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					CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95




                                 CANRI . . . the power of shared information




     CANRI DIY — Do It Yourself Manual
            How to participate in CANRI's information-sharing framework




                                                  v0.95 (beta)

                                   www.canri.nsw.gov.au/diy




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http://www.canri.nsw.gov.au – canri@canri.nsw.gov.au – Phone: +612 9895 7808 – PO Box 3720 Parramatta NSW 2124 Australia
CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                                                               v0.95


                             CANRI DIY — Do It Yourself:
                            Main Documentation v0.95 (beta)
About this Document
      Last revised:        2010-07-28
     Authorised by:        CANRI DIY Steering Committee
         More Info:        More Info: Document custodian - CANRI Business Development Manager Ph 612 9895 7808
                           canri@canri.nsw.gov.au
        Reference:         This document was prepared as the Main Documentation component of the CANRI DIY (Project
                           #04: www.canri.nsw.gov.au/activities/projects/2001/plan/diy_manual_plan.html).
         Copyright:        This document is provided on a fair use basis. Any re-use or republication of the content herein
                           must acknowledge the source of the material cited.
           Warning:        Information contained in this doc is accurate to the best knowledge of the authors. Users should
                           make themselves familiar with the material and consider risk factors before proceeding with actions
                           that could result in a loss of valuable resources.
    Change history:         V0.95        2002-06-24           Released beta DIY for CANRI community review



Arrangement
1       About the Do-It-Yourself Manual ......................................................................................................... 5
        1.1   Who should read this document .................................................................................................. 5
        1.2   Summary of References .............................................................................................................. 6
        1.3   Distribution package .................................................................................................................... 6
        1.4   Glossary ....................................................................................................................................... 6
        1.5   Further reading ............................................................................................................................ 7
        1.6   Current CANRI Contacts ............................................................................................................. 7
2       CANRI at a Glance ................................................................................................................................. 8
        2.1  Why CANRI?................................................................................................................................ 8
        2.2  Who benefits from CANRI? ......................................................................................................... 8
        2.3  What does it cost to be involved with CANRI? ............................................................................ 9
        2.4  Where can I get advice? ............................................................................................................ 11
        2.5  Are there security risks? ............................................................................................................ 11
        2.6  Who is supporting CANRI? ........................................................................................................ 12
        2.7  Which standards does CANRI support? .................................................................................... 12
3       Getting started with CANRI ................................................................................................................ 16
        3.1    End-to-end: 4 Steps for information sharing .............................................................................. 16
        3.2    Completing the picture: CANRI's role ........................................................................................ 18
        3.3    Case studies: CANRI in the real world ...................................................................................... 19
        3.4    Participation summary: options and opportunities ..................................................................... 21
        3.5    Funding your CANRI-compliant project ..................................................................................... 21
4       Answer Finder ..................................................................................................................................... 22
5       CANRI from a Technical Perspective ................................................................................................ 24
        5.1  Framework architecture ............................................................................................................. 24
        5.2  Functional model ....................................................................................................................... 25
        5.3  OGC Architecture ...................................................................................................................... 25
        5.4  CANRI deployment .................................................................................................................... 26
        5.5  Web Map Server ........................................................................................................................ 26



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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                                                                v0.95

       5.6       Web Feature Server .................................................................................................................. 28
       5.7       Gazetteer ................................................................................................................................... 28
       5.8       CANRI Catalog .......................................................................................................................... 29
       5.9       Natural Resources Data Directory (NRDD) ............................................................................... 29
       5.10      Natural Resources Atlas (NRA) ................................................................................................. 30
6      Applications: Solutions for your end-users ..................................................................................... 31
       6.1   Suggested steps in solution design ........................................................................................... 31
       6.2   Making use of existing data ....................................................................................................... 32
       6.3   Making use of existing applications ........................................................................................... 33
       6.4   Application development: Roll-your-own ................................................................................... 34
       6.5   GeoTools ................................................................................................................................... 35
       6.6   MapBroker ................................................................................................................................. 35
       6.7   WebMap Composer (WMC) ...................................................................................................... 36
7      Managing Metadata ............................................................................................................................. 37
       7.1  Overview: the role of metadata in CANRI .................................................................................. 37
       7.2  MET Online: Metadata Management for the NRDD .................................................................. 38
       7.3  MEM: Metadata Extension Manager for Web services ............................................................. 41
       7.4  Testing and troubleshooting ...................................................................................................... 44
8      Guide to Data Serving ......................................................................................................................... 45
       8.1   Quick start .................................................................................................................................. 46
       8.2   Evaluating your options ............................................................................................................. 47
       8.3   Organising your Data ................................................................................................................. 47
       8.4   ArcIMS / WMS and WFS Connectors ........................................................................................ 49
       8.5   Autodesk MapGuide .................................................................................................................. 51
       8.6   CubeSERV................................................................................................................................. 51
       8.7   DSLite ........................................................................................................................................ 52
       8.8   Exposure Image / Spatial Server ............................................................................................... 52
       8.9   GenaMap / GenaWorld .............................................................................................................. 52
       8.10 GeoMedia WebMap (Intergraph) ............................................................................................... 52
       8.11 GeoServer.................................................................................................................................. 52
       8.12 ER Mapper: Image Server ......................................................................................................... 53
       8.13 MapInfo ...................................................................................................................................... 53
       8.14 MapServer (MapServ, ex ForNet) ............................................................................................. 53
       8.15 MapServer 3.5 / 3.6 ................................................................................................................... 53
       8.16 WFSLite ..................................................................................................................................... 54
9      Testing: Conformance and Interoperability ...................................................................................... 56
       9.1   Utilities and testcases ................................................................................................................ 56
       9.2   WMT program ............................................................................................................................ 56
       9.3   ConformIT .................................................................................................................................. 56


List of Tables
Table 1: DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Documentation Guide by Audience .................................................................. 5
Table 2: Distribution package checklist ........................................................................................................... 6
Table 3: Open-source (non-commercial) Options ......................................................................................... 11
Table 4: Summary of CANRI-supported standards ....................................................................................... 13
Table 5: How you can participate in CANRI .................................................................................................. 21
Table 6: Frequently Answered Questions ..................................................................................................... 22
Table 7: Summary of References: CANRI Technical Framework ................................................................. 24



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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                                                     v0.95

Table 8: Parameters of a GetMap Request ................................................................................................... 27
Table 9: Summary of References: End-User Applications ............................................................................ 31
Table 10: Applications in the CANRI framework ........................................................................................... 33
Table 11: Summary of References: Metadata Management......................................................................... 37
Table 12: ANZLIC Core Metadata Elements ................................................................................................. 38
Table 13: Field Guide to CANRI (ICMISS) Extensions ................................................................................. 42
Table 14: Summary of References: Data serving Solutions.......................................................................... 45
Table 15: Evaluation criteria for data serving ................................................................................................ 47
Table 16: Recommended Projections and Datum ......................................................................................... 48


List of Figures
Figure 1: Four Steps for Do-It-Yourself participation in CANRI ....................................................................... 8
Figure 2: RIIS Component diagram ............................................................................................................... 19
Figure 3: PartnerPlus Component diagram ................................................................................................... 20
Figure 4: Bare-bones 3-tier Architecture ....................................................................................................... 24
Figure 5: OGC Web Services Architecture .................................................................................................... 25
Figure 6: CANRI Deployment diagram .......................................................................................................... 26
Figure 7: OpenGIS Web Map Service ........................................................................................................... 26
Figure 8: OpenGIS Web Feature Service...................................................................................................... 28
Figure 9: Orientation to Data Serving ............................................................................................................ 31
Figure 10: Orientation to Managing Metadata ............................................................................................... 37
Figure 11: Relationship of CANRI Catalog with MEM and MET Online ........................................................ 38
Figure 12: Orientation to Data Serving .......................................................................................................... 45




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                              v0.95


1 About the Do-It-Yourself Manual
The CANRI Do-It-Yourself (DIY) Manual provides comprehensive information on CANRI:
      high-level CANRI vision for agency managers and decision makers
      conceptual orientation for communications and web designers
      detailed/procedural content for technical specialists
      material for natural resource managers exploring CANRI‟s potential
The primary theme of the DIY is enabling direct technical participation in CANRI.
Since the DIY documentation is focussed on giving you information sufficient to "do-it-yourself", you
might well imagine that "how to do it" is a known and stable set of procedures. However, the reality is that
online spatial technology is evolving so rapidly that authoritative documentation is impractical.
The DIY has been designed with a flexible structure that can be continuously updated to provide the latest
and most useful information to the CANRI technical community as it becomes available.
To this end, we strongly suggest you take advantage of the two CANRI mailing lists, CANRI-Talk and
CANRI-News. Subscribe online at: http://www.canri.nsw.gov.au/feedback_register.html
Our main objective with the DIY is to produce documentation that meets the CANRI community's needs.
To do this effectively, we need to hear from you. Please contact the Business Development Manager on (02
9895 7808) or email canri@canri.nsw.gov.au to provide feedback on the document.

1.1       Who should read this document
The DIY Main Documentation has been prepared with the following core user groups in mind:
     Agency and Organisational decision makers
     Data custodians
     Web Application managers
     IT Support staff
Here's a quick summary of the DIY content with audience interest indicated:

Table 1: DIY (Do-It-Yourself) Documentation Guide by Audience
Section                          Of special interest to     Highlights
1: About the DIY                 All                          Explanation of the DIY Main Documentation
   Documentation
2: CANRI at a Glance             All                          Description of the program context and benefits analysis

3: Getting started with CANRI    Agency and                   Strategic planning, process overview and decision
                                 Organisational decision       support
                                 makers                       End-to-end: CANRI participation in four steps
4: Answer Finder                 All                          Our collection of Frequently Answered Questions, this
                                                               section with cross-links to detailed information.
5: CANRI from a Technical        Web Application Mgrs         CANRI architecture
   Perspective                   IT Support Staff             Component descriptions, references and usecases

6: Applications: Solutions for   Web Application Mgrs         Putting the value of CANRI at your user's fingertips.
   your end-users                IT Support Staff             Options for end-user interfaces

7: Managing Metadata             Data Custodians              Using MET Online and the MEM to specify data product
                                                               and service listings in the NRDD and CANRI Catalog
8: Guide to Data Serving         Data Custodians              Setting up and registering OpenGIS compliant data
                                 IT Support staff              servers for the CANRI network

9: Testing: Conformance and      Web Application Mgrs         Introduction to testing for OpenGIS compliance and
   Interoperability              IT Support Staff              CANRI interoperability




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                                                  v0.95


1.2        Summary of References
Following is the DIY Reference Schedule for 3rd party and modular documentation resources. If you're
looking for quick access to a specific product or component, these links take you to the central reference for
each package.
Caution: Products and components are typically maintained by 3rd party developers, who produce and
maintain the associated technical documentation. These resources will vary in both style and semantics
from this document. Please be aware of these variations and interpret carefully.

DIY Reference Schedule
Summary of References 1: Web Map Servers .............................................................................................. 26
Summary of References 2: Web Feature Servers ....................................................................................... 28
Summary of References 4: CANRI Catalog Service ..................................................................................... 29
Summary of References 5: Natural Resources Data Directory (NRDD) ....................................................... 29
Summary of References 6: Natural Resources Atlas (NRA) ......................................................................... 30
Summary of References 7: GeoTools .......................................................................................................... 35
Summary of References 8: MapBroker ........................................................................................................ 35
Summary of References 9: WebMap Composer .......................................................................................... 36
Summary of References 10: MET Online ...................................................................................................... 38
Summary of References 11: ArcIMS (WMS and WFS) ................................................................................. 49
Summary of References 12: Autodesk MapGuide ........................................................................................ 51
Summary of References 13: CubeSERV ...................................................................................................... 51
Summary of References 14: DSLite .............................................................................................................. 52
Summary of References 15: Exposure Image / Spatial Server ..................................................................... 52
Summary of References 16: GenaMap / GenaWorld .................................................................................... 52
Summary of References 17: GeoMedia WebMap (Intergraph) .................................................................... 52
Summary of References 18: GeoServer ...................................................................................................... 52
Summary of References 19: ER Mapper: Image Server .............................................................................. 53
Summary of References 20: MapInfo ........................................................................................................... 53
Summary of References 21: MapServer 3.5 / 3.6 ........................................................................................ 53
Summary of References 22: WFSLite ........................................................................................................... 54


1.3        Distribution package
Selected reference documents are distributed with the DIY Main Documentation in a single package
(diy_distpack.zip), which is available online at: www.canri.gov.au/diy/

Table 2: Distribution package checklist
Title                                                   Filename                                          Local doc            Local HTML
CANRI DIY Main Documentation                            diy.doc                                             diy.doc               diy.html
CANRI Glossary                                          glossary.xls                                      glossary.xls                --
Note: There are a number of web links in the documentation. You must be connected to the internet to
access these links.

