ANNEX malnutrition

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                                                                              Coordinating Office




                                   ACT INTERNATIONAL
                          EMERGENCY ASSESSMENT CHECKLISTS
                           (RAPID AND DETAILED ASSESSMENTS)
                                     March 09 version

Emergency assessment checklists should be used by ACT International members undertaking an emergency
assessment, and planning to submit an Appeal or Rapid Response Fund proposal. They are for all members of
ACT International, but should always be done in coordination with other relevant actors in the field
(government, UN, INGOs and local partners). When carrying out the assessment, you need to look both at the
emergency situation and the administrative capacity to respond.

Types of emergency assessments: ACT International uses two different emergency assessments:

-       Rapid Emergency Assessment: conducted by members during the first days following the emergency
(ideally during days 1-3).      This assessment should provide the basis for delivering immediate emergency
assistance. Assessment and emergency assistance planning must be based on sex- and age disaggregated data
from the start. Results of the Rapid Emergency Assessment should determine what the main needs are, what the
planned intervention will be, whether the members have sufficient capacity to conduct the emergency response,
or whether external financial resources will be required (thus leading to a request for resources from the ACT
Rapid Response Fund or a Preliminary Appeal proposal).

-       Detailed Emergency Assessment: Over the next 1-3 weeks, the Rapid Emergency Assessment should
be followed by a Detailed Emergency Assessment, which will gather more specific and complete information on
the emergency and the proposed emergency response (in some cases leading to the Appeal proposal). A
detailed assessment could take up to several weeks, but could be faster depending on the scale of the emergency,
the area affected, the complexity of the issues and the amount of resources available. Both assessments should
be seen as first steps in a continuous process of reviewing and updating as part of overall monitoring. 1

There are two components to each of these assessment types; situation analysis and administrative capacity.



                                                                            ACT is a global alliance of churches and related
                                                                            agencies working to save lives and support communities
                                                                            in emergencies worldwide.
                                                                            The ACT Coordinating Office is based with the World
                                                                            Council of Churches (WCC) and The Lutheran World
                                                                            Federation (LWF) in Switzerland.

1
    Sphere Handbook, page 31.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.           2

Assessment checklists: Checklists are effective tools and reference documents to ensure that the key areas of
emergency analysis have been examined by members in the emergency-affected country, as a primary basis for
planning an emergency response. In view of the great differences between emergencies, these checklists
should be adapted to the specific context in which members are operating (particularly the detailed
emergency assessment checklist, and especially the sectoral assessment chapters). They should be
considered as a “memory aid”, to ensure that key issues are adequately and effectively covered. Checklists
have been developed for a Rapid Emergency Assessment (ANNEX 1, page 3) and a Detailed Emergency
Assessment (ANNEX 2, page 7). While the checklists are taken mainly from the Sphere Handbook, they also
benefit from other important reference documents, found as ANNEX 3, page 55.

Types of information/data collection: With participatory assessment as the main element, members must
decide what kind of information and data collection will be carried out, from among a number of possibilities
which include: focus group discussions; individual interviews; household interviews; meetings with local leaders
or community representatives; sector interviews; random sampling, and surveys.2

Terms of Reference for an emergency assessment: ToR for every emergency assessment (rapid and detailed)
should be drawn up.


                                    Terms of Reference should include:

                    Names/profiles of team members (including gender, age and expertise)
                    Locations to be visited
                    Type assessment (rapid or detailed)
                    Type checklist to be used (especially for detailed assessments, where the
                     standard checklist should be modified/adapted to meet requirements of the
                     specific emergency)
                    Categories of informants (groups, individuals, leaders)
                    Questions to be asked (and which member covers which set of questions)
                    Methods of collecting information and data
                    Timing of the assessment (how long will it take)


Emergency assessment reporting: Results of the rapid and detailed emergency assessments should be compiled
on the respective Reporting Templates, found in the two assessment checklists.




ACT Coordinating Office
Geneva, March 2009




2
 The Guidelines for Emergency Assessment, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, contains an
excellent chapter on various means of collecting information. The Good Enough Guide is another important reference on
how to involve people at every stage of an emergency, and on how to conduct interviews and collect information.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.         3

                                                                                                          ANNEX 1

                      ACT RAPID EMERGENCY ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
                               AND REPORTING TEMPLATE

 RAPID EMERGENCY ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST

Check to find out what assessments have already been done and what coordinating organizations like OCHA are
responding to this emergency. Be prepared to share your own assessment findings with these organizations.

1.       SITUATION ANALYSIS; DETAILS OF THE EMERGENCY

What was the type/nature of the emergency?

When did the emergency occur?

Where exactly did the emergency occur?

Provide map of affected area.

What information is available on damage to the affected area, and impact on the affected population (women,
men, boys, girls)?

What is the general physical, social, economic and political working environment? How might this affect the
ability to respond?

What is the presence and strength of networks of member(s) in the affected area?

2.       INFORMATION ON AFFECTED POPULATION

What is the estimated total of persons affected, including casualties (mortalities, injured or wounded?

What disaggregated data by age and sex is available (by percentage, or exact/approximate figures if available)?
  Sex ratio M-F
  % under 5
  % 6- 17
  % 18-65
  % over 65

     Number of girls and women 13-49?

     Number of households and average family size?

     Number of persons by age/sex with specific needs (unaccompanied children, persons with disabilities,
     chronically ill, elderly, single- and child-headed households, pregnant and lactating women)?

Are there major issues which divide the population? How have different parts of population been affected
differently?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          4
What is the situation of the affected population based on the following emergency indicators3?

                     INDICATOR                               EMERGENCY LEVEL
             Mortality rate                   Over 2 per 10,000 per day
             Nutritional status of children   Over 10% with less than 80% weight for height
             Food                             Less than 2,100 calories/person/day
             Water quantity                   Less than 7.5 - 10 liters per person per day
             Water quality                    Over 25% of people with diarrhea
             Site space                       Less than 30 sq. m. per person
             Shelter space                    Less than 3.5 sq. m. per person
             Non-food items                   Less than one full set of clothing, blanket/bedding/mat,
                                              soap, and kitchen utensils per person

3.      ACTIONS TO DATE

What actions thus far have been taken by the ACT member(s) individually?

Have locally available stocks of member(s) been distributed (as applicable)?

Which type of data collection is being used by the ACT member(s) to ensure participation of affected
populations and communities?

What actions thus far have been taken by the ACT member(s) collectively through the ACT Forum (as
applicable)?

What actions have been taken by others – government, United Nations agencies, NGOs, affected populations
themselves? How did ACT members coordinate their actions with these?

4.      SUMMARY OF OVERALL EMERGENCY NEEDS

A.    Situation Analysis:
What are the needs of the affected population in the following sectors and areas of activity?

Protection

Water (reference: Sphere Handbook, pp. 89-90, for water assessment checklist)

Sanitation and hygiene (Sphere, pp. 90-92 for sanitation assessment checklist)

Food (Sphere, pp. 174-76 for food security assessment checklist)

Nutrition (Sphere, pp. 180-182 for nutrition assessment checklist)

Non-food items (Sphere, pp. 241-243 for non-food items assessment checklist)

Shelter and site selection (Sphere, p. 238-241 for shelter and settlement assessment checklist)

Health (Sphere, pp. 295-297 for health services assessment checklist)



3
  From Sphere Handbook, and UNHCR Handbook for Emergencies (Third edition, 2007). It is recognized that the above
statistical information will likely not be immediately available, and may take some time to obtain.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          5
Psychosocial support4 (Community Based Psychosocial Services in Humanitarian Assistance: A Facilitator‟s
Guide)

Security

Education

Environment

Economic development and livelihoods

In sector assessments, have analysis of gender differences been taken into account in the design of services,
access to services, and equitable participation of women, men, girls and boys? 5

Have ACT policies and guidelines been taken into account in your assessment, including: Gender Policy
Principles; Policy on HIV in Humanitarian Emergency Assistance Programmes; Principles of ACT Security and
Safety? Have the Sphere Standards been taken into account?

What are the capacities and strategies to cope with the emergency needs:
       Of the affected population?
       Of the government and humanitarian agencies?

B.    Administrative Capacity Analysis

Coordination (Appeal writing, Staff leadership, Interagency)

Communication (With donors/ international media, local population/ media, affected population)

Human Resources (Available people; Training needs, Use of Code of Conduct, Care for caregivers.

Logistics (Sphere, pp. 192-193 for supply chain management logistics assessment checklist)

Financial (systems in use, experienced staff, banking systems etc.)

What gaps in the emergency response exist, between emergency needs and planned responses?




4
  Prepared by Church of Sweden, Norwegian Church Aid, and Presbyterian Disaster Assistance. Also, IASC Guidelines on
Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings, p. 25, and Mental Health in Emergencies, WHO.
5
  From Gender Handbook, sector checklists.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.       6
                   RAPID EMERGENCY ASSESSMENT REPORTING TEMPLATE

1.      SUMMARY:
Date of report
Type, location and date of emergency
Number of people affected
Reason for assessment
Summary of rapid assessment conclusions, including whether an ACT response is planned, and whether a
   Rapid Response Fund or Appeal proposal will be made. If so, complete section 3. below.

