International Human Rights Day by ijk77032

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 2

									December 6, 2005 


International Human Rights Day 


I’m Gayla Wick, First Vice President of the Union of Northern Workers and a member of the 
Public Service Alliance of Canada. 
                 th 
On December 10  1948 the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. 
They said that the equal rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, 
justice and peace in the world. 

They then laid out 30 Articles that they urged humanity to learn, adopt and uphold. 

All 30 of those articles are worthy but today I will point out Articles 23 to 25 as being the closest 
to my heart. They have to do with work. 

Articles 23 to 25 say: 

Everyone has the right to work, to free choice of employment, to just and favourable conditions 
of work and to protection against unemployment. 

Everyone has the right to equal pay for equal work. 

Everyone has the right to just and favourable pay. 

Everyone has the right to form and join trade unions. 

Everyone has the right to rest, including reasonable working hours and holidays with pay. 

Everyone has the right to a decent standard of living and to security in the event of 
unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, and old age. 

All of those certainly sound like the kinds of rights unions have been seeking for workers over the 
years. 

In fact, some of those are the basis of our most recent negotiations at the bargaining table. 
And I wish to remind you that the UN’s declaration was drawn up back in 1948 nearly 60 years 
ago. Today, in Canada, even here in the north, we are still trying to achieve some of those rights 
for our members. 

The Union of Northern Workers is still dealing with the last of its Pay Equity Complaint against 
the GNWT. Equal Pay for work of Equal Value.



                                              Page 1 of 2 
That complaint was heard by the Canadian Human Rights Commission in Ottawa because the 
Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the Northwest Territories had no Human Rights Legislation. 

After 11 years of court hearings that complaint was finally settled. 

I was one of the people who received back pay that was owed to me for 10 years.  My Union 
fought for my right to equal pay for equal work. 

My Union spent millions of dollars fighting for my Human Rights and those of my Union 
Brothers and sisters. 

I proudly celebrated my Union’s victory and the upholding of my rights. 

Shortly after our victory, a series of meetings were held around the north with input from various 
groups, the NWT Status of Women, the Northern Territories Federation of Labour, PSAC and 
the UNW on a proposed Human Rights Act for the NWT. 

It took some time and a great deal of discussion and lobbying, but on October 30th, 2002 the 
Northwest Territories Legislative Assembly passed the NWT Human Rights Act. 

By taking the GNWT before the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal over discrimination based on 
gender, the UNW played a large part in getting a Human Rights Act that protects the rights of all 
northerners. 

I am rightfully proud of my union and the part we played in helping northerners get their own 
Human Rights Act.  This is an asset that protects all of the people of the NWT. 

Today is a day of celebration; the NWT Human Rights Commission is actively celebrating and 
promoting Human Rights in our Territory. 

I ask you to share with me in honouring the principles of the United Nation’s Universal 
Declaration of Human Rights. So that we can achieve a harmonious society, that protects the 
equal rights and dignity of all of its members. 

Human rights, we all have them, they protect us and we need to uphold them for everyone.




                                              Page 2 of 2 

								
To top