1.4        Glossary
The diversity of technical dialects involved with CANRI ensures that at some point we all trip up against
unfamiliar jargon. The CANRI Glossary is our ongoing attempt to de-jargonise and clarify terms commonly



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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95

used in the framework. There's a copy of the Glossary distributed with this document. The online (and most
current) version is available at: http://www.canri.nsw.gov.au/glossary.html
The Glossary is a document in progress: we need your input. If you can't find a term in the glossary, or
think we should change the way we talk, send a note to the CANRI-Talk mailing list and let's speak the
same language.

1.5      Further reading
If you're completely new to the world of geospatial information, it's probably a good idea to do some
reading and experimenting as soon as possible.
If you're a manager or policy decision maker, getting a handle on the importance of spatial information is a
good starting point. You might want to browse the industry magazine for articles that discuss business
strategic issues for geospatial information. [GeoWorld]
If you're a data custodian, web developer or IT staffer, you'll want to understand how web-based GIS is
implemented. Spatialnews is a more technically-focussed publication. [Spatialnews]
And finally, if you're looking for a good rave about how geospatial data is relevant to the development of a
more healthy society, consider the musings at the GeoServer Project.

1.6      Current CANRI Contacts
CANRI is managed by the collective natural resource agencies of NSW through the NRIMS Steering
Group. The Department of Land and Water Conservation, as lead agency, coordinates the CANRI Program.
Visit CANRI on the web: http://www.canri.nsw.gov.au
Email us: canri@canri.nsw.gov.au
Write: CANRI Program GPO Box 39 Sydney NSW 2001
Join an email list:
      CANRI-News to receive occasional CANRI updates [View CANRI-News archive]
      CANRI-Talk to discuss CANRI development [View CANRI-Talk archive]
Or contact one of the CANRI team:
Neil Bennett                                                 Jonathan Doig, Program Director
Acting Chair, CANRI Program Board                            Chair, CANRI Program Implementation Group
Ph: 02 9895 7700                                             Ph: 02 9895 7781 Fax: 02 9895 7834
Fax: 02 9895 7834                                            Email: jdoig@canri.nsw.gov.au
Email: nbennett@dlwc.nsw.gov.au                              PO Box 3720
PO Box 3720                                                  Parramatta NSW 2124
Parramatta NSW 2124
Mike Thompson                                                Cecilia Tram, CANRI Business Development Manager
Convenor, CANRI Community Reference Group                    Ph: 02 9895 7808 Fax: 02 9895 7834
Ph: 0500 888 876                                             Email: ctram@dlwc.nsw.gov.au
Fax: 02 4872 1319                                            PO Box 3720
Email: miket@nature.net.au                                   Parramatta NSW 2124
                                                             PO Box 3720
                                                             Parramatta NSW 2124
                                                             William Leader, CANRI Project Officer
                                                             Ph: 02 9895 7296 Fax: 02 9895 7834
                                                             Email: wleader@canri.nsw.gov.au
                                                             PO Box 3720
                                                             Parramatta NSW 212


You can also contact the CANRI committees and groups to find out more about CANRI activities, or to
discuss how your organisation might become involved.




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


2 CANRI at a Glance
Section 2 is an overview of the CANRI program from an organisational perspective. We'll address issues of
particular interest to agency managers and policy decision makers. We'll also offer some views on
CANRI that may help more technical readers gain a broad appreciation of how it all fits together.
If you're looking for a quick start and want to skip the background, go straight to Getting started with
CANRI, where you'll find a linked guide to the popular CANRI DIY Four-Step.
As shown below, the Four Steps actually sit in context with two main options, Providing an End-user
Application, and/or Providing Data Products.
Depending on your organisation's requirements, some combination of the four highlighted steps below will
be involved in your CANRI participation.

Figure 1: Four Steps for Do-It-Yourself participation in CANRI

                                    Provide an end-user                   End-user applications
                                                                           End-user applications
                                         application


                                         Comms strategy
                                          Product design                        CANRI
                    Participating         Needs analysis             Information-sharing network
                    organisation        Techincal inventory
                                           Infrastructure        Register NRDD
                                                Skills             metadata

                                    Provide data products                         Serve Data
                                                                                   Serve Data




2.1      Why CANRI?
Many people find out about CANRI because they are trying to do something very sensible: they want to see
their own information in context with the information that others have produced. Over the years, NSW
natural resources agencies have come to recognise that much of their own data, while valuable in its own
right, is even more valuable when it can be combined with information managed by other agencies.
To coordinate an information sharing network, these agencies formed the Natural Resources Information
Management Strategy (NRIMS). CANRI is the action program in front of the NRIMS strategy. [more info
about NRIMS and related policy processes]
CANRI isn't a piece of software you install, and it's not a service you pay for: it's a standard way of doing
things. When agencies support these standards, the result is an "information sharing network". Another term
for this is "interoperability".

2.2      Who benefits from CANRI?
CANRI is based on publicly available, industry-standard technologies: it is an "open" framework. This
openness means that natural resource agencies, local councils, non-profit groups and other organisations
can proceed with investment in e-government mapping projects with a high degree of confidence. By
working within the CANRI framework, they can ensure their ability to collaborate with institutional and
public partners.
CANRI's strategic goal is to improve access to natural resources information for all kinds of environmental
decision-makers as well as the general public. Specific target groups include:
      Catchment Management Boards and other community natural resource management groups;
      Environmental policy and operational staff of local, State and Commonwealth government;
      Environmental and Landcare groups;
      Industry groups such as mining, farming and environmental consultants; and



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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


     Education: high schools, primary schools and universities
Since CANRI is a collaborative framework, it provides benefit opportunities at many levels.

Helping agencies fulfil e-Government obligations
CANRI establishes a supporting framework to encourage the development of internet facilities that
empower community involvement in a broad range of government, environmental and natural resource
reforms. The CANRI program addresses a number of major government initiatives:
      meeting the needs of regional/rural communities;
      supporting community-based decision-making;
      supporting integrated natural resource and environmental management; and
      improved efficiency through electronic delivery of Government services.
Through CANRI, each agency has the following means of delivering on service obligations and/or
operational efficiency:
      Serve “information products” (maps and/or data) for others to use
      Provide specific online services to stakeholders via application interfaces
      Create stakeholder information services through configuring “views” using multi-agency sources
          of information
      Create intranet applications to help develop new information products
      Create intranet applications using CANRI sourced data
The first question your organisation will need to answer is: "What are we trying to achieve?" CANRI is
especially relevant if your responses include:
      Improving online access to information resources
      Collaborative participation with natural resources management peers
      Giving stakeholders access to specific information products
But this vision of seamless collaboration is not without its challenges . . . you'll need to ponder carefully
issues such as:
      Cost recovery policies
      Standards development conflicts
      Legacy systems expenses
      IP, privacy and product liability concerns
Nonetheless, the potential benefits to government and community objectives are enormous.

Tools and strategies for maximising value of investment
The distributed, standards based nature of the CANRI framework supports a growing pool of data services,
technology options and best-practice knowledge that dramatically change the ability of participating
agencies to cost effectively deliver and maintain new spatial applications via web technologies.
Such applications may be deployed on the public internet, on private intranet or on access controlled
“extranet” environments.
The CANRI framework helps network participants:
      Realise the value of investment in network and infrastructure;
      Use each other's data in situ (it doesn't need to be shipped around on tapes and disks);
      Seamlessly integrate and link our information products
      Avoid the need to centralise, so we can control our own data for security, Quality Control and
         updating
      Form efficient cooperative networks that encourage the value creation process.

2.3      What does it cost to be involved with CANRI?
For many agencies, cost is a determining factor in the level of participation afforded to CANRI. Answering
the question can involve a serious commitment to planning, needs analysis and technical infrastructure.


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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95

There's no special shortcut through this terrain: on the other hand, any agency who has already committed
to providing online data or applications is at least halfway toward participation in CANRI.
The basic factors associated with CANRI participation can be assessed through the following sections in
this document:
       Data product design and development [Solution design]
       Data serving or hosting arrangements [Data serving Quick Start]
       Application design and development or hosting arrangements [Roll your own Application]

Costing estimates
Most organisations will find that there's a CANRI solution that's the right size for their budgets. While it's
possible to come up with a million dollar project, many more are a matter of a few thousand dollars, mostly
in labour. The range of possibilities far exceeds our ability to provide any useful discussion of the matter in
the DIY.
Here are a few pointers:
      A very rough guide to pricing for various CANRI projects can be seen in the Activities section of
         the website and by reviewing the project schedule (specifically the Description of Activities and
         Resources Required, CANRI Cost and In-kind Cost) for various projects.. For example, the NCC's
         PartnerPlus project estimated cost was about $270k, while a dataset showing National Park
         boundaries maintained by NPWS was delivered for $6k. Scan for a project similar to yours and
         note the budget and any other funding sources. In many cases, CANRI agencies contribute
         matching funds to the funding provided by CANRI. Contact the project officer and chat about their
         experience.
      The investment in your data is, usually, the most expensive component of an online mapping
         exercise (conventional estimates place data as 80% of the cost of a geographic information
         system). This cost isn't directly associated with CANRI participation, but the importance of clean
         data cannot be overestimated. Make sure to budget accordingly.
      If you're going to provide an end-user application, invest the time necessary to have a very clear
         picture of user needs. This can dramatically affect the cost of development and maintenance, and
         the lack of a clear business case is a recipe for monumental budget blowouts.
      Planning pays. It makes sense to invest a modest amount of your budget up front in a consultancy
         that more accurately outlines your options.

Commercial and open source software options: choosing what's right for
you
Commercially available software exists that can fulfil part or all of the requirements for participation in
CANRI. Commercial software is commonly provided with extensive documentation, guidance material and
support mechanisms. Of course such features and the peace of mind they bring come at a price.
Open source software is usually developed through a community of developers. While it can often lack the
packaging and support mechanisms that come with commercial software, open source alternatives are much
more adaptable to your particular needs.
The more mature open source projects are far more flexible, robust and secure than many of their
commercial counterparts: Apache and Linux are but two examples of this.
Nonetheless, installing, configuring and maintaining open source software usually requires more technical
expertise. You will need to evaluate the balance between investment in technical expertise (either in-house
or via a contractor) required for open source alternatives compared to the benefits and limitations of a
commercial product.
It is important to note that CANRI makes every effort to make sure there is an open-source, public domain
solution for each of these factors. Perhaps the best place to research open-source options is the FreeGIS
project at: http://freegis.org.




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95

Following is a summary of open source alternatives for each of the main functional components involved in
CANRI participation. Complete references for each product are provided in the related sections of this
document.

Table 3: Open-source (non-commercial) Options
Component function            Product
WMS Map servers               MapServer 3.5

WFS Feature servers           MapServer 3.5
                              GeoServer

Viewing applications          Application development: Roll-your-own
                              MapServer 3.5
                              GeoTools
Metadata management           See references at: Managing Metadata



2.4      Where can I get advice?
If you represent an organisation with an interest in NSW environmental issues and you wish to make your
own information more accessible to others, or use the CANRI framework in your own website, we would
welcome your involvement. Please contact us for further discussions: canri@canri.nsw.gov.au
If you are interested in having information about your datasets included in the NRDD or would like more
details about the directory, please contact the Convenor of the NSW Metadata Working Group at
nrdd@dlwc.nsw.gov.au.
And of course, make sure to join the two CANRI mailing lists, CANRI-Talk and CANRI-News. Subscribe
online at: www.canri.nsw.gov.au/feedback_register.html.