2.        BACKGROUND:
    Names/agencies of assessment team (including gender, age, and expertise)
    Locations visited
    Itinerary
    Categories of informants
    Methods of information and data collection used (including sources)
    Sources of secondary information (including other assessments)
    Constraints

3.      MEMBER(S)’ EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING:

Objective: What is the planned overall objective of the emergency response? Objectives by sector?
Target population:
   What is the target population for the planned member(s)‟ response?
   If available, provide disaggregated data, by age and sex.
   In which locations will the proposed response take place?
Proposed activities of member(s):
   What are the proposed activities, by sector? By target group?
   What are the expected outputs of the activities, which are necessary to achieve the objective?
   What indicators will be used to measure the outputs?
Proposed implementation arrangements:
   Which member(s) will implement the emergency response?
   What is the member(s) capacity to implement the response: cooperatively through the ACT Forum; using
        its own resources and church/ecumenical networks; through non-member partners (does a local MoU
        or cooperation agreement exist?)
Coordination:
   To what extent are the member(s) involved in in-country, inter-agency coordination mechanisms in this
        emergency?
   To what extent will the ACT Forum in the country be the prime focus of member coordination (and
        implementation) for this emergency response?
Communications and media:
    Do the member(s) have pre-established, well developed contacts with media and public
         information/awareness networks?
    Is a local Communicator identified to assist the member(s) and Forum with communications and media
         activities?
Planned implementation period: what is the planned duration of activities (if known at this time)?
Resources: extent of human/staffing, financial and material resources available among members to conduct
 the emergency response? Are there gaps in human resource requirements or expertise?

ANNEX: Terms of Reference for the Assessment Team
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.   7
                                                                ANNEX 2




                  ACT DETAILED EMERGENCY ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
                             AND REPORTING TEMPLATE
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.   8


                                          Table of Contents
                     DETAILED EMERGENCY ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST


1.     DETAILS OF THE EMERGENCY AND THE AFFECTED AREA          Page 9
       1.1. The emergency
       1.2. The affected area

2.     INFORMATION ON AFFECTED POPULATION                          11

3.     ACTIONS TO DATE                                             12

4.     SUMMARY OF OVERALL EMERGENCY NEEDS- SECTOR ASSESSMENT       13

       4.1.      Protection                                        13
       4.2.      Security                                          16
       4.3.      Water                                             17
       4.4.      Sanitation and hygiene                            19
       4.5.      Food and food security                            22
       4.6.      Nutrition                                         24
       4.7.      Non-food items                                    26
       4.8.      Shelter and site selection                        29
       4.9.      Health                                            31
       4.10.     Psychosocial support                              34
       4.11.     Education                                         37
       4.12.     Environment                                       38
       4.13.     Economic development and livelihoods              39
       4.14.     Sector assessments – conclusions                  41


5.     SUMMARY OF ADMINISTRATIVE CAPACITY ANALYSIS                 42
       5.1. Coordination                                           42
       5.2. Communication                                          43
       5.3. Human Resources                                        44
       5.4. Logistics                                              45
       5.5. Financial                                              47
       5.6. Administrative Capacity Conclusions                    47

DETAILED EMERGENCY ASSESSMENT REPORTING TEMPLATE                   48

ANNEX:      REFERENCE DOCUMENTS                                    50
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          9

1.      DETAILS OF THE EMERGENCY AND THE AFFECTED AREA
1.1.    THE EMERGENCY

What was the type/nature of the emergency?

When did the emergency occur?

Where exactly did the emergency occur?
       Provide map of affected area.

What information is available on damage to the affected area, and impact on the affected population?

1.2.    THE AFFECTED AREA

Political overview:
-       What is the political environment? Include national, regional, and local administrative aspects, and
        pertinent conflicts. If this is a conflict emergency, please elaborate on details of the conflict including
        expected developments.
-       What is the history of the area that influences current events?
-       What political groups are struggling for power, using the emergency/relief to increase their standing in
        the community?
-       Are there those who benefit from a slow resolution to the conflict?
-       Does everyone have a voice in the political debate?
-       Are there negative consequences for having a dissenting opinion?

Geographic overview:
- What is the general profile of the physical environment and any key features presenting ongoing risks:
geography; climate; recurring natural hazards; environmental vulnerabilities?
- Is the proximity to the border (if applicable) a concern for the affected populations?
- Is the fragility of the local environment a concern (e.g., possible degradation, proximity to protected areas)?

Infrastructure overview:
Are roads, railways, ports, and airports in good condition?
Are telephone, telecommunications and electricity systems functioning?
Is there all-season accessibility?
About how many people live in the affected area?
What is the extent of community structures/facilities in the affected area?

Socio-economic overview:
What is the economic situation? What is the economic mainstay (farming, industry, employment, informal
       trading)?
Are local people able to find work? Are some groups of people excluded? Is the wealth controlled by a
       few/group? Which are the different groups?
What are the different problems identified by different socio-economic groups? By women and by men?
-      What is the standard of living for the local community? How does this compare to the national
       economy? What is the poverty line?
-      Who benefits economically in the present disaster?
-      What is the salary scale for health/mental health professionals, clerical persons, translators, drivers etc?
       This information is necessary for budgeting purposes.
Socio-cultural overview:
-      Are there identifiable or emerging social groups or associations? If so, describe.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.        10
-      What is the general status of the general community? Are people working together? Are there different
       types of society? What are their strengths in the culture? Are there any chronic issues that complicate the
       situation?
-      Who are the formal /informal decision-makers? In what way is the civil society participating in decision
       making?
-      Who must be consulted in the community before beginning a project? Formal/informal leaders including
       women leaders?
-      Are there people who have power of influence, whose endorsement carries weight?
-      What are community characteristics before and after the emergency: strengths and resistance?
-      What is the social organization of the affected area, and the affected community: clans, tribes, ethnic,
       religious, neighborhoods?
-      What are the cultural roles of women and men? What is women‟s position in society? How involved
       are women in decision-making processes?
-      Family structure: matrilineal, patrilineal, extended, role prescriptions, living structure, handling of
       finances, decision making?
-      What are structures that maintain cultural norms for funerals, birth rituals (elders, religious groups)?
-       If there has been population movement, what is the relationship between the host population and the
       refugees/IDPs, historically and in the present?
-       What is the flow of information from the government about the emergency, about missing family
       members, about incoming aid and how to get it, about safety/danger?
-      In this culture, does the individual or the group have primacy?
-      When there are conflicts, how are they expressed and how resolved? Are there rituals that signal that a
       conflict is finished?
-      If there is more than one culture in the community, how do they work together? Do they have distinct
       roles? Power?
-      How do people deal with disasters, suffering, violence?
-      What does the culture teach about family organization, gender roles, relationships with strangers,
       keeping the traditions?
-      How are emotions/thoughts expressed (for example, sadness, anger, happiness, suspicion, fear, attitudes,
       disagreement, intolerance, prejudice)?
-       Do people ask for help or for psychological support when they need it? If yes, how are they seen by
       their community?
-      How did/does the community treat and consider people with physical illness and disabilities ?
-       In the current context, are there any situations in which traditions and rituals cannot be practiced? (For
       example: for children born of rape, for the missing, for those who are buried on the way to exile or when
       in hiding)
-      What is the religious or faith-based composition of the affected area, and affected population?
-      What role does religion/spiritual life play in the daily life of the people? In births, deaths, etc.?
-      What is the relationship of priests, imams, monks or other religious persons to the larger community?
-      Who are the religious leaders in this community? How are they contacted?
-      Does the religious community have capacity and plan to assist in the emergency response?
-      Have religious practices resumed since the disaster?
-      Are rituals planned in response to the disaster? Who is included in them?
-      Are there sanctions/taboos about specific topics, traditions, rituals or social interactions (death, burial,
       mourning, rape, acts of revenge, sexuality)?
-      Are the religious and spiritual practices of the host population similar or in conflict with the refugee
       population? How are things working?
-      Are there religious understandings of disasters/mental health that psychosocial workers should
       understand?
-      What is the presence and strength of networks of ACT member(s) in the affected area?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.            11

2.         INFORMATION ON AFFECTED POPULATION
-      What is the estimated total of persons affected, including casualties (mortalities, injured or wounded?
-      If people are displaced, where have they come from?
-      Are additional population movements expected?
-      Where is the location of the affected population? Type: camps, transit centers, villages, towns, dispersed in
       rural areas.
-      What is the location and number of those living with relatives, and local people in rural and urban areas?
-      Is a mapping of the locations being made, including estimated numbers of various types of the affected
       populations?
-      What is the population change in the affected area, through displacement/arrivals?
-      What disaggregated data by age and sex is available (by percentage, or exact figures if available)?
       Sex ratio M-F:
                    % under 5
                    % 6-17
                    % 18-65
                    % over 65
-      Number of girls and women 13-49
-      Number of households and average family size?
-      Number of persons by age/sex with vulnerabilities and specific needs (separated families, unaccompanied
       children, persons with disabilities, chronically ill, elderly, single- and child-headed households, pregnant and
       lactating women, persons with HIV&AIDS, demobilized child soldiers or ex-soldiers, survivors of torture or
       sexual violence)?
-      Does the affected community comprise groups of individuals who do not form typical households, such as
       unaccompanied children, or particular minority groups with household sizes that are not typical?
-      What are the particular risks for the vulnerable people and why?
-      What are the situation and basic survival needs of the affected population based on the following emergency
       indicators6?

