in the spray can works well too. You can spray yourself down
before you ride out, it is fit to use on horses or humans.




                                                                                                 13
                              EVENTS
Hello everyone! Jeremy (Dunn) is slowly on the mend. It is hard
keeping him down though, even little things take a toll on his arm. He
wants to keep his mind busy and says he is ready to do some lessons
from the ground only. So we will be in Agoura Hills for an evening next
week. I am hauling along my Poco mare for a few people to see. We
have not figured out which day yet. Most likely a Tuesday or
Wednesday. Please let us know if you would like to get on the schedule
for that location. We will also be at Moonraker Ranch most likely next
weekend also. I will confirm shortly. Take care! Brandie and Jeremy
www.JBCattleCo.com Cwgrlvet@aol.com




                                                                      14
Wild Horse and Burro Expo                                                August 21-23, 2009
Both Lesley Neuman and Charles Wilhelm will work with WILD MUSTANGS during the Wild Horse and
Burro Expo. -Both had hooves trimmed on July 24, 2009 and current on vacc. and coggins. They will be
dewormed before Expo! Here are the two Wild Mustangs they will be working with and
will be available for adoption:

#3831 is a Red Roan 2 yr old filly, two yrs old. Gathered on 12/31/2008 from Callaghan HMA: NV0604




#3975 is a Gray 2 yr old filly, gathered on 01/05/2009 from Bald Mountain HMA: NV0603




                                                                                                     15
                                                        former host, Joyce Anderson. Inside I found a very
The Walking with Winnie Trip
                                                        generous money order to help pay for Winnie's trailer
Journal                                                 ride to California, which I expect the vet will
                                                        recommend. Please see our Thank You page for a list
                                                        of contributors.
97 Years Young
Posted: 26 Jul 2009 07:02 PM PDT                        In the evening Mister Albino and I were treated to a
                                                        dinner out, courtesy of Dad and Ginny, and Ginny's
                                                        grown children and grandchildren.


                                                        Blake Cuts His Leg Open
                                                        Posted: 25 Jul 2009 07:42 PM PDT




Yesterday and today Winnie got worked in
preparation for her exam tomorrow. This is because
her lameness only shows up after consecutive days of
exercise, and disappears with rest. Yesterday we
walked 7.5 miles together. Today we started with
some free lunging at a trot, followed by a five mile
bareback ride at a walk. While we were out, Winnie
and I enjoyed the big vistas and the Ohio farmland      This morning Mister Albino went to say hello to
scenery.
                                                        the horses in the back paddock at Wyandot County
                                                        Equine Rescue and noticed that one of them had a
                                                        bloody leg. He called me to take a look at it and I
                                                        immediately phoned the office to let them know
                                                        a horse had been injured. While waiting for
                                                        Dave, the Director, and his assistant, Laura, to
                                                        arrive, I managed to get a halter on the paint
                                                        horse and separate him from the rest of the herd.
                                                        No one knows how he did it, but "Blake" had
                                                        severed a tendon! After he was sedated, Laura
                                                        and I walked the very sleepy fellow to the upper
                                                        barn, where Dave sewed him up and wrapped his
                                                        wound.


After my ride, Mister Albino drove me 63 miles south
for a visit with my father and his wife, Ginny. At my
dad's house, a letter was waiting for me, sent by

                                                                                                             16
                                                       eye, but I could tell it was still there by the slight
                                                       wobble in her step.


                                                       Dixieland Drummer, a race horse recuperating at
                                                       Wyandot County Equine Rescue from a fractured
                                                       cannon bone, rode in the trailer with Winnie to the
                                                       University of Findlay campus. Big-hearted "Dixie"
                                                       won his first race, but sacrificed his leg in the effort,
                                                       and was sent to equally big-hearted Dave Balz at the
                                                       rescue facility, in hopes of saving his life. Dave
                                                       wanted x-rays taken of Dixie's leg, to see how well the
                                                       horse has healed since the accident on May 30.
After that excitement, I needed a cup of Red
Rose tea to settle me down. Mister Albino made
lunch, and then we took Winnie on a walk past
the corn fields, up to the Point Drive-In, where
all three of us enjoyed softie cones. By the time
we got back, Blake, in the stall next to Winnie's,
looked much better. Winnie gave him a nose kiss
and told him to get well soon!




