INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL FOR LIBERAL ARTS by ijk77032

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									                  INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL FOR LIBERAL ARTS

                                       2008-2009
                         SCHOOL COMPREHENSIVE EDUCATIONAL PLAN
                                         (CEP)




    SCHOOL: 10X342
      ADDRESS: 2780 RESERVOIR AVENUE
    TELEPHONE: 718-329-8570
          FAX: 718-329-8572




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS



SECTION I: SCHOOL INFORMATION PAGE
SECTION II: SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM SIGNATURE PAGE
SECTION III: SCHOOL PROFILE
  Part A. Narrative Description
  Part B. School Demographics and Accountability Snapshot
SECTION IV: NEEDS ASSESSMENT
SECTION V: ANNUAL SCHOOL GOALS
SECTION VI: ACTION PLAN
REQUIRED APPENDICES TO THE CEP FOR 2008-2009
  APPENDIX 1: ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES (AIS) SUMMARY FORM
  APPENDIX 2: PROGRAM DELIVERY FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLS)
  APPENDIX 3: LANGUAGE TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION
  APPENDIX 4: NCLB REQUIREMENTS FOR TITLE I SCHOOLS
  APPENDIX 5: NCLB/SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOLS IN NEED OF IMPROVEMENT (SINI) AND
  SCHOOLS REQUIRING ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SRAP)
  APPENDIX 6: SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOLS UNDER REGISTRATION REVIEW (SURR).
  APPENDIX 7: SCHOOL-LEVEL REFLECTION AND RESPONSE TO SYSTEM-WIDE IMPLICATIONS OF
  FINDINGS FROM AUDITS OF THE WRITTEN, TESTED, AND TAUGHT CURRICULUM IN ELA AND
  MATHEMATICS
  APPENDIX 8: CONTRACTS FOR EXCELLENCE (C4E) SCHOOL-BASED EXPENDITURES FOR 2008-09




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                               SECTION I: SCHOOL INFORMATION PAGE


SCHOOL                                  SCHOOL            INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL FOR
NUMBER:            10X342               NAME:             LIBERAL ARTS

DISTRICT:
            10                          SSO NAME/NETWORK #: EMPOWERMENT# 17

SCHOOL
ADDRESS:            2780 Reservoir Avenue

SCHOOL
TELEPHONE:               718-329-8570               FAX: 718-329-8572

SCHOOL CONTACT                                                              Kmaldon2@scho
PERSON:                       Karen Maldonado              EMAIL ADDRESS:   ools.nyc.gov


POSITION/TITLE                                   PRINT/TYPE NAME


SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM CHAIRPERSON               Jason Norman


PRINCIPAL                                        Karen Maldonado


UFT CHAPTER LEADER                               Jason Norman
PARENTS’ ASSOCIATION
PRESIDENT                                        Nelsy Lopez
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE
(Required for high schools)                      Laura Taveras
COMMUNITY SCHOOL DISTRICT
SUPERINTENDENT                                   Elena Papaliberios




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                          SECTION II: SCHOOL LEADERSHIP TEAM SIGNATURE PAGE

Directions: There should be one School Leadership Team (SLT) for each school. As per the Chancellor’s
Regulations for School Leadership Teams, SLT membership must include an equal number of parents
and staff (students and CBO representatives are not counted when assessing the balance), and ensure
representation of all school constituencies. The signatures of SLT members on this page indicates their
participation in the development of the Comprehensive Educational Plan and confirmation that required
consultation has occurred in the aligning of funds to support educational programs (Refer to Chancellor’s
Regulations A-655 on SLT’s; available on the NYCDOE website at
http://schools.nyc.gov/Administration/ChancellorsRegulations/default.htm). Note: If for any reason an SLT
member does not wish to sign this plan, he/she may attach an explanation in lieu of his/her signature.

                                        Position/Constituency
                Name                                                               Signature
                                        Represented
Karen Maldonado
                                        *UFT Chapter Chairperson or
Jason Norman
                                        Designee
                                        *PA/PTA President or
Nelsy Lopez
                                        Designated Co-President
                                        Title I Parent Representative
n/a
                                        (suggested, for Title I schools)
                                        DC 37 Representative, if
Maria Duran
                                        applicable
                                        Student Representative, if
Laura Taveras
                                        applicable




      * Core (mandatory) SLT members.

Signatures of the member of the School Leadership Team (SLT), as well as any applicable documentation, are
available for viewing at the school and are on file at the Office of School Improvement.



      UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
SECTION III: SCHOOL PROFILE

   Part A. Narrative Description
   Directions: In no more than 500 words, provide contextual information about your school’s
   community and its unique/important characteristics. Think of this as the kind of narrative description
   you would use in an admissions directory or an introductory letter to new parents. You may wish to
   include your school’s vision/mission statement and a description of strategic collaborations/
   partnerships and/or special initiatives being implemented. You may copy and paste your narrative
   description from other current resources where this information is already available for your school
   (e.g., grant applications, High School Directory, etc.). Note: Demographic and accountability data for
   your school will be addressed in Part B of this section.


   ISLA is the only middle school/high school in New York City serving grades 7-12, completely devoted
   to bilingual (Spanish) education. In the Department of education, there are various schools which offer
   bilingual classes and a differentiated ESL program. However, ISLA is the only school dedicated and
   designed to achieve bi-literacy and welcomes students who are at the beginning, intermediate, and
   advanced levels of English acquisition. Though many of our students are not yet proficient, we have
   made notable progress on state summative assessments, which can be viewed in the Progress Report.
   Students are exposed to native language content and continue to receive more aggressive exposure to
   English strategies within the classroom, around the campus, and as they continue to volunteer in a
   supportive community. The most prominent contribution to their willingness to achieve is the strongly
   collaboration and connection we have to their families, their experiences, and their future. Over 50% of
   our staff have similar immigration experiences and serve as role models to our parents and our
   children.

   ISLA is located in a building with five other schools. When you enter the building and pass the double
   doors on the left, you realize you have immediately entered a community of support, learning, and
   advancement of children. Students are courteous, well dressed, and exhibit very minor discipline
   issues. According our Regional Safety Officer and Campus Manager, we stand out as a model of
   success based on our Impact Report from the Office of School Safety and Planning for 2007-2008. Our
   students are unified in school uniform, and their perspective on education and openness to learning.
   ISLA students are educated to understand the value of all levels of education and the impact it will
   have on their future, their families, and their professions. Students believe it will allow them better
   opportunities for career decisions, to support their families in their native countries, and to possibly
   allow for some to become U.S. citizens. Students at ISLA are part of Campus wide initiatives such as
   student led fundraisers, campus council and campus community service. For students who struggle
   with society’s non acceptance of sexual identity, students have become trailblazers in starting the
   Walton Campus’ first Gay Straight Alliance and a Young Women’s abstinence group, sponsored by
   the Montifiore Health Clinic. Our students are realistic: they may live in poverty, but they feel
   privileged attending ISLA, as we feel honored educating them.




   UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
SECTION III – Cont’d

Part B. School Demographics and Accountability Snapshot
Directions: A pre-populated version of the School Demographics and Accountability Snapshot
provided in template format below (Pages 6-8 of this section) is available for download on each
school’s NYCDOE webpage under “Statistics.” Schools are encouraged to download the pre-populated
version for insertion here in place of the blank format provided.

           SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHICS AND ACCOUNTABILITY SNAPSHOT
School Name: International School for Liberal Arts
District: 10         DBN #: 10x342             School BEDS Code #: 32-10-00-01-1342

                                              DEMOGRAPHICS
Grades Served in          Pre-         K        1    2     3                   4         5       6    x 7
2008-09:             K
                     x8           x9          x 10     x 11    x 12            Ungrad.           Ungrad.
                                                                        Ele.                 Sec.
Enrollment:                                            Attendance:
(As of October 31)         2006        2007     2008   (As of June 30 – % of         2006     2007    2008
Pre-K                                                  days students attended)                92.8    89.9
                                                                                     93%
                                                                                              %       %
Kindergarten
Grade 1                                                 Student Mobility:
Grade 2                                                 (% of Enrollment as of       2006     2007    2008
Grade 3                                                 June 30)                     88.6     95.4    95%
Grade 4
Grade 5                                                 Eligible for Free Lunch:
Grade 6                                                 (% of Enrollment as of       2005     2006    2007
Grade 7                                                 October 31)                  100
                           42      49          56                                             98%     98%
                                                                                     %
Grade 8                    64      60          54
Grade 9                    81      104         105      Students in Temporary Housing:
Grade 10                   83      80          82       (Total Number as of June 2006 2007            2008
Grade 11                           93          91       30)                      2     1              1
Grade 12                                       88
Ungraded Elementary                                     Recent Immigrants:
Ungraded Secondary                                      (Total Number as of          2006     2007    2008
Total                      270     386         476      October 31)                  25       22      21

Special Education Enrollment:                          Suspensions:
(October 31)            2006       2007        2008    (Online Occurrence
                                                                                     2006      2007   2008
Number in Self-         0          0           0       Reporting System
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                           DEMOGRAPHICS
Contained Classes                                [OORS] – Number as of
                                                 June 30)

No. in Collaborative
Team Teaching (CTT)       0        0        2       Principal Suspensions         0      23     3
Classes
Number all others                                   Superintendent
                          2        11       5                                     9      4      2
                                                    Suspensions
These students are included in the enrollment
information above.
                                                    Special High School Programs:
English Language Learners (ELL)                     (Total Number)
                                                                              2006       2007   2008
Enrollment:
(October 31)           2006 2007             2008   CTE Program Participants      0      0      0
# in Trans. Bilingual                               Early College HS
                                                                                  0      0      0
Classes                                             Participants
# in Dual Lang.
Programs
# receiving ESL
                       260    288           469
services only                                       Number of Staff:
# ELLs with IEPs                                    (As of October 31;
                              11            7       includes all full and part-   2006   2007   2008
                                                    time staff)
These students are included in the General and      Number of Teachers
                                                                                  18     20     31
Special Education enrollment information above.
                                                    Number of Administrators
                                                                                  2      3      3
Overage Students:                                   and Other Professionals
(# entering students
                                                    Number of Educational
overage for grade as of    2006    2007      2008                                 0      1      2
                                                    Paraprofessionals
October 31)
                              5        0        0
                                                    Teacher Qualifications:
Ethnicity and Gender:                               (As of October 31)            2006   2007   2008
(% of Enrollment as of                              % fully licensed &
October 31)                2006    2007      2008   permanently assigned to       100    100    100
                                                    this school
American Indian or                                  Percent more than two
Alaska Native                                       years teaching in this        0      8.7    20
                                                    school
Black or African
                                                    Percent more than five
American                                                                          41.7   47.8   96
                                                    years teaching anywhere
Hispanic or Latino        100%     100%      100%

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                         DEMOGRAPHICS
Asian or Native
                                                Percent Masters Degree or
Hawaiian/Other Pacific                                                    75.0   83      100
                                                higher
Isl.
White                                           Percent core classes      88.0   84.6    100
Multi-racial                                    taught by “highly
                                                qualified” teachers
Male                      58.2    54.2     48
                                                (NCLB/SED definition)
Female                    41.8    45.8     52

                                  2008-09 TITLE I STATUS
x Title I Schoolwide Program (SWP)         Title I Targeted Assistance       Non-Title I
Years the School Received Title I
                                        2005-06        2006-07         2007-08        2008-09
Part A Funding:

               NCLB/SED SCHOOL-LEVEL ACCOUNTABILITY SUMMARY
SURR School: Yes        No x If yes, area(s) of SURR
                              identification:
Overall NCLB/SED                                              School in Need of
                                   x
Accountability Status (2007-08):        In Good Standing      Improvement (SINI) – Year
                                                              1
                                                              NCLB Corrective Action –
    School in Need of                  NCLB Corrective Action
                                                              Year 2/Planning for
    Improvement (SINI) – Year 2        – Year 1
                                                              Restructuring (PFR)
    NCLB Restructured – Year           School Requiring
    ___                                Academic Y ___

Individual               Elementary/Middle Level          Secondary Level
Subject/Area Ratings     ELA:     Good Standing           ELA:        N/A
                         Math:    Good Standing           Math:       N/A
                         Science: Good Standing           Grad.       N/A
                                                          Rate:
This school’s Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) determinations for each accountability measure:
                                 Elementary/Middle Level         Secondary Level
                                 ELA      Math       Science    ELA      Math       Grad.
Student Groups                                                                      Rate
All Students                       √SH        √          √
Ethnicity
American Indian or Alaska Native
Black or African American
Hispanic or Latino                 √SH        √
Asian or Native Hawaiian/Other
Pacific Islander

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
White
Multiracial
Other Groups
Students with Disabilities
Limited English Proficient            √SH          √
Economically Disadvantaged            √SH          √
Student groups making AYP in
each subject
                                       Key: AYP Status
√     Made AYP                       X Did Not Make X* Did Not Make AYP Due to
                                       AYP                  Participation Rate Only
√SH   Made AYP Using Safe            - Insufficient Number of Students to Determine AYP Status
      Harbor Target
Note: NCLB/SED accountability reports are not available for District 75 schools.

                       CHILDREN FIRST ACCOUNTABILITY SUMMARY
Progress Report Results – 2007-08         Quality Review Results – 2007-08
Overall Letter Grade               B      Overall Evaluation:             Well Developed
Overall Score                      65.6   Quality Statement Scores:
Category Scores:                          Quality Statement 1: Gather     Well Developed
                                          Data
School Environment                 A      Quality Statement 2: Plan and   Well Developed
(Comprises 15% of the Overall             Set Goals
Score)
School Performance                 F      Quality Statement 3: Align      Well Developed
(Comprises 30% of the Overall             Instructional Strategy to Goals
Score)
Student Progress                   A      Quality Statement 4: Align      Well Developed
(Comprises 55% of the Overall             Capacity Building to Goals
Score)
Additional Credit                  3.0    Quality Statement 5: Monitor    Well Developed
                                          and Revise
Note: Progress Report grades are not yet
available for District 75 schools.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                                         SECTION IV: NEEDS ASSESSMENT

Directions: Conduct a comprehensive review of your school’s educational program informed by the most current quantitative and qualitative
data available regarding student performance trends and other indicators of progress. Include in your needs assessment an analysis of
information available from New York State Education Department and New York City Department of Education accountability and assessment
resources, i.e., School Report Cards, Progress Reports, Quality Review and Quality Review Self-Assessment documents, periodic assessments,
ARIS, as well as results of Inquiry Team action research, surveys, and school-based assessments. (Refer to your school’s Demographics and
Accountability Snapshot in Part B of Section III.) It may also be useful to review the schools use of resources: last year’s school budget,
schedule, facility use, class size, etc.