            INDICATOR                                            EMERGENCY LEVEL
    Mortality rate                   Over 2 per 10,000 per day
    Nutritional status of children   Over 10% with less than 80% weight for height
    Food                             Less than 2,100 calories/person/day
    Water quantity                   Less than 7.5 - 10 liters per person per day
    Water quality                    Over 25% of people with diarrhea
    Site space                       Less than 30 sq. m. per person
    Shelter space                    Less than 3.5 sq. m. per person
    Non-food items                   Less than one full set of clothing, blanket/bedding/mat, soap, and kitchen
                                     utensils per person


3.         ACTIONS TO DATE
-      Have the ACT member(s) previously conducted a review of national disaster risks and organizational
       capacity assessment as part of the ACT Capacity Development Initiative? If yes, which specific steps have
       been taken to ensure that weaknesses identified have been addressed (as related to this emergency and this
       assessment)?
-      What emergency response actions thus far have been taken by the member(s) individually?
-      Have locally available stocks of member(s) been distributed (as applicable)?


6
    From Sphere Handbook, and UNHCR Handbook for Emergencies (Third edition, 2007).
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.            12
-      What actions thus far have been taken by the member(s) collectively through the ACT Forum (as
       applicable)? Are actions taking advantage of various strengths of the members (gifts of the spirit)?
-      Which type of data collection is being used by the member(s) to ensure participation of affected populations
       and communities?
-      Does the participatory assessment consult an equal number of men and women to gather essential sectoral
       information?
-      Are conditions good for community mobilization, self-help, ownership and control of the emergency
       response in all sectors?
-      What actions have been taken, and are being planned, by others – government, Unite Nations agencies,
       NGOs, affected populations and communities themselves?
-      Who are the main players in the area?
-      Which coordination arrangements are in place?
-      Are there any obvious gaps to activities underway or planned?
-      Are targeted actions based on gender analysis being planned/taken, to address needs of women, men, girls
       and boys?
-      Are ACT members involved in activities relating to conflict resolution or bridge-building?
-      Have ACT policies and guidelines been taken into account in your assessment, including: Gender Policy
       Principles; Policy on HIV in Humanitarian Emergency Assistance Programmes; Principles of ACT Security
       and Safety? Have the Sphere Standards been taken into account?


4.        SUMMARY OF OVERALL EMERGENCY NEEDS – SECTOR ASSESSMENT
Sector assessments – analysis:        What are the needs of the affected population in the following sectors and
areas of activity?

4.1.      PROTECTION7


     STANDARD:
     - The nutritional and support needs of identified at-risk groups are met. (Sphere General Nutrition Support
     Standard 2)


1.        Participatory information gathering

      Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
      Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
      Have women been consulted separately from men?
      Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
       disabilities etc)?

2.        What are the extent and availability of protection in the affected area?




7
  Protection is defined as a concept that encompasses all activities aimed at obtaining full respect for the rights of the
individual in accordance with human rights, refugee and humanitarian law. This can be accomplished through an
environment – political, social, cultural, institutional and legal – conducive to the sustainable exercise and respect of
fundamental freedoms and human rights. From IASC Guidelines for Gender-based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian
Settings.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.             13
3.         Protection considerations and risks:

General:
-    Is a human rights framework applied to all aspects and sectors of assessment?
-    Do affected persons have protection:
      Of life, security of the person, physical integrity and dignity?
      Of rights related to the basic necessities of life?
      Of other economic social and cultural rights?
      Of other civil and political rights?8
-    Which social groups or categories of persons are most at risk, and why? How can these groups be best
     supported to empower themselves?
-    What were the reasons for flight of refugees and asylum-seekers? What is their legal status? Are the
     rights of the internally displaced persons, asylum-seekers, refugees, and local population respected?
-    Are IDPs, asylum-seekers or refugees at risk of being forced to return, relocate or resettle against their
     wishes?
-    Is registration of displaced persons undertaken?
-    Are people subject to physical, gender-based or psychological abuse, intimidation or insecurity?
-    Are some persons or groups subject to discrimination?
-    Is a monitoring and reporting mechanism for human rights violations in place?- Is information gathered on
     legal, institutional, cultural, practical, and social obstacles faced in securing protection?

By specific needs category:

     Women with specific needs:
-     How many women with specific needs are among the affected population (and what are the specific
      needs)?
-     What capacities do they have?
-     How many female-headed households are there as a percentage of the total?
-     Does concern for personal safety and freedom from sexual harassment, sexual assault or domestic abuse
      limit the movement or options of girls and women?

      Gender-based violence:
-       Have the nature, scope and magnitude of gender-based violence been assessed (including sexual violence,
        physical violence, emotional and psychological violence, socio-economic violence, and harmful traditional
        practices such as female genital mutilation and sex-selective neglect and abuse?
-       Have arrangements been made to care for persons subjected to gender-based violence (GBV)?
-       Has the assessment identified major causes, consequences and potential solutions to GBV, the individuals
        most at risk, and existing coping mechanisms? Are actions taken to address causes?
-      Are actions being taken around camps, villages and urban areas where GBV incidents have occurred or are
       likely to occur?
-      Are mechanisms in place to guarantee security of persons affected and of witnesses, to protect them against
       further harm?
-     Are women and children protected from the effect of hostilities, including any form of sexual violence,
      including prosecuting those responsible for such crimes (reference UN Security Council resolution 1325)?
-     How are community leaders and men involved within this issue? What have they done?

     Children:
-     How many reported cases are there of children killed, injured, missing, separated from families,
      unaccompanied, or without access to basic needs (food, water, shelter, health care, and education)?
-     What are the risks and threats faced by children in terms of abuse, exploitation, violence and deprivation of
      parental care?

8
    As elaborated in the IASC Operational Guidelines on Human Rights and Natural Disasters, 2006.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.             14
-      Are there specific protection and care concerns for girls specifically? Boys specifically?
-      Which organizations are working on child protection issues in the area?
-      What care and tracing arrangements are being made for unaccompanied and separated children?
-      Are children provided with special care and assistance as guided by the principles of the Convention on the
       Rights of the Child (the child‟s right to life, survival and development; non-discrimination; the best interests
       of the child; and participation of the child)?
-      What structures are supporting children, such as schools, child friendly spaces, child care centers?

      Elderly:
-      What was the role that elderly persons played in society? Their legal rights and customary privileges?
-      What capacities do they have?
-      In each of the sectors, are planned activities accessible to elderly?
-      What structures are supporting the elderly?

      HIV&AIDS:
-      What is the estimated level of HIV in the community? What are the main identified routes of transmission?
-      What is the population‟s level of awareness and understanding of the disease? How can the planned
       programme assist in this?
-      Are the main elements of the ACT Policy on HIV in Emergency and Humanitarian Work being followed in
       assessment and planning?

      People with disabilities:
-      What are the main types of mental and physical disabilities present?
-      What structures are supporting them?
-      Who is responsible for their care?
-      What capacities do they have?
-      In each of the sectors, are planned activities accessible to the people with disabilities and mentally ill?

4.     Conclusions:

-      Main findings

-      Recommendations

4.2.       SECURITY


     STANDARD:
     - Existing shelter and settlement solutions are prioritized through the return or hosting of emergency-
     affected households, and the security, health, safety and well-being of the affected population are ensured.
     (Sphere Shelter and Settlement Standard 1)


1.         Participatory information gathering

      Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
      Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
      Have women been consulted separately from men?
      Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
       disabilities etc)?

2.         What are the extent and availability of security arrangements in the affected area?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.            15
3.        Security considerations and risks:

-      What is the security situation for the affected population and in the affected area? What are the types,
       degrees and locations of violence, including gender-based violence?
-      Which areas are the most dangerous for girls, boys, youth, women, extremely vulnerable persons, people
       with disabilities?
-      Are there any specific security concerns mentioned by youth and differently abled?
-      Are there any potential security threats to humanitarian action?
-      Who ensures the safety of the population (military, militia, police, peacekeeping forces)? Do any of these
       put the population more at risk?
-      Is adequate security being provided to the affected population, and are reported incidents being responded
       to? Does a reporting mechanism exist? How does it function; confidentiality? Does the affected population
       know how it functions and how to access it?
-      Is the presence of mines a concern? Who is involved in demining?
-      What is the impact of security on the local/affected population in terms of freedom of movement, access to
       food, water, health services, markets, latrines and wash facilities?
-      What are the people‟s likely movements? What are the existing and potential security factors and threats
       for the people affected and for planned relief responses?
-      What special security risks exist for women and girls, men, boys and youth?
-      If you have a security plan, has it been activated? Is the plan current, and updated?
-      Is there a security focal point for your agency or forum?
-      Is the member(s) part of a country-wide security plan? If so, what actions are being taken?
-      What advice is being given to agencies to avoid/minimize risk?
-      If you intend to work or travel in insecure areas, what measures are you taking to avoid/minimize security
       threats?

4.       Conclusions:

-        Main findings

-        Recommendations

4.3.      WATER


     STANDARDS AND INDICATORS:9
     - All people have safe and equitable access to a sufficient quantity of water for drinking, cooking and
        personal and domestic hygiene. Public water points are sufficiently close to households to enable use of
        the minimum water requirement. (Sphere Water Supply Standard 1)
     - Water is palatable, and of sufficient quantity to be drunk and used for personal and domestic hygiene
        without causing significant risk to health. (Sphere Water Supply Standard 2)
     - Minimum 15 liters of water per person per day (Sphere indicator)
     - One water point per 250 people. (Christian Aid)
     - Maximum distance to water point 500 meters. (Sphere indicator)




9
 Unless otherwise noted, Standards and Indicators are found in the Sphere Handbook. Refer to Sphere for additional
Standards and Indicators.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.         16
1.      Participatory information gathering

    Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
    Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
    Have women been consulted separately from men?
    Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
     disabilities etc)?