                                                       After the horses were unloaded at University Equine
                                                       Veterinary Services, Dave introduced us to
                                                       veterinarian Rick Henninger, who would examine
Vet Prescribes Rest for Winnie                         both horses. Winnie went first.
Posted: 28 Jul 2009 04:45 PM PDT
                                                       I discussed Winnie's case with Dr. Henninger, who
                                                       gave Winnie a flex test and watched her trot back and
                                                       forth on a hard surface, and then on the lunge line in
                                                       the softer arena. Back on the concrete flooring, Dr.
                                                       Henninger grabbed Winnie's tail to pull her off
                                                       balance a couple of times, to see how well she would
                                                       recover when thrown off her stance. He also had his

Winnie and I started our Monday early, so she could    assistant turn her in tight circles while he watched

enjoy a breakfast of grass and I could enjoy another   how she handled her feet. He could see the slight drag

bareback ride before taking her for her afternoon      and stiffness in the hind end, particularly on the right

appointment with the vet. Winnie didn't seem to        side. She had a bit of clumsiness on her left side, too,

mind me on her back at a walk or a trot. Her           and asked me if Winnie has shown any signs of

lameness might not be noticed except by a trained      illness. Since she hasn't had any fever or gone off her
                                                       feed since I adopted her, Dr. Henninger did not think
                                                                                                                17
a test for EPM or herpes was warranted. He explained       America's National Treasure.
that if she were diseased, her lameness would
progress in spite of rest. In Winnie's case, rest          Thanks to all those folks who have helped us on our
improves her condition, which means it is more likely      way, hosted us, raised money for our effort, and
the lameness is caused by soft tissue wear and tear.       cheered us on. We are sorry we will miss meeting
                                                           those who agreed to host us along the American
                                                           Discovery Trail from Cincinnati to Dodge City, and
                                                           from the Santa Fe Trail to points further west. I am
                                                           especially disappointed to miss this part of the trip,
                                                           where we would spend less time in traffic and more
                                                           time on trail, enjoying the view across the Western
                                                           horizon.


                                                           As for Dixie, his future is uncertain, and after looking
                                                           at his x-rays, Dr. Henninger recommended six
                                                           additional weeks of rest. Dave also told the doctor
The vet suspects that the repetitive task of walking
                                                           about the horse that injured himself over the
several hours and days in a row, for long distances,
                                                           weekend (see last Saturday's blog entry), and his
could be the reason for Winnie's lameness, even
                                                           future is also uncertain. For now, he remains in the
though we trained and prepared for the walk from
                                                           stall next to Winnie, and they have become friends.
March through May. We discussed the possibility of
giving Winnie bute and resting her for two or three
                                                           At present I am working on making arrangements for
weeks, then putting her to the task again, to see if the
                                                           Winnie's trailer ride from Carey, Ohio to Reno,
lameness returns.
                                                           Nevada, where my daughter can pick us up with her
                                                           friend's trailer. I will continue to blog about our
I then asked the vet about the possibility that Winnie
                                                           journey until we arrive in Paradise, and from there, I
is too young for the job I am asking her to do, and he
                                                           hope to network with local folk who want to protect
said that this might be true.
                                                           horses, rescue abused animals, and save the
                                                           Mustangs. While I cannot know what is in store for
Certainly I do not want to risk causing further pain,
                                                           Winnie and me, I still have faith that God knows what
injury, or permanent damage to my horse, and after
                                                           he is doing with us. We must surrender to the
giving it some more thought on the way home from
                                                           circumstances as they are presented, and try to make
the exam, I decided it would be in Winnie's best
                                                           the best choice for Winnie.
interest to discontinue the walk altogether. I fear the
lameness will return if I resume the same schedule of
work. It would be better to trailer Winnie the distance
west, and let her recover over a six-month period.