After conducting your review, summarize in this section the major findings and highlights of your school’s strengths, accomplishments, and
challenges. Consider the following questions:
     - What student performance trends can you identify?
     - What have been the greatest accomplishments over the last couple of years?
     - What are the most significant aids or barriers to the school’s continuous improvement?


School’s Strengths:
- The school has developed an on-going system of monitoring and revising curriculum plans.
- The school has a strong formative assessment cycle that is used to inform instruction.
- There is an instructional leadership team comprised of teacher leaders which ensures that instructional goals are being met in every content
area.
- The school effectively uses data to differentiate instruction and to plan for each grade and class.
School’s Achievements
- The Middle School grades have had exemplary achievement gains in Math.
- As per the 2007 School Report Card, the school has developed a strong learning environment in which students feel safe and encouraged.
- The school has had significant gains in math with students identified as being in the bottom 1/3 of the city.
- Currently, 75% of our graduating class is scheduled to graduate with an advanced regents diploma.
- The school has had extraordinary achievement gains in High School Math, Science, and Social Studies as per the 2008 Progress report.

School’s Challenges
   - The school is challenged with being in a building which is shared by 5 other schools.
   - The current 11th grade class has the highest credit recovery needs of the school.
   - The school has a relatively large group of SIFE students.


DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                                                        SECTION V: ANNUAL SCHOOL GOALS

Directions: Based on the findings and implications from the comprehensive needs assessment (Section IV), determine your school’s
instructional goals for 2008-09 and list them in this section along with a few phrases of description. The resulting list should include a limited
number of goals (5 is a good guideline), and the list as a whole should be a clear reflection of your priorities for the year. Good goals should be
SMART – Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time-bound.
Notes: (1) In Section VI of this template, you will need to complete an “action plan” for each annual goal listed in this section. (2) Schools
designated for improvement (SINI/SRAP/SURR or schools that received a C for two consecutive years, D, or F on the Progress Report) must
identify a goal and complete an action plan related to improving student outcomes in the area(s) of improvement identification. (3) When
developed, Principal’s Performance Review (PPR) goals should presumably be aligned to the school’s annual goals described in this section.

           1. To utilize a Critical Friends Group learning approach, with all faculty members, in order to further develop the learning
           community for student achievement and teacher retention through a year long commitment from teachers to serve as
           facilitators in the process.

Our school has made a commitment to train teachers to facilitate Critical Friends Groups in collaboration with the foundation and protocols of
the National School Reform Faculty. Critical Friends Group, also referred to as CFG gives teachers the opportunity to build and strengthen
learning communities, to promote adult growth. ISLA long term goal is to facilitate this process with our students as well. The goal of further
developing the learning community through the Critical Friends Group approach is indirectly aligned to student achievement. 95% of the faculty
are currently participating in CFG and have shown to have better classroom results in academic and behavioral achievement as delineated on our
OORS reports and Scholarship Data. Over 50% of the faculty has contributed their dilemmas in effort to find solutions to challenges posed
within the classroom and in their own instructional areas of expertise.


   2. Continue to analyze the DYO interim assessment system; to collect more comprehensive data that is aligned to all learning
      standards and performance indicators so there is an increase in student passing rate by 5% and credit accumulation.

   In order for our students to be successful in all areas such as mathematics, science, social studies, (subjects other than language), they must
   develop strong literacy skills in both languages. Our formative assessments must reflect this. This year we will design school-based
   assessments aligned to all New York State standards and performance indicators. This school designed assessment is called Periodic
   Assessment Analysis Tool (PAAT), which analyzes with a common assessment data tool. This tool is the basis for dialogue between content
   area departments and grade level colleagues. The results will offer teachers the opportunity to analyze skills that need to be re-taught, provide


DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
   intervention, or reinforced. We will then use the data developed through these assessments to develop/revise curriculum, curriculum maps,
   differentiate instruction and refer students for targeted supports.

   3. Strengthen literacy skills in students’ native language to provide a stronger foundation for English language literacy acquisition
      in order to have a higher number of students matriculate into Advanced Placement Spanish and a higher number of students
      prepared for the English Language Arts Regents Exam.

   ISLA understands proficient writing abilities are best attained through strong professional development opportunities to craft pedagogical
   expertise. Our teachers, who focus on ESL and NLA, will be provided with intensive and comprehensive training in the structures, methods
   and practices necessary to execute exemplary writing workshop classes for middle and high school students. The focus is shaped towards
   offering ISLA teachers instructional methods focused on remediation in literacy, while designed to target different language proficiency
   levels. These methods are designed within each of the five stages of writing, and in developing and executing compelling and engaging
   writing workshop curriculum for the students




DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                                                         SECTION VI: ACTION PLAN

Directions: The action plan should be used as a tool to support effective implementation and to evaluate progress toward meeting goals. Use the
action plan template provided below to indicate key strategies and activities to be implemented for the 2008-09 school year to support
accomplishment of each annual goal identified in Section V. The action plan template should be duplicated as necessary. Reminder: Schools
designated for improvement (SINI/SRAP/SURR or schools that received a C for two consecutive years, D, or F on the Progress Report) must
identify a goal and complete an action plan related to improving student outcomes in the area(s) of improvement identification.

Subject/Area (where relevant):

Annual Goal                                  To utilize a Critical Friends Group learning approach, with all faculty members, in order to
Goals should be SMART – Specific,            further develop the learning community
Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and
Time-bound.
Aligning Resources: Implications for         Funding and Supplies have been designated from our C4E allocations, for teachers to be trained,
Budget, Staffing/Training, and Schedule      attend out of building professional development, to provide teacher books to promote inquiry
Include reference to the use of Contracts    and action research.
for Excellence (C4E) allocations, where
applicable.
Indicators of Interim Progress and/or        End of Nov ‘08
Accomplishment                                      Professional Development Wednesdays are dedicated to CFG on a weekly basis for 75
Include: interval of periodic review;               minutes.
instrument(s) of measure; projected gains           Teachers who serve as facilitators are trained over the summer ’08 with National School
                                                    Reform Faculty
                                                    Faculty is introduced and assigned CFG placement in order to begin the process of adult
                                                    learning.
                                                    Three protocols introduced to CFG members; connections, final word, and dilemma.
                                             Principal “checks in with staff to survey how effective CFG is for the larger community.
                                             End of Feb ‘09

                                                 All teachers given an opportunity to share a dilemma and begin to prepare for action
                                                 research
                                                 Faculty receives a copy of Why Gender Matters in order to begin the work on order to

DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
                           strengthen practice of looking at student work.
                           Facilitators retreat to the National School Reform Faculty conference to receive development
                           and turn-key to other faculty members.
                       Principal “checks in with staff to survey how effective CFG is for the larger community.

                       End of Mar/April ‘09

                          Teachers share student work in CFG professional development and use colleagues as a
                          support to strengthen instructional practices and as a basis for student improvement
                          Teachers use the “Final Word” protocol to strengthen their understanding of students by
                          gender; gender reveals some trends that may inform better instructional strategies for
                          students.

                       end of May/ June ‘09
                          All teachers share reflective practices on their learning of CFG process and survey how they
                          want to take their learning of CFG to the next level.
                          Principal asks faculty to serve as facilitators to be trained for ’09-’10 school year to have the
                          CFG process become cyclical.
                          Due to strong collaboration and adult learning, teacher retention is 95%.




DRAFT – MAY 12, 2008
Annual Goal                                  Strengthen literacy skills in students’ native language to provide a stronger foundation for
Goals should be SMART – Specific,            English language literacy acquisition in order to have a higher number of students
Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and       matriculate into Advanced Placement Spanish and a higher number of students prepared
Time-bound.                                  for the English Language Arts Regents Exam.

Action Plan                                  -- Learn how to better analyze and understand the implications of the ELE data – Spanish
Include: actions/strategies/activities the   reading comprehension exam
school will implement to accomplish the      -- Enhance the DYO assessment to include more open ended questions, writing prompts and
goal; target population(s); responsible      other assessments of native language literacy skills
staff members; and implementation            -- Begin interdisciplinary curriculum between ELA and NLA
timelines.                                   -- Develop writing portfolios in Native Language Arts and ELA
                                             -- Develop links between and align the work of the ELA and NLA departments

Aligning Resources: Implications for         Funds from fair student funding and C4E have been allocated for teachers’ to be trained by
Budget, Staffing/Training, and Schedule      teachers regarding DYO. For example, coverages, per-diem, and per-session. In addition, we
Include reference to the use of Contracts    have purchased additional computers so teachers can create DYO and share via e-mail.
for Excellence (C4E) allocations, where
applicable.
Indicators of Interim Progress and/or        End of Nov ‘08
Accomplishment
Include: interval of periodic review;               NLA and ELA staff are going to join PD
instrument(s) of measure; projected gains           ELA and NLA department goals are similar and aligned in assessment goals

                                             End of Feb ‘09

                                             All upper level classes in NLA and ELA focus on critical lens essays that mirror the ELA
                                             regents; these writing prompts will be embedded into the DYO assessments.
                                             End of Mar/April ‘09

                                               Similar rubrics are designed in NLA and ELA with students having a firm understanding of
                                               rubric development and use it for peer analysis.



UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                                end of May/ June ‘09

                                                   ESL and NLA create an aligned curriculum for 9th grade.
                                                   Strategies, tasks, and rubrics are similar.
                                                        Summer reading list is developed with writing assignments to prepare eligible students
                                                   for early participation in ELA Regents and Spanish A.P.

Annual Goal
Goals should be SMART – Specific,            Continue to analyze the DYO interim assessment system; to collect more comprehensive data
Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and       that is aligned to all learning standards and performance indicators so there is an increase in
Time-bound.                                  student passing rate by 5% and credit accumulation.
Action Plan                                  Improved formative and summative assessment scores
Include: actions/strategies/activities the   Level of rigor has visibly increased as seen
school will implement to accomplish          To increase the literacy skills of all students through writing portfolios
the goal; target population(s);
responsible staff members; and               The assessment results give teachers and students a clearer picture as to whether students are
implementation timelines.                    progressing or need further intervention. However, the ISLA assessment tool will offer a different
                                             opportunity, where teachers can link students’ strength and weaknesses to performance indicators and
                                             standards for each question of the DYO assessment. The results will indicate material which needs to
                                             be taught in a different manner, specific areas for intervention, and areas where students have mastered
                                             specific topics. All students who require intervention will have it embedded into their daily schedule
                                             for after school.

Aligning Resources: Implications for         All resources and supplies for creating and analyzing periodic assessments, including per-session
Budget, Staffing/Training, and               allotted for teacher planning will utilize 2% of school funding.
Schedule
Indicators of Interim Progress               End of Nov ‘08
and/or Accomplishment                               Annual Review Process Launched with feedback and input from staff
                                                    Departments have set instructional goals that are also embedded into teacher-level performance
                                                    goals
                                                    PAAT launched
                                                    Analysis of the data documented for each department
                                                    Inquiry Team questions developed by Dept

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                         End of Feb ‘09
                                Each teacher has completed at least three peer observations
                                Each teacher can present at least one good lesson in his/her goal area
                                Engage in a data review with the Principal using the periodic assessment data
                                Each teacher has engaged in at least one (up to three )professional learning experiences related
                                to goals (budget aligned to provide off site support as needed)
                         Departments submit current curriculum map based on tweaks made through examination of periodic
                         assessment results
                         end of Mar/April ‘09

                         -- Each teacher has engaged in at least one more (up to six)professional learning experiences related to
                         goals (budget aligned to provide off site support as needed)
                         -- Data Review with Principal to look at trends in periodic assessment data and how improvements
                         have been made over time


                         end of May/ June ‘09

                         --curriculum map submitted with changes made through assessment cycles this year
                          -- Teachers submit evidence of meeting goals and revise goals for the upcoming school year (student
                          learning goals and teacher professional goals)




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                       REQUIRED APPENDICES TO THE CEP FOR 2008-2009


Directions: All schools must complete Appendices 1, 2, 3, 7 & 8. All Title I schools must complete Appendix 4. All schools identified under
NCLB or SED for School Improvement, including Title I Schools in Need of Improvement (SINI) – Year 1 and Year 2, Title I Corrective Action
(CA) Schools, NCLB Planning for Restructuring Schools, NCLB Restructured Schools, and Schools Requiring Academic Progress (SRAP), must
complete Appendix 5. All Schools Under Registration Review (SURR) must complete Appendix 6. Note: Please refer to the accompanying CEP
Guide for specific CEP submission instructions and timelines.

APPENDIX 1: ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES (AIS) SUMMARY FORM – SED REQUIREMENT FOR ALL SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 2: PROGRAM DELIVERY FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS – NCLB/SED REQUIREMENT FOR ALL
     SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 3: LANGUAGE TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION – CHANCELLOR’S REGULATIONS FOR ALL SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 4: NCLB REQUIREMENT FOR ALL TITLE I SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 5: NCLB/SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SINI AND SRAP SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 6: SED REQUIREMENTS FOR SCHOOLS UNDER REGISTRATION REVIEW (SURR)

APPENDIX 7: SCHOOL-LEVEL REFLECTION AND RESPONSE TO SYSTEMWIDE CURRICULUM AUDIT FINDINGS –
REQUIREMENT
     FOR ALL SCHOOLS

APPENDIX 8: CONTRACTS FOR EXCELLENCE (CFE) SCHOOL-BASED EXPENDITURES FOR 2008-09 – SED
REQUIREMENT FOR ALL
     SCHOOLS




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                    APPENDIX 1: ACADEMIC INTERVENTION SERVICES (AIS) SUMMARY FORM

                                     New York State Education Department (SED) requirement for all schools

Part A. Directions: On the chart below, indicate the total number of students receiving Academic Intervention Services (AIS) in each area
listed, for each applicable grade. AIS grade and subject requirements are as follows: K-3: reading and math; 4-12: reading, math, science, and
social studies. Academic Intervention Services include 2 components: additional instruction that supplements the general curriculum (regular
classroom instruction); and/or student support services needed to address barriers to improved academic performance such as services provided
by a guidance counselor or social worker. Note: Refer to the District Comprehensive Educational Plan (DCEP) for a description of district
procedures for providing AIS.