2.      What are the extent and availability of water and water facilities in the affected area?

3.      Water-related considerations and risks:

-       Do persons have sufficient access to safe water?
-       Equal access for all? Are the vulnerable groups included?
-       Is queuing organized? Is there a distribution for those unable to fetch water?
-       Is there adequate drinking water for households?
-       Is there adequate water storage in houses/shelters?
-       What water practices was the population accustomed to before the emergency?
-       How much water is available per person per day?
-       What is the current water source and who are the present users? Reliability and quality?
-       What is the daily/weekly frequency of the water supply?
-       Is the water available at the source sufficient for short-term and longer-term needs for all groups in the
        population?
-       If not: are there competing groups regarding the access and availability to water?
-       Are water collection points close enough to where people live? Are they safe?
-       Is the current water supply reliable? How long will it last?
-       Do people have enough water containers of the appropriate size and type?
-       Is there knowledge on hygienic maintenance of water tanks and jerry cans?
-       Is the water source contaminated or at risk of contamination (microbiological or chemical/radiological)
        from waste or livestock?
-       Is treatment necessary? Is treatment possible? What treatment is necessary?
-       Is disinfection necessary, even if the supply is not contaminated?
-       Are there alternative sources nearby?
-       What traditional beliefs and practices relate to the collection, storage and use of water?
-       Are there any obstacles to using available supplies?
-       Is it possible to move the population if water sources are inadequate?
-       Is it possible to tanker water if water sources are inadequate?
-       What are the key hygiene issues related to water supply?
-       Do people have the means to use water hygienically?
-       Is there enough water for the livestock?

4.      Conclusions:

-      Main findings

-      Recommendations
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.           17

4.4.      SANITATION AND HYGIENE


     STANDARDS AND INDICATORS:
     - All facilities and resources provided reflect the vulnerabilities, needs and preferences of the affected
        population. Users are involved in the management and maintenance of hygiene facilities where
        appropriate. (Sphere Hygiene Promotion Standard 1)
     - People have adequate numbers of toilets, sufficiently close to their dwellings, to allow them rapid, safe
        and acceptable access at all times of the day and night. (Sphere Excreta Disposal Standard 1)
     - People have an environment that is acceptably uncontaminated by solid waste, including medical waste,
        and have the means to dispose of their domestic waste conveniently and effectively. (Sphere Waste
        Management Standard 1)
     - People have an environment in which the health and other risks posed by water erosion and standing
        water, including storm water, flood water, domestic waste water and waste water from medical
        facilities, are minimized. (Sphere Drainage Standard 1)
     - Toilets are sited, designed, constructed and maintained in such a way as to be comfortable, hygienic and
        safe to use. (Sphere Excreta Disposal Standard 2)
     - Maximum 20 persons per toilet/latrine, with use of toilets segregated by sex. (Sphere indicator)
     - Toilet facilities minimum 50 meters from dwellings. (Sphere indicator)


1.        Participatory information gathering

      Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
      Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
      Have women been consulted separately from men?
      Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
       disabilities etc)?

2. What are the extent and availability of sanitation facilities in the affected area?

Do they correspond to:
-   cultural beliefs and practices in sanitation usage?
-   the hygiene habits?

What are the needs and roles in operation, maintenance and distribution?

3.        Sanitation-related considerations and risks:

Excreta disposal
-   What are the specific hygienic needs for women and children?
-   What is the current defecation practice? If it is open defecation, is there a designated area? Is the area
    secure? Is there a health hazard?
-   What are current beliefs and practices, including gender-specific practices, concerning excreta disposal?
-   Are there any existing facilities? If so, are they used, are they sufficient and are they operating successfully?
    Can they be extended or adapted?
- What are the sanitation and hygienic needs regarding facilities in schools, community buildings, reception
    areas, health posts etc?
-   How will toilets /sanitation facilities need to be planned; separate for men and women or family wise? What
    are the cultural habits to take into consideration?
-   Is there enough knowledge on sanitation? Who is maintaining the sanitation facilities? How will maintain
    the toilets?
    ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.       18
    -   Is the current defecation practice a threat to water supplies (surface or ground water) or living areas?
    -   Do people wash their hands after defecation and before food preparation and eating? Are soap or other
        cleansing materials available?
    -   Are people familiar with the construction and use of toilets?
    -   What local materials are available for constructing toilets?
    -   Are people prepared to use pit latrines, defecation fields, trenches, etc.?
    -   Is there sufficient space for defecation fields, pit latrines, toilets, etc.?
    -   What is the slope of the terrain?
    -   What is the level of the groundwater table?
    -   Are soil conditions suitable for on-site excreta disposal?
    -   Do current excreta disposal arrangements encourage vectors?
    -   Are there materials or water available for anal cleansing? How do people normally dispose of these
        materials?
    -   Is there enough space for washing facilities?
    -   Is it possible for people with disabilities and small children to access toilets in an easy and safe way?
    -   Is there an understanding on how to assist children to use the toilet?
    -   How can knowledge be disseminated in the community?

    Vector-borne disease
    -   What are the vector-borne disease risks and how serious are these risks?
    -   What traditional beliefs and practices relate to vectors and vector-borne disease? Are any of these either
        useful or harmful?
    -   If vector-borne disease risks are high, do people at risk have access to individual protection?
    -   Is it possible to make changes to the local environment (by drainage, scrub clearance, excreta disposal,
        refuse disposal, etc.) to discourage vector breeding?
    -   Is it necessary to control vectors by chemical means? What programmes, regulations and resources exist for
        vector control and the use of chemicals?
    -   What information and safety precautions need to be provided to households?

  Solid waste disposal
-      Is solid waste a problem?
-      How do people dispose of their waste? What type and quantity of solid waste is produced?
-      Can solid waste be disposed of on-site, or does it need to be collected and disposed of off-site?
-      What is the normal practice of solid waste disposal for the affected population? (compost/refuse pits,
       collection system, bins.)
-      Are there medical facilities and activities producing waste? How is this being disposed of? Who is
       responsible?

  Drainage
-     Is there a drainage problem (e.g. washing facilities, flooding of dwellings or toilets, vector breeding sites,
      polluted water contaminating living areas or water supplies)?
-     Is the soil prone to waterlogging?
-     Do people have the means to protect their dwellings and toilets from local flooding?

    Causalities
    -  What provision is there for disposal of are bodies taken care of?

    -   By whom?
    -   What are the local funeral traditions?
    -   How are cultural aspects been taken care of?
    -   What practical provisions have been made?
    -   How do you handle bodies of animals and livestock?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          19
5.        Conclusions:

-        Main findings

-        Recommendations

4.5.      FOOD AND FOOD SECURITY


     STANDARDS AND INDICATORS
     - Where people are at risk of food insecurity, programme decisions are based on a demonstrated
        understanding of how they normally access food, the impact of the disaster on current and future food
        security, and hence the most appropriate response. (Sphere Assessment and Analysis Standard 1 (Food
        Security)
     - People have access to adequate and appropriate food and non-food items in a manner that ensures their
        survival, prevents erosion of assets and upholds their dignity. (Sphere Food Security Standard 1)
     - Rations for general food distribution are designed to bridge the gap between the affected population‟s
        requirements and their own food resources. (Sphere Food Aid Planning Standard 1)
     - The food items provided are appropriate and acceptable to recipients and can be used efficiently at the
        household level. (Sphere Food Aid Planning Standard 2)
     - Food distributed is of appropriate quality and is fit for human consumption. (Sphere Food Aid Planning
        Standard 3)
     - The method of food distribution is responsive, transparent equitable and appropriate to local conditions.
        (Sphere Food Aid Management Standard 3)
     - There is access to a range of foods that meet nutritional requirements. (Sphere indicator)
     - An estimated 2,100 kcals per person per day is recommended. (Sphere nutritional requirement)


1.        Participatory information gathering

      Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
      Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
      Have women been consulted separately from men?
      Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
       disabilities etc)?

2.        What are the extent and availability of food in the affected area?

3.        Food-related considerations and risks:

-         How has the disaster affected the different sources of food and income for each of the livelihood groups
          identified? Elderly, people with disabilities, men and women
-         How has it affected the usual seasonal patterns of food security for the different groups?
-         How has it affected access to markets, market availability and prices of essential goods?
-         For different livelihood groups, what are the different coping strategies and what proportion of people
          are engaged in them?
-         How have the social structure and responsibilities for food distribution changed within the family units
          this changed as compared with the pre-disaster situation?
-         Which group or population is most affected?
-         What are the short- and medium-term effects of coping strategies on people‟s financial and other assets?
-         Do persons have food or food stocks, and if so how long will they last?
-         Are food stocks available in the affected area?
-         What is the normal diet of the affected population?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.            20
-         Is food accessible to all groups?
-         Food distribution – is it necessary, is it being carried out, what are the contents? Is the content culturally
          appropriate? How is it organized? Monitoring?
-         Is food aid targeted to women, children, and persons/groups with specific needs?
-         Are ration cards in use? Who gets them?
-         Are specific protection, social and psychological considerations taken into account in food provision,
          such as needs for family unit stability; social needs of the elderly and access for people with disabilities?
-         What is the possible impact on the local market by food distribution?
-         What are the cooking methods and options?
-         What are the roles of women, men, girls and boys in food procurement?
-         Are there cultural and religious food restrictions/preferences for women and men?
-         Are there differences in women‟s and men‟s control over and access to food resources?
-         What are the cultural, practical and security-related obstacles persons might face in accessing food?
-         Have women been consulted separately from men?