2.5      Are there security risks?
Security concerns are often foremost in the minds of IT and agency staff who are responsible for
organisational integrity both at a network level and in terms of product liability. Although there are no
simple, comprehensive answers to these concerns, we can offer some general insights that might assist.
First and foremost, there is nothing special about CANRI's technical implementation that introduces new
types of security risk. CANRI uses standard http protocol, so standard web security approaches apply.

Product liability/privacy
Data provided through a CANRI-registered dataserver is available to the public. For many data custodians,
this is not a problem since their data is well organised and current. However, if there are concerns specific
to the nature of the information in a particular product, you may consider preparing a "public version" of
your data specifically for release through CANRI.
This approach gives public users a data product that is useful and accurate, but not necessarily complete.
Giving users at least some indication of what your data is all about can be a powerful incentive to build
demand for your data with minimal risk. With sufficient demand, a justification for improving the
underlying data quality can be established.

Data servers and applications
Generally, security is a matter for middleware applications to sort out. Customised access control options
can be implemented in your application's middleware if there are specific policy-level restrictions that
apply. Although there has been some thinking about how to generalise such controls, at the moment it is
still a matter for custom development.
Data servers are not generally a point of vulnerability as they work within the normal restrictions imposed
on such programs. For instance, DSLite is a CGI program that writes only to a log file on the server (other



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than this it is "read only"). All of the Java-based solutions are as secure as any other servlet: there are no
unique risks in the CANRI context.

Security watching brief
To date, there have been no identified security risks associated with CANRI. If you would like to discuss
these matters further, please get in touch with the CANRI Systems Working Group.

2.6      Who is supporting CANRI?
CANRI is supported by government, NGOs, community and industry working together on a number of
specific projects targeted at key community sectors or issues.
The CANRI program builds on work already done under the NSW Natural Resources Information
Management Strategy (NRIMS). This strategy, a cooperative effort between thirteen New South Wales
natural resources management and other agencies, aims to develop common standards and technologies to
provide accurate, current and integrated information to decision-makers and the broader NSW community.
CANRI has received capital funding over four years from July 2000. Funding has also been obtained from other
sources such as the Commonwealth‟s Australian Coastal Atlas project.
Natural resources management agencies:
      Department of Land and Water Conservation
      Environment Protection Authority
      Planning NSW
      National Parks and Wildlife Service
      NSW Agriculture
      Department of Mineral Resources
      State Forests
      Australian Museum
      NSW Fisheries
      Royal Botanic Gardens
Other agencies:
      Premiers Department
      Treasury
      Department of Information Technology & Management
NGO and Community Sector
      Nature Conservation Council NSW
Commercial Developers
      ESRI Australia
      Exposure
      Homer Systems
      Intergraph
      MapInfo
      Navigate
      Social Change Online
If your organisation is relevant to CANRI and you're not listed here, please let us know by sending an email
to: canri@canri.nsw.gov.au

2.7      Which standards does CANRI support?
CANRI helps agencies and others implement online geo-spatial facilities that comply with applicable
international and local standards. Generally, these standards are developed in collaboration with industry
and organisational stakeholders.




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At a global level, standards for geospatial information are developed and administered by the OpenGIS
Consortium (OGC). Here in Australia, the Australia New Zealand Land Information Council (ANZLIC)
facilitates the implementation of a range of policies, including the adoption of standards such as those
developed by the OGC. These standards are in turn expressed through the Australian Spatial Data
Infrastructure (ASDI) process.
CANRI is responsible for alignment and coordination of these standards as they are implemented by NSW
natural resources agencies, and particularly within the enabling projects CANRI sponsors such as the
NRDD catalog and other products such as the WMC application configuration tool.
The standards process itself is driven by data custodians and technology developers who communicate
needs and opportunities with each other, fashioning the shape of interoperablity standards as they go.
CANRI is related to other standards processes as well, such as the development of data models and a data
model repository for use in the natural resources management community.
The relevant standards for CANRI include:

Table 4: Summary of CANRI-supported standards
Domain             Standard                 Administrator                            Reference
Searching          GEO/Z39.50 Protocol          FGDC         www.blueangeltech.com/Standards/GeoProfile/geo22.htm
Registries &
Spatial
Databases
Rendered maps      Web Mapping Service           OGC         www.opengis.org/techno/specs.htm
                   (WMS)
Geographic         Web Feature Service           OGC         www.opengis.org/techno/specs.htm
features           (WFS)
Registry data      Catalog Interface             OGC         www.opengis.org/techno/specs.htm
                   Implementation
                   Specification
Geospatial         ANZLIC Version 3            ANZLIC        www.anzlic.org.au/asdi/metaiso.htm
metadata           based on ISO 19115
                   and the FGDC
Geographic         Geography Markup              OGC         www.opengis.net/gml/01-029/GML2.html
Feature            Language (GML).
Encoding


CANRI maintains interlocking relationships with these national and international programs. Following is a
brief introduction to each.

OpenGIS Consortium (OGC)
www.opengis.org.au/
OGC is an international industry consortium of more than 220 companies, government agencies and
universities participating in a consensus process to develop publicly available geoprocessing specifications.
Open interfaces and protocols defined by OpenGIS® Specifications support interoperable solutions that
"geo-enable" the Web, wireless and location-based services, and mainstream IT, and empower technology
developers to make complex spatial information and services accessible and useful with all kinds of
applications.
The OGC development process provides protocols and standards that are implemented and promoted
through the CANRI framework. The OGC standards are referred to in a series of trademarked "OpenGIS"
implementation specifications.
These specifications are recognised through the International Standards Organisation (ISO).




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Australia-New Zealand Land Information Council (ANZLIC)
www.anzlic.org.au/
ANZLIC is the peak council for public sector spatial data management in Australia and New Zealand. Its
members represent the jurisdictional coordinating arrangements in their jurisdiction.
ANZLIC provides an overarching framework within which other national bodies contribute to ANZLIC
objectives. Those bodies include the Public Sector Mapping Agencies (PSMA), the Intergovernmental
Committee on Surveying and Mapping (ICSM) and the Committee for Geographical Names in Australasia
(CGNA).
While surveying, mapping and property-related data are important components of Australia's and New
Zealand's spatial data infrastructures, ANZLIC recognises that the community has interests in a much
broader range of spatial data and that there is a need to provide comprehensive coordinating arrangements
that embrace those types of data, including coastal and marine data and natural resources data.
An important feature of ANZLIC is that it represents an extensive community of coordination arrangements
that give it the capacity for drawing together the views and interests of spatial data users and producers
across a wide range of disciplines.

Australian Spatial Data Infrastructure (ASDI)
www.anzlic.org.au/asdi/asdimain.htm

The Australian Spatial Data Infrastructure (ASDI) is an initiative facilitated by ANZLIC (the Spatial
Information Council). The ASDI is a mechanism to provide better access to the wide range of spatial
information held by many government agencies and other bodies around Australia.

Creating the ASDI has strategic, institutional and technical implications affecting all levels of government
and the private sector. It must create a situation where all sources of spatial information are able to make
their data available which meet their requirements. More importantly, a successful ASDI must provide a
reliable framework to provide value-adding applications delivering information products and services to
end-users in government, business and community.

ANZLIC has been working with all governments, and more recently the private sector, to create an
environment in which the ASDI can be created. Efforts have included:
      Addressing institutional arrangements setting out the role of all parties;
      Developing national pricing, copyright and data access policies and guidelines;
      Formulating national agreements for access and management of spatial data across jurisdictions;
      Brokering implementation of a national distributed online data directory (the Australian Spatial
        Data Directory) as the first component of a “distribution network” for the ASDI;
      Negotiating sponsorship of major national fundamental data sets;
      Influencing development of international standards for spatial information to provide the data
        standards framework needed for an ASDI.
      Working in partnership to adopt technologies to give shape to a first version of the ASDI.

Australian Spatial Data Dictionary (ASDD)
www.auslig.gov.au/asdd/about.htm
The ASDD is a national initiative supported by all governments under the auspices of the Australia New
Zealand Land Information Council (ANZLIC). The ASDD aims to improve access to Australian spatial
data for industry, government, education and the general community through effective documentation,
advertisement and distribution.
The directory will link government and commercial nodes in each State/Territory and spatial data agencies
within the Commonwealth Government.
A key objective of the ANZLIC strategic plan is to promote the development of the Australian Spatial Data
Infrastructure (ASDI) that will improve access to and availability of nationally consistent spatial datasets.



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The ASDD is an essential component of the ASDI and incorporates information about datasets (metadata)
from all jurisdictions.
The technology being used for the ASDD is the Z39.50 search and retrieval protocol which when combined
with the World Wide Web provides a simple method of searching, discovery and retrieval of spatial data.
More detail is available in the Technical Documentation (www.environment.gov.au/net/asdd/tech/) that also
includes instructions for configuring a node in the ASDD.

Federal Geographic Data Committee
www.fgdc.gov/
The US Federal Geographic Data Committee coordinates the development of the National Spatial Data
Infrastructure (NSDI). The NSDI encompasses policies, standards and procedures for organizations to
cooperatively produce and share geographic data.
The 17 federal agencies that make up the FGDC are developing the NSDI in cooperation with organizations
from state, local and tribal governments, the academic community and the private sector.




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3 Getting started with CANRI
In Section 3 we will look at benefits analysis, technical options and a couple of case studies. This overview
of CANRI should be helpful for decision makers looking for options and technical newcomers looking
for high-level clues.
If you're encountering CANRI for the first time, the                        Basic usecase - get involved!
technology and concepts can seem overwhelming. Don't
give up! CANRI is actually a pretty straightforward
idea. With a bit of study you'll be able to see exactly
how CANRI can benefit your organisation. You'll also
understand how your participation helps all NSW
natural resource stakeholders to manage the state's                                                 Participate in CANRI

information resources in an effective and empowering                Agency/Organisation
manner.

3.1         End-to-end: 4 Steps for information sharing
So let's focus on what CANRI actually does. It's important to see CANRI as an "enabling framework",
which is a nice piece of jargon that basically translates to: CANRI helps agencies design and deploy an end-
to-end relationship with the NRIMS information-sharing network. [more info about CANRIs strategic plan and
projects]


Step 1: Data Product design                                                Data Product design
The first step toward creating our
information-sharing network is to decide
what data products will be provided (ie,
provided either via the web or under some
other arrangement).
You will need to decide what data can be                                               Participate in CANRI
shared, under what conditions and with                   Agency/Organisation
whom. This is the process of "data product
design" (a data product can be maps and/or
geo-referenced data).
Product design involves concepts that are
probably familiar to any data custodian                                                Provide data products
already. [more info about data product design                     Data Custodian
especially for CANRI]
Note: if you don‟t have a data product, but                                   Design Data Product Register data in catalog
want to use the data available through
CANRI in your website or intranet, go
straight to Step 4: Applications.

Step 2: Registering in the catalog
Once the data products have been developed, the next step is to let everyone know about it. This is handled
by registering your data products in an online catalog. NRIMS and CANRI provide such a catalog for
NSW, called the Natural Resources Data Dictionary (NRDD). The NRDD is part of a national network of
catalogs which comprise the Australian Spatial Data Dictionary (ASDD). [more info about the NRDD]
Registering a data product involves providing two types of metadata (information about information is
called "metadata"):
      Descriptive information: eg, the name of the data product, who owns it, what projection it is in, etc
      Availability information (how can this data be accessed): eg, online, via CD-ROM, tape, etc.
The metadata required by CANRI is based on the Australian standards for resource and service description.




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The metadata for your products can be
managed online through the Metadata                       Register data product in NRDD (CANRI Catalog)
Extension Manager (MEM) and MET Online
interfaces. You'll need to contact the CANRI
Technical Officer establish an account if your
organisation doesn't already have one. [more
info about managing metadata]
You can see what your metadata records look                                             Participate in CANRI
like online by using the Natural Resources
                                                         Agency/Organisation
Audit (NRA) which is an online search and
browse application sitting on top of the
NRDD. [more info about the NRA]
If your data products are not intended for
online delivery, this registration process                                              Provide data products
completes the story. Agencies who wish to                         Data Custodian
make use of your data are able to use the
information in the NRDD to contact you and                                    Design Data Product Register data in catalog
arrange for access to the dataset under
whatever terms are negotiated.