                                                                               At-risk          At-risk          At-risk           At-risk
                                                                              Services:        Services:        Services:          Health-
              ELA         Mathematics        Science       Social Studies
                                                                              Guidance          School            Social           related
  Grade




                                                                             Counselor       Psychologist        Worker            Services
          # of Students   # of Students    # of Students   # of Students    # of Students    # of Students    # of Students     # of Students
            Receiving       Receiving        Receiving       Receiving        Receiving        Receiving        Receiving         Receiving
               AIS             AIS              AIS             AIS              AIS              AIS              AIS               AIS
 K                                              N/A             N/A
  1                                             N/A             N/A
  2                                             N/A             N/A
  3                                             N/A             N/A
  4
  5
  6
  7            42              40                                                 2                                  1                1
  8            41              39                                                 1                                                   1
  9                                                                               16                                2
 10                            16                                                 2                                 5
 11                            29                               57                 1                                8
 12            63                               13              23                                                  18

Identified groups of students who have been targeted for AIS, and the established criteria for identification:


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
   o Students in Grades K – 3 who are considered at-risk for not meeting State standards as determined by their performance on ECLAS 2 or
     other identified assessments, or who have been identified as potential holdovers.
   o Students in Grades 4 – 8 who are performing at Level 1 or Level 2 on New York State English language arts (ELA), mathematics,
     science, and social studies assessments.
   o Students in Grade 9 who performed at Level 1 or Level 2 on NYS Grade 8 ELA, mathematics, science, and social studies assessments.
   o Students in Grades 10 – 12 who scored below the approved passing grade on any Regents examination required for graduation in English
     language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Part B. Description of Academic Intervention Services

                                      Description: Provide a brief description of each of the Academic Intervention Services (AIS)
Name of Academic Intervention         indicated in column one, including the type of program or strategy (e.g., Wilson, Great Leaps, etc.),
Services (AIS)                        method for delivery of service (e.g., small group, one-to-one, tutoring, etc.), and when the service is
                                      provided (i.e., during the school day, before or after school, Saturday, etc.).
ELA:                                  AIS in ELA in being implemented in several different ways:
                                          One 90 minute period per week (Before School)
                                          One 90 minute period per week (After School)
                                          One 180 minute period per week (Saturday Academy)
                                          Differentiate instruction in all ELA classes –
                                          Level classes based on students English Level, where a specific plan will be tailored to meet
                                          their unique needs.
                                      AIS in ESL in being implemented in several different ways:
                                          One 90 minute period per week (Before School)
                                          One 90 minute period per week (After School)
                                          One 180 minute period per week (Saturday Academy)
                                          Differentiate instruction in all ELA classes –
                                          Level classes based on students English Level, where a specific plan will be tailored to meet
                                          their unique needs.

Mathematics:                          AIS in math in being implemented in several different ways:
                                         One 90 minute period per week
                                         Differentiate instruction in all math classes --
                                         Peer Tutoring
                                         Level classes based on students Math Level, where a specific plan will be tailored to meet their
                                         unique needs.


Science:                                 In addition to the State mandated periods of science instruction students will receive an
                                         additional 90 minute period of AIS instruction in science per week.

                                         The science lab will be used as a vehicle to provide AIS instruction


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Social Studies:                       In addition to the State mandated periods of social studies instruction students will receive an
                                      additional 90 minute period of AIS instruction in social studies per week.
                                      The additional AIS period will be tailored to meet the specific needs of each student

At-risk Services Provided by the   School counselors will provide guidance and crisis Counseling services during the school day, one
Guidance Counselor:                period a week or more frequently if needed, to all students especially, Hispanic and Economically
                                   Disadvantaged students in grades 7-12. The service is offered in English and Spanish. Students are
                                   assisted in learning how to deal with various personal issues including school, friends, family,
                                   current events, etc.
At-risk Services Provided by the   The school psychologists will offer clinical services, agency referrals, and educational, social and
School Psychologist:               personal services during the school day on an as needed basis to at risk students including student sin
                                   the SWD, LEP, Hispanic and Economically Disadvantaged subgroups. This service will identify
                                   emotional, social, neurological factors that impede on student performance and provide prescriptive
                                   measures that address student needs by suggesting additional student support services.
At-risk Services Provided by the   Social Workers will provide counseling services to at risk students especially students in the
Social Worker:                     targeted subgroups of SWD, LEP, Black, Hispanic and Economically Disadvantaged and their
                                   families during the school day, one period a week or more frequently if needed. Students are
                                   assisted in learning how to deal with various personal and family issues that are adversely affecting
                                   student progress.
At-risk Health-related Services:   Health related services are offered during the school day, one period a week or as needed, to all
                                   students especially SWD, LEP, Black, Hispanic and Economically Disadvantaged students in grades
                                   8-12. Students are assisted in learning how to cope with health related issues such as obesity,
                                   diabetes, asthma, etc.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                          APPENDIX 2: PROGRAM DELIVERY FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLs)

                                                        NCLB/SED requirement for all schools

Part A: Language Allocation Policy (LAP)




                                                             Language Allocation Policy
                                                                   2008 - 2009



The International School for Liberal Arts, also referred to as ISLA, serves a population of approximately three hundred and ninety students. All of our
students are English Language Learners, whose native language is Spanish. In accordance with the New York State Commissioner’s Regulation Part
154, our students’ educational and linguistic needs are served appropriately in a Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) program. All parents of
children at ISLA have chosen TBE as their program of choice. Because of the school’s design, where the entire population is Spanish-speaking, we
must provide this method of programming for students. The goal of our TBE program is to enable our ELL students to develop the linguistic,
cognitive, and affective skills they need to function in the school and community at large. Additionally, the goal our ultimate goal is to give our
students the tools they need to go to college and sustain matriculation. Only a strong program can afford our students this opportunity.

ISLA will provide TBE classes exclusively in grades 7-12. 60% of our 9th grade students have attended ISLA for three years. As a result, the majority
of their proficiency levels range from intermediate- proficient. The other 40% is a combination of students who have not yet been tested and beginning
ESL students.

As a result of in-house designed diagnostic assessment results, instructional time is 60% in the native language, and 40% in English for all students
who have not received a score of advanced. This variation requires our TBE teachers to differentiate instruction in order to meet the required
performance standards for the native language (Spanish), English Language Arts, and ESL. Staff will utilize data from the NYSESLAT, Spanish
LAB, ELE, school created diagnostic assessments, and the LAB-R to create instructional units that will support the academic language development of
each student.

ESL instruction within in the TBE classes will be aligned with NYS guidelines and the New York City Chancellor’s recommendations. All ELL
students at the beginning level will receive 540 minutes (three units) of ESL; intermediate levels of English proficiency will receive the mandated 360
minutes of ESL per week. Students at the advanced level will receive 180 minutes per week of ESL (one period per day) with more time allocated to
English literacy instruction, which will include English Language Arts course. TBE and ESL teachers will utilize scaffolding and differentiated
instructional strategies for increased ESL and content area academic development.

The TBE and ESL teachers will provide meaningful educational experiences that will allow ELL students to be active participants rather than passive
agents of the language development process. Teacher resourcefulness and creativity will allow us to explore and extend the children’s linguistic,
cultural, and academic knowledge. Through the use of the Balanced Literacy and ISLA custom designed math programs and initiatives, TBE and ESL
teachers will utilize mini lessons, independent work, peer tutoring and instructional technology to develop academic and linguistic lessons appropriate
for both the native language and English literacy. Each language will be a separate instructional focus within the school day. English language
development will be further strengthened through English taught enrichment classes such as art and additional ESL support on a daily basis through
our extended day and Saturday Academy programs.


In order to provide our ELLs with additional school resources, the staff will meet weekly to review ongoing assessments, reflecting both qualitative
and quantitative data. The following services are available for the entire ISLA population:


   •   Professional Development for all staff members is designed to bring their level of expertise on ELLs to an instructional peak. For example,
       teachers will be trained not only on strategies designed by Quality of Teaching for English Learners (QTEL), literacy (through all content
       areas) and mathematic initiatives, but also by the instructional leader. Additionally, teachers will be trained by the Spanish Bilingual Technical
       Assistance Center (SBETAC) on issues regarding native language and ESL.

   •   Bilingual Academic Intervention Services for all grades will provide ELLs within a small group an appropriate literacy program that
       emphasizes high standards resulting in students reading at or above grade level in both their native and second language.


   •    Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFE) will receive additional support services to assist them in achieving grade level literacy
       levels in their native language, while assisting in the English acquisition process. Students who are identified as SIFE will receive mandatory
       extended day programs




                                                     Assessment of Language Allocation Policy

The LAP team, which is the entire ISLA pedagogical staff, will convene on a regular basis to ensure program integrity and coherence. The team will
review assessment results of the LAB-R, NYSESLAT, ELE, and school based assessments, this includes, but not limited to exams, writing portfolios,
journals, and class assignments.
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                          APPENDIX 2: PROGRAM DELIVERY FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ELLs)

                                                        NCLB/SED requirement for all schools

Part A: Language Allocation Policy (LAP)




                                                             Language Allocation Policy
                                                                   2008 - 2009



The International School for Liberal Arts, also referred to as ISLA, serves a population of approximately three hundred and ninety students. All of our
students are English Language Learners, whose native language is Spanish. In accordance with the New York State Commissioner’s Regulation Part
154, our students’ educational and linguistic needs are served appropriately in a Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) program. All parents of
children at ISLA have chosen TBE as their program of choice. Because of the school’s design, where the entire population is Spanish-speaking, we
must provide this method of programming for students. The goal of our TBE program is to enable our ELL students to develop the linguistic,
cognitive, and affective skills they need to function in the school and community at large. Additionally, the goal our ultimate goal is to give our
students the tools they need to go to college and sustain matriculation. Only a strong program can afford our students this opportunity.

ISLA will provide TBE classes exclusively in grades 7-12. 60% of our 9th grade students have attended ISLA for three years. As a result, the majority
of their proficiency levels range from intermediate- proficient. The other 40% is a combination of students who have not yet been tested and beginning
ESL students.

As a result of in-house designed diagnostic assessment results, instructional time is 60% in the native language, and 40% in English for all students
who have not received a score of advanced. This variation requires our TBE teachers to differentiate instruction in order to meet the required
performance standards for the native language (Spanish), English Language Arts, and ESL. Staff will utilize data from the NYSESLAT, Spanish
LAB, ELE, school created diagnostic assessments, and the LAB-R to create instructional units that will support the academic language development of
each student.

ESL instruction within in the TBE classes will be aligned with NYS guidelines and the New York City Chancellor’s recommendations. All ELL
students at the beginning level will receive 540 minutes (three units) of ESL; intermediate levels of English proficiency will receive the mandated 360
minutes of ESL per week. Students at the advanced level will receive 180 minutes per week of ESL (one period per day) with more time allocated to
(Attachment A)

                                                   ISLA STUDENT POPULATION

7Th GRADE                               55
8TH GRADE                               54
9th GRADE                               105
10TH GRADE                              102
11TH GRADE                              93
12th GRADE                              91
Total                                   500


                                                         ISLA proficiency levels

    Beginning            Intermediate         Advanced            Not –tested
                                                                (new arrivals )
       119                   165                216                   80




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Part B: CR Part 154 (A-6) Bilingual/ESL Program Description

Type of Program: __X_Bilingual ___ ESL ___ Both                  Number of LEP (ELL) Students Served in 2007-08: ___380_________________
(No more than 2 pages)

I.     Instructional Program for ELLs (including brief description of program, # of classes per program, language(s) of instruction, instructional
       strategies, etc). Program planning and management description, to include identification and placement of ESL/Bilingual certified teachers,
       utilization of appropriate instructional materials (English and other languages) and technology, school-based supervisory support, use of
       external organizations, compliance with ELL-related mandates and use of data to improve instruction.:

       A. Curricular: Briefly describe the school’s literacy, mathematics and other content area programs and explain ELLs’ participation in those
       programs.
       Briefly describe supplemental programs for ELLs (i.e., AIS, Saturday Academies).

       B. Extracurricular: Briefly describe extracurricular activities available in your school, and the extent to which ELLs participate. Such programs
       may include art, music, sports, clubs, etc.

II.   Parent/community: Describe parent/community involvement activities planned to meaningfully involve parents in their children’s education and
      to inform them about the state standards and assessments. Activities might include parent orientations, homework help, leadership development,
      ESL and/or math/literacy.

III. Project Jump Start: Describe the programs and activities to assist newly enrolled ELL/LEP students prior to the first day of school.

IV. Staff Development (2007-2008 activities—tentative dates and ELL-related topics): Describe how staff will participate in ongoing, long-term
    staff development with a strong emphasis on the State learning standards and high impact differentiated and academic language development
    strategies.

V.    Support services provided to LEP students: Describe other support structures that are in place in your school which are available to ELLs.

VI. Name/type of native language assessments administered (bilingual programs only): Describe how you assess the level of native language
    development and proficiency of the ELLs who are in a bilingual program.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                                                   CR Part 154 (A-6)

                                  2007-08 SCHOOL BUILDING BILINGUAL/ESL PROGRAM DESCRIPTION


School District:    District 10                      Type of Program:_x__Bilingual__ESL__Both__

School Building: International School for Liberal Arts No. LEP Students Served 2007-08: 268
Empowerment School

Name of Principal: Karen Maldonado


I   Instructional Program (including brief description of program, # of classes per program,
    Language(s) of instruction, instructional strategies, etc).

       ISLA offers the Transitional Bilingual Education model to 100% of its student body. There are _18 _ classes in total. In the seventh grade,
       there are _2__, in the 8th there are _2_, in the 9th grade there are_4__, in the 10th grade there are _4_, in the 11th grade there are 3 , and in the
       12th grade there are 3 . The language of instruction in our bilingual program is Spanish. ISLA takes into account the variety of levels
       amongst our English Language Learners. Our entire population is Spanish-speaking English Language Learners and all ELLs are serviced
       accordingly with federal regulations (NCLB), state, and city regulations (CR-Part 154). Instructional resources have been prescribed by the
       New York City Department of Education in both English and Spanish All students receive per CR part 154 NLA classes as part of their
       program. The content area teachers follow the school Language Allocation Policy. For example, for a class with mainly beginners, instruction
       is 60% in English and 40 % in the native language which is Spanish for all students.