4.         Conclusions:

-        Main findings

-        Recommendations

4.6.       NUTRITION


     STANDARDS:
     - The nutritional needs of the population are met. (Sphere General Nutrition Support Standard 1)
     - Where people are at risk of malnutrition, programme decisions are based on a demonstrated
        understanding of the causes, types, degree and extent of malnutrition, and the most appropriate
        response. (Sphere Assessment and Analysis Standard 2 (Nutrition))
     - Moderate malnutrition, severe malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are addressed. (Sphere
        Correction of Malnutrition Standards 1, 2 and 3)


1.         Participatory information gathering

      Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
      Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
      Have women been consulted separately from men?
      Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
       disabilities etc)?

2.         What are the extent and availability of nutritional activities in the affected area?

3.         Nutrition-related considerations and risks:

      What information on the nutritional situation exists?
-      Have any nutrition screening or surveys been conducted? Is the situation improving or deteriorating?
-      Are there any data from mother and child health clinics?
-      Are there any data from existing supplementary or therapeutic feeding centres or activities?
-      What information exists on the nutritional situation of the affected population prior to the current crisis
       (even if people are no longer in the same place)?
-      Are any groups more malnourished than others?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          21
    What is the risk of malnutrition related to poor public health?
-    Are there signs of malnutrition?
-    Are there any reports of disease outbreaks which may affect nutritional status, such as measles or acute
     diarrhoeal disease? Is there a risk that these outbreaks will occur?
-    What is the estimated measles vaccination coverage of the affected population?
-    Is Vitamin A routinely given in measles vaccination? What is the estimated Vitamin A supplement
     coverage?
-    Has anyone estimated mortality rates (either crude or under five)? What are they and what method has been
     used?
-    Is there, or will there be, a significant decline in ambient temperature likely to affect the prevalence of acute
     respiratory infection or the energy requirements of the affected population?
-    Is there a high prevalence of HIV&AIDS, and are people already vulnerable to malnutrition due to poverty
     or ill health?
-    Have people been in water or wet clothes for long periods of time?
-    Are there signs of nutritional deficiency (anemia, goiter)?
-    What are the nutritional needs, cooking skills and control over resources of the affected population?
-    What are reasons for inequalities in malnutrition rates?
-    Are there cultural, practical, and security-related obstacles faced in accessing nutritional assistance?

    What is the risk of malnutrition related to inadequate care?
-    Is there a change in work patterns (e.g. due to migration, displacement or armed conflict) which means that
     roles and responsibilities in the household have changed?
-    Is there a change in the normal composition of households? Are there large numbers of separated children,
     people with disabilities and/or elderly?
-    Has the normal care environment been disrupted (e.g. through displacement), affecting access to secondary
     carers, access to foods for children, access to water, etc?
-    What are the normal infant feeding practices? Are mothers bottle feeding their babies or using
     manufactured complementary foods? If so, is there an infrastructure that can support safe bottle feeding?
-    Is there evidence of donations of baby foods and milks, bottles and teats or requests for donations?
-    Has HIV&AIDS affected caring practices at household level?

    What is the risk of malnutrition related to reduced food access?

    What formal and informal local structures are currently in place? Through which potential
     interventions could they be channeled?
-     What is the capacity of the Ministry of Health, religious organisations, HIV&AIDS community support
      groups, infant feeding support groups, or NGOs with a long- or short-term presence in the area?
-     What is available in the food pipeline?
-     Is the population likely to move (for pasture/assistance/work) in the near future?

What nutrition intervention or community-based support was already in place before the current disaster,
organised by local communities, individuals, NGOs, government organisations, UN agencies, religious
organisations, etc.? What are the nutrition policies (past, ongoing and lapsed), the planned long-term nutrition
responses, and programmes that are being implemented or planned in response to the current situation?

4.       Conclusions:

-        Main findings

-        Recommendations
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          22
4.7.       NON-FOOD ITEMS


     STANDARDS AND INDICATORS:
     - The people affected by the emergency have sufficient clothing, blankets and bedding to ensure their
        dignity, safety and well-being. (Sphere Non-food Items Standard 1)
     - Each emergency-affected household has access to sufficient soap and other items to ensure personal
        hygiene, health, dignity and well-being. (Sphere Non-food Items Standard 2)
     - Each emergency-affected household has access to cooking and eating utensils. (Sphere Non-food Items
        Standard 3)
     - Each emergency-affected household has access to communal cooking facilities or a stove and an
        accessible supply of fuel for cooking needs and to provide thermal comfort. (Sphere Non-food Items
        Standard 4)
     - Each emergency-affected household responsible for the construction or maintenance and safe use of
        their shelter has access to the necessary tools and equipment. (Sphere Non-food Items Standard 5)
     - People have adequate facilities and supplies to collect, store and use sufficient quantities of water for
        drinking, cooking and personal hygiene, and to ensure that drinking water remains safe until it is
        consumed. (Sphere Water Supply Standard 3)
     - Family kit minimum: 1 cooking pot, 2 jerry cans, 1 basin, 1 kitchen knife, 2 wooden spoons/family.
        (Christian Aid)
     - 1 eating plate, 1 metal spoon, 1 mug per person. (Christian Aid)
     - Soap: 250 grams per person/month. (Sphere indicator)
     - Laundry soap: 200 grams per person per month. (Sphere indicator)
     - At least one full set clothing per person. (Sphere indicator)
     - Access to combination of blankets, bedding or sleeping mats. (Sphere indicator)
     - Sanitary materials for women and girls. (Sphere indicator)


1.         Participatory information gathering

      Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
      Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
      Have women been consulted separately from men?
      Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
       disabilities etc)?

2.         What are the extent and availability of non-food items in the affected area?

3.         Non-food item-related considerations and risks:

      Clothing and bedding
-      What is the customary provision of clothing, blankets and bedding for women, men, children and infants,
       pregnant and lactating women and older people, and what are the particular social and cultural
       considerations?
-      How many women and men of all ages, children and infants have inadequate or insufficient clothing,
       blankets or bedding to provide protection from the adverse effects of the climate and to maintain their
       health, dignity and well-being, and why?
-      What is the immediate risk to life of the lack of adequate clothing, blankets or bedding, and how many
       people are at risk?
-      What are the potential risks to the lives, health and personal safety of the affected population through the
       need for adequate clothing, blankets or bedding?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.         23
    Personal hygiene
-    What essential items to address personal hygiene issues did a typical household have access to before the
     disaster?
-    What essential items do affected households no longer have access to?
-    What are the particular needs of women, men, girls and boys, , infants, youth, people with disabilities?
-    What additional items are considered socially or culturally important to maintain the health and dignity of
     the affected people?

    Cooking and eating, stoves and fuel
-    What cooking and eating utensils did a typical household have access to before the disaster?
-    How many households do not have access to sufficient cooking and eating utensils, and why?
-    What form of stove for cooking and heating did a typical household have access to, where did the cooking
     take place in relation to the existing shelter and the surrounding area, and what fuel was typically used?
-    How many households do not have access to a stove for cooking? And heating, and why?
-    How many households do not have access to adequate supplies of fuel for cooking and heating, and why?
-    What are the opportunities and constraints, in particular the environmental concerns, of sourcing adequate
     supplies of fuel for the displaced households and the host community as appropriate?
-    What is the impact on the women in the displaced community of sourcing adequate supplies of fuel?
-    What cultural and customary use and safe practice considerations should be taken into account?

    Tools and equipment
-    What basic tools to construct, maintain or repair a shelter do the households have access to?
-    What livelihood support activities can also utilise the basic tools for shelter construction, maintenance and
     repair?
-    Does the climate or natural environment require a ground covering to maintain appropriate standards of
     health and dignity, and what appropriate material solutions can be provided?
-    What vector control measures, particularly the provision of mosquito nets, are required to ensure the health
     and well-being of households?

    Access to non-food items
-    Is information gathered on:
         -     family entitlement cards and ration cards (in name of primary female and male household
               representatives)? Is provision made for unaccompanied minors or widows?
         -     availability of clothing and household items per person/family?
         -     access of persons to bedding, blankets or sleeping bags?
         -     access of women and girls to sanitary materials?
         -     targeted provision of non-food items to persons affected by gender-based violence and their
               families, and other persons with specific needs?
-    Do people with disabilities have access to all of the above-mentioned items in addition to mobility items?
-    Is information gathered on social and cultural practices regarding non-food items by the affected
     population?

4.       Conclusions:

-        Main findings

-        Recommendations
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.           24

4.8.       SHELTER AND SITE SELECTION


     STANDARDS:
     - Local physical planning practices are used where possible, enabling safe and secure access to and use
        of shelters and essential services and facilities, as well as ensuring appropriate privacy and separation
        between individual household shelters. (Sphere Shelter and Settlement Standard 2)
     - People have sufficient covered space to provide dignified accommodation. Essential household
        activities can be satisfactorily undertaken, and livelihood support activities can be pursued as required.
        (Sphere Shelter and Settlement Standard 3)
     - The design of the shelter is acceptable to the local population. (Sphere Shelter and Settlement Standard
        4)
     - The shelter construction approach is in accordance with safe local building practices and maximizes
        local livelihood opportunities. (Sphere Shelter and Settlement Standard 5)


1.         Participatory information gathering

      Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
      Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
      Have women been consulted separately from men?
      Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
       disabilities etc)?

