SOC101 Introduction to Sociology A study of various aspects

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					                                                              OBR
                                                              Received(time) 12:54 PM
                                                              Date           4/27/2006


                        Ohio Articulation Number (OAN)
                           Course Submission Form
                                  2005-2006




College/University North Central State College

Course(s) Submitted(Title   & Course #)   SOC101 Introduction to                  for
                                          Sociology
Ohio Articulation Number                  OSS 021

Date 4/30/06                     Course    1          of a   1       Course OAN mapping.

Name and title of individual submitting on behalf of the college/university

Name Bruce M. Sliney                      Title   Dean, Community Outreach Division

Address    2441 Kenwood Circle
           PO Box 698
           Mansfield, OH 44901

E-mail     bsliney@ncstatecollege.edu

Phone      419-775-4866

Fax        419-755-5674


Credit Hours 3                       qtr       X             sem
Lecture Hours     3
Laboratory Hours     0         (if applicable)
Pre-Requisites(s) Course work (if applicable)
None

Placement Score (if applicable)
(Name of test)
(Domain)       (Score)

Catalog/Course Description (Includes Course Title and Course #)
      SOC101 Introduction to Sociology A study of various aspects of our social
      system which affect individuals and organizations. Emphasis is placed on a
      process of value clarification whereby the student can better understand his or
      her relationship to this society and the specific types of organizations that
      comprise it.
Texts/Outside Readings/Ancillary Materials
Textbook(s): Suggested:
       1. Sociology, An Introduction
           A. Author: Alex Thio
           B. Edition: 5th, 1998
           C. Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
Workbook(s) and/or Lab Manual(s):
      none.
Course Objectives and/or Plan of Work
Purpose of Course: The course is designed to provide the student with an introduction
      to the vocabulary concepts related to sociology, and to enable the student to
      make application of this knowledge toward understanding various aspects of
      society.

Course Outcomes:
       Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:
        1. Outline and compare the three major perspectives of Sociology:
             Functionalist, Conflict, and Interactionist.
        2. Define the core Sociological concepts of: Culture, Social Structure,
             Socialization, Social Stratification, Deviance, and Racial, Ethnic, Gender
             and Age Issues.
        3. Relate the application of these concepts to select social institutions: the
             Family, Education, Religion, Politics, the Economy, Science and Health,
             Social Movements and Social Change via class discussion and/or the
             completion of a research project.
       Course Content:
       The first half of the course consists of the introduction of core sociological
concepts. The second half is devoted to the application of these concepts through a
discussion of a variety of social institutions with which most people deal on a daily
basis.
       Part Two: Social Institutions
       Specific topics might include: deviance, social inequality, the family, religion,
       government, and politics, the economy, education, health and medicine, social
       movements and social change.
Description of Assessment and/or Evaluation of Student Learning
Grading and Testing Guidelines:

      The final course grade will be determined through at least two of the following:
      1. Exams designed to measure the student's ability to define and apply
           concepts discussed in class.
      2. A comprehensive final exam.
      3. Class participation.
      4. A research project.
Master Syllabi and Working Syllabi (if both are used)
NORTH CENTRAL STATE COLLEGE
                        COURSE SYLLABUS
                      Last Revision: October, 1998

A.    Course Number and Title: SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology

B.    Academic Division: Arts & Sciences

C.    Department: Humanities/Social Science

D.    Lecture Hours: 3

E.    Lab Hours: 0

F.    Credit Hours: 3

G.    Prerequisites: None

H.    Course Description from Catalog:
      Introduction to Sociology, SOC 101, a study of various aspects of our social
      system which affect individuals and organizations. Emphasis is placed on a
      process of value clarification whereby the student can better understand his or
      her relationship to this society and the specific types of organizations that
      comprise it.

I.    Textbook(s): Suggested:
       1. Sociology, An Introduction
           A. Author: Alex Thio
           B. Edition: 5th, 1998
           C. Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
      J.   Workbook(s) and/or Lab Manual(s): none.