       Additionally, we have designed our curriculum to target the needs of students in all subject areas. Our school has established its goal of
       improving student achievement through a Balanced Literacy approach in Mathematics, English, Social Studies, and Science. We aim to achieve
       a level of mastery for both our teachers and students through lesson planning designed according to Quality Teaching of English Learners
       (QTEL) and other professional development for our teachers in ESL.
       The bilingual and ESL teachers will model, observe, and analyze student learning, through a comprehensive tool created by ISLA called
       Analytic Literacy Inventory Assessment, (ILIA). He/she will advise, coach, guide, and assess student progress. All learning activities take place
       within the context of the principles of learning, which include among others, setting clear goals, high expectations and high standards for all
       students. The principles of learning also assist in the development of effective means of assessing student progress in meeting the standards.
       Staff will be exposed to research in second language acquisition and strategies to communicate with parents about instruction and other key
       factors, which affect their child’s development.


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
    II.       Parent/Community Involvement

          During the first month of school, all parents of ELLs are offered an orientation workshop to explain the services offered to their child through
          ISLA, Part 154 and our ESL/Bilingual Program. At the conclusion of this workshop, a video will be viewed in Spanish followed by a question
          and answer session. After the initial parent orientation, ongoing meetings and informational correspondence will be given to parents on a
          monthly basis, or more frequently as needed. All correspondence will be disseminated in both Spanish and English. Extensive effort is put forth
          to involve the parents of ELLs into the community of ISLA. The following initiatives will be implemented for our parents:

              •   Committees such as the School Leadership Team, workshops given by ISLA community members, and joining the PA/PTA, are all
                  outlets offered to our parents. Additionally, the No Child Left Behind Act has made is possible for parents to participate in different
                  aspects of our learning community.
              •   Parents are afforded the opportunity to enroll in ESL classes during the evening, twice a week, for three hours starting in September.
              •   Parents will assist in coordinating special events inside the school and throughout the city of New York. This will give them the tools
                  necessary to be a partner in the ISLA learning community and the lives of their children. It will also give parents a voice and
                  participation in their children’s education.

    III.      Project Jump Start (Programs and activities to assist newly enrolled LEP students) : N.A.


    IV.       Staff Development

              In alignment with the Language Allocation Policy, each week, ISLA staff will study the academic lives of our students through study
              groups, lesson planning, and teacher collaboration, amongst colleagues, in ISLA and other schools within the city to model and support
              best practices. Teachers will also use data, both quantitative and qualitative, as a means to assess entry levels and the work which needs to
              be done to assess progress. Twice a month, a professional development session will be conducted for all pedagogues reflective on students’
              needs by the Instructional Support Specialist for ELLs. During this time frame, the facilitator will incorporated different strategies to target
              the ELLs, including, but not limited to strategies to help students progress and reach a level of proficiency on the NYSESLAT. Teacher
              will be guided on how to best support their work through the four modalities of the New York State ESL standards, (reading, writing,
              speaking, and listening) regardless of content area. All supplemental resources will provide methodologies developed to assist our
              students in reaching the goal of proficiency and academic excellence.

              Specifically, we are using the following professional development resources for our staff:

                  •   When Kids Can’t Read, What teachers can do by Kylene Beers

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
             •   Access and Engagement by Aida Walqui
             •   Learning to Learn in a Second Language by Pauline Gibbons
             •   Making Content Comprehensible for English Language Learner: The SIOP Model by Jana Echevarria, Mary Ellen Vogt, and
                 Deborah J. Short


          These resources, coupled with analyzing student work, will assist in developing master teachers. Thus, it will develop a ambitious and
          dedication learning community.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                                                       A-2(a)
                         Number of LEP Students Identified and Served in Each School Building by Type of Program in 2006-07

School District: ___________10___________

School Building ___________342___________



               (Complete this form for each school building with LEP students in grades 7-12 and Special Education during 2006-07)
                                        Grade 8            Grade 9         Grade 10         Grade 11       Grade 12          Special
                  Grade 7                                                                                                Education(K-12)
Language
                 Ide        Served    Ident    Served Ident  Served      Ide     Served   Ide    Served   Ide Served   Identi    Served
                 ntifi     Bil ES     i       Bil ES i      Bil ES       nti    Bil ES    nti   Bil ES    nti Bil E    fied     Bil ES
                 ed              L    fied          L fied       L       fied        L    Fie        L    fie     S                  L
                                                                                          d                d      L
Arabic (ARB)
Bengali
(BEN)
Bosnian
(BOS)
Chinese
(CMN)
French (FRA)
H. Creole
(HAT)
Hindi (HIN)
Japanese
(JPN)
Korean
(KOR)
Polish (POL)
Portuguese
(POR)
Russian
(RUS)
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Spanish        55     55           54   54     105   105   102   102        93    93        91   91          9   9
(SPA)
Vietnamese
(VIE)




SUB            55     55           54   54     105   105   102   102        93    93        91   91          9   9
TOTALS

Total Number of LEP students                               Total Number of LEP students Served
Identified in the Building in 2008-09    500                  in the Building in 2008-09         380                   (Do
not include long-term LEPs)                                 (Do not include long-term LEPs)      Bilingual       ESL




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
     Number of Teachers and Support Personnel for 2008-09


School Building: _____342_________________________ District ___10_________________

     List the FTEs in your school in the Bilingual Education and ESL Programs in the appropriate
     column.


                                              Number of Teachers
       School Building                           2006-2007                                 Number of
                                                                                         Teaching Assistan
                                                                                                              Sub-
                                          Appropriately           Inappropriately        Paraprofessionals
                                                                                                              Total
                                            Certified*              Certified or
                                                                 Uncertified Teachers
                                                                                                    y
       Building Name                 Bilingual     ESL             Bilingu ESL             BilinguaESL
                                     Program      Program          ProgramProgram                Program
                                                                                           Program
           10X-342                   34                                                                      34




          TOTALS                    34                                                                       Grand
                                                                                                             Total: 34

* The number of teachers reported must represent the number of teachers holding an appropriate license for the subject
area being taught (i.e., language arts and content area.)
    Note: The Office of Bilingual Education and Foreign Language Studies will conduct a random review of the 2006-
2007 teacher reported data. Districts randomly selected will be asked to electronically submit to the Department, the
name of the teacher(s), social security number and type of license or certificate issued by the NYSED.
** Examples of this may include: teachers without an appropriate New York State teaching certificate or New York
City license for the subject area(s) being taught or without a valid NYS teaching certificate or NYC license.
*** Teaching Assistants and Paraprofessionals must be working under the direct supervision of a licensed teacher.
Attach additional sheets if necessary


     UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Include schedules for three different students in the ESL program (one each for Beginning, Intermediate and
Advanced English Proficiency levels based on NYSESLAT/LAB-R). The schedules must account for all
periods. Use attached Freestanding ESL Schedule Template. If your school has a bilingual/Dual Language
program, also provide three sample schedules (one each for Beginning, Intermediate and Advanced English
Proficiency levels based on NYSESLAT/LAB-R). The schedules must reflect ESL, Native Language Art and
content area instruction through use of both languages. Use attached Bilingual Schedule Template.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
SAMPLE STUDENT SCHEDULE 2007-08 (Bilingual)

Bilingual Program Type:       _X__ TBE               ___ Dual Language
Indicate Proficiency Level:   ___ Beginning         ___Intermediate    _X_Advanced

  School District: _____10______________                  School Building:___342________

     Period        Time         Monday          Tuesday         Wednesday       Thursday         Friday
                From: 8:00    ESL             ESL              ESL             ESL             ESL
        1
                To: 8:48

                From: 8:51    ELA             Earth Science    Art             ELA             ELA

        2       To: 9:39

                From: 9:42    Earth Science   Art              Earth Science   Math            Earth Science
        3
                To: 10:30

                From: 10:33   Math            US History       US History      US History      Math
        4
                To: 11:21

                From: 11:24   US History      Math             Math            Earth Science   US History
        5
                To: 12:12

                From: 12:15   Lunch           Lunch            Lunch           Lunch           Lunch
        6
                To: 1:03

                From: 1:06    Physical        Physical         Physical        Physical        Physical
        7                     Education       Education        Education       Education       Education
                To: 1:54

                From: 1:57    Native          US History                       Native          Math
        8                     Language                                         Language
                To: 2:45      Arts                                             Arts

                From: 2:28    Native          Native                           Art             Native
        9                     Language        Language                                         Language
                To: 3:36      Arts            Arts                                             Arts

                From:         Subject         Subject          Subject         Subject         Subject
       10                     (Specify)       (Specify)        (Specify)       (Specify)       (Specify)
                To:
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
SAMPLE STUDENT SCHEDULE 2007-08 (Bilingual)

Bilingual Program Type:       _X__ TBE               ___ Dual Language
Indicate Proficiency Level:   ___ Beginning         __X_Intermediate        ___Advanced

  School District: _____10______________                  School Building:___342________

     Period        Time         Monday          Tuesday         Wednesday       Thursday       Friday
                From: 8:00    Chemistry       Chemistry        Art             Chemistry    Chemistry
        1
                To: 8:48

                From: 8:51    Global          Global           Global          Spanish AP   Spanish AP
                              Studies         Studies          Studies
        2       To: 9:39

                From: 9:42    Lunch           Lunch            Lunch           Lunch        Lunch
        3
                To: 10:30

                From: 10:33   ESL             ESL              ESL             Spanish AP   ESL
        4
                To: 11:21

                From: 11:24   ESL             ESL              Spanish AP      ESL          ESL
        5
                To: 12:12

                From: 12:15   Math B          Math B           Math B          Math B       Math B
        6
                To: 1:03

                From: 1:06    Math B          Spanish AP       Chemistry       Chemistry    Spanish AP
        7
                To: 1:54

                From: 1:57    Art             Art              Lunch           Global       Global
        8                                                                      Studies      Studies
                To: 2:45

                From: 2:28    Physical        Physical         Physical        Physical     Physical
        9                     Education       Education        Education       Education    Education
                To: 3:36

                From:         Subject         Subject          Subject         Subject      Subject
       10                     (Specify)       (Specify)        (Specify)       (Specify)    (Specify)
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                To:


Grade 11

SAMPLE STUDENT SCHEDULE 2007-08 (Bilingual)

Bilingual Program Type:       _X__ TBE              ___ Dual Language
Indicate Proficiency Level:   _X__ Beginning        ___Intermediate      ___Advanced

  School District: _____10______________                 School Building:___342________

     Period        Time         Monday          Tuesday        Wednesday       Thursday          Friday
                From: 8:00    Physical        Physical        Physical        Physical        Physical
        1                     Education       Education       Education       Education       Education
                To: 8:48

                From: 8:51    Native          Art             Earth Science   Global          Art
                              Language                                        Studies
        2       To: 9:39      Arts

                From: 9:42    Math A          Math A          Native          Math A          Global
        3                                                     Language                        Studies
                To: 10:30                                     Arts

                From: 10:33   Lunch           Lunch           Lunch           Lunch           Lunch
        4
                To: 11:21

                From: 11:24   Native          Native          Global          Math A          Native
        5                     Language        Language        Studies                         Language
                To: 12:12     Arts            Arts                                            Arts

                From: 12:15   Earth Science   Native          Earth Science   Earth Science   Earth Science
        6                                     Language
                To: 1:03                      Arts

                From: 1:06    Global          Math A          ESL             Earth Science   Math A
        7                     Studies
                To: 1:54

                From: 1:57    ESL             ESL                             ESL             ESL
        8
                To: 2:45

                From: 2:28    ESL             ESL                             Global          ESL
        9                                                                     Studies
                To: 3:36
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                 From:            Subject          Subject          Subject          Subject          Subject
        10                        (Specify)        (Specify)        (Specify)        (Specify)        (Specify)
                 To:


Grade 11

Part C: For schools that will receive Title III ELL Supplemental Services for 2007-08:

Title III, Part A: Language Instruction for Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students

Form TIII – A (1)(a)

Grade Level(s) 7-12                   Number of Students to be Served: 380           LEP 380        Non-LEP
Number of Teachers           34             Other Staff (Specify)         1 Principal, 2 Assistant Principals, 1 Business
Manager, 1 Payroll Secretary, 1 Pupil Secretary, 1 Parent Coordinator, 2 Guidance Counselor, 1 School Social Worker,
School Aides, 2 Paraprofessional

School Building Instructional Program/Professional Development Overview

Title III, Part A LEP Program

Language Instruction Program – Language instruction education programs funded under Title III, Part A, of
NCLB, must help LEP students attain English proficiency while meeting State academic achievement standards.
They may use both English and the student's native language and may include the participation of English
proficient students (i.e., Two Way Bilingual Education/Dual Language program.) Priority Programs implemented
under Title III, Part A, may not supplant programs required under CR Part 154. These supplemental services should
complement basic bilingual and ESL services required under CR Part 154. Direct supplemental services should be
provided for: before/after-school and Saturday programs, reduced class-size, and/or push-in services. Supplemental
instructional support for dual language programs is also permitted. Teachers providing the services must be
certified bilingual education/ESL teachers. In the space provided below, describe
     school’s language instruction program for                   grade level(s)
     limited English proficient (LEP) students                   language(s) of instruction
     type of program/activities to improve                       rationale for the selection of program/activities
     mathematics, native and/or English language                 times per day/week
     learning                                                    program duration
     number of students to be served                             service provider and qualifications




Professional Development Program – Describe the school’s professional development program for teachers and
other staff responsible for the delivery of instruction and services to limited English proficient students. Explain
how the school will use Title III funds to provide professional development to support ELLs. Describe the target
audience.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Description of Parent and Community Participation–Explain how the school will use Title III funds to increase
parent and community participation ELLs




       Title III, Part A: Language Instruction for Limited
       English Proficient and Immigrant Students                                         Form TIII – A(1)(a)
                               School Year 2007-2008


                                                                                                  The
Region 1                                          CSD: 10                     School Building International
                                                                                                  School for
                                                                                                  Liberal Arts
                                                                                                  -342
                                                                                                  Non-
Grade Level(s)    7-12          Number of Students to be Served: 500             LEP 500          LEP 0
                                                       1 Principal, 2 Assistant Principals, 1 Business
Number of Teachers       34      Other Staff (Specify) Manager, 1 Payroll Secretary, 1 Pupil Secretary, 1
                                                       Parent Coordinator, 2 Guidance Counselor, 1 School
                                                       Social Worker, 6 School Aides, 2 Paraprofessional

    School Building Instructional Program/Professional Development Overview
                          Title III, Part A LEP Program*
                          Language Instruction Program
At ISLA, our goal is to prepare students for college so they can create positive change in
their home and global communities. To achieve these ends we must ensure that our
English language learners excel in their acquisition of the English language, and achieve
in their academic subjects. Title III funds play critical role in our learners achieving their
educational goals successfully. These funds are used as follows:


ELL Saturday Academy-
Grades 8 – 20 Saturdays
Grades 9 & 10 – 20 Saturdays

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Students will have class in the subjects of ELA, NLA, ESL, and Math in these sessions.
Instruction is provided by licensed teachers in each of the content areas.