Step 3: Data serving
Most agencies, however, will want to provide online access to their data products. This involves arranging
for some form of web-based data serving. CANRI's information sharing network is based on spatial data
exchange standards that are established by
the international OpenGIS Consortium                              Serving your own data
(OGC). To be available to the CANRI
network, data must be served using the
OpenGIS standardised protocols. These
standards define very simple (yet powerful)
GIS functionality such as "getMap" and
"getFeature". [more info about the OpenGIS                                   Participate in CANRI
protocols and related standards]
                                                       Agency/Organisation
If your organisation already has a spatial
web server, you can probably locate an
OpenGIS connector (or "wrapper") that
allows your particular software to handle
OpenGIS standard requests. Some spatial                                                Provide data products
web server products communicate natively                         Data Custodian
in OpenGIS protocols, so a wrapper isn't
required. [more info about spatial webservers                                Design Data Product Register data in catalog
and wrappers]
With the advent of the OpenGIS Web
Feature Service protocol, a wide range of
non-GIS packages can be used to serve data
in a spatial context. For example, the data
behind the SoEDirect application is sourced
                                                                                  Serve data products
from a WFS server connected via SQL
Server to MSAccess and MSExcel                             Web/GIS technician
resources.
Many data layers can be hosted on a single                               Set up OGC server Register service in catalog
web server. The server details for each data
product is recorded in the "availability" section of the product's metadata record.




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Alternatively, if you're not set up to serve spatial data on the web, you can negotiate a hosting agreement
with an agency that provides OpenGIS compliant data servers. For example, the NSW DLWC hosts a
number of databases on behalf of CANRI partner agencies. [more info about DLWC hosting]

Step 4: Applications  Putting data to work
For many organisations, the real payoff from
CANRI happens at the end-user application.                 Applications: Providing an End-user interface
This is where the user is able to interact with
the live dataset via some form of functional
interface. Applications can be standalone,                                    Application hosting Application install/config
working with data hosted on your network,
but in this context we'll look at applications
that make use of other datasets via the
CANRI information-sharing network. In fact                                            Provide end-user interface
you don‟t even need to serve data to create
                                                              Application developer
an application that leverages the value the
CANRI. [more info about applications]
There are practically unlimited possibilities
for custom-built applications that make use
of CANRI. But until now developing an
                                                                                        Participate in CANRI
application from scratch has involved
                                                       Agency/Organisation
considerable investment of resources in
needs analysis, technical design, code
development and maintenance.
Fortunately, as OpenGIS standards are
integrated into more commercial software                                                Provide data products
packages, the process of application                             Data Custodian
development will be simplified to a matter
of configuration options. So participants are                                Design Data Product Register data in catalog
increasingly able to focus on meeting user
needs with standard software rather than
getting bogged in deep technical
development. [more info about application
vendors]

3.2        Completing the picture:                                                       Serve data products

           CANRI's role                                        Web/GIS technician

As you can see from this overview, most of
the responsibility for creating data products,                           Set up OGC server Register service in catalog
registering them, serving and providing a
viewing application rests with your organisation. CANRI provides supporting intellectual resources, advice
and guidance to improve the effectiveness of your efforts.
In practical terms, we can see that CANRI provides technical "enablement" through carefully placed
services such as the NRDD catalog facility. These services are the tangible expressions of the CANRI
framework.
CANRI is a cooperative response of the State‟s natural resource agencies to the changing demands for their
information, as recognised in the policy imperatives and reform strategies of the NSW Government.
Increasingly we will need to use each other's data in sophisticated analysis, decision support and
community consultation contexts. This requires seamlessly integration and linking between our information
products, as well as controls for data for security, quality and currency.
CANRI helps coordinate technical policy amongst participating users so that they can maximise the
combined value of their natural resource information assets to the benefit of all.



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3.3      Case studies: CANRI in the real world
Here are two examples to illustrate the issues involved with real-world CANRI:

DLWC: River Information Internet System (RIIS)
Business case
River flow information is managed through several state agencies with incompatible technical platforms.
High public and agency demand for an integrated view of this information led DLWC to propose a River
Information Internet Service (RIIS) that exploits the CANRI framework.
The RIIS initiative involved a number of priority outcomes, including the delivery of:
       River flow information from additional agencies
       Enhanced information presentation control
       An agreed protocol for the ongoing support of the RIIS system and information published via
          system.
       Software that will easily permit other agencies and interest groups to publish data.
       Software that will provide generic tools for plotting and graphing of data.
       Publication of time-series electrical conductivity and water temperature information
By establishing an interoperable application with CANRI recommendations, DLWC wish to knit together a
network of about 650 remote monitoring sites. Data from the telemetered sites is used to: monitor water
releases from dams; act as early Flood Warning; and to monitor discharge of water into the river system.
This information is invaluable to researchers, agribusiness operators, environmental specialists and water
regulators. DLWC and associated agencies receive numerous requests for this data via traditional channels,
and have borne the resulting overheads of managing these requests.
A CANRI-compliant online mapping facility was seen as the most appropriate solution.
Solution
The RIIS project surveyed existing data sources and delivery mechanisms. It was found that all NSW water
agencies planned to publish near real time water information, and most had little internet infrastructure. An
arrangement was made to host all the data on DLWC's public web server.
Each agency produced an update mechanism to manage the data at DLWC.
Each data layer was registered with the NRDD using the MEM administration interface.
A service definition was established with the CANRI catalog.
With the data now available to the network, a viewing application needed to be considered. After assessing
options, it was decided to configure an existing client-side Java applet to provide a user interface. Although
this arrangement might look like a "data warehouse" solution, it's important to note that the centralisation is
provided solely for convenience while the participants upgrade their infrastructures. The RIIS architecture,
using CANRI concepts, will function as a truly distributed, heterogenous network when it is fully deployed.

Figure 2: RIIS Component diagram
                                          DLWC hosting
         RIIS                                                  RIIS maps                            source
                                                                                   Data              data
                 JAVA
                                  MapBroker                                    consolidation      source
                 applet
                                                                              and replication      data
                                                               RIIS data                               source
                                                                                                        data
           Client Brow ser
                                                     CANRI
                                                                NRDD
                                                     Catalog

The applet sends simple requests (layers and extent) to DLWC's licenced copy of MapBroker.
After a pro-forma check with the CANRI catalog, MapBroker sends the appropriate requests for a basemap
image and GML formatted data to the RIIS map and data servers.




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MapBroker combines the returned image and data (re-projection), passing a single packet back to the
viewing applet.
Usage
The RIIS site is currently in its second build, and is providing services to an increasing range of user
groups:
     Internal DLWC (Intranet): the intranet version of RIIS provides DLWC water mangers with a
         single site that shows up to the last 12 months of river flows and heights on the Internet. From this
         site they can see how the river height and flow conditions for many locations across NSW;
     Irrigators: check on river conditions, assess the likelihood of suitable flows for pumping;
     Recreational Swimmers: check on water conditions for their favourite swimming location;
     Recreational Anglers: check the level of dams and rivers prior to deciding on a fishing trip;
     Recreational Canoers: check stream levels of rivers prior to deciding on a boating trip;
     Students: use the site to provide input to school projects;
     Other Gov Agencies: link to the site and also download data to their sites;
     Consultants: obtain river information and value-add to it in their areas of expertise;
     River Community: check on river and dam levels in times of drought or flood.
Take a look at RIIS online: waterinfo.dlwc.nsw.gov.au/riis/riis.html

Nature Conservation Council NSW: PartnerPlus
Business case
The Nature Conservation Council of NSW (NCCNSW) is an umbrella organisation that represents a diverse
membership of community and non-government environmental groups. These groups are concerned with
communicating environmental issues to their members and the public, which in turn participate with the
groups to develop an accurate picture of environmental conditions on the ground. These groups often
engage in field-level research that produces useful natural resources data, combining the power of basic
scientific analysis with broad public participation.
NCCNSW recognised the need for an interactive internet tool through which remote users could collaborate
using shared information and documents. Many groups have no data serving infrastructure, and few have
any access to base data such as topography and administrative boundaries.
Since each group needed their own branded interface and data hosting facility, NCCNSW initiated a project
to provide a "map application builder" tool which would deliver these benefits via the CANRI framework.
Solution
A major part of the PartnerPlus program is based on a commercial product developed by Social Change
Online, the WebMap Composer (WMC). The PartnerPlus program adds modular extensions for map and
data file upload and automated catalog management to the basic WMC.

Figure 3: PartnerPlus Component diagram
                                       Community Hosting                      WMC Admin
         NCC Group
                                                                View
                                                               configs              Map
               Map                                                                                    source
                                 MapBroker                                       interface
            interface                                                                                  data
                                                              Template                              source
                                                              configs          Data Upload           data
         Client Brow ser                                                                                 source
                                                                             User Management              data
                                                           Data serving
                                                           (Spatial GIS)      Client Brow ser

                                                PartnerPlus   metadata
                                                  Catalog     database


                                                CANRI
                                                           NRDD
                                                Catalog




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NCC map administrators are able to upload maps and make them available to the MapServer spatial GIS.
MapServer provides native connectivity for OpenGIS WMS requests. NCC map administrators may also
upload spatially referenced tabular data to make it available to a Web Feature Server engine designed by
Social Change Online. This data can then be represented as features on an online map with attached data.
Once uploaded, both map and data layers are automatically registered in the PartnerPlus internal catalog.
NCC map administrators can then configure a viewing extent and interface template, accessing these and
other CANRI map layers, and save the combined package with a filename. The end-user is able to access
these map applications through normal links embedded in HTML pages. They may typically be used to
support a member group‟s campaign objectives.
PartnerPlus is expressed through the NCCNSWs mapping pages: www.nccnsw.org.au/mapping/

3.4      Participation summary: options and opportunities
Following is a summary of opportunities for DIY participation in the CANRI framework:

Table 5: How you can participate in CANRI
Your desired participation                What's involved
Publicise the existence of a data
product
List data in the NRDD                     The ANZLIC metadata form includes a section that asks for details of dataset
                                          availability. You can make your data available only offline, or accessible in
                                          various manners via an online service as below.
                                          This is the starting point for all data serving. A dataset only becomes visible
                                          to CANRI applications once it is registered in the NRDD, which is the ANZLIC
                                          metadata repository.
Provide data access to the network
                rd
Upload data to 3 party host               Arrange to share facilities with a CANRI partner. There are several hosting
                                          options available. See the Data Serving section for more details.
Serve data from your server               You need to have an OpenGIS compliant web server or connector visible to
                                          the internet. Either maps or feature information can be served.
Provide viewing/interaction
       rd
Use a 3 party service                     Arrange for privileged access to a web application with the application's host.
                                          Eg, members of the Nature Conservation Council are able to use the
                                          centrally-hosted PartnerPlus facility to create publicly-available map viewing
                                          applications.
Licence and host a CANRI-compliant        Select a technical solution and establish it in your network (internet or
web map application on your own           intranet).
server
Develop and host your own application     Specify the user interaction and build accordingly. Respect the OpenGIS
                                          standards and CANRI recommendations.



3.5      Funding your CANRI-compliant project
CANRI receives funding requests annually. Application forms and guidelines are available on the website
CANRI is only able to approve a fraction all applications. Generally, you should investigate all other
funding sources and potential collaborators in order to meet your budget requirements.




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4 Answer Finder
The Answer Finder is an ever-growing compilation of questions and answers gleaned from conversations
on the CANRI support lists, various workshops and seminars, and from the community of experts
associated with the program. As such, it is useful for all readers.
The more current form of this resource is a searchable database available online at:
www.canri.nsw.gov.au/diy/. In the print version of the DIY, the list is sorted alphabetically on
Component/Product.

