Interaction Design Examples by Scott Lambridis

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					   Scott Lambridis ● scott@omnibucket.com ● 510-735-5885 ● 2125 Woolsey St Berkeley CA 94705




                        Interaction Design Examples by Scott Lambridis


       The interactive design process requires absolute sensitivity to user needs. I have created
two examples of the interactive design process in order to show my ability to identify and solve
design problems, describe my design and tell you why it’s good, understand the people for whom
I am designing, and show my ability to excel at both conceptual and detailed design. For this
exercise I have used the following two fictional challenges:

       I.        Redesign how the ATM interacts with users in order to create a better user
                 experience for customers which will drive them from the expensive bank
                 window tellers to the automated machines.

       II.       Redesign the way users create and format tables in Microsoft Word to improve
                 the user’s experience with this feature.



I. ATM Redesign

        Let’s look at our prototypical user, Mary. Mary loves spending time with her dog Jake.
She wants to know that if he got into a scuffle with that German Shephard at the dog park, that
she’d be able to access all her money immediately to pay for any emergency medical procedures.
She wants to know that when her friends pay her office reimburses her that she can withdraw it
immediately. She wants to know that when she’s talking to that cute bartender at the bar around
the corner that she comes across as witty, and not distracted by things like forgetting her ATM
card in the ATM, or worrying if that deposit actually went through since she never got a receipt.
And if she ends up going out with him when his shift ends, after she’s had quite a few, she wants
to know that she won’t be getting splashed by the rain, struggling to reach the ATMs keypad, or
blinded by the sun. If, on the other hand, she ends up going home alone, she wants to feel safe
that she won’t be mugged at the ATM, and that even if she’s tipsy and distracted, that no one can
see over her shoulder. And last Thursday, when her high school friend was in town and they
were chatting it up she totally didn’t realize the ATM was out of service until she tried to put her
card in.

        If Mary was to use an ATM more frequently, she must be able to move fluidly between
all accounts and dollars with a minimum of restrictions, while making her feel safe from external
factors and internal bank errors. Someone at her bank finally clued into this, and built a new
AUTOMATED BANKING PLUS (or ABP) machine. Sans the nomenclative redundancy, the
ABP machine is a one-stop shop for Mary which adopts the ease of use of her favorite online
ING Direct online banking systerm, with the security of her local bank teller.

       Here’s how Mary interacts with it:




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                                                                               Interaction Design examples
                                                                                         by Scott Lambridis




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Scott Lambridis ● scott@omnibucket.com ● 510-735-5885 ● 2125 Woolsey St. Berkeley CA ● www.slambridis.com
                                                                               Interaction Design examples
                                                                                         by Scott Lambridis




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Scott Lambridis ● scott@omnibucket.com ● 510-735-5885 ● 2125 Woolsey St. Berkeley CA ● www.slambridis.com
                                                                               Interaction Design examples
                                                                                         by Scott Lambridis




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Scott Lambridis ● scott@omnibucket.com ● 510-735-5885 ● 2125 Woolsey St. Berkeley CA ● www.slambridis.com
                                                                               Interaction Design examples
                                                                                         by Scott Lambridis
II. Microsoft Word Tables

        Let’s take our prototypical user Mary again. Mary wants to be well-liked by her boss and
co-workers. Mary’s work piles up quickly. She wants to get it done efficiently so that she looks
good to her boss and so she doesn’t become stressed and irritable around her co-workers. And if
she gets the most important work done fast, she can do some online shopping for dog Jake’s
Halloween costume. She thinks the Chihuahua/Jack Russell mix would look great with bat wings
to match his ears, but she hasn’t had time to shop around for one because:

           1. Every time she has to navigate through ungainly menus, she loses her spot on the
              page.
           2. She wastes time with too many clicks and options in numerous popups.
           3. She never gets the table she wants through Word’s autoformatting and defaults,
              and
           4. Then adjusting the tables never works as well as Excel.

       For Mary to have a more pleasurable user experience with Word tables, they must
balance easy non-interruptive insertion with intuitive customization not unlike Excel tables. She
would love if Word had On-The-Page Tables, easy-to-use tables which let you insert them as if
you were drawing a box, and tweak them as intuitively as Excel.

       Here’s how Mary interacts with them:




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Scott Lambridis ● scott@omnibucket.com ● 510-735-5885 ● 2125 Woolsey St. Berkeley CA ● www.slambridis.com
                                                                               Interaction Design examples
                                                                                         by Scott Lambridis




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Scott Lambridis ● scott@omnibucket.com ● 510-735-5885 ● 2125 Woolsey St. Berkeley CA ● www.slambridis.com
                                                                               Interaction Design examples
                                                                                         by Scott Lambridis




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Scott Lambridis ● scott@omnibucket.com ● 510-735-5885 ● 2125 Woolsey St. Berkeley CA ● www.slambridis.com