Professional Development Program
Professional development will provide our teachers with additional tools to ensure that
learner needs are being met. Professional development sessions expose our teachers to
best practices and scientific-based research on strategies for our learners.

Additionally, these sessions will allow our teachers to meet their professional goals (in
relation to their learners).

Professional Development
   • The Schillinger Group – Literacy Consultants
   • City College Mathematics – Math training for middle school and high school
       teachers
   • QTEL – Quality Teaching for English Learners – Training for middle school and
       high school teachers.

*Building providing Title III services to immigrant students must also complete this form
                                for the immigrant program.



Form TIII – A (1)(b)

Title III LEP Program
School Building Budget Summary

Allocation: $58,257
Budget Category                          Budgeted           Explanation of Proposed Expenditure
                                         Amount
Professional staff, per session, per     $31,232            Per session: Period 0, Period 9, Saturday Academy,
diem (Note: schools must account for                        After School Programs
fringe benefits)
Purchased services such as               $20,000            Educational Consultants
curriculum and staff development
contracts
Supplies and materials                                      Spanish and English Novels
Travel                                                      ASCD, NABE
Other
TOTAL                                    $58,257
* $7,025 not scheduled
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                     This entire section must be completed for each budget submitted.

                                                           SECTION XVII
                                                         BUDGET NARRATIVE

School District     10                                 For Title     III
BEDS Code           321000010282

* MUST BE SUBMITTED WITH EACH BUDGET IN THIS DCEP ADDENDUM UPDATE


If Transferability is used for 2007-2008, the Transferability Form must be submitted online and a hard copy must be submitted with the
budget narrative to expedite the review of the FS-10.
Additionally, on the Budget Narrative and FS-10, please indicate the amount of funds to be included under transferability in the budget
categories and the Title where funds will be used. Example: In the Title IIA budget under Code 15 – Transferability - Title I Reading
Teacher – FTE. 35 - $15,000.
                                     This entire section must be completed for each budget submitted.

School District            10                          For Title     III
BEDS Code                          321000010282

Code 80
Employee Benefits
                           NA




Code 90
Indirect Cost
                           NA


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Code 49
BOCES Services
                              NA



Code 20
Equipment
                              NA




Title III, Part A LEP Program

Language Instruction Program – Language instruction education programs funded under Title III, Part A, of NCLB, must help LEP students attain
English proficiency while meeting State academic achievement standards. They may use both English and the student's native language and may
include the participation of English proficient students (i.e., Two Way Bilingual Education/Dual Language program.) Programs implemented under
Title III, Part A, may not supplant programs required under CR Part 154. In the space provided below, describe the school’s language instruction
program for limited English proficient (LEP) students. The description must include: type of program/activities; number of students to be served;
grade level(s); language(s) of instruction; rationale for the selection of program/activities; times per day/week; program duration; and service
provider and qualifications.

The International School for Liberal Arts, also referred to as ISLA, will serves a population of four hundred and ninety-seven students. Our
instructional program funded under Title III will facilitate our English Language Learners to attain English proficiency while meeting State academic
standards. All of our students are English Language Learners, whose native language is Spanish. Currently, At ISLA, our goal is to prepare students
for college so they can create positive changes in their home and global communities. To achieve these ends we must ensure that our English
language learners excel in their acquisition of the English language, and achieve in their academic subjects. Our bilingual students’ are served
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
appropriately in a Transitional Bilingual Education Program. (TBE) Our Transitional Bilingual Program is aligned with NYS guidelines and follows
the New York City Chancellor’s recommendations. In a Transitional Bilingual Program all Beginners level High School English Language Learner
will receive 540 minutes (3 Units) of ESL, Intermediate Level of English will receive the mandated 360 minutes of ESL per week, students at the
Advanced level will receive 180 minutes per week and 1 unit of English Language Arts. In Middle School all Beginner and Intermediate level
students will receive 2 units of ESL, and our advanced students will receive 1 unit of ESL and ELA.

Students programs include language arts and content area instruction in their native language and intensive English as a Second Language. As the
students develop English proficiency based on the NYSESLAT result or the passing of the English Regents exam instruction in English increases and
their native language instruction decreases.




Some of the instructional strategies utilized in the classrooms to increase and support English language acquisitions are as follows; Cooperative
learning groups- Students work in small groups to achieve a common instructional goal. Jigsaw- A cooperative learning strategy in which everyone
becomes an expert and shares his learning, so that eventually all group members know the content. Think-Pair and Share- Differentiation strategy
which students are required to reflect on a topic individually and then pair with another student to discuss, review and revise their ideas to share with
class. Brainstorming- A strategy for eliciting ideas from students. Webbing/Graphic Organizers- Provides a visual picture of how words or
phrases connect to a topic and graphic organizers are utilized as visual representations of abstract concepts and process used to aide students
understanding of the concepts. In addition, teachers embed Shared Reading and Word Study in their instruction to support students in learning a new
language.

Students with Interrupted Formal Education (SIFE) will receive additional support services in achieving grade level literacy levels in their native
language. Students who are identified as SIFE will receive small group instruction in their native language arts. ISLA is committed to our vision of
creating successes throughout our learning community.

We have implement the following after-school programs to avail students the opportunity for additional instructional time to acquire English as a
Second Language and mathematics in a small group setting. In High School students have been provided with the opportunity to acquire regents
credits for graduation.

Professional Development Program – Describe the school’s professional development program for teachers and other staff responsible for the
delivery of instruction and services to limited English proficient students.

Professional Development for all staff members is designed to bring their level of expertise on Ells to an instructional peak. We will form Critical
Friends Groups with teachers in all content area to focus on best practices and looking at students work. In addition, 4 teachers will attend NABE
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
conference and ASCD where they will attend workshops on Ell strategies, importance of native language literacy in the development of second
language literacy, strategies for helping English Language Learners through the writing process and implement successful writing programs for Ells.
Teachers will turnkey to all staff members at ISLA and continue to share and incorporate different strategies to assist the students during their
Critical Friends Group. Teachers will attend the following staff development workshops:

   •     Quality of Teaching for English Language Learners (QTEL)
   •     Teachers will participate in bi-weekly Critical Friends group (CFG) the focus will be on sharing best practices and looking at students work.
   •     The Schillinger Group – Literacy Consultants
   •     City College Mathematics – Math training for middle school and high school teachers
   •     NABE conference
   •     ASCD conference

Form TIII – A (1)(b)

Title III LEP Program
School Building Budget Summary

Allocation:
Budget Category                                 Budgeted             Explanation of Proposed Expenditure
                                                Amount
Professional staff, per session, per diem       31,232.00            After-School Program (ESL, Mathematics, Algebra Regents,
(Note: schools must account for fringe                               Geometry, Calculus, Chemistry Regents, Living Environment and
benefits)                                                            Spanish Regents)
Purchased services such as curriculum and       20,000               Educational Consultants and Presenters.
staff development contracts
Supplies and materials                          3025.00              Spanish and English Novels
Travel                                          4000.00              ASCD, NABE, NACCP
Other
TOTAL                                           58,257.00




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                        APPENDIX 3: LANGUAGE TRANSLATION AND INTERPRETATION

                                         Requirement under Chancellor’s Regulations – for all schools

Goal: To communicate whenever feasible with non-English speaking parents in their home language in order to support shared parent-school
accountability, parent access to information about their children’s educational options, and parents’ capacity to improve their children’s
achievement.

Part A: Needs Assessment Findings

1. Describe the data and methodologies used to assess your school’s written translation and oral interpretation needs to ensure that all parents
   are provided with appropriate and timely information in a language they can understand.

The RPOB report allowed us to see that a large percent of our students come from non-English speaking homes. In addition, all interviews of
new arrival parents are performed by in Spanish by the assistant principals. Our parent coordinator is bilingual and is often used to translate for
parents so they can communicate with non bilingual teachers. It is evident that 50% of the oral communication held at ISLA is handled in
Spanish. It is evident through our report and interviews that there is a need for written translation and oral interpretation services.

2. Summarize the major findings of your school’s written translation and oral interpretation needs. Describe how the findings were reported
   to the school community.

The Oral Interpretation Service will allow teachers and administrators to express crucial information to parents concerning students’ academic
progress, academic standards, available services and programs. At the same time this service grants parents the opportunity to share their
concerns and questions about the school and the education of their children. In addition, because our entire student population is Spanish
speaking, all parent letters and flyers are translated in Spanish for effective communication.


Part B: Strategies and Activities

1. Describe the written translation services the school will provide, and how they will meet identified needs indicated in Part A. Include
   procedures to ensure timely provision of translated documents to parents determined to be in need of language assistance services. Indicate
   whether written translation services will be provided by an outside vendor, or in-house by school staff or parent volunteers.

The International School for Liberal Arts had determined the need for written translation through various sources First , The RPOB report from
the NYC ATS which indicates that 100 percent of our students reside in homes where Spanish is the dominant language. In addition, a total of


     UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
60 new arrival students were registered this year. Their Home Language Surveys reveal that Spanish is the language understood and spoken in
the home. During the registration process, all parents needed to be interviewed in Spanish. This information suggests the need for translated
information so that parents can be informed in their native language about the New York City Educational system, their rights and options as
parents to make informed decision about the education of their children, how to navigate the education system to support their children’s
education, and how they can become involved in their school community. Since a significant percentage of parents are not proficient in
English, It is evident there is a need for all school information, including the principal’s letters, to be translated in Spanish.



2. Describe the oral interpretation services the school will provide, and how they will meet identified needs indicated in Part A. Indicate
   whether oral interpretation services will be provided by an outside contractor, or in-house by school staff or parent volunteers.

The ISLA community considers parent involvement as an important component in enhancing and supporting students. There is a need and
desire to create a respectful communication with parents. This could only be accomplished by informing parents in the language they
understand. The proposed translation services will provide the school and its parents with the means to communicate both through written
documents and oral translations in the language parents understand. The funds for this service will cover the following written translations: the
translation service will be provided by the parent coordinator and teachers.




3. Describe how the school will fulfill Section VII of Chancellor’s Regulations A-663 regarding parental notification requirements for
   translation and interpretation services. Note: The full text of Chancellor’s Regulations A-663 (Translations) is available via the following
   link: http://docs.nycenet.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-151/A-663%20Translation%203-27-06%20.pdf.

Because we are a bilingual school, all parent documents are translated to the native language. (Spanish)




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                          APPENDIX 4: NCLB REQUIREMENTS FOR TITLE I SCHOOLS

                                                 All Title I schools must complete this appendix.

Directions:
- All Title I schools must address requirements in Part A and Part B of this appendix.
- Title I Schoolwide Program (SWP) schools must complete Part C of this appendix.
- Title I Targeted Assistance (TAS) schools must complete Part D of this appendix.


Part A: TITLE I ALLOCATIONS AND SET-ASIDES

1. Enter the anticipated Title I allocation for the school for 2008-2009 $466,874.

2. Enter the anticipated 1% allocation for Title I Parent Involvement Program $4669.

3. Enter the anticipated 5% Title I set-aside to insure that all teachers in core subject areas are highly qualified $23,344.

4. Enter the percentage of High-Quality Teachers teaching in core academic subjects during the 2007-2008 school year 100%

5. If the percentage of high quality teachers during 2007-2008 is less than 100% describe activities and strategies the school is implementing
   in order to insure that the school will have 100% high quality teachers by the end of the coming school year.


Part B: TITLE I SCHOOL PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT POLICY & SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT

1. School Parental Involvement Policy – Attach a copy of the school’s Parent Involvement Policy.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
       SCHOOL INVOLVEMENT & RESPONSIBILITY POLICY
                  International School of Liberal Arts, ISLA
            “It takes a village/community to raise a child”. - African proverb.

We, the school, Parents and Students agree to work cooperatively to provide and obtain a
successful education by mutual undertaking.


                            SCHOOL RESPONSIBILITIES
 • Training parents to enhance the involvement of other parents in planning reviewing,
 and creating activities in order to meet the Title I program guidelines.
 • In order to maximize parental involvement and participation in the education of their
 children. Arranging a variety of times for school meetings, to facilitate everyone’s
 schedules.
 • Adopting and implementing model approaches to improving parental
 involvement, including the provision of transportation or child care when possible
 • Assure that parents may participate in professional activities, i.e., literacy classes and
 workshops as well as:
  •   Parents/Teacher conferences
  •   Children’s progress reports to their parents.
  •   Reasonable access to staff
  •   Opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child’s class
  •   Observation of classroom activities
  •   Access to enrichment programs

  • Hosting a numbers of events and meetings through the year that allow parents to be
  involved directly in school activities and through;

      1. School Leadership Team SLT
      2. Parent Association
      3. Title 1 parent representation
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
 • Providing high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive effective learning
 environment that enables the participating meet the State’s student academic
 achievement standards.
   POLIZA DE PARTICIPACION Y RESPONSABILIDAD ESCOLAR

                Escuela Internacional de Artes Liberales, ISLA
            “Se requiere un pueblo/comunidad para educar un niño”.- Proverbio Africano.


 Nosotros, la escuela, los padres y los estudiantes acordamos trabajar en cooperación para
 proporcionar y para obtener una educación exitosa para el mutuo beneficio.