Table 6: Frequently Answered Questions
Key                                     Abbreviation           Description
User                                    AP                     Agency planner, manager
                                        DC                     Data Custodian
                                        WT                     Web technician
C/P (Component/Product)                 ArcIMS                 ESRI's Geospatial Webserver
                                        MetOn                  MET Online
                                        Catalog                MEM: Metadata Extension Manager
                                        NRA                    NSW Natural Resources Atlas


Question             Answer                                                     User     C/P     Reference
How do I submit a    If you have a hosting arrangement with DLWC,               DC        -      Hosting services
dataset?             contact the CANRI Technical Officer to review
                     procedures. Generally, updating your data is
                     organised according to policies negotiated between
                     you and your host service.
How do I enter or    You must have a login to access the MEM and                DC      MET      Managing Metadata
update a             MET Online. This can be organised by application                  Online
metadata record?     to the CANRI Technical Officer.                                   MEM
                     Once you have an account, you can manage most
                     of your metadata directly from the administration
                     interfaces for MET Online and MEM.
Can I request a      Generally, CANRI does not act as a broker to fulfil        WT        -      CANRI-Talk email list
dataset be added     specific data requests. If you know which agency is        AP
by another           responsible for the data you're looking for, contact
agency?              them directly. If you're not sure, send a note to
                     CANRI-talk and see if someone can advise you.
How can I contact    All data in the CANRI framework is registered in           WT       NRA     NSW Natural
the people who       the NRDD. The metadata in this registry provides           AP               Resources Atlas
created a dataset    contact details. You will need to access this
on CANRI?            metadata record to find contact details.
                     Many applications provide links to these metadata
                     records from the map legend.
                     If this is not available, try searching for the dataset
                     using the NRA.
Why are some key     Some agencies are still working through the issues         WT        -      CANRI Data
datasets not         associated with making data available outside their        AP               Framework
present?             boundaries.
                     There has been a tremendous amount of work
                     done to inventory existing resources and assess
                     priorities. This project is being coordinated through
                     the CANRI Data Framework project.
                     If you have a specific data requirement, please
                     make your comments to the responsible agency



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                     and engage with the CANRI-Talk mailing list.
What security        There are no known security risks specific to             WT        -      Are there security
does CANRI           CANRI. Normal web security procedures are                 AP               risks?
provide for the      entirely adequate preparation for providing CANRI-
data?                compliant services.                                       IT

How can I access     Access to a select range of national datasets is          WT        -      Australian Natural
Australia-wide       provided through the Australian Natural Resources         AP               Resources Atlas
datasets?            Atlas. These datasets are not directly available to                        (ANRA)
                     the CANRI framework currently, although plans are                          CANRI OWS proposal
                     under way to enable this capability under the OWS
                     initiative.
How do I             This functionality is provided only in specific           WT     DatEx     DatEx (CANRI Project
download the         applications at the current time. The most popular        AP     NRA       #11)
data behind the      of these applications is SoEDirect, which supports                         NSW Natural
map?                 access to the EPA's State of the Environment                               Resources Atlas
                     reporting data.
                     A separate CANRI project to enable data access is
                     being undertaken through the DatEx initiative.
                     Currently, the most reliable method for arranging
                     data access is to contact the data custodian. This
                     information is provided in the ANZLIC metadata
                     record for the dataset stored in the NRDD and
                     available through the NRA.
Do CANRI             A collection of geo-referenced text documents can         WT     NRDD
applications         be listed as a dataset in the NRDD.
provide access to    Typically, the custodian for this collection would
documents as         provide a map data layer through a map or feature
well as maps and     server. The server returns the collection's
data?                mappable information (eg, point or coverage).
                     Users clicking on this feature would be shown a
                     data record that includes a URL to the text
                     document.
Can the CANRI        CANRI can help you arrange for hosting at a               WT        -      Hosting services
site host my GIS     number of CANRI agencies or network partners.             AP
map?                 We'll need to discuss the details of your
                     requirements. Please contact the CANRI Business
                     Development Manager.
What software do I   Simple applications can be created using normal           WT
need to create an    HTML markup, so you really only need a text editor
application?         and a website.
                     More complex applications can involve almost any
                     level of technical skills and development tools.
Can CANRI tell       This information is available in the dataset's            WT     NRDD      Natural Resources
me about the         ANZLIC metadata record (which you can locate by           AP               Data Dictionary
data (quality,       searching the NRA).                                                        (NRDD)
currency) listed     If this information is not sufficient, you need to
in the NRDD?         contact the administrative contact listed.
Can I connect to     Yes, but currently CANRI does not support the             WT    Catalog
the CANRI            OpenGIS catalog protocol, so you'll need to work
catalog from my      with the original CSGI protocols. If this is confusing,
own application?     you probably need to get in touch with the CANRI
                     Technical Officer




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5 CANRI from a Technical Perspective
Okay, this is where the talk gets a bit more technical. You should be familiar with basic GIS and internet
terms terms and abbreviations. Refer to the Glossary if you're not sure about a TLA!
This section covers the CANRI framework in an abstract design sense, which may be particularly useful for
Data Custodians, Web Application Managers and IT Support Staff.

Table 7: Summary of References: CANRI Technical Framework
CANRI Catalog
Gazetteer
Natural Resources Data Dictionary (NRDD)
Natural Resources Atlas (NRA)
Web Feature Server
Web Map Server



5.1      Framework architecture
CANRI implements a typical 3-tier architecture. To make sure we understand how this term is used in
CANRI, let's take a quick look at each tier before moving into the details.

Applications                                                           Figure 4: Bare-bones 3-tier Architecture
This is a troublesome term because it is so useful. Almost
anything with a couple of moving parts can be called an
                                                                                    End-user applications
                                                                                    End-user applications
application. In the 3-tier architecture, we are usually
referring to end-user interfaces (ie, web pages rendered in
the user‟s browser) and client-side applets as applications.
                                                                                                        Network
Middleware
This is generally the domain of things "server-side". For                                Middleware
example, a web server's Java servlet running environment
is an example of middleware. Many CANRI applications
make use of middleware services, provided by such
products as MapBroker, for server-side functionality to a
range of client applications.                                                           Data Sources
                                                                                        Data Sources

Data sources
This is the raw input side of things. Data sources can be almost anything that has a geospatial reference,
including raster images, vector feature data, or spatially referenced text documents.
Also included in this tier are utility collections, like metadata thesauri, gazetteers and data model
repositories.
Data sources are addressable through data servers, which are the active agents that interact with the
resource collection (eg, through a JDBC connection to a geospatial database).

Advantages of the 3-tier architecture
This arrangement provides a high degree of flexibility in a distributed environment. By cleanly separating
each layer, and providing well-known, public Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for the transport,
encoding, data modelling and request formats, many individual participants can contribute to the network
without the overhead of negotiating these agreements on a case-by-case basis. This is one of CANRI's most
powerful concepts.



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5.2      Functional model
Another way to look at the CANRI framework, from a functional perspective, identifies five "ACORN"
components:
     Applications: web-based interfaces that deliver an information product to a user. Applications
        provide control and user interaction in a web browser, connecting to other components in the
        background. Agencies can develop their own applications to make use of data available through
        the CANRI framework.
     Catalogs: or registries, hold information about components operating in the CANRI framework.
        While data owners can establish their own data catalogs, it is more typical to simply use the
        CANRI catalogue (used by the NRDD and NRA) to store metadata details.
     Operators: The CANRI framework can make use of independent information services available
        on the web. Currently, a geographic projection service is built in to the CANRI application server.
        This area of the architecture is expected to grow with the availability of gazetteers, address
        geocoding, image processing and other services.
     Repositories: are the storage devices for primary information, eg, a spatial database or a geo-
        referenced collection of text documents stored on a web server. The CANRI framework helps data
        owners serve information from their own servers or through data hosting services.
     Network: physical connections, messaging and transport protocols. CANRI promotes and assists
        the OpenGIS Consortium in the development of open network standards. While the definition of
        protocols and standards is the domain of bodies such as the OGC and ANZLIC, many data owners
        will need to consider network issues when establishing CANRI services. For example, firewalls,
        caching and user management are typical network concerns.

5.3      OGC Architecture
The OGC also recommends the 3-tier approach. The OGC Web Services Architecture (OWS) clarifies how
these perspectives combine to form the specific components in an OGC context.
The OWS includes three principal types of geo-referenced information access services: Web Map Server
(WMS), Web Coverage Server (WCS) and Web Feature Server (WFS). In addition, there are services such
as GeoParser and GeoCoder that return spatially referenced results. Following is an architecture diagram
showing conceptually how some of the OGC Web Services are related, and naming some (not all) of the
operations they define.

Figure 5: OGC Web Services Architecture

            OGC
         Web Service

                           GetCapabilities




                                                                                 OGC
              Web Registry                        OGC                                                         Web Coverage
                                                                              Web Feature
                Service                      Web Map Service                                                     Server
                                                                                Service



                     GetDescriptor                GetMap                                 GetFeature
                                                                                                                 GetCoverage
              RegisterService                         GetFeatureInfo             DescribeFeatureType




                                        Styled Layer
                                                                       Transaction WFS                GeoCoder Service
                                       Descriptor WMS



                                                                                  LockFeature
                                              DescribedLayer                 Transaction                    GeocodeFeature




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5.4      CANRI deployment
CANRI components are deployed at various servers throughout the NRIMS community. Although DLWC
has played a significant role in establishing first-generation services, other agencies and CANRI partners
are also adding services and resources to the framework.
There is no practical limit to scaling or extending the architecture to take advantage of additional data
resources, evolving middleware and extended applications. The components implemented or planned in the
CANRI framework are shown in the figure below. In the following sections you'll find detailed reference
summaries for these components.

Figure 6: CANRI Deployment diagram
                                Application                                                                         Access
                                 templates                                                                        management
               Application                             End-user                  End-user        End-user
                                  Layouts
                 builder                              applications              application     application
                                   Views



                                            Application                         Application
                                              server                              server



                                                                                                                           Internet



                             Data server
                Data                                                                CANRI Catalog
              uploader
                               Data                        Data                     CANRI
                                                                     metadata                NRDD               NRDD
                              layers                      Models                  extensions

                                                             load
              Local
              data                                                                    MEM                     MET Online

                                                                                              load metadata




5.5      Web Map Server
Summary of References 1: Web Map Servers
 OpenGIS Specification        www.opengis.org/techno/specs.htm#implementation
            reference
    GetCapabilities DTD       www.digitalearth.gov/wmt/xml/



Overview
Map servers are designed to provide map images of access to              Figure 7: OpenGIS Web Map
geographic data collections. To work in the CANRI environment,                          Service
these map servers must implement the OGC Web Map Service
                                                                                              OGC
(WMS) standard, which requires the server to support three                               Web Map Service
requests:
GetCapabilities: Obtains service-level metadata, which is a
                                                                       GetCapabilities
machine-readable (and human-readable) description of the WMS's                         GetMap GetFeatureInfo
information content and acceptable request parameters. The
response to a GetCapabilities request is general information about
the service itself and specific information about the available maps.
The Capabilities document is an XML configuration file that is provided to requesting agents (such as
MapBroker). The most critical part of the WMS Capabilities XML is the Layers and Styles it defines. This
file is required by the WMS specification and must conform to the OGC‟s DTD.