2.         What are the extent and availability of shelter facilities in the affected area?

3.         Shelter-related considerations and risks:

Risks
-   How many households have adequate shelter? How many are without any or with inadequate shelter and
    where are they?
-   How many people who are not members of individual households are without any or with inadequate
    shelter and where are they?
-   What is the immediate risk to life of the lack of shelter and inadequate shelter, and how many people are at
    risk?
-   What are the potential risks to the lives, health and security of the affected population through the need for
    shelter?
-   What are the potential risks to and impact on any host populations due to the presence of displaced
    households?
-   What are the potential further risks to lives, health and security of the affected population as a result of the
    ongoing effects of the disaster on the provision of shelter?

Household activities
-  What household and livelihood support activities typically take place in the shelters of the affected
   population, and how does the resulting space provision and design reflect these activities?
-  What household and livelihood support activities typically take place in the external areas around the
   shelters of the affected population, and how does the resulting space provision and design reflect these
   activities? Is there enough space for children‟s and community activities?
    ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.      25
    Materials and design
    -  What initial shelter solutions or materials have been provided to date by the affected households or other
       actors?
    -  What existing materials can be salvaged from the damaged site (if applicable) for use in the reconstruction
       of shelters?
    -  What is the availability of local building materials and tools?
    -  What are the typical building/shelter practices of the displaced and host populations, and what are the
       different materials that are used to provide the structural frame and roof and external wall enclosures?
    -  What alternative design or materials solutions are potentially available and familiar or acceptable to the
       affected population?
    -  How can the potential shelter solutions identified accommodate appropriate single and multiple disaster
       prevention and mitigation concerns?
    -  How are shelters typically built and by whom?
    -  How are construction materials typically obtained and by whom?
    -  How can women, youths and older people be trained or assisted to participate in the planning, design and
       construction of their own shelters, and what are the constraints?
    -  Is there a need for plastic sheeting or tents as a temporary measure?

    Local resources and constraints
    -   What are the current material, financial and human resources of the affected households and the
        community, and the constraints to meeting some or all of their urgent shelter needs?
    -   What are the opportunities and constraints of current patterns of land ownership, land usage and the
        availability of vacant land, in helping to meet urgent shelter needs? (How are needs of groups such as
        orphans and widows met?)
    -   What are the opportunities and constraints of the host population in accommodating displaced households
        within their own dwellings or on adjacent land?
    -   What are the opportunities and constraints of utilising existing, available and unaffected buildings or
        structures to temporarily accommodate displaced households?
    -   What are the requirements and constraints of local authority regulations in developing shelter solutions?

  Camp/site selection (as applicable)
-    What is the camp layout, and is it adequate? What is the spacing between shelters? Security and safety
     aspects?
-    Have land rights, soil type, proximity to the border, and proximity of adequate water been taken into
     account?
-    Are gender concerns taken into account in the physical planning of camps and in the design and
     implementation of services? For example, is safe shelter available for women and children, and provided in
     a gender-sensitive way?

    4.     Conclusions:

    -     Main findings

    -     Recommendations
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          26
4.9.      HEALTH


     STANDARDS:
     - All people have access to health services that are prioritized to address the main causes of excess
        mortality and morbidity. (Sphere Health Systems and Infrastructure Standard 1)
     - Health services are designed to support existing health systems, structures and providers. (Sphere
        Health Systems and Infrastructure Standard 2)
     - People have access to health services that are coordinated across agencies and sectors to achieve
        maximum impact. (Sphere Health Systems and Infrastructure Standard 3)
     - Health services are based on relevant primary health care principles. (Sphere Health Systems and
        Infrastructure Standard 4)
     - People have access to clinical services that are standardized and follow accepted protocols and
        guidelines. (Sphere Health Systems and Infrastructure Standard 5)
     - People have access to information and services that are designed to prevent the communicable diseases
        that contribute most significantly to excess morbidity and mortality. (Sphere Control of Communicable
        Diseases Standard 1)
     - All children aged 6 months to 15 years have immunity against measles. (Sphere Control of
        Communicable Diseases Standard 2)
     - People have access to effective diagnosis and treatment for those infectious diseases that contribute
        most significantly to preventable excel morbidity and mortality. (Sphere Control of Communicable
        Diseases Standard 3)
     - Measures are taken to prepare for and respond to outbreaks of infectious and communicable diseases.
        (Sphere Control of Communicable Diseases Standards 4 and 5)
     - People have access to the minimum package of services to prevent transmission of HIV&AIDS.
        (Sphere Control of Communicable Diseases Standard 6)
     - Decreasing death rates, towards less than 1/100,000/day (Sphere indicator)


1.        Participatory information gathering

      Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
      Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
      Have women been consulted separately from men?
      Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
       disabilities etc)?

2.        What are the extent and availability of health facilities in the affected area?

3.        Health-related considerations and risks:
-         Is health information gathered on:
          -        an equal number of men and women?
          -        age- and sex-disaggregated cause-specific mortality rates?
          -        age- and sex-disaggregated fatality rates?
          -        groups with specific needs, by age and sex?

Background health information
-     Identify pre-existing health problems and priorities in the emergency-affected area prior to the
      emergency. Ascertain local disease epidemiology.
-     Identify pre-existing health problems and priorities in the country of origin if refugees are involved.
      Ascertain disease epidemiology in the country of origin.
-     Identify existing risks to health, e.g. potential epidemic diseases.
-     Identify previous sources of health care.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.        27
-       Determine the strengths and coverage of local public health programmes in refugees‟ country of origin.
-       Determine the level of understanding in the affected population to risks of health, hygiene practices, and
        disease transmission.

Mortality rates
-      Calculate the crude mortality rate, per 10,00 per day (CMR).
-      Calculate the under-5 mortality rate (U5MR: age-specific mortality rate for children under 5 years of
       age).
-      Calculate cause-specific mortality rates.

Morbidity rates
-     Determine incidence rates of major diseases that have public health importance (type, numbers, location)
-     Determine age- and sex-specific incidence rates of major diseases where possible.
-     Determine estimated number of trauma/war victims.

Available resources
-      Determine the capacity of and the response by the Ministry of Health of the country or countries affected
       by the disaster.
-      Determine the status of national health facilities, and those in the affected area (hospitals, clinics, aid
       posts), including total number, classification and levels of care provided, physical status, functional
       status and access.
-      Determine the numbers and skills of available health staff.
-      Determine the capacity and functional status of existing public health programmes, e.g. Expanded
       Programme on Immunisation (EPI), maternal and child health services, medical screening of new
       arrivals.
-      If a camp situation, has there been a measles vaccination programme? Coverage rate?
-      Determine the availability of standardized protocols, essential drugs, supplies and equipment.
-      Determine the status of existing referral systems.
-      Determine the status of the existing health information system (HIS).
-      Determine the capacity of existing logistics systems, especially as they relate to procurement,
       distribution and storage of essential drugs, vaccines and medical supplies.
-      Determine number of health workers from among the affected population.
-      Determine whether specific protection, psychological and social considerations are taken into account in
       health care provision.
-      Determine availability of psychiatric treatment
-      Determine the status of referral structures for physical and psychiatric disorders
-      Resources available for chronic diseases, such as diabetes, TB, HIV&AIDS

Consider data from other relevant sectors
-     Nutritional status
-     Environmental conditions
-     Food and food security

Gender-based violence considerations
-     Is adequate and confidential basic health care, including physical, reproductive and psychological health
      care, available to all women and girls, especially those affected by gender-based violence?
-     Do women and adolescent girls have access to basic health services?

4.      Conclusions:

-       Main findings

-       Recommendations
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.         28

4.10.   PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT10


INDICATORS:
- The emergency assessment includes an investigation and analysis of coping strategies of the affected
   population. (Sphere indicator)
- Where possible, the emergency assessment builds upon local capacities, including both formal and
   informal institutions. (Sphere indicator)


1.      Participatory information gathering

    Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
    Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
    Have women been consulted separately from men?
    Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
     disabilities etc)?

2. What are the psychosocial supports, activities, considerations and risks in the affected area?

Assessment should take account of the following:

Existence of Basic Support System
Basic Functions
      Family networks/ Community structures
-      Does the provision of basic services support or hinder community structures and family networks?
-      What was the self help structure immediately after the emergency/disaster? Who did people turn to?
-      Is the community showing cohesion/solidarity or are there competing factions?
-      What is the structure of communication between tribes, ethnic/political groups? Does this extend to
       cooperation on mutually agreed upon projects? If so why/why not and how can it be facilitated if not?
-      How do self-help groups function within the affected population (e.g., women working together to care
       for families, children‟s play groups)?
-      What are the connecters and dividers within the community?
-      What language barriers exist? (There could be four languages within one nationality.)
-      What religious connectors exist? Are there also religious factors which divide the community?
-      How did people react to the emergency? Ask parents how their children reacted. Do they feel able to
       support their child? Are they worried about their child? What are the existing support structures for
       children?
-      What Information/Communication is available to the affected population, how often and how is it
       distributed?
-      Are there trained professionals among the affected population who can be organized to help their own
       people (teachers, social workers, psychologists, nurses, home health care aids, pastors, traditional
       healers, etc.)? Have people been trained in normal reactions to abnormal situations?

In armed conflict crises
-      Was imprisonment, detention in re-education/education camps used? Who was targeted? How many,
       where ?