                       RESPONSABILIDADES DE LA ESCUELA
    • Entrenamiento de los padres para realzar la participación de otros padres en el
      Repaso de planeamientos y creando actividades para satisfacer las pautas del
      programa del título I.
    • Para maximizar la implicación y la participación paténtales en la educación de sus
      niños. Programar una variedad de reuniones de la escuela, en horarios que de
      facilidad al horario de cada uno.
    • Adoptando e implementando modelos que promuevan la participación de los
      padres. Implicación que incluye la disposición del cuidado de niño y del
      transporte en los casos de necesidad.
    • Asegurar que los padres pueden participar en las actividades profesionales, es
      decir, las clases y talleres de la instrucción así como:
           •      Conferencias de padres/maestros
           •      Informes sobre la marcha de los trabajos de los niños a sus padres.
            •     Acceso razonable al personal
            •     Oportunidades de ofrecerse voluntariamente y de participar en la clase
                  de su niño
            •     Observación de las actividades de la sala de clase
            •     Acceso a los programas del enriquecimiento
            •     Asegurar una serie de eventos y reuniones durante el año que permitan
                  que los padres estén implicados directamente en actividades de la
                  escuela y a través de;
           1. Equipo de Liderazgo de la escuela SLT
           2. Asociación
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008 del padres
           3. Representación de los padres del programa de título 1
       • Proporcionar un plan de estudios y de instrucción de alta calidad en un ambiente
B: TITLE I SCHOOL PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT POLICY & SCHOOL-PARENT COMPACT

2. School Parental Involvement Policy – Attach a copy of the school’s Parent Involvement Policy.

Explanation: In support of strengthening student academic achievement, each school that receives Title I, Part A funds must develop jointly
with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parental involvement policy that contains information required
by section 1118(a)(2) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The policy establishes the school’s expectations for parental
involvement and describes how the school will implement a number of specific parental involvement activities. It is strongly recommended
that schools, in consultation with parents, use a sample template as a framework for the information to be included in their parental
involvement policy. The template is available in the eight major languages on the NYCDOE website. Schools, in consultation with parents, are
encouraged to include other relevant and agreed upon activities and actions as well that will support effective parental involvement and
strengthen student academic achievement. The school parent involvement policy must be provided and disseminated in the major languages
spoken by the majority of parents in the school. For additional information, please refer to the 2008-09 Title I Parent Involvement Guidelines
available at the NYCDOE website link provided above.
I


International School for Liberal Arts, and the parents of the students participating in actives, services, and programs funded by Title 1, part
A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) (participating children), agree that this compact outlines how the parents, the entire
school staff, and the students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the means by which the school and
parents will build and develop a partnership that will help children achieve the State’s high standards.

This school-parent compact is in effect during school year 2008-09

3. School-Parent Compact - Attach a copy of the school’s Parent Involvement Policy.

Explanation: Each school receiving funds under Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) must develop a
written school-parent compact jointly with parents for all children participating in Title I, Part A activities, services, and programs. That
compact is part of the school’s written parental involvement policy developed by the school and parents under section 1118(b) of the ESEA.
The compact must outline how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student academic
achievement and the means by which the school and parents will build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the State’s high
standards. It is strongly recommended that schools and parents use the sample template which is available in the eight major languages on the
NYCDOE website as a framework for the information to be included in the compact. Schools and parents, in consultation with students, are
encouraged to include other relevant and agreed upon activities and actions as well that will support effective parental involvement and
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
strengthen student academic achievement. The school-parent compact must be provided and disseminated in the major languages spoken by the
majority of parents in the school. For additional information, please refer to the 2008-09 Title I Parent Involvement Guidelines available at the
NYCDOE website link provided above.


School Responsibilities

International School for Liberal Arts will:

1. Provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables the participating children to
   meet the State’s student academic achievement standards as follow:

2. Hold parent-teacher conferences (at least annually in elementary schools) during which this compact will be discussed as it relates to the
   individual child’s achievement. Specifically. Those conferences will be held:

3. Provide parents with frequent reports on theirs children’s progress. Specially, the school will provide reports as every (6) weeks.

4. Provide parents reasonable access to staff. Specifically, staff will be available for consultation with parents as follows: On a need basics
   teachers professional periods.

5. Provide parents opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child’s class, and to observe classroom act ivies, as follow:

Parent Responsibilities

We, as parents, will support our children’s learning in the following ways:

   •   Monitoring attendance.
   •   Making sure that homework is completed.
   •   Monitoring the amount of television their children watch.
   •   Volunteering in my child’s classroom.
   •   Participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to my children’s education.
   •   Promoting positive use of my child’s extracurricular time.
   •   Stay informed about my child’s education and communicating with the school by promptly reading all notices from school or the school
       district either received by my child or by mail and responding, as appropriate.


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
   •   Serving, to the extent possible. Policy advisory groups, such as being the Title I, Part A parent representative on the school’s School
       Improvement Team, the Title I Policy Advisory Committee, the District wide Policy Advisory Council, the State’s Committee of
       Practitioners, The School Support Team or other advisory or policy groups.

   Optional Additional Provisions

   Student Responsibilities (revise as appropriate to grade level)

We, as students, will share the responsibility to improve our academic achievement and achieve the State’s high standards. Specifically, we
will:

   •   Do my homework every day and ask for help when I need to.
   •   Read at least 30 minutes every day outside of school time.
   •   Give my parents or the adult who is responsible for my welfare all notices and information received by me from school every day.
   •   To strengthen my native language as well and ask for assistance whenever I need it.


Additional Required School Responsibilities (requirements that schools must follow, but optional as to being included in the school-
parent compact)

International School for Liberal Arts will:

   1. Involving parents in the planning, review, and improvement of school’s parental involvement policy, in an organized, ongoing, and
      timely way.
   2. Involve parents in the joint development of any school-wide program plan, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way.
   3. Hold an annual meeting to inform parents to be involved in Title I, part A Programs, and to explain the Title I, Part A requirements, and
      the rights of parents to be involve to be involve in Title I, Part A programs. The school will convene the meeting at a convenient time to
      parents, and will offer a flexible number of additional parent involvement meetings, such as in the morning or evening, so that as many
      parents as possible are able to attend. The school will invite to this meeting all parents of children participating in Title I, Part A
      programs (participating students) and will encourage attend.
   4. Provide information to parents of participating students in an understandable and uniform format, including alternative formats upon
      request of parents with disabilities, and to the extent practicable, in a language that parents can understand.
   5. Provide parents of participating children information in a timely manner about Title I, Part A programs that includes a description and
      explanation of the school curriculum, the forms of academic assessment used to measure children’s progress, and the proficiency levels
      students are expected to meet.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
   6. On the request of parents, provide opportunities for regular meetings for parents to formulate suggestions, and to participate, as
      appropriate, in decisions about the education of their children. The school will respond to any suggestions as soon as possible.
   7. Provide to each parent an individual students report about the performance of their child on the State assessment in at lest math,
      language arts and reading.
   8. Provide each parent timely notice when their child as being assigned or has been taught for four (4) or more consecutive weeks by
      teacher who is not highly qualify within the meaning of term in section 200.56 of the Title I Final Regulations (67 Fed. Reg. 71710,
      December 2, 2002).


Optional School Responsibilities

To help build and develop a partnership with parents to help their children achieve the State’s high academic standards, the International
School for Liberal Arts will:

   1. Recommend to the local education agency (LEA), the names of parents of participating children of Title I, Part A programs who are
      interested in serving on the State’s committee of Practitioners and school Support Teams.
   2. Notify parents of the school’s participation in Early First, Reading First and Even Start Family Literacy Programs operating within the
      school, the district and the contact information.
   3. Work with the LEA in addressing problems, if any, in implementing parental involvement activities in section 1118 of Title I, Part A.
   4. Work with the LEA to ensure that a copy of the SEA’s written complaint procedures for resolving an issue of violation(s) of a Federal
      stature or regulation of Title I, Part A programs is provided to parents of students and to appropriate private school officials or
      representatives.




Explanation: In support of strengthening student academic achievement, each school that receives Title I, Part A funds must develop jointly
with, agree on with, and distribute to, parents of participating children a written parental involvement policy that contains information required
by section 1118(a)(2) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The policy establishes the school’s expectations for parental
involvement and describes how the school will implement a number of specific parental involvement activities. It is strongly recommended
that schools, in consultation with parents, use a sample template as a framework for the information to be included in their parental
involvement policy. The template is available in the eight major languages on the NYCDOE website. Schools, in consultation with parents, are
encouraged to include other relevant and agreed upon activities and actions as well that will support effective parental involvement and
strengthen student academic achievement. The school parent involvement policy must be provided and disseminated in the major languages
spoken by the majority of parents in the school. For additional information, please refer to the 2008-09 Title I Parent Involvement Guidelines
available at the NYCDOE website link provided above.
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
I

International School for Liberal Arts, and the parents of the students participating in actives, services, and programs funded by Title 1, part
A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) (participating children), agree that this compact outlines how the parents, the entire
school staff, and the students will share the responsibility for improved student academic achievement and the means by which the school and
parents will build and develop a partnership that will help children achieve the State’s high standards.

This school-parent compact is in effect during school year 2008-09

4. School-Parent Compact - Attach a copy of the school’s Parent Involvement Policy.

Explanation: Each school receiving funds under Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) must develop a
written school-parent compact jointly with parents for all children participating in Title I, Part A activities, services, and programs. That
compact is part of the school’s written parental involvement policy developed by the school and parents under section 1118(b) of the ESEA.
The compact must outline how parents, the entire school staff, and students will share the responsibility for improved student academic
achievement and the means by which the school and parents will build and develop a partnership to help children achieve the State’s high
standards. It is strongly recommended that schools and parents use the sample template which is available in the eight major languages on the
NYCDOE website as a framework for the information to be included in the compact. Schools and parents, in consultation with students, are
encouraged to include other relevant and agreed upon activities and actions as well that will support effective parental involvement and
strengthen student academic achievement. The school-parent compact must be provided and disseminated in the major languages spoken by the
majority of parents in the school. For additional information, please refer to the 2008-09 Title I Parent Involvement Guidelines available at the
NYCDOE website link provided above.


School Responsibilities

International School for Liberal Arts will:

6. Provide high-quality curriculum and instruction in a supportive and effective learning environment that enables the participating children to
   meet the State’s student academic achievement standards as follow:

7. Hold parent-teacher conferences (at least annually in elementary schools) during which this compact will be discussed as it relates to the
   individual child’s achievement. Specifically. Those conferences will be held:



UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
8. Provide parents with frequent reports on theirs children’s progress. Specially, the school will provide reports as every (6) weeks.

9. Provide parents reasonable access to staff. Specifically, staff will be available for consultation with parents as follows: On a need basics
   teachers professional periods.

10. Provide parents opportunities to volunteer and participate in their child’s class, and to observe classroom act ivies, as follow:

Parent Responsibilities

We, as parents, will support our children’s learning in the following ways:

   •   Monitoring attendance.
   •   Making sure that homework is completed.
   •   Monitoring the amount of television their children watch.
   •   Volunteering in my child’s classroom.
   •   Participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to my children’s education.
   •   Promoting positive use of my child’s extracurricular time.
   •   Stay informed about my child’s education and communicating with the school by promptly reading all notices from school or the school
       district either received by my child or by mail and responding, as appropriate.
   •   Serving, to the extent possible. Policy advisory groups, such as being the Title I, Part A parent representative on the school’s School
       Improvement Team, the Title I Policy Advisory Committee, the District wide Policy Advisory Council, the State’s Committee of
       Practitioners, The School Support Team or other advisory or policy groups.

   Optional Additional Provisions

   Student Responsibilities (revise as appropriate to grade level)

We, as students, will share the responsibility to improve our academic achievement and achieve the State’s high standards. Specifically, we
will:

   •   Do my homework every day and ask for help when I need to.
   •   Read at least 30 minutes every day outside of school time.
   •   Give my parents or the adult who is responsible for my welfare all notices and information received by me from school every day.
   •   To strengthen my native language as well and ask for assistance whenever I need it.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Additional Required School Responsibilities (requirements that schools must follow, but optional as to being included in the school-
parent compact)

International School for Liberal Arts will:

   9. Involving parents in the planning, review, and improvement of school’s parental involvement policy, in an organized, ongoing, and
       timely way.
   10. Involve parents in the joint development of any school-wide program plan, in an organized, ongoing, and timely way.
   11. Hold an annual meeting to inform parents to be involved in Title I, part A Programs, and to explain the Title I, Part A requirements, and
       the rights of parents to be involve to be involve in Title I, Part A programs. The school will convene the meeting at a convenient time to
       parents, and will offer a flexible number of additional parent involvement meetings, such as in the morning or evening, so that as many
       parents as possible are able to attend. The school will invite to this meeting all parents of children participating in Title I, Part A
       programs (participating students) and will encourage attend.
   12. Provide information to parents of participating students in an understandable and uniform format, including alternative formats upon
       request of parents with disabilities, and to the extent practicable, in a language that parents can understand.
   13. Provide parents of participating children information in a timely manner about Title I, Part A programs that includes a description and
       explanation of the school curriculum, the forms of academic assessment used to measure children’s progress, and the proficiency levels
       students are expected to meet.
   14. On the request of parents, provide opportunities for regular meetings for parents to formulate suggestions, and to participate, as
       appropriate, in decisions about the education of their children. The school will respond to any suggestions as soon as possible.
   15. Provide to each parent an individual students report about the performance of their child on the State assessment in at lest math,
       language arts and reading.
   16. Provide each parent timely notice when their child as being assigned or has been taught for four (4) or more consecutive weeks by
       teacher who is not highly qualify within the meaning of term in section 200.56 of the Title I Final Regulations (67 Fed. Reg. 71710,
       December 2, 2002).


Optional School Responsibilities

To help build and develop a partnership with parents to help their children achieve the State’s high academic standards, the International
School for Liberal Arts will:

   5. Recommend to the local education agency (LEA), the names of parents of participating children of Title I, Part A programs who are
      interested in serving on the State’s committee of Practitioners and school Support Teams.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
   6. Notify parents of the school’s participation in Early First, Reading First and Even Start Family Literacy Programs operating within the
      school, the district and the contact information.
   7. Work with the LEA in addressing problems, if any, in implementing parental involvement activities in section 1118 of Title I, Part A.
   8. Work with the LEA to ensure that a copy of the SEA’s written complaint procedures for resolving an issue of violation(s) of a Federal
      stature or regulation of Title I, Part A programs is provided to parents of students and to appropriate private school officials or
      representatives.

Part C: TITLE I SCHOOLWIDE PROGRAM SCHOOLS

Directions: Describe how the school will implement the following components of a Schoolwide Program as required under NCLB. Note: If a
required component is already addressed elsewhere in this plan, you may refer to the page numbers where the response can be found.

1. A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school that is based on information on the performance of children in relation to the State
   academic content and student academic achievement standards.