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GetMap: Obtains a map image whose geospatial and dimensional parameters are well-defined per the
WMS syntax specifications. The GetMap operation is designed to produce a map, which is defined to be
either a pictorial image or a set of graphical elements. This a required function for WMS connectors.
Obtains a map image whose geospatial and dimensional parameters are well-defined as per the WMS
syntax specifications. The GetMap operation produces a map, defined as either a pictorial image or a set of
graphical elements. This is a required function for WMS servers.
It may surprise GIS experts to discover how simple the GetMap-supported parameters are. Remember,
online mapping is very much in its infancy: making the most out of this first generation of specifications
will build demand for more advanced capabilities.
Here's a summary of the parameters supported by WMS GetMap:

Table 8: Parameters of a GetMap Request
Request Parameter                                Required/     Description
                                                 Optional
VERSION=version                                      R         Request version.
REQUEST=GetMap                                       R         Request name.
LAYERS=layer_list                                    R         Comma-separated list of one or more map layers.
                                                               Optional if SLD parameter is present.
STYLES=style_list                                    R         Comma-separated list of one rendering style per
                                                               requested layer. Optional if SLD parameter is present.
SRS=namespace:identifier                             R         Spatial Reference System.
BBOX=xmin,ymin,xmax,ymax                             R         Bounding box corners (lower left, upper right) in SRS
                                                               units.
WIDTH=output_width                                   R         Width in pixels of map picture.
HEIGHT=output_height                                 R         Height in pixels of map picture.
FORMAT=output_format                                 R         Output format of map.
TRANSPARENT=TRUE|FALSE                               O         Background transparency of map (default=FALSE).
BGCOLOR=color_value                                  O         Hexadecimal red-green-blue color value for the
                                                               background color (default=0xFFFFFF).
EXCEPTIONS=exception_format                          O         The format in which exceptions are to be reported by
                                                               the WMS (default=SE_XML).
TIME=time                                            O         Time value of layer desired.
ELEVATION=elevation                                  O         Elevation of layer desired.
Other sample dimension(s)                            O         Value of other dimensions as appropriate.
Vendor-specific parameters                           O         Optional experimental parameters.
The following parameters are used only with Web Map Services that support the Styled Layer Descriptor
specification
SLD=styled_layer_descriptor_URL                      O         URL of Styled Layer Descriptor (as defined in SLD
                                                               Specification).
WFS=web_feature_service_URL                          O         URL of Web Feature Service providing features to be
                                                               symbolized using SLD.


Note: Previously, the GetMap request was capable of returning Feature data. That is now the role of an
OpenGIS Web Feature Service.
GetFeatureInfo: Asks for information about particular features shown on a map. The GetFeatureInfo
operation is designed to provide clients of a WMS with information about a feature in a map image returned
by a previous GetMap request.




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95

The use case for GetFeatureInfo is that a user sees the response of a GetMap request and chooses a point on
that map for which to obtain more information. The basic operation provides the ability for a client to
specify which pixel is being asked about, which layer(s) should be investigated, and what format the
information should be returned in. The actual semantics of how a WMS decides what to return more
information about, or what exactly to return is left up to the WMS provider.
Within CANRI, this GetFeatureInfo capability has been exploited to provide a range of useful applications
that access non-image data sources. Please note that this is properly the domain of a Web Feature Server,
despite the rather confusing use of the terms within CANRI to date.
Note also that GetFeatureInfo is an optional capability for a WMS: software developers are not required to
support it. This is another good reason to move toward the emerging WFS specification if you're primarily
serving data and providing data interaction.

5.6      Web Feature Server
Summary of References 2: Web Feature Servers
             Provisional
                            http://www.opengis.org/info/techno/rfp13info.html
            specification



Overview
                                                                                Figure 8: OpenGIS Web Feature
Feature servers are designed to provide access to (and                                  Service
interaction with) non-image data collections. Generally, WFS
operations support INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, QUERY and                                           OGC
DISCOVERY of geographic features.                                                       Web Feature Service
At the time of writing no implementation specification had yet
been released for WFS, but we have a good idea of what it will          GetCapabilities
look like. CANRI sponsored participation in the development                     DescribeFeatureType
of this spec through the OWS Testbed process, which has                                           GetFeature
produced very useful advances in defining the access,
interaction, and symbolisation parameters for time-series and sensor data collections.
It is expected that a basic WFS server will support three requests: GetCapabilities, DescribeFeatureType
and GetFeature. An advanced (transactional) WFS would additionally implement a Transaction operation,
and LockFeature.

5.7      Gazetteer
Overview
Gazetteers are a specific type of web-based feature servers. Typically they are used to server controlled
values, eg. geographic placenames.
In this context, a gazetteer provides a means to specify a geographic object through use of well known
(common) names, such as a town name. Gazetteers are needed to navigate quickly and efficiently to
targeted information or services available in CANRI. Without them, CANRI applications would be too
difficult to navigate through or cross-link from other contexts. A placename gazetteer is also useful as an
authoritative reference for spelling.
At present, local gazetteer copies (ie “non-authoritative” data) are served and used in production CANRI
applications in the interim for high priority feature types such as catchments and LGAs. Authoritative third
party services will be provided when available.
CANRI will be developing user interfaces for gazetteer functions as these are not yet well-evolved or
standardised.




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


5.8      CANRI Catalog
Summary of References 3: CANRI Catalog Service
 OpenGIS Specification      http://www.opengis.org/techno/specs/99-051.pdf



Overview
The CANRI Catalog is network-addressable data server sitting on top of the NRDD and including
service/availability details for data layers.
Catalogs are one of the most complex areas for CANRI, with issues including authority, how things are
classified, completeness and duplication across multiple catalogs. Technical and policy standards are still at
an early stage of development and are still evolving in different communities, such as libraries and GIS.
Recognising this difficulty, CANRI will be piloting the integration into CANRI web applications of access
to a single high-priority non-CANRI spatial data collection: the Australian Natural Resources Data Library
(ANRDL). The ANRDL is the repository for over 200 natural resources datasets created during the
National Land and Water Resources Audit (NLWRA), and is managed by the Bureau of Rural Sciences
(BRS) within the Commonwealth Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (AFFA) [See the
NLWRA website]

How the CANRI Catalog is used
The CANRI Catalog is available to framework applications as a CSGI dataserver. The CSGI protocol is a
forerunner of current OpenGIS specifications.
Currently, the Catalog is available to those applications that are configured to handle CSGI. These include
the main NRDD browsing application (the NRA), the Australian Coastal Atlas, and PartnerPlus. New
applications are expected only to implement the OpenGIS Catalog specification, and CANRI will be
upgraded soon, per the CANRI CataloguePlus Project 02.

5.9      Natural Resources Data Directory (NRDD)
Summary of References 4: Natural Resources Data Directory (NRDD)
          Online version    www.canri.nsw.gov.au/nrdd/
    Related DIY module      CANRI Metadata Managers Guide
       Technical Support    CANRI Technical Officer
      Access restrictions   Password-protected online administration interface



Overview
The Natural Resources Data Directory (NRDD) is a register of around 5,000 natural resource datasets held
mainly by New South Wales State and local government agencies. Its purpose is to make natural resources
data widely accessible by providing a friendly interface. The term data has been interpreted as broadly as
possible and includes not only data in digital form (including satellite imagery) but also material in
hardcopy formats such as printed maps, reports and photographs.
The NRDD covers a wealth of information for topics as diverse as vegetation and wildlife, inland and
coastal waters, land use, soils, mineral resources, energy, urban planning, infrastructure, air pollution and
many more. Much of the information listed in the NRDD is now priceless because it can never be collected
again. Unlike other information, natural resources information remains extremely valuable regardless of its
age.
It includes data collected over long periods of time, such as the heights and flows of rivers in NSW dating
back to the late 1880's, as well as up to the minute information collected as part of specific projects.



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Registration of data products in the NRDD is free. CANRI encourages those agencies, organisations and
industries holding natural resources information to list their data.

How the NRDD is used
A student of architecture recently used the NRDD to find out how best to locate and access information
about the town of Tamworth in north-western New South Wales for a major design project. She wanted
historical and cultural information on town planning and development, soil surveys, maps indicating soil
types, land contours and any other relevant information. This was all available through the NRDD.
Application designers who wish to access the NRDD and CANRI service catalog directly from their own
applications should review Application development: Roll-your-own.

5.10 Natural Resources Atlas (NRA)
Summary of References 5: Natural Resources Atlas (NRA)
          Online access     www.canri.nsw.gov.au/atlas
    Access Restrictions     None: public application



Overview
The NRA helps users discover and access natural resources data layers covering a wide range of
environmental themes such as wildlife, vegetation, geology, land, water, pollution and more. It provides the
ability to search all the data layers in the NSW Natural Resources Data Directory (NRDD) and to view
those which have been made available online.
The NRA enables users to select an area of interest on a map and search approximately 5,000 data records
currently listed in the NRDD. Searches can be formulated on a particular theme, keyword, or physical
property. The NRA functions as a catalog browsing tool for the NRDD.
Although technically speaking the NRA is just another CANRI application, it is included here as a core
framework component due to its role as the primary access interface to the data served in the CANRI
framework.

How the NRA is used
The NRAs URL is provided above. From this page, choose to "Search the NRA".
Let's say you wish to find and view what water and soil quality information exists near Wollongong. Zoom
in on the map to Wollongong, using the zoom controls and pan to frame up your area of interest.
Then, from the legend option [Search for Data], use the pop-up search interface to locate suitable data
layers. You could add data to the map such as Streamwatch sample points, groundwater availability or acid-
sulfate soil risk assessments in the Illawarra. When you have selected all your data layers, choose to [Use
these Layers] and you will be returned to the main NRA map interface with your map layers added.




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


6 Applications: Solutions for your end-users
This section is particularly useful for web designers, communications managers and agency decision
makers. Technical approaches to application design will be of interest to Web Application managers and
IT Support staff.
If serving data is the "input" to CANRI, applications are the "output". This Section takes a closer look at
some of the best ways to use the power of the CANRI framework within your own organisational domain.
There is no practical limit to the variety of applications that CANRI can support. So we'll cover some of the
basic issues associated with application design, and provide a snapshot of current CANRI applications to
fuel your imagination.

Figure 9: Orientation to Data Serving

                                    Provide an end-user                   End-user applications
                                                                           End-user applications
                                         application


                                        Comms strategy
                                         Product design                         CANRI
                    Participating        Needs analysis              Information-sharing network
                    organisation       Technical inventory
                                          Infrastructure         Register NRDD
                                               Skills              metadata

                                    Provide data products                         Serve Data
                                                                                   Serve Data

Software and solutions
This table provides links directly to the relevant software or component reference summaries.

Table 9: Summary of References: End-User Applications
GeoTools
MapBroker
MapServer 3.5 / 3.6 (provides application and data serving)
WebMap Composer (WMC)



6.1      Suggested steps in solution design
Designing an application means designing a solution: the "holistic" process of looking at a project from all
perspectives and developing an optimised approach to getting results.
If you're concerned with applications, obviously you need to consider your organisation's policies and
objectives, the actual data formats, the capabilities of the services involved, and of course, the user's needs.
Here's a rough list of pointers to get your discussions under way: We strongly recommend that before
starting technical development you put together a solution design that addresses these factors.

Strategic concerns
Organisational strategy: e-Government
    What is available from framework partners
    What data products are we custodians of already (make use of available products instead of
       investing in new development)
    What is involved in negotiation or creation of required data (if a new product is to be developed,
       what issues will need to be addressed)



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     How does this application help us deliver on e-Government outcomes
Communications strategy: Client focus
     What does the client need . . . this defines the purpose of the application or data provision
     Linkages with commercial services
     Agency collaboration opportunities
     Corporate identity and credits
     Funding availability
Technical strategy: Interoperability
     Preparing for a more connected world
     Evolving your agency's capacity to network knowledge
     Provides incentive for rigorous quality control

Technical Evaluation
         Will we use distributed data sources (ability to query catalog?)
         Are we providing shallow or deep user interaction (server/client side?) (more than OpenGIS
          WMS/WFS parameters?)
         Do we have web infrastructure and skills to support the application (use internal/contractor/hosting
          service?)

Create data products
If a new data product needs to be created, you must consider:
       Symbolisation at scale
       Data management workflow
       Performance factors
       Costs (internal + licensing)
       Data quality issues (for use of data beyond its original context)
       Maintenance
If you are providing a non-map dataset, this requires typical information modelling exercise:
       Data schema
       Links to more information
       User scenarios
       Transaction requirements
These points may involve quite complex issues. Remember, CANRI itself is simply a way of doing things.
Generally, you'll find that most of this planning exercise is normal analysis which you are already familiar
with. We bring it to your attention as a caution against thinking that CANRI provides ready-made answers
in these areas.

6.2       Making use of existing data
In designing your application, you may wish to first check out what data is already available online. This bit
of research may uncover surprising results. This research may uncover surprising results. At the time of
writing, there were about 100 datasets served through the CANRI framework and more are coming online
steadily. These datasets can be viewed through the NRA and other applications that make use of the
CANRI catalog.
Additionally, there are about 5,000 listings in the NRDD. Searching these records may reveal just the right
dataset for your application. Try contacting the data custodian and arrange for them to serve the data to the
CANRI network. Alternatively, you may be able to negotiate access to the data and serve it yourself.