10
  Community Based Psychosocial Support in Humanitarian Assistance: A Facilitator‟s Guide, pp. 89-96, Church of
Sweden, Norwegian Church Aid, and Presbyterian Disaster Assistance. Also, IASC Guidelines on Mental Health and
Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings, p. 25, and Mental Health in Emergencies, WHO.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.       29
-      Who has been involved in the fighting? Where do the combatants come from? Is the local population
       recruited?
-      Is the local population targeted for rape/ looting/ terror?

In natural disasters
-      Was there any warning of the coming disaster?
-      Did people witness the death of family, friends, or body identification?
-      Did people face the likelihood of their own death or severe injury? Were they trapped awaiting rescue?
-      Were there delays in help arriving? Were there additional deaths during the wait?
-      Is this a repeat of other disasters (floods, famines etc)?

Psychosocial impact in slow onset disasters (famine, AIDS epidemic etc.):
-      Do people report a sense that their own death is inevitable, unavoidable?
-      Do you hear the belief that help is distributed unevenly or withheld?
-      How have people tried to survive? Has there been loss of dignity/worth due to begging or prostitution
       for food etc.?

Focused Non-Specialized Support

-      What are the own possibilities to support each other?
-      What kind of safety concerns do people have? (Domestic violence, gender based violence, recruitment,
       torn tarpaulin etc.)
-      Do people know where to turn regarding their specific safety situation?
-      What groups have been most affected by the disaster/emergency? How have they been helped? Who can
       these groups/individuals turn to?
-      Children‟s situation…?
-      What are the main concerns/stressors according to children, youth, women, and men (without assuming
       that everyone has a concern or are traumatized)?
-      Are there people with „mental problems‟? What is done with them?
-      Have people started to plan for the future?
-      What are the local coping mechanism/strategies? What kind of solution do people imagine? What are the
       desired immediate plans? Look at time frame! Are people answering in terms of hours, days or weeks?
       Have people started with activities? Are people stopped (by government/UN/NGOs) from being
       involved? What are the reasons why people are inactive/ active? Is there a difference between
       religious/cultural/ethnic groups in terms of plans/activities?
-      Are there self-help groups for sharing and dealing with stress reactions?
-      Who cares for the caregiver?
-      What are the Mosque/Church/Temple attendance possibilities?)
-      Are procedures for family reunification started? Who is doing this?
-      What are the local burial practices? Who is responsible currently? Are supplies available?
-      Are there provisions for regular life events such as births, weddings and so on?

Resources available in the community to meet psychosocial needs

-      What is the existing link between the health and the protection section on psychosocial support? If there
       is none, how can it be set up?
-      How is the religious community responding to the crisis? Are their leaders trained in dealing with stress
       reactions? Do they have others trained in pastoral care that can be mobilized?
-      What traditional practices of this cultural group may help them through this crisis (family networks,
       income generating activities, ability to organize in small self-help groups, rituals of healing)?
-      What is needed to help families care for their members (family housing, eating meals together, activities
       for children so parents can do legal work)?
-      What resources are needed to supplement available human resources within the community?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          30
-        Are there physical resources in the community which can be used to deliver psychosocial support
         (buildings, vehicles, books, playgrounds, copy machines, computers)?
-        In the perception of the community, what psychosocial services are most needed so that their community
         can function again? Please note which group within the community is making which recommendation.
-        What local efforts to provide services to the community can be supported and/or expanded?
-        Are community dialogues initiated to raise awareness that sexual violence is never the fault of the
         survivor?
-        What needs are there for capacity-building so that local people can help their own community?
-        Is the breakdown of local services by competition for trained local staff an issue?

Mental health

-        What is the structure of national mental health services, policy, professionals? How does one contact the
         persons in charge of the health office?
-        Who is coordinating mental health services in this emergency? How can they be contacted?
-        How is mental health interventions carried out within general primary health care, and do they maximize
         care by families and active use of resources within the community?
-        What are the structures like in terms of caring for the mentally ill?
-        What are the clinical/medical supports for home care of chronically ill and people with mental
         disorders?
-        How are the urgent psychiatric problems managed within primary health care?
-        How are community structures relating to protection and care for persons with severe mental disorders
         arranged?
-        Are appropriate medication for mentally ill readily available? Do professionals know how to use them?

4.       Conclusions:

        Main findings

        Recommendations

4.11.    EDUCATION


STANDARD:
- Are minimum standards in education in emergencies, following the INEE guidelines, being
   followed?11


1.       Participatory information gathering

    Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
    Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
    Have women been consulted separately from men?
    Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
     disabilities etc)?

2. What are the extent and availability of educational facilities and activities in the affected area?



11
  “Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies, Chronic Crises and Early Reconstruction”, Inter-agency Network for
Education in Emergencies (INEE), 2006.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          31
3.       Education-related considerations and risks:

-        Are the five categories of the INEE minimum standards in emergencies being properly assessed and
         addressed: access and learning environment; teaching and learning; teachers and other education
         personnel; education policy and coordination; and standards common to all categories (community
         participation, utilization of local resources, and education responses based on an initial assessment)?
-        Is there access to education, and vocational/skills training, for refugees, internally displaced persons, and
         others in the affected population? Equally to girls and boys?
-        For whom is education available?
-        Are trained teachers available? Educational supplies?
-        What prevents children from attending school?
-        Are schools functioning?
-        Is the risk of gender-based violence being addressed/minimized in and around schools and educational
         facilities?
         Do teachers have knowledge on normal reactions and how to respond to traumatic situations?

4.       Participatory assessment of women, men, girls and boys – is information gathered on education
         and vocational/skills training?

5.       Conclusions:

-       Main findings

-       Recommendations

4.12.    ENVIRONMENT


STANDARD:
- The adverse impact on the environment is minimized by the settling of the emergency-affected
   households, the material sourcing and construction techniques used. (Sphere Shelter and Settlement
   Standard 6)


1.       Participatory information gathering

    Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
    Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
    Have women been consulted separately from men?
    Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
     disabilities etc)?

2.       What is the environmental context in the emergency-affected area?

3.       Environmental considerations and risks:

-        What is the impact of the emergency on the local environment?
-        What are the issues of concern for the host and/or affected community?
-        What immediate environmental hazards pose a threat to the affected population?
         What natural resources are available to the affected population (land, water, forest)?
-        What are the environmental concerns, and potential impact, in providing the necessary shelter assistance
         (construction materials and access) and in supporting the displaced households (fuel, sanitation, waste
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.        32
         disposal, grazing for animals if appropriate)? What are the alternatives to collecting firewood? On what
         areas do people need education on management of natural resources and environment?
-        What are the cultural practices related to management of natural resources? Are there possible risks for
         the environment?
-        Are there risks for conflicts between host communities and temporary shelter sites due to scarcity of
         resources? What ways and resources are there to handle these possible conflicts?
-        What are the livelihood activities and how do they affect the environment?
-        What is the topographical and environmental suitability of using accessible vacant land to accommodate
         temporary settlements?

4.       Conclusions:

-       Main findings

-       Recommendations

4.13.     ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND LIVELIHOODS


STANDARDS:
- Primary production mechanisms are protected and supported. (Sphere Food Security Standard 2)
- Where income generation and employment are feasible livelihood strategies, people have access to
   appropriate income-earning opportunities, which generate fair remuneration and contribute towards
   food security without jeopardizing the resources on which livelihoods are based. (Sphere Food
   Security Standard 3)
- People‟s safe access to market goods and services as producers, consumers and traders is protected
   and promoted. (Sphere Food Security Standard 4)


1.       Participatory information gathering

    Which participatory methods were used in this assessment?
    Have women, men, boys and girls all been consulted?
    Have women been consulted separately from men?
    Which marginalized groups might not have been consulted (minority groups, domestic workers, people with
     disabilities etc)?

2.       What are the extent and availability of economic development and livelihood activities in the
         affected area?
-        What are the desired future possibilities in terms of livelihood?

3.       Economic development and livelihood considerations and risks:

Livelihood situation pre-emergency
-       What are the availability, and ownership, or productive resources in the area?
-       How did the different livelihood groups acquire food or income before the emergency? For an average
        year in the recent past, what were their sources of food and income?
-       How did these different sources of food and income vary between seasons in a normal year?
        (Constructing a seasonal calendar may be useful.)
-       Looking back over the past 5 or 10 years, how has food security varied from year to year? (Constructing
        a timeline or history of good and bad years may be useful.)
-       What kind of assets, savings or other reserves are owned by the different livelihood groups (e.g. food
        stocks, cash savings, livestock holdings, investments, credit, unclaimed debt)?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.          33
-          Over a period of a week or a month, what do household expenditures include, and what proportion is
           spent on each item?
-          Who is responsible for management of cash in the household, and on what is cash spent?
-          How accessible is the nearest market for obtaining basic goods? (Consider distance, security, ease of
           mobility, availability of market information, etc.)?
-          What is the availability and price of essential goods, including food?
-           Prior to the emergency, what were the average terms of trade between essential sources of income and
           food (e.g. wages to food, livestock to food)?

Present livelihood situation
-      To what extent can the affected population continue their usual livelihood activities?
-      What is the availability of agricultural tools and seeds at the community and household levels?
-      Are there groups in the community who share the same livelihood strategies? How can these be
       categorised according to their main sources of food or income?
-      Are self-reliance and sustainable livelihood programmes available to persons affected by gender-based
       violence, and other persons with specific needs?
-      Does the affected population face economic risks such as: no access to means of livelihood; single
       parents looking after young children and thus unable to work; lack of labour power; exploitation of
       (refugee/IDP) labour?