K.    Purpose of Course: The course is designed to provide the student with an
      introduction to the vocabulary concepts related to sociology, and to enable the
      student to make application of this knowledge toward understanding various
      aspects of society.

L.    Supplies Needed: Appropriate small-group exercises

M. Course Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course the student should be able to:
      1. Outline and compare the three major perspectives of Sociology:
          Functionalist, Conflict, and Interactionist.
      2. Define the core Sociological concepts of: Culture, Social Structure,
          Socialization, Social Stratification, Deviance, and Racial, Ethnic, Gender
          and Age Issues.
     3.   Relate the application of these concepts to select social institutions: the
          Family, Education, Religion, Politics, the Economy, Science and Health,
          Social Movements and Social Change via class discussion and/or the
          completion of a research project.

N.   Course Content:
     The first half of the course consists of the introduction of core sociological
     concepts. The second half is devoted to the application of these concepts
     through a discussion of a variety of social institutions with which most people
     deal on a daily basis.

     Part Two: Social Institutions
     Specific topics might include: deviance, social inequality, the family, religion,
     government, and politics, the economy, education, health and medicine, social
     movements and social change.

O.   Planned Activities: Lecture, class discussion, small group discussion, guest
     speakers.

P.   Grading and Testing Guidelines:
     The final course grade will be determined through at least two of the following:
     1. Exams designed to measure the student's ability to define and apply
          concepts discussed in class.
     2. A comprehensive final exam.
     3. Class participation.
     4. A research project.

Q.   Attendance Requirements:
     The taking of attendance is required. Because much of the information being
     disseminated comes from the lectures and class discussions relative to the
     subject, but not necessarily concurrent with the texts, consistent attendance is
     very important for students and should be stressed.

R.    Other Specific Guidelines or Requirements: None.

S.    Statement on Disabilities:
      Any student who requires reasonable accommodations related to a disability
      should inform the course instructor and the Coordinator of Disabled Student
      Services (room 186 T in the Fallerius Technical Education Center; phone 755-
      4727).

T.    Statement on Withdrawals:
      As a student, you are expected to attend class. If you are unable or choose not
      to attend class, you need to officially drop the class. You may do this up to
      the end of the eighth week during a regular eleven-week quarter, and up to the
      end of the fifth week during an eight-week term (Classes not following an
      eight or eleven-week schedule have different withdrawal and refund dates.
      Contact the Student Records Office for applicable dates). The last day to
          officially drop an eight or eleven-week class is listed in Newsbriefs, the weekly
          publication on campus, and is also available at the Student Records Office. If
          you registered for classes in the Student Success Center, you should return
          there to officially withdraw from any classes. All other students should go
          to the Student Records Office to process their withdrawal from any class.

          If you choose to walk away from your class without officially withdrawing
          from it, the faculty member teaching the class must grade your classroom
          performance on the material available to him or her. This normally results in
          an “F” grade. An “F” grade can lower your grade point average considerably,
          depending on the total credits accumulated.

U.        Statement of Academic Dishonesty/Plagiarism/Copyright Infringement
          It is the position of the College that the responsibility for academic honesty is
          that of the student. It is expected that the student's work will be the product of
          his/her own efforts unless the student clearly indicates otherwise. Academic
          honesty is an important element of mature, responsible learning.

          Dishonest scholarly practices include but are not limited to appropriating, in
          whatever form, another's work and submitting it as one's own (known as
          Plagiarism), intentionally falsifying information, or taking another's ideas with
          the intention of passing these ideas off as one’s own (also known as
          Plagiarism).

          In addition, cases of academic dishonesty may involve photocopied materials.
          Materials used may fall under the copyright Act. Violations of said Act may
          subject the user and/or the College to sanctions. If you have questions whether
          a particular use is in violation of the Act, please contact the office of the Vice
          President of Academic and Student Services.

     V.       Classroom Conduct
          All students are expected to demonstrate professional behavior and use
          language appropriate for the classroom learning experience.

Additional Documentation




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