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Key datasets
There is an enormous volume of geo-spatial information in the natural resources community, so it should
come as no surprise if a particular dataset is not yet available online. The process of identifying priority
datasets is a project in itself, the CANRI Data Framework project. This project involves consultation with a
wide range of data custodians and stakeholders to come up with the most productive areas for investment of
resources. As an example, here are some of the priority datasets identified through a thematic inventory on
Salinity:
      Soil and Land Information System (SALIS)
      Erosion - Landuse Survey
      Spatial database of native vegetation clearing applications
      Land Management Plans - Multi-Attribute assessment
      Salinity Hazard Mapping
      Stressed River Catchments and Sub-Catchments
      Irrigation Areas
      Groundwater Level Data
      Water Quality (boreholes)
      Land Capability
Through the project links above, you can review the current priorities along a number of inventory
headings. Input to this process is gladly received: contact the Project Officer via the website for more
discussion .

6.3      Making use of existing applications
One of the quickest ways to address your application requirements is to negotiate with an existing
application provider. There are an increasing number of applications designed for this sort of arrangement,
eg, the PartnerPlus program provides customisation and data hosting support for applications built through
the WebMap Composer.
To evaluate the suitability of an existing application for your needs, ask yourself these questions:
      How much interaction do our users require?
      Can we brand the user interface?
      Can the application be called from a weblink on our website and show a preset configuration?
      What are the data sharing policies and technology platforms?
A range of hosting services are provided through DLWC, including data and application hosting. Other
agencies and organisations expect to be offering similar services in the future. For more information about
shared applications or hosting services, contact the CANRI Business Development Manager.

Table 10: Applications in the CANRI framework
 Allows Hosting: Means that the application can be used to save specified configurations
 Distributed Data: Means that the application can be configured to include data from remote servers
                                                                                                Allows      Distribute
Application      Managed by      Description
                                                                                               hosting?      d data?
CLIO                DLWC         Community Landcare Information Online                             -             +
                                 Landcare groups
Coastal Atlas       DLWC         ACA                                                               -             +
                                 NSW node of the Australian Coastal Atlas
FishFiles            NSW         FishFiles                                                         -             +
                   Fisheries     Species Database
HITS                DLWC         Hunter Integrated Telemetry System                                -             -
                                 A data gathering system that uses radio and telephone to
                                 automatically collect realtime data from remote
                                 environmental monitoring sites in the Hunter Valley and



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                                 DLWC Hunter Region
NRA                 DLWC         Natural Resources Atlas                                           -             +
                                 Viewing application for the NRDD. General-purpose
                                 discovery, display and query of natural resources data.
PartnerPlus       NCC NSW        PartnerPlus                                                       +             +
                                 Service available to NCC member groups. Allows creation
                                 of map views, control over interface layout, and data-
                                 upload/hosting.
PlanConnect         PNSW         IPlan information network                                         -             +
                                 Enables users to access a wide range of local and state
                                 planning instruments as well as CANRI-listed datasets
PlantNet             RBG         NSWPlant, Plants@Risk, WeedAlert, WattleWeb                       -             -
                                 New South Wales plant names, their distribution and their
                                 conservation status.
RIIS                DLWC         River Information Internet System                                 -             +
                                 Provides river water levels and flows, storage elevations,
                                 volumes and discharges from locations across New South
                                 Wales.
SoE Direct        NSW EPA        State of the Environment Reporting                                -             +
                                 Provides online access to several important NSW EPA
                                 data resources, to assist Councils in preparing their own
                                 State of the Environment reports.
SPADE               DLWC         Soil Profile Attribute Data Environment                           -             -
                                 Find and display soil profile information, get info on the
                                 soil profile points displayed on the map, and retrieve a
                                 report on the landform and soil at that site.
Streamwatch/        Sydney       Community-driven local water quality database                     -             +
Waterwatch          Water
Wildlife Atlas      NPWS         Atlas of NSW Wildlife                                             -             -
                                 Fauna dictionary
Note: These applications are accessible from the CANRI home page

6.4        Application development: Roll-your-own
While it can be mind-bogglingly complicated to build your own high-end online mapping application, there
are a number of ways to build very simple, fast applications that may just do the job with a minimum of
fuss. We'll outline a couple of these as starters, but feel free to experiment. If you come up with something
new, make sure to announce it on CANRI-Talk!

Simple JavaScript WMS Client
An example of a simple WMS client that could be inserted in to a HTML document can be found at the
The University of Kansas Natural History Museum and Biodiversity Research Center Site:
 http://tsadev.speciesanalyst.net/documentation/ow.asp?InlineWMSMap This site is definitely worth a look
to see how a simple client can be built.

Map image only: Using Layers
This is a very simple trick to put a map on your website in about 15 minutes using nothing but a browser
and a text editor (assuming you can change pages on your website!)
This approach only works for datasets that are available online through the CANRI catalog, and exploits the
DHTML <layers> element to overlay images (note: <layers> are supported by later model Microsoft
InternetExplorer browsers).
1. Set your desired viewing extent (zoom in/out)



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2. Search/browse for map data in the NRDD via the NRA classic interface
3. Select desired layers for display on the map
4. Once your legend is complete and the view is acceptable, click on the link "view statistics" at the
    bottom of the page.
5. Note that each data layer in the legend has a link: copy this as a shortcut and paste it into your text
    editor. Each of these URLs returns one map layer (try it in your browser: just paste the link in and hit
    return: you should get a map).
6. Now that you have the list of URLs that are combined in the map view, all you need to do is stack up
    the images so they appear in a single bounding box.
If you're not familiar with layers, there's an example of this technique online at:
www.communityfoods.com.au/widgets/map_viewer.jsp.

Connecting to the CANRI Catalog
For some applications, it's important to be able to query the CANRI Catalog. This is a reasonably
challenging technical requirement, and not to be undertaken lightly. The CANRI technical staff maintain a
help file that should be sufficient to get you started.

6.5      GeoTools
Summary of References 6: GeoTools
      Online information    http://geotools.sourceforge.net/
                 Licence    Open-source


GeoTools is a free Java-based mapping toolkit that allows maps to be viewed interactively on web browsers
without the need for dedicated server-side support. The project is open source and is covered by the LGPL.

6.6      MapBroker
Summary of References 7: MapBroker
      Online information    webmap.socialchange.net.au/products.html
      Technical Support     CANRI Technical Officer
                 Licence    Commercial



Overview
MapBroker is a Java library that allows JSP-based middleware applications to access multiple sources of
geographic data and render them into interactive maps within any end-user web application.
MapBroker's suite of Java servlets and classes handle functions such as:
     Re-projection and geo-rectification
     Multi-threaded (simultaneous) access of data
     Catalog service queries
     View configuration
     Responding to client-side interactive requests
     Multiple data formats from remote services (images, documents, LDAP directories, etc)
MapBroker provides a JavaScript and Java Application Programming Interface (API) that can be accessed
from JSP (Java Server Pages) web pages.




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How MapBroker is used
MapBroker is applied in situations where distributed data sources are to be combined in a single end-user
interface. The central feature that MapBroker supports is the ability to query multiple, heterogenous data
servers across the internet and combine their responses into a single map view.
A prime example of such an end-user application is the NRA, which allows users to browse and view
datasets available in the NRDD via the CANRI Catalog. The user identifies datasets of interest in the
NRDD and specifies viewing particulars via the NRA interface. All communication between the NRA
interface, the Catalog and the distributed data sources is managed via the MapBroker.

6.7      WebMap Composer (WMC)
Summary of References 8: WebMap Composer
    Product Information     webmap.socialchange.net.au/documentation/wmc/
      Technical Support     support@socialchange.net.au
                 Licence    Commercial



Overview
WebMap Composer (WMC) is a product developed and licenced by Social Change Online. A self-
contained suite of middleware components and interface templates, the WMC allows application authors
without technical skills to produce end-user interfaces and views on data and combine these into end-user
viewing applications.
These applications run from your server (or from a hosting partner) and provide control over the interface
branding. These applications can be launched from a normal web link, making it quite feasible to enhance
your website with interactive mapping.

How WebMap Composer used
WebMap Composer has been used to rebuild the NRA application, support PlanningNSW's PlanConnect
interface, and is at the core of the Nature Conservation Council's PartnerPlus project.
CANRI is considering the potential benefits of offering organisations the opportunity to licence the
WebMap Composer at reduced rates.




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7 Managing Metadata
This section is intended to assist data custodians or IT staff who have responsibility for managing
metadata records for data products and web services in the NRDD and CANRI Catalog.

Figure 10: Orientation to Managing Metadata

                                    Provide an end-user                   End-user applications
                                                                           End-user applications
                                         application


                                        Comms strategy
                                         Product design                         CANRI
                    Participating        Needs analysis              Information-sharing network
                    organisation       Technical inventory
                                          Infrastructure         Register NRDD
                                               Skills              metadata

                                    Provide data products                         Serve Data
                                                                                   Serve Data


Table 11: Summary of References: Metadata Management
MET Online: Metadata Manager (NRDD authoritative metadata)
MEM: Metadata Entry Manager (services and CANRI extensions)



7.1      Overview: the role of metadata in CANRI
Metadata is the quiet secret of CANRI: it's the foundation for the network. This foundation is organised
around two concepts: metadata for datasets and (if applicable) metadata describing the web service where
data layers may be accessed..
The metadata for datasets is collected using the MET Online interface. So when you create a new dataset
(or other data product), you need to provide a description of the data to the NRDD using MET Online. The
specification for this metadata is maintained by ANZLIC and is known as Page 0 metadata.. MET Online
also collects several additional metadata elements known as NSW Page 1 metadata.
The delivery of data layers is accomplished through a web service (e.g., a dataserver). The metadata for
services is stored in the CANRI Catalog, which accommodates extensions to the core ANZLIC elements.
We typically refer to this service metadata as the "CANRI extensions".
Currently, the CANRI extensions are managed through the MEM online interface. This is expected to
change in the near future, with the MET Online interface providing the functionality required for both data
layers and their service details.




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Figure 11: Relationship of CANRI Catalog with MEM and MET Online

                          NRA                              CANRI Applications
                      MapBroker                                    MapBroker          MapBroker




                                            CANRI Catalog

                                            CANRI
                                                        NRDD          copy      NRDD
                                          extensions




                            MEM                                                            MetOnline



                          metadata          Services
                                          Services                     Data
                                            Services                                       metadata
                                          (WMS/WFS)
                                         (WMS/WFS)                    Layers
                                           (WMS/WFS)

From an operational perspective, user applications connect to the CANRI Catalog. The CANRI Catalog is
currently implemented in Oracle and represents a manually maintained copy of the NRDD metadatabase.
CANRI services metadata is linked to the NRDD records where relevant. The CANRI Catalog also
incorporates ANZLIC records for non-NSW data available through the CANRI applications, as well as
records from OpenGIS sources world-wide.

7.2       MET Online: Metadata Management for the NRDD
Summary of References 9: MET Online
           Online version      http://www.canri.nsw.gov.au/nrdd/
      Technical Support        NRDD Coordinator
       ANZLIC Metadata         http://www.anzlic.org.au/asdi/metaelem.htm
            Guidelines



Overview
MET Online is the web-based management interface for your NRDD metadata records. The interface is
linked from CANRI's NRDD information page, above.
The MET Online interface provides in-line help and guidance.
It is usually a good idea to prepare your metadata before launching the administration interface. To assist
you, the table below sets out the ANZLIC page 0 metadata elements. For more information about each
element, you should refer to the ANZLIC Metadata Guidelines, above.