This is what I must do for my horse, in spite of the
disappointment it brings. I expect Winnie's fans will
remain loyal, even though she only achieved ten
percent of her intended miles across the USA. At least
we made it over the Pennsylvania line, met and heard
from many wonderful people, and hopefully, brought
attention to the plight of the mustang horse,
                                                                                                                    18
Winnie to be Examined at Ohio State                      has conducted interesting research in this area. See
                                                         the article written by Stacey Oke, DVM, at
Posted: 30 Jul 2009 06:14 PM PDT
                                                         www.thehorse.com "Lame or Ataxic? Kinetic Gait
                                                         Analysis Can Tell"


                                                         We hope to put Winnie on a trailer headed toward
                                                         California by the end of next week. We are able to do
                                                         this, thanks to the fund-raising efforts of our good
                                                         friend and former host, Joyce Anderson, of
                                                         Kerhonkson, New York. She and her family and
                                                         friends have made it possible for us to hire a
                                                         professional hauler to take Winnie across country.


This morning Winnie and I practiced a few ground         This evening Winnie enjoyed a dinner of grain and

exercises, to keep her limber and alleviate boredom.     hay, and Mister Albino made sure she and her injured

Before we returned from the barn, Dr. Margaret           neighbor, Blake, had fresh water to keep them cool

Mudge from Ohio State University returned a call I       tonight. Over the weekend I will exercise her more in

made earlier and listened to my concerns about           preparation for her test on Tuesday.

Winnie. She said a team of veterinarians could
examine Winnie next week.


Courtesy of Dave Balz of the Wyandot County Equine
Rescue, Winnie will trailer to the Daniel M. Galbreath
Equine Trauma Research Center for a kinetic gait
analysis. This test will better determine if her
lameness is due to a musculoskeletal problem or a
neurological problem or a combination of both.
Hopefully, the team of doctors there will be able to
isolate the area that is troubling her and recommend
a treatment program. Alicia L. Bertone, DVM, PhD,




                                                                                                                19
                                    MUSTANG FOR SALE
I have attached some pictures of my TIP horse, Cowboy to include in your newsletter. I have also written
a piece about him below. Thank you so much for including this! Please let me know if you need
anything else.

Cowboy is a wonderful two year old colt who is available for adoption. Cowboy was gathered from the
Nut Mountain area in October of 2007 as a weanling. Cowboy made his way to an adoption event and
when he was still patiently waiting for a home at the end of the event, I took him in as a project horse.
From day one, Cowboy as been a dream to work with. He met me at the gate the first time I went to
work with him and has been a very good boy about everything since. He loves attention and really wants
a person to bond with. Cowboy is currently 14.2 hands high and is still growing. His legs are mile long!
Cowboy halters, ties, leads and trailers just to name a few of his talents. He went to a clinic just a month
into gentling and did fantastic.

Cowboy is available for adoption through the BLM and his adopter will need to be approved by the BLM
prior to adoption. The standard $125 adoption fee will apply.. Cowboy also has a blog at
www.cowboysjourney.blogspot.com. If you are interested in adopting Cowboy, please contact me at
acowboystory@yahoo.com. Cowboy currently resides in Northern California, but I am willing to transport
him to the right approved home.

I can't say enough good things about this fantastic colt. He will make someone a wonderful companion
for life. kg6oqh@comcast.net (Currently in Napa, CA). Would be adopted through the Litchfield
Corrals through Videll 530 254 6575




                                                                                                         20
Please let everyone know that a 7-week old wild mustang is
available at Washoe County Regional Animal Services (775-
353-8900) for adoption. He was found on the side of the road somewhere in the
Virginia Foothills or Highlands, I can’t remember, with a wound on his neck and
obviously separated from his herd. He is being bottle fed four times a day right
now and that’s all I know. I did see him, a tan and white youngster, and he is very
sweet and cute. I wish I could take him but I can’t. Hopefully someone can adopt
him and care for him (the chief horse investigator is Bobby Smith.)