2. Schoolwide reform strategies that:
      a) Provide opportunities for all children to meet the State's proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement.
      b) Use effective methods and instructional strategies that are based on scientifically-based research that:
            o Increase the amount and quality of learning time, such as extended school year, before- and after-school and summer
                 programs and opportunities.
            o Help provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum.
            o Meet the educational needs of historically underserved populations.
            o Address the needs of all children in the school, but particularly the needs of low academic achieving children and those at
                 risk of not meeting the State academic content standards and are members of the target population of any program that is
                 included in the Schoolwide Program. These programs may include counseling, pupil services, mentoring services, college
                 and career awareness/preparation, and the integration of vocational and technical education programs.
            o Are consistent with and are designed to implement State and local improvement, if any.


3. Instruction by highly qualified staff.

       a. All I teachers at ISLA are 100% certified according to the “highly qualified” definition in the NCLB legislation. This percentage is
          to be maintained by ongoing intensive professional development provided to all teachers.
       b. Rigorous mentoring is embedded in teacher development.
       c. Supervisors conduct both, informal and formal observations as part of their ongoing leadership and evaluation of teachers’ progress.
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
       d. Supervisors articulate their findings to coaches to help guide productive professional development activities.

4. High-quality and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals (and, where appropriate, pupil services
   personnel, parents, and other staff) to enable all children in the Schoolwide Program to meet the State’s student academic standards.


   •   Our school has an extremely effective professional development team. A literacy coach, math coach, principal, assistant principals,
       teacher mentor, lead teacher.
   •   Each teacher has an opportunity to meet with his/her team at least twice a month during common planning, departmental meeting, grade
       level meetings or common prep. meetings.
   •   Our staff development models include: observations, feedback, study groups, intra-visitations, team meetings and on to one meeting
       with supervisors.

5. Strategies to attract high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-need schools.

The aim of the school is to attract the best qualified instructional teachers in our school. This is done through:
     • City wide recruitment fairs.
     • Regional Personnel Office
     • Teach America
     • Teaching Fellows
     • International Fellows
All teachers applying to ISLA are requested a demonstration lesson prior to employment. ISLA maintains an open and transparent professional
development plan that meets the needs of newly hired teachers and the objectives of the school. Our school has established very strong
partnership with various universities such as Lehman College, Mercy College and Fordham University in order to attract students’ teachers.


6. Strategies to increase parental involvement through means such as family literacy services.

ISLA offers monthly workshops on: Life skills, adolescent development, helping children with homework, asthma and other health related
areas. Additional services are provided to parents such as GED, ESL and Technology.

7. Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs, such as Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading First,
   or a State-run preschool program, to local elementary school programs.
N/A


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
8. Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of academic assessments in order to provide information on, and to
   improve, the achievement of individual students and the overall instructional program.

Though our periodic assessment teachers are able to assess to students progress, students are assessed on an ongoing basis and the team of
educators decide when to move the students to more challenging work.



9. Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of the academic achievement
   standards are provided with effective, timely additional assistance. The additional assistance must include measures to ensure that students’
   difficulties are identified on a timely basis and to provide sufficient information on which to base effective assistance.


All struggling students are identified early and through diagnostic assessment and placed in their appropriate classes(SIFE). Students are
assessed every month. Curriculum is adjusted based on their needs. Read 180 is use to work with these students. This program starts from
decoding to fluency in reading.


10. Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services and programs, including programs supported under NCLB, i.e., violence
    prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job
    training.

ISLA provides students with peer mediation, conflict resolution, programs.




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               APPENDIX 7: SCHOOL-LEVEL REFLECTION AND RESPONSE TO SYSTEM-WIDE IMPLICATIONS OF FINDINGS FROM
                       AUDITS OF THE WRITTEN, TESTED, AND TAUGHT CURRICULUM IN ELA AND MATHEMATICS

Background
From 2006 to 2008, the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE) and the New York State Education Department (NYSED)
commissioned an “audit of the written, tested, and taught curriculum” to fulfill an accountability requirement of the No Child Left Behind
(NCLB) Act for districts identified for “corrective action.” The focus of the audit was on the English language arts (ELA) and mathematics
curricula for all students, including students with disabilities (SWDs) and English language learners (ELLs). The audit examined the alignment
of curriculum, instruction, and assessment as well as other key areas—such as professional development and school and district supports—
through multiple lenses of data collection and analysis. The utilized process was a collaborative one, intended not to find fault but to generate
findings in concert with school and district constituency representatives to identify and overcome barriers to student success. As such, the audit
findings are not an end in themselves but will facilitate important conversations at (and between) the central, SSO, and school levels in order to
identify and address potential gaps in ELA and math curriculum and instructional programs and ensure alignment with the state standards and
assessments.

Directions: All schools are expected to reflect on the seven (7) key findings of the “audit of the written, tested, and taught curriculum” outlined
below, and respond to the applicable questions that follow each section.


CURRICULUM AUDIT FINDINGS

KEY FINDING 1: CURRICULUM
Overall: There was limited evidence found to indicate that the ELA and mathematics curricula in use are fully aligned to state standards.
Although New York City is a standards-based system, teachers do not have the tools they need to provide standards-based instruction to all
students at all levels, particularly ELLs. There is a lack of understanding across teachers, schools, and audited districts regarding what students
should understand and be able to do at each level in ELA and mathematics.

1A. English Language Arts

Background
A curriculum that is in alignment will present the content to be taught (as outlined by the state standards), with links to the following: an array
of resources from which teachers may choose in teaching this content; a pacing calendar and/or suggested timeframe for covering the

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
curriculum material; a description of expectations for both the teacher’s role and the student level of cognitive demand to be exhibited; and a
defined set of student outcomes—that is, what the student should know and be able to do as a result of having mastered this curriculum. The
New York State ELA Standards identify seven different areas of reading (decoding, word recognition, print awareness, fluency, background
knowledge and vocabulary, comprehension, and motivation to read) and five different areas of writing (spelling, handwriting, text production,
composition, motivation to write) that are addressed to different degrees across grade levels. Although listening and speaking are addressed
within the New York State ELA Standards, they are not further subdivided into topic areas. A written curriculum missing literacy competencies
or performance indicators at any grade level will impact the alignment of the curriculum to state standards. A written curriculum that does not
address the areas in reading identified by the state standards will also impact vertical and horizontal alignment within and between schools by
creating gaps in the Grades K–12 curriculum. Vertical alignment is defined as the literacy knowledge addressed at a grade level that builds
upon and extends learning from the previous grade level, whereas horizontal alignment refers to agreement between what is taught by teachers
addressing a common subject across a single grade level.

ELA Alignment Issues:

- Gaps in the Written Curriculum. Data show that the written curriculum in use by many schools is not aligned with the state standards in
  terms of the range of topics covered and the depth of understanding required. All reviewed curricula had gaps relative to the New York
  State ELA standards. The fewest gaps were found at Grade 2, but the gaps increased as the grade levels increased. Interviewed staff in a
  number of the schools that were audited reported less consistent and effective curriculum and instruction at the secondary level. These data
  further indicated that curricula were not adequately articulated—less articulated in secondary than elementary schools.

- Curriculum Maps. The curriculum alignment analyses noted that although a number of curriculum maps had been developed, the mapping
  has been done at a topical level only and does not drill down to an expected level of cognitive demand that will indicate to teachers what
  students should know and be able to do at each grade level. These curriculum maps addressed only content topics—not skills to be
  mastered, strategies to be utilized, or student outcomes to be attained.

- Taught Curriculum. The Surveys of Enacted Curriculum (SEC)1 data also show that the taught curriculum is not aligned to the state
  standards. For example, in the reviewed high school-level ELA classes, auditors observed a great disparity between what is taught and the
  depth to which it should be taught. A similar lack of depth can be seen in elementary and middle grades as well (specifically Grades 2, 4, 5,
  and 6) and Grade 8. As one might look at it, the taught ELA curriculum is quite broad but lacks depth in any one area. Although standards
  indicate that instruction should be focused on having students create written products and spoken presentations, SEC data show quite the

1
  To examine whether instruction was aligned to the New York state standards and assessments, teachers in the district completed the Surveys of Enacted Curriculum
(SEC). Based on two decades of research funded by the National Science Foundation, the SEC are designed to facilitate the comparison of enacted (taught) curriculum to
standards (intended) and assessed curriculum (state tests), using teachers’ self-assessments. The data for each teacher consist of more than 500 responses. The
disciplinary topic by cognitive-level matrix is presented in graphic form, which creates a common language for comparison and a common metric to maintain comparison
objectivity.


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
   opposite. There is very little emphasis on speaking and listening and only a moderately higher level of emphasis on writing. Critical reading
   also is supposed to have a much greater depth than is currently occurring in high school English classes.

- ELA Materials. In a number of the audited schools, teachers interviewed indicate that they have sufficient amounts of curriculum materials
  available to them; however, the materials they have are not adequate to meet the needs of all learners, particularly English language
  learners, students with disabilities, and struggling readers. Further, the materials in use are reportedly often not relevant to the students’
  background knowledge, suggesting a need for more age appropriate and culturally relevant books and articles for student use.

- English Language Learners
  Multiple data sources indicate that there is a great deal of variation in the curriculum and instruction that ELL students receive, by grade
  level, by type of ELL program or general education program, and by district. For example, some of the best instruction observed by site
  visitors was found in ELL program classrooms at the elementary level, which contrasted sharply with the generally lower quality of ELL
  program instruction at the secondary level. The auditors found that planning for ELL education at the city and even district levels did not
  percolate down to the school and teacher levels. Consequently, planning for ELL education in the audited schools generally occurred at the
  level of individual teachers or ELL program staff, contributing to the variations in curriculum and instruction observed across ELL and
  general education programs. Further, there is a general lack of awareness of the New York State Learning Standards for ESL.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 1A:

1A.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.
Given the fact of our community services are devoted entirely to ELLs, it is the responsibility of the community to appropriately design
curriculum and assessment that reflect the differentiated levels and intense rigor of instruction all students deserve.

1A.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

        Applicable      Not Applicable

1A.3: Based on your response to Question 1A.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?

Though 1 out of every 4 children in NYC is an English Language Learner, we have yet to develop rigorous curriculum in the upper grades that
are academically compatible to the rigor of the monolingual student.


1A.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.
UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Additional support is always welcomed and would be a supportive instrument in this process.



1B. Mathematics

Background
New York State assessments measure conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and problem solving. In the New York State Learning
Standard for Mathematics, these are represented as process strands and content strands. These strands help to define what students should
know and be able to do as a result of their engagement in the study of mathematics. The critical nature of the process strands in the teaching
and learning of mathematics has been identified in the New York State Learning Standard for Mathematics, revised by NYS Board of Regents
on March 15, 2005: The process strands (Problem Solving, Reasoning and Proof, Communication, Connections, and Representation) highlight
ways of acquiring and using content knowledge. These process strands help to give meaning to mathematics and help students to see
mathematics as a discipline rather than a set of isolated skills. Student engagement in mathematical content is accomplished through these
process strands. Students will gain a better understanding of mathematics and have longer retention of mathematical knowledge as they solve
problems, reason mathematically, prove mathematical relationships, participate in mathematical discourse, make mathematical connections,
and model and represent mathematical ideas in a variety of ways. (University of the State of New York & New York State Education
Department, 2005, p. 2) When curriculum guides lack precise reference to the indicators for the process strands, then explicit alignment of the
curriculum to the process strands is left to the interpretation of the individual classroom teacher.

Specific Math Alignment Issues:

- A review of key district documents for mathematics shows substantial evidence that the primary mathematics instructional materials for
  Grades K–8 (Everyday Mathematics [K–5] and Impact Mathematics [6–8]) are aligned with the New York state content strands except for
  some gaps that appear at the middle school level in the areas of measurement and geometry and number sense and operations. The
  instructional materials that were available at the high school level during the time of the audits (New York City Math A and B [8–12]) were
  aligned with the 1999 standards but not with the newer 2005 standards. Furthermore, these documents show that there is a very weak
  alignment to the New York state process strands for mathematics at all grade levels.

- The SEC data for mathematics curriculum alignment (similar to Key Finding 1A for ELA), shows that there is a lack of depth in what is
  being taught in the mathematics classroom as compared to what is required by the state standards.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 1B:

1B.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
    The school identified these math issues back in 2005 and planned accordingly by acquiring supplemental materials in order to
close the gap that existed in the Impact Mathematics Curriculum.

1B.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

        Applicable       Not Applicable

1B.3: Based on your response to Question 1B.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?
-Our school made significant gains in mathematics in the Middle School grades.
- Teachers developed a strong viable curriculum that covers all the gaps that are absent in Impact Mathematics.

1B.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.




KEY FINDING 2: INSTRUCTION
Overall: Multiple data sources indicate that direct instruction and individual seatwork are the predominant instructional strategies used by
teachers in audited districts; there is indication of limited use of best practices and research-based practices, including differentiated instruction.
A number of schools in audited districts further evidenced a lack of student engagement in classrooms, particularly at the secondary level.
These data also show that there is an intention to use research-based and best practices; yet according to the interviews, SEC, and classroom
observations, there is limited evidence of implementation and monitoring of such practices. Interview data indicate that in audited districts,
teachers indicate a need for more support focused on differentiation of instruction for all learners.

2A – ELA Instruction
Classroom observations in audited schools show that direct instruction was the dominant instructional orientation for ELA instruction in almost
62 percent of K–8 classrooms. (In direct instruction, the teacher may use lecture- or questioning-type format. It includes instances when the
teacher explains a concept, reads to students, or guides students in practicing a concept.) Direct instruction also was observed either frequently
or extensively in approximately 54 percent of the high school ELA classrooms visited. On a positive note, high academically focused class time
(an estimate of the time spent engaged in educationally relevant activities) was observed frequently or extensively in more than 85 percent of
K–8 classrooms visited, though this number fell slightly to just over 75 percent of classrooms at the high school level. Student engagement in
ELA classes also was observed to be high – observed frequently or extensively 71 percent of the time in Grades K–8, but this percentage
shrank to 49 percent at the high school level. Finally, independent seatwork (students working on self-paced worksheets or individual

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
assignments) was observed frequently or extensively in approximately 32 percent of the K–8 ELA classrooms visited and just over 34 percent
of classrooms in high school.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 2A:

2A.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.

This finding is irrelevant to our schools’ findings.
2A.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

         Applicable          Not Applicable

2A.3: Based on your response to Question 2A.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?


2A.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.



2B – Mathematics Instruction
Auditors noted that although high academically focused class time was observed either frequently or extensively in 80 percent of K–8
mathematics classes, it was observed at this level only in 45 percent of the high school mathematics classes. Further, a high level of student
engagement was observed either frequently or extensively in 52 percent of Grades K–8 and 35 percent of Grades 9–12 mathematics
classrooms. School Observation Protocol (SOM2) and SEC results also shed light on some of the instructional practices in the mathematics
classroom. The SOM noted that direct instruction in K-8 mathematics classes was frequently or extensively seen 75 percent of the time in
Grades K–8 (and 65 percent of the time in Grades 9–12). Student activities other than independent seatwork and hands-on learning in the
elementary grades were rarely if ever observed. Technology use in mathematics classes also was very low.


2
  To examine instruction in the classrooms, the School Observation Measure (SOM) was used to capture classroom observation data for the district audit. The SOM was
developed by the Center for Research in Educational Policy at the University of Memphis. The SOM groups 24 research based classroom strategies into six categories: (1)
instructional orientation, (2) classroom organization, (3) instructional strategies, (4) student activities, (5) technology use, and (6) assessment. Two to seven key classroom
strategies are identified within each category for a total of 24 strategies that observers look for in the classroom. These 24 strategies were selected to address national
teaching standards.


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 2B:

2B.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.
- There has been a systematic implementation of inter-visitations throughout every content area.
- Professional Development in the use of technology has been provided to most teachers.
- Students are assigned advisors in 11th and 12th grade in order to differentiate and ensure that they meet their academic goals.

2B.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

        Applicable       Not Applicable

2B.3: Based on your response to Question 2B.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?
- Every math Teacher systematically visits other classrooms and debriefs with the teacher observed.
- Technology is used in 100% of the Math Classrooms and in every lesson.
- As noted by our QR, there is a high level of engagement in our math classes.

2B.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.



KEY FINDING 3: TEACHER EXPERIENCE AND STABILITY
In a number of audited schools, respondents stated that teacher turnover was high, with schools accommodating a relatively high percentage of
new and transfer teachers each year.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 3:

3.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.

Please see answer to question 3.3


3.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
        Applicable x     Not Applicable

3.3: Based on your response to Question 3.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?

Our teacher retention rate is 90%.


3.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.


KEY FINDING 4: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT—ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS
Interview data (from classroom teachers and principals) indicate that professional development opportunities regarding curriculum, instruction,
and monitoring progress for ELLs are being offered by the districts, however, they are not reaching a large audience. Many teachers
interviewed did not believe such professional development was available to them. A number of district administrators interviewed mentioned
the presence of QTEL (Quality Teaching for English Learners) training, but few classroom teachers seemed aware of this program. Although
city, district and some school-based policies (e.g., Language Allocation Policy) and plans for ELL instruction do exist, rarely were they
effectively communicated to teachers through professional development and other avenues.




Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 4:

4.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.

 Since we are an ELL community, we must offer professional development that solely caters to the growth and progress of our students and
teachers.
4.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

        Applicable      Not Applicable

4.3: Based on your response to Question 4.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?

UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
4.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.




KEY FINDING 5: DATA USE AND MONITORING—ELL INSTRUCTION
Data from district and teacher interviews indicate that there is very little specific monitoring of ELLs’ academic progress or English language
development. Testing data, where they do exist (for example, the NYSESLAT yearly scores) either are not reported to all teachers involved in
instructing ELLs or are not provided in a timely manner useful for informing instruction. If and when testing data are provided, the data are not
disaggregated by proficiency level of ELL student, students’ time in the United States, or type of program in which the ELL is enrolled (i.e.,
ESL, TBE, Dual Language, or general education).

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 5:

5.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.
We have developed our own interim assessments to address this issue.

5.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

        Applicable       Not Applicable

5.3: Based on your response to Question 5.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?

Quite often one has to find other avenues to measure success. We were not satisfied with the turn around time for analyzing results at the city
and state level; we created, designed and analyzed data in house.

5.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
KEY FINDING 6: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT—SPECIAL EDUCATION
While the DOE and individual schools have made a substantial investment in professional development for special and general education
teachers, classroom observations, IEP reviews, and interviews indicate that many general education teachers, special education teachers, and
school administrators do not yet have sufficient understanding of or capacity to fully implement the range and types of instructional approaches
that will help to increase access to the general education curriculum and improve student performance. Further, many general education
teachers remain unfamiliar with the content of the IEPs of their students with disabilities, have a lack of familiarity with accommodations and
modifications that would help support the students with disabilities in their classrooms, and are not knowledgeable regarding behavioral
support plans for these students.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 6:

6.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.
 We have scheduled training for all teachers to receive information on how to educate students who are labeled as Special Education. We
realize some teachers have no experience in the field of special education, therefore it is important to make sure all teachers are aware of the
needs of each individual student in the community who has an IEP.


6.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

    x    Applicable       Not Applicable

6.3: Based on your response to Question 6.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?
We need further information and training on how to best support students who need to be served in bilingual education and special education.


6.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.

ISLA is in the process of receiving additional support from the ISC.



KEY FINDING 7: INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAMS (IEPS FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES)


UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
Although IEPs clearly specify testing accommodations and/or modifications for students with disabilities, they do not consistently specify
accommodations and/or modifications for the classroom environment (including instruction). Further, there appears to be lack of alignment
between the goals, objectives, and modified promotion criteria that are included in student IEPs and the content on which these students are
assessed on grade-level state tests. Finally, IEPs do not regularly include behavioral plans—including behavioral goals and objectives—even
for students with documented behavioral issues and concerns.

Please respond to the following questions for Key Finding 7:

7.1: Describe the process your school has or will engage in to assess whether this finding is relevant to your school’s educational program.


7.2: Indicate your determination of whether this finding is, or is not, applicable to your school.

        Applicable x      Not Applicable

7.3: Based on your response to Question 7.2, what evidence supports (or dispels) the relevance of this finding to your school’s educational
program?

Our students who have IEPs are serviced to address academic, social, and emotional issues they may have in our community. We operate on an
inclusion model to ensure all students are served, and all students adapt to a differentiated environment.


7.4: If the finding is applicable, how will your school address the relevant issue(s)? Indicate whether your school will need additional support
from central to address this issue.




UPDATED – OCTOBER 2008
                                        CEP Appendix 8: Contracts for Excellence
  This electronic version of the CEP Appendix 8 allows you to submit details about your proposed 2008-09 Contracts for Excellence
                                          spending within the six eligible program areas.

   1. This form must describe your preliminary plans to use the total amount of funds allocated to your school in the Contracts for
                  Excellence allocation category in Galaxy. If you do not know this amount, please refer to Galaxy.

          2. The sum of the allocations you list in each program area must match the total amount allocated to you in Galaxy.

  3. Please provide all of the information requested for each of the program strategies to which you've allocated funds, as per SED
                                                            requirements.

                                           This survey must be completed by Tuesday July 15 at 6pm.
                                                                 Thank you!



Submit date: Jul 16, 2008               Email address: KMaldon2@schools.nyc.gov
   Please provide the following information about your school. You must complete all of the fields on this page in order for your
   survey to be valid.
 School DBN                                                 10x342
 School Name                                                International School for Liberal Arts
 Total Amount of "Contracts for Excellence" Allocation in
                                                            $ 203,007
 Galaxy
 Principal Name                                             Karen Maldonado
 Principal Email                                            kmaldon2@schools.nyc.gov
 Principal Phone                                            7183298570



   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding to reduce class size?

  j
  k
  l
  m
  n Yes
  i
  l
  m
  n No
  j
  k
  How much do you plan to allocate for each of the following program strategies?
Creation of additional classrooms                       $ 95,317
Reducing teacher-student ratio through team teaching
strategies


  Does your school plan to allocate FY09 funding to reduce class size via the creation of additional classrooms?

j
k
l
m
n Yes
i
l
m
n No
j
k


  What grade(s), subject(s), and/or special populations are being targeted using C4E resources in school year 2008-09? How many
  new classrooms/class sections will be created for school year 2008-09?

  * If you plan to use C4E funds to target more than one grade, please fill out one row per grade.

  For example:

  C4E Target #1: 6 - ELA - ELLs - 25 - 1 -24
  C4E Target #2: 8 - Math - Students with Disabilities - 26 - 1 -25

  * If you plan to target more than one special population in a single grade, please fill out a seperate row for each subgroup.

  For example:

  C4E Target #1: 6 - ELA - ELLs - 25 - 1 -24
  C4E Target #2: 6 - ELA- Students with Disabilities - 25 - 1 -24

  * If you plan to target more than one subject area in a single grade, please fill out a seperate row for each subject area.

  For example:

  C4E Target #1: 6 - ELA - ELLs - 25 - 1 -24
  C4E Target #2: 6 - Math - ELLs - 25 - 1 -24
                                                                                                               # New         Projected
                                                                   Targeted    Targeted     Average Class   Classrooms /   Average Class
                                                  Targeted Grade    Subject   Population    Size 2007-08    New Sections   Size 2008-09
                                                                               English
C4E Target #1                                          10           Other     Language          29.0             1              25
                                                                              Learners
                                                                               English
C4E Target #2                                          11           Other     Language          29.0             1              25
                                                                              Learners
                                                                               English
C4E Target #3                                          12           Other     Language          31.0             1              25
                                                                              Learners
C4E Target #4
C4E Target #5
C4E Target #6


  Does your school plan to allocate FY09 funding to reduce class size by reducing teacher-student ratios in existing classrooms
  (e.g., team teaching models, creation of additional CTT classes, etc.)?

k
l
m
n Yes
j
k
l
m
n No
i
j


  Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding to increase student time on task?

j
k
l
m
n Yes
i
l
m
n No
j
k


  How much do you plan to allocate for each of the following program strategies?
Before- and After-School Programs                          $ 52,217
Summer School Programs                                     $ 2,052
Dedicated Instructional Time
Individualized Tutoring                                    $ 49,682



  Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding to support new or expanded before- or after-school programs?

k
l
m
n Yes
i
j
k
l
m
n No
j


  Please describe the program.
The focus will be on strengthen second language skills in ESL before school and after school programs.



  Please indicate the student population(s) you intend to target via this initiative.

c
d
e
f
g English Language Learners
b
e
f
g Students with Disabilities
c
d
d
e
f
g Students in Poverty
c
d
e
f
g Students with Low Academic Achievement / at Risk of Not Graduating
b
c
   Is the program described above a first-time implementation of the program/strategy, or an expansion of an existing
   program/strategy?

j
k
l
m
n New implementation
i
l
m
n Program Expansion
j
k


   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for new or expanded summer school programs?

j
k
l
m
n Yes
i
l
m
n No
j
k


   Please describe the program.
The focus is on regents tutoring and strengthening content area skills through the use of ESL strategies



   Please indicate the student population(s) you intend to target via this initiative.

d
e
f
g English Language Learners
b
c
d
e
f
g Students with Disabilities
c
e
f
g Students in Poverty
c
d
c
d
e
f
g Students with Low Academic Achievement / at Risk of Not Graduating
b


   Is the program described above a first-time implementation of the program/strategy, or an expansion of an existing
   program/strategy?

k
l
m
n New implementation
j
k
l
m
n Program Expansion
i
j


   Please indicate how the program/strategy will be expanded for school year 2008-09 (e.g., additional summer program offerings,
   increase in the number of students served, etc.).
Increasing the nunber of students, while increasing the number of courses offered



   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for new or expanded efforts to increase dedicated instructional time (e.g.,
   instructional blocks for core academic subjects, additional instructional periods for areas of greatest student need, Response to
   Intervention (RTI) and/or intensive individual intervention, etc.)?
k
l
m
n Yes
i
j
k
l
m
n No
j


   Please describe the program.
Students in the high school will be given an extra period of ESL to strengthen writing skills.



   Please indicate the student population(s) you intend to target via this initiative.

c
d
e
f
g English Language Learners
b
e
f
g Students with Disabilities
c
d
d
e
f
g Students in Poverty
c
d
e
f
g Students with Low Academic Achievement / at Risk of Not Graduating
b
c


   Is the program described above a first-time implementation of the program/strategy, or an expansion of an existing
   program/strategy?

j
k
l
m
n New implementation
i
l
m
n Program Expansion
j
k


   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for new or expanded efforts to offer individualized tutoring (provided by highly
   qualified staff as a supplement to general curriculum instruction and targeted to students not meeting State standards)?

j
k
l
m
n Yes
i
l
m
n No
j
k


   Please describe the program.
Students in the lowest academic achievement category will receive non-voluntary tutoring to increase their level of performance in English and other
content areas.



   Please indicate the student population(s) you intend to target via this initiative.

d
e
f
g English Language Learners
b
c
d
e
f
g Students with Disabilities
c
e
f
g Students in Poverty
c
d
e
f
g Students with Low Academic Achievement / at Risk of Not Graduating
c
d


   Is the program described above a first-time implementation of the program/strategy, or an expansion of an existing
   program/strategy?

l
m
n New implementation
j
k
j
k
l
m
n Program Expansion
i


   Please indicate how the program/strategy will be expanded for school year 2008-09.
More students will be able to attend the program than in the 07-08 school year



   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for teacher and principal quality initiatives?

k
l
m
n Yes
j
k
l
m
n No
i
j


   Does your school plan to use FY09 C4E funding for middle and high school restructuring efforts?

k
l
m
n Yes
j
k
l
m
n No
i
j


   Does your school plan to allocate FY09 funding to implement a new full-day pre-kindergarten program, or to expand an existing
   pre-kindergarten program at the school?

l
m
n Yes
j
k
j
k
l
m
n No
i


   Does your school plan to allocate FY09 funding to expand and/or replicate a model instructional program for English Language
   Learners (ELLs)?

k
l
m
n Yes
i
j
k
l
m
n No
j


   How much do you plan to allocate for this program?
Model Programs for ELLs                                      $ 3,738
     Please describe the program.
  The funding will increase the resources available to students and teachers.



     Is the program described above a first-time implementation of the program/strategy, or an expansion of an existing
     program/strategy?

  k
  l
  m
  n New implementation
  j
  j
  k
  l
  m
  n Program Expansion
  i


     Please indicate how the program/strategy will be expanded for school year 2008-09.
  The overall goal is to increase the performance of English acquisition.




CEP Appendix 8: Contracts for Excellence

								
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