Is information gathered on:
-       Different skill sets, needs, vulnerabilities and responsibilities of affected persons, including women-
        headed and child-headed households?
-       Gender division of labour, responsibilities and coping strategies within the household? What are the
        effects of coping strategies on their health, general well-being and dignity?
-       Inequalities on access to and control of resources?
-       Obstacles persons could face in accessing income generation activities?

4.         Conclusions:

-        Main findings

-        Recommendations

4.14.      SECTOR ASSESSMENTS - CONCLUSIONS

Gender analysis:
- In sector assessments, has analysis of gender differences in design of services and access to services, through
   participation of women, men, girls and boys, been taken into account?12

-      Using disaggregated data, in your conclusions are there any significant differences between or within groups
       and/or locations (e.g., priority on those most affected due to gender, age, disability, people living with
       HIV&AIDS, ethnicity or poverty)?

Problems and risks:
For each sector, what is your judgment of the severity of problem areas in the sector, and risks associated with
potential consequences?




12
     From Gender Handbook, sector checklists.
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.       34
Capacities:
What are the capacities, resources and strategies to cope with the emergency needs:
- Of the ACT member(s)?
- Of the government and humanitarian agencies?
- Of the affected population:
       existing strengths in individual and social groups?
       material, physical social and spiritual resources?
       their ability to cope with the crisis and recover from it?

Gaps: What major gaps in the emergency response exist?


5.      SUMMARY OF ADMINISTRATIVE CAPACITY

5.1.    COORDINATION


STANDARDS:
-


1.      Appeal writing



2.      Staff leadership




3.      Interagency coordination




4.      Conclusions:

-      Main findings

-      Recommendations
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.     35

5.2     COMMUNICATIONS



STANDARDS:
-


1.     Communication with donors/ international media



2.     Communication with local population/ media



3.     Communication with affected population



4.     Conclusions:

-      Main findings

-      Recommendations


5.3.    HUMAN RESOURCES


STANDARDS:
-



1.      Available people



2.      Training needs



3.      Use of Code of Conduct



4.      Care for caregivers
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.       36
5.      Security and safety needs of staff (and reference to Principles of ACT Safety and Security, and
        ACT Security Handbook



6.       Conclusions:

-      Main findings

-      Recommendations


5.4.    LOGISTICS


STANDARDS:
- Food is stored, prepared and consumed in a safe and appropriate manner at both household and
   community levels. (Sphere Food Aid Management Standard 1)
- Food aid resources (commodities and support funds) are well managed, using transparent and
   responsive systems. (Sphere Food Aid Management Standard 2)



1.      What are the extent and availability of transport and logistics systems in the affected area?

2.      Logistics-related considerations and risks:

-       Do purchase contracts provide for delivery-linked payments, and the return of damaged goods and
        penalties for any deviations in fulfillment of the contract, other than in situations of force majeure?
-       Do transporters and handling agents assume total liability for food commodities in their care and
        reimburse any losses?
-       How are storage facilities kept safe and clean? How are commodities protected from damage and/or
        loss?
-       What steps have been taken at all levels to minimize commodity losses?
-       Are commodities in damaged containers salvaged as far as possible?
-       Are commodities inspected at regular intervals and any suspect commodities tested? Are unfit items
        certified and disposed of in accordance with clearly defined procedures and national public health
        regulations? Is recycling of unfit commodities into the market avoided?
-       Are physical inventory counts undertaken periodically by knowledgeable persons in the area of
        inventory management not associated with the project under review, and reconciled with stock balances?
        Are summary inventory reports compiled at regular intervals and made available to all stakeholders?
-       Do waybills properly document all commodity transactions?
-       Do stock ledgers provide details of all receipts, issues and balances?
-       Is auditing, including process management auditing, carried out at all levels of the supply chain?
-       Are there enough cars, trucks and other transport for member operations?
-       Are vehicles used to carry food commodities in good running order?
-       Are there some locations that cannot be reached by road? Quality of roads?
-       Do cargo spaces have no protruding edges that may damage packaging, and are they adequately
        protected from bad weather (e.g. by tarpaulins).
-       Do vehicles not carry other commercial and/or hazardous materials along with food commodities?
-       If vehicles have carried hazardous materials in the past, are there any residues?
-       Regarding procurement, where will supplies and materials come from, how long will they take to get
        there, and what are the constraints? What are advantages in local vs. external purchase/procurement?
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.       37

What are the security concerns for drivers or warehouse personnel responsible for goods and commodities?

What measures are taken to ensure protection of local population from coercive drivers or transportation
workers?

Who is responsible for finance?
Who is responsible for warehouse?

Is there a policy on sex abuse and exploitation and a report or response mechanism already being used? Incident
reports and follow-up? Internal rules, Code of Conduct?

Is there a communication system set up? Security telephone line? UNDSS? Radio communication

3.      Conclusions:

-      Main findings

-      Recommendations


5.5.    FINANCIAL


STANDARDS:


1. Financial systems in use



2. Banking systems



3. Experienced staff



4.      Conclusions:

-      Main findings

-      Recommendations


5.6.    ADMINISTRATIVE CAPACITY CONCLUSIONS
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.       38
                  DETAILED EMERGENCY ASSESSMENT REPORTING TEMPLATE

 1.      SUMMARY:
 Date of report
 Type, location and date of emergency
 Number of people affected
 Reason for assessment
 Summary of rapid assessment conclusions, including whether an ACT response is planned, and whether a
    Rapid Response Fund or Appeal proposal will be made. If so, complete section 3. below.

 2.        BACKGROUND:
     Names/agencies of assessment team (by gender, age, and area of expertise)
     Locations visited
     Itinerary
     Categories of informants
     Methods of information and data collection used (including sources)
     Sources of secondary information (including other assessments)
     Constraints

 3.      MEMBER(S)’ EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING:

 Objective: What is the planned overall objective of the emergency response? Objectives by sector?

 Target population:
    What is the target population for the planned member(s)‟ response?
    If available, provide disaggregated data , by age and sex. .
    In which locations will the proposed response take place?

 Proposed activities of member(s):
    Activities:
        - What are the proposed activities, by sector ? By target group?
        -    Do the proposed activities correspond to areas of expertise/specialization of the member(s)? Do
        gaps in expertise exist?
    Outputs: What are the expected outputs of the activities, which are necessary to achieve the objective?
    Indicators:
        What indicators will be used to measure the outputs (to check that the planned activity was carried
             out)?
        -    What indicators will be used to measure impact (the effect the activity had on the affected
             population and community)?

 Proposed implementation arrangements:
    Which member(s) will implement the emergency response?
    What is the member(s) capacity to implement the response:
       cooperatively through the ACT Forum?
       using its own resources and church/ecumenical networks?
       through non-member partners (does a local MoU or cooperation agreement exist?)
       do local members/partners have the resources (see below) to implement the activities you are
             proposing?

 Coordination:
    To what extent are the member(s) involved in in-country, inter-agency coordination mechanisms in this
       emergency?
    To what extent will the ACT Forum in the country be the prime focus of member coordination (and
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.      39
        implementation) for this emergency response?

 Communications and media:
    Do the member(s) have pre-established, well developed contacts with media and public
        information/awareness networks?
    Is a local Communicator identified to assist the member(s) and Forum with communications and media
        activities?

    Planned implementation period: What is the planned duration of activities (if known at this time)?

    Resources:
     Human: extent/capacity of staffing resources available among members/partners to conduct the
        emergency response (administration, finance, communications, operations, and sector specialists)?
        Are there gaps in human resource requirements?
     Financial: extent of financial resources locally available? Are additional financial resources required?
     Materials: extent of material resources locally available, including emergency stockpiles, and
        operational materials? Are additional materials needed?
     Equipment and supplies: extent of computers, communications equipment (telephone, FAX, Email,
        HF/VHF radios, satellite telephone), office supplies and other items needed to operate effectively?
     Transport and logistics: availability and adequacy of transportation and related logistics?

 ANNEXES:
  Terms of Reference for the Assessment Team
  Summary of interviews
ACT Emerg. Assessment Checklist_March 2009 Rev.   40

                                                                                          ANNEX 3

                                  REFERENCE DOCUMENTS



 The Sphere Project: Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response
 Christian Aid Emergency Assessment Guidelines
 Community Based Psychosocial Services in Humanitarian Assistance: A Facilitator‟s Guide, Church of
          Sweden, Norwegian Church Aid, and Presbyterian Disaster Assistance.
 UNHCR Handbook for Emergencies (new, 2007 Third Edition)
 UNHCR materials from Workshop on Emergency Management (WEM)
 UNHCR Handbook on Standards and Indicators
 Mental Health in Emergencies (World Health Organization)
 IASC: Protecting Persons Affected by Natural Disasters
 IASC Women, Girls, Boys and Men: Different Needs – Equal Opportunities
 IASC Needs Analysis Framework
 IASC Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings
 IASC Guidelines for Gender-based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings
 IASC Inter-agency Contingency Planning Guidelines for Humanitarian Assistance
 IFRC Guidelines for Emergency Assessment
 Caritas Internationalis Emergency Response Tool Kit
 CARE Emergency Preparedness Planning Guidelines
 World Vision Disaster Management Manual
 The Good Enough Guide: Impact Measurement and Accountability in Emergencies

				
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