                   How we promote our Mustangs
                        (From a Mustang Family Member)
I have been going to the 4-H fair and looked at the different horses not
one Mustang or even mixed.........with mustang.. A voice within said
how about you and your mustang next year to promote the mustang
breed I made for horses lovers to enjoy showing to others..........Aw that
is right I will keep following him up on training and show people that
mustangs are great horses to.. I thought of making up a mustang flier
and handing it out to others tonight........

       From a Mustang/Burro Newsletter Family Person

Do you happen to have any info on finding horse -friendly
accommodations for people hauling their own horse from CA to VA? I
know there are resources but don't know where to look. Perhaps
someone you know has already done this trek?
dianegardnerhomes@yahoo.com




                                                                                  21
From Cindy: I wrote this story when we lost            standards, and is a gentleman with girls. While
our first Mustang. I don’t remember what they          this is the makeup of a great man, in High
were looking for, but I submitted it to THE            School, these qualities don’t make you the “Cool
ULTIMATE HORSE SITE. I never heard                     Kid” - With his horse, he found a place where
anything and didn’t give it another thought.           he fit in. Our son found he was already traveling
                                                       down a lifes path called “The Cowboy Way.”
A few days ago, just for fun, our son Goggled his
name – and up popped the story I wrote…..Some          Scott and Mister entered in several classes at
of you have seen this and for some it’s new.           both the Reno Mustang Show and the Bishop
This is how our journey with Mustangs began:           Mustang Show. Between the two shows, our
                                                       “boys” received ribbons from first place through
A Tribute to Mister – A Once WILD                      6th place. These were the first two shows either
Mustang:                                               of them had ever been in. Again, Mister taught
                                                       our son a lesson in competing.
Scott, our son is a young man that was born 100
years too late…He loves the “Cowboy Way” –             At the Reno Wild Horse and Burro Show, Scott
                                                       showed Mister cows for the first time. Mister
One of Scott’s favorite movies is Lonesome             had FUN with the cows….Scott and Mister took
Dove – He wanted a horse just like “Hell Bitch”        a third place later that day in the sorting event.
in the movie. Well, not the same disposition, but
the same color….We looked at the paperwork             At the Bishop Mustang show, there was a class
for the Warm Springs Correctional facility,            that Scott had signed up for, Western Riding”.
talked with Hank Curry, the Head Trainer, and          When he got a copy of the pattern and saw many,
narrowed our selection down to three                   many lead changes, he asked me to pull him
Mustangs…..                                            from the event…Scott had no idea how to do a
                                                       flying lead change. Several other riders gathered
At the prison, we were admiring one of the             around our son to help him learn how to do the
horses we liked, and a potential adopter said, “I      flying lead changes. One person looked at Scott
like this horse. I don’t care what it costs, I want    and said, “You will never remember all this
this horse”…..So, we moved on to the next horse        stuff, just shift your weight in the saddle, and
on the list.                                           sometimes the horse will change his lead.” So,
                                                       Scott and Mister went into the
At the end of the day, Mister was our new family       class………Mister looked like a little kid
member. We were not quite ready for him, so he         skipping – he did the most animated lead
stayed at the prison for an extra 30 days of           changes we had ever seen. Scott and Mister took
training. When we picked up Mister, out walked         their one and only 1st place. When they
this rather tough looking inmate….he put Mister        announced Scotts number, I thought he was
in the trailer, and tears rolled down his face as he   going to fall off his saddle.
exited the trailer….We realized these tough guys
were able to find a “ soft spot” in the hearts for     Two weeks later, we lost our beloved Mister to
the horses they worked with.                           colic. Mister’s last job was teaching us all how
                                                       to say goodbye to a beloved friend….We carry
Mister taught our son to ride. Scott was               his spirit with us everyday.
learning, and of course Mister was learning at the
same time. It wasn’t always a smooth ride, but
both learned and grew better for their                 Here is the link with the story and pictures that
relationship with each other. A bond was               were submitted too:
formed between a young man and his horse.              http://www.ultimatehorsesite.com/fun/stories/la
                                                       wrence_mister.html
Our son doesn’t drink, do drugs, likes country
music, is a loyal friend, has high moral
                                                                                                       22
   MUSTANG MAKEOVER
                                                         I have started the process of riding ILDivo. He has
                                                         been a joy to work with. In the beginning, I knew that
                                                         I needed to go slow, steady, but slow. If something
                                                         really scares him, his reaction is to run. He also
                                                         showed his anxiety by ducking his head and bucking
                                                         a little bit. I have spent many hours and days, ground
                                                         driving, ponying him with Presley, and exposing him
                                                         to new people and new things. My last experience
                                                         with Diva, my last Mustang Makeover Horse, taught
                                                         me many things. The most important lesson was that
                                                         she was not exposed to enough HUMANS. She
                                                         bonded with me, however, did not like others. When
                                                         her new owners started working with her, she wanted
                                                         nothing to do with them and did not want Janice to
                                                         get on her. The process of transfering the riding of
                                                         Diva over to Janice was to say the least, a 2 month
                                                         process. I have read in many emails in the mustang
                                                         Makeovers that others who have purchased
                                                         mustangs trained elsewhere have had this same
                                                         problem.

                                                         For these reasons, I decided it would be best for me
                                                         to hold onto ILDivo with Presley and have my helper
                                                         get on him first. I could keep the horse from running
                                                         or bucking, I kept Nick safe as well, and I could keep
                                                         this a very positive, quiet, calm situation for my horse.
                                                         It worked great, Presley kept everything in complete
                                                         control, Nick hung on, ILdivo felt safe. The end. After
                                                         two more rides like that, I got on and rode him. He
                                                         was co-operative , at ease, and all the ground work
                                                         and extra time paid off. I will continue to have
                                                         different riders on him throughout his training.In an
                                                         effort to not make him a one person horse, he has to
                                                         trust all Humans in general, not just his Nanny
                                                         Saunya.

                                                         This is the beginning of his 7th week in training.
                                                         While I am happy with our progress I must move
                                                         along quickly now. At this point he has learned to be
                                                         ridden, tie, haul, wear a pack saddle, he ponys along
                                                         with another horse and the list goes on. He backs up
                                                         , moves his shoulders around to the right and left and
                                                         will go forward pretty good. Today, I will add spurs,
                                                         (not sharp) he will start wearing a snaffle and I will
                                                         begin to push him for more. He is happy, we are
                                                         great partners, he has many friends, lots of food and
I have been really working hard on ILDivo since my       water, and security. What more could a pretty wild
last post. Many things have happened. To begin with,     horse ask for?
Terri Russell from KOLO8 aired our first part of the
story last Thursday. It was fantastic. We have had       I will be posting pictures of me riding him as soon as I
wonderfull reviews. The ending to the story was to       get one! Check out my Sister's face the day of pick
say the least, priceless. Anyone who is reading this     up. It says it all!!!!!!!!
may see the segment my going to kolotv.com. Click
on hot topics, type in the Extreme Mustang
Makeover, click and watch.

7/28/09 It's been a fantastic week. The Little Man has   with spurs, he is learning many new things. He
made progress by leaps and bounds. I am riding him       learned to sidepass in all of about two minutes. For
                                                                                                                23
more, go to my blog,
www.renomustangdiva.blogspot.com . Also, for
everyone who does not live here, you can view Terri
Russell's story on us . Go to kolotv.com click on
hot topics, click on Extreme Mustang Makeover.
As always, Terri is outdoing herself. She has
dedicated many hours to the story and we are just
beginning. It will air again Thursday night on the 5:00
news. Walker , Terri's camerman, also is dedicating
his time and expertise to us. Thank you to both of
them.




.




                                                          24
This Weeks Humor




                   25

				
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Description: MustangBurro tetanus