Table 12: ANZLIC Core Metadata Elements
Category          Element             Definition of Element                            Obln           Max
Occ               Field
Dataset           ANZLIC              The unique identifier given to the dataset by    M              1     Text(15)
                  Identifier          ANZLIC.
                  Title               The ordinary name of the dataset.                M              1     Text(160)
Custodian         Custodian           The business name of the custodial               M              1     Text(120)



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                                    organisation or responsible party
                                    associated with the dataset.
                  Jurisdiction      The state or country in which the Custodian       M       1            Text(30)
                                    of the dataset is domiciled.
Description       Abstract          A brief narrative summary of the content of       M       1            Text(2000)
                                    the dataset.
                  Search Word       Words likely to be used by a non-expert to        M       N            Text(60)
                                    find the dataset.
                  Geographic        The ordinary name of one or more pre-             O       N
                  Extent Name       defined, known geographic objects that
                                    reasonably show the extent of geographic
                                    coverage of the dataset. This element is
                                    usually implemented as three discrete
                                    elements as listed below
                                                                                                  1
                  GEN Category      Category to which the Geographic Extent           C       1            Text(80)
                                    Name belongs including map series, local
                                    government area and drainage divisions
                                    and major river basins.
                                                                                                  1
                  GEN Custodial     Country, state or territory that is responsible   C       1            Text(30)
                  Jurisdiction      for maintaining the detail of the geographic
                                    object
                                                                                                  1
                  GEN Name          Name of the geographic object.                    C       1            Text(80)
                  Geographic        Boundary enclosing the dataset expressed          O       N            Text(1000)
                  Extent Polygon    as a closed set of geographic coordinates
                                    (latitude, longitude) of the polygon
                                    referenced to GDA94. This is an alternate
                                    way of describing geographic extent of the
                                    dataset if no pre-defined area is
                                    satisfactory.
                  Geographic        A rectangle defining the minimum and              M       1
                  Bounding Box      maximum coordinates of the entire data.
                                    This element is implemented as four
                                    discrete elements as listed below.
                  North             Northern-most coordinate of the limit of the      M       1            Signed Real
                  Bounding          dataset expressed in latitude, in decimal                              Number
                  Latitude          degrees.
                  South             Southern-most coordinate of the limit of the      M       1            Signed Real
                  Bounding          dataset expressed in latitude, in decimal                              Number
                  Latitude          degrees.
                  East Bounding     Eastern-most coordinate of the limit of the       M       1            Signed Real
                  Longitude         dataset expressed in longitude, in decimal                             Number
                                    degrees
                  West Bounding     Western-most coordinate of the limit of the       M       1            Signed Real
                  Longitude         dataset expressed in longitude, in decimal                             Number
                                    degrees.
Data Currency     Beginning date    Earliest date at which the phenomena in the       M       1            Text(10)
                                    dataset actually occurred.
                  Ending date       Latest date at which the phenomena in the         M       1            Text(10)
                                    dataset actually occurred.
Dataset Status    Progress          The status of the process of creation of the      M       1            Text(20)
                                    dataset.
                  Maintenance       Frequency of changes or additions that are        M       1            Text(20)
                  and Update        made to the dataset after its initial
                  Frequency         completion.




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Access            Stored Data       The format in which the dataset is stored by    M          1           Text(500)
                  Format            the custodian.
                  Available         The format in which the dataset is available.   O          N           Text(240)
                  Format Type
                  Access            Any restrictions or legal prerequisites that    M          1           Text(500)
                  Constraint        may apply to the access and use of the
                                    dataset including licensing, liability and
                                    copyright.
Data Quality      Lineage           A brief history of the source and processing    M          1           Text(4000)
                                    steps used to produce the dataset.
                  Positional        A brief assessment of the closeness of the      M          1           Text(4000)
                  Accuracy          location of spatial objects in the dataset in
                                    relation to their true position on the Earth.
                  Attribute         A brief assessment of the reliability           M          1           Text(4000)
                  Accuracy          assigned to features in the dataset in
                                    relation to their real world values.
                  Logical           A brief assessment of the degree of             M          1           Text(4000)
                  Consistency       adherence of logical rules of data structure,
                                    attribution and relationships. Data structure
                                    can be conceptual, logical or physical.
                  Completeness      A brief assessment of the extent and range      M          1           Text(4000)
                                    in regard to completeness of coverage,
                                    completeness of classification and
                                    completeness of verification.
Contact           Contact
Information
                                                                                        2
Organisation      Name of the       M                                               1          Text(120)
                  organisation
                  from which the
                  dataset may be
                  obtained.
                                                                                                   2
                  Contact           The position in the Contact Organisation        M          1           Text(40)
                  Position          that will answer questions about the
                                    dataset.
                                                                                                   2
                  Mail Address      Postal address or delivery point of the         M          2           Text(40)
                                    Contact Position.
                                                                                                   2
                  Locality          Locality associated with the Mail Address.      M          1           Text(60)
                  State             Aust: State associated with the Mail
                                    Address
                                        2
NZ: Optional      M                 1                                               Text(40)
extension for
Locality.
                                                                                                   2
                  Country           Country associated with the Mail Address.       M          1           Text(40)
                  Postcode          Aust: Postcode associated the Mail
                                    Address.
                                        2
NZ: Optional      M                 1                                               Text(10)
postcode for
mail sorting.
                                                                                                   2
                  Telephone         Telephone number of the Contact Position.       O          1           Text(25)
                                                                                                   2
                  Facsimile         Facsimile number of the Contact Position.       O          1           Text(25)
                                                                                                   2
                  Electronic Mail   Electronic Mail Address of the Contact          O          1           Text(80)
                  Address           Position.




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Metadata Date     Metadata Date     Date on which the metadata record was          M          1            Text(10)
                                    created or modified.
Additional        Additional        Any additional metadata the supports           O          1            Text(4000)
Metadata          Metadata          documentation of the dataset including a
                                    reference to another directory or report.



7.3       MEM: Metadata Extension Manager for Web services
This section is applicable to technical staff who are setting up web services, such as an OpenGIS Web Map
Server (WMS). You'll be guided through the process of accessing the MEM online interface and
configuring/testing the metadata record for your service.

Overview
The Metadata Extension Manager (MEM) is a web-interface for the configuration of data layers available to
the CANRI framework. MEM interfaces with the CANRI Catalog metadatabase hosted by DLWC. The
MEM is used to collect and manage the additional services metadata – referred to as "CANRI extensions" –
necessary for providing online access to the data layers.
Before accessing the MEM, you must have a login and password, which may be obtained from the CANRI
Technical Officer.

Notes and Prerequisites
         The dataset custodian must ensure that an ANZLIC-compliant metadata record has been provided
          to the NRDD using the MET Online interface.
         The ANZLIC metadata record must be manually entered into the CANRI metadatabase by the
          CANRI metadatabase administrator
         The administrator must have specified the subset of metadata records that are visible for this user
          within the MEM.
         Several layer definitions can be specified for a single metadata record.
         The name "ICMISS" is the previous name for CANRI.
         The term „middleware‟ in this document refers to the MapBroker application by Social Change
          Online. It is the blackbox into which we are feeding layer options as described in this document.

Getting started
The Metadata Extension Manager is located at: is.dlwc.nsw.gov.au/icmiss/manage/login.html
After login you are presented with a list of existing layers visible to you for editing.
You can now [Delete] this layer, create a [New] layer definition or [View] and edit this layer.
Please delete any layer definitions that are superseded, as they will still be visible to users when searching
for metadata records that are linked to them.

Adding a New Layer Definition
You are required to identify the metadata record to which you wish to link your layer.
You can request a preselection of metadata records matching searchwords in title and abstract, but usually
you will identify the metadata record by ANZLIC identifier ANZNS…….
If , on [Submit], the expected record does not appear, it is either not in the database or you have not been
granted access to this record.
If the expected record appears , [Select] it and give your layer a short name:

Layer Names
1. Keep this name short and free of spaces and other punctuation marks except underscores




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2. Please help with layer management by consistently prefixing this name with an identifier of your
    agency, eg. “epa_wqms”, “dlwc_acidsulp_soils”. This name need not be unique among all CANRI
    layers, but it is likely that it will need to be unique among layer definitions within your agency.
3. If you plan to use mapserv as your dataserver for this layer, this name can only be 20 characters long.
    Due to a bug in mapserv, each underscore appearing in this name reduces the maximum permissable
    length by one character.
You are now taken to the ICMISS Extension page of the MEM and are required to fill it out and [Apply]
your settings. See documentation on Editing a Layer Definition and proceed to supply all required
information.

Editing a Layer Definition
There is a Help facility built into the MEM interface which describes the interface itself adequately, but is
directed to the technically minded user (i.e. someone who understands the meaning of „arbitrary dataserver‟
without further explanation) and does not mention bugs. Use it for reference beyond this document, which
aims to assist in defining layers quickly.
Note: All metadata extension layers are cached by CANRI middleware. Do not expect to see changes by
refreshing display of your layer in an active application. Use the [Test Preview] tool instead, remove and
reload your layer in the application or restart the application.
If your layer is called from static XML files (eg. WebMap Composer Data View, pre-defined themes in
NRA, CoastalAtlas or custom applications) you may have to manually make service detail changes inside
the applications as well.

Table 13: Field Guide to CANRI (ICMISS) Extensions
Attribute               Notes
Layer Name              Change the layer name if needed. See comment on layer names.
                        If your layer is called from XML-files (eg. WebMap Composer, pre-defined themes in NRA, Coastal
                        Atlas or custom applications) you will have to change layer names there as well !
Data Server             „Dataserver‟ in the context of this document means any program responding to MapBroker‟s request
                        for returning geographic data, as images of rendered layers or XML-style information about a layer,
                        rendered by the middleware itself.
                        Choose from a list of dataserver URLs. These are defined and edited through [Data Server
                        Maintenance] dialog, which guides you through defining the URL of the CGI application handling
                        dataserver requests. Note that you cannot specify any parameters with this URL (eg.
                        '„www.mysite.mapserv?map=mymap”) because CANRI middleware will append “?” to the URL
                        regardless. If you need server-specific parameters you need to provide a wrapper-application.
Protocol                CSGI2.0 for dslite and mapserv, WMT1.0 for WMS1.0 compliant dataservers.

Description             Describes layer in list of layers on login to MEM.

Metadata Extension
Creator                 Your name, consistent across layers, please.
                        Click [Apply] to save your changes.
Spatial Context         Set a list in which datum/projection your dataserver can return features, and for which spatial extent
                        (enclosing rectangle) in a map-request the dataserver should attempt mapping.
                        The most common setting for NSW government agency layers is AGD66/Geographic (latitude,
                        longitude in decimal degrees). The following extent will display the whole of NSW including Norfolk
                        Islands: -20.0 N, 140 W, 160 E, -40 S.
                        If your dataserver supports reprojection (eg. mapserv), you can define multiple entries for
                        datum/projection. WMS ompliant dataservers will always return available projections in their
                        capabilities document.
                        Note:     ANZLIC metadata records allow specification of several extents, so you may see several
                        named extents. In practice only one spatial context will be used for each layer definition. If your
                        dataset comprises of many tiles it is advisable to furnish a metadata record describing the dataset as
                        a whole, treat the dataset as a single entity (through merging of tiles or the use of tiling features in
                        the map server) and define the extent for the complete dataset.
Queriable               Allows display of a subset of data according to a textual attribute criterion Oracle SQL function „LIKE‟.




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Attributes              Supported only for pointlayers layers using DSLITE dataserver. The value for „Column‟ must
                        correspond to the name of the column(s) in your DSLITE datasource. Only the String „Type‟ has been
                        tested.
Capability
Name                    You are required to provide a short description of what the layer shows, which will be appended to
                        the layer‟s title in the map legend.
                        This is very useful when defining multiple layers for a single metadata record (see AUSLIG‟s „Global
                        Map Data Australia‟ dataset for an example).
                        Note:Do not include punctuation marks in this field as some software modules currently cannot
                        handle this.
Feature                 Geographic data type. Only 'point', 'line' and 'polygon' specifications have been used so far. The
                        choice presented does not directly correspond to WMS compliant queries.
Vector Type             Specify what the dataserver actually returns. This can be either text-based (XML) or image-based
                        (currently only GIF supported).
Image Type              If your dataserver returns XML/GML-style list of datapoints (DSLITE pointdata server, ServerServlet,
                        WebFeatureServer), VectorType is set to„Text/XML‟, ImageType to 'none'.
                        For dataservers returning GIF images VectorType is set to 'none' and 'ImageType to 'image/gif'.
                        Once the above fields have been specified and [Add]ed to the layer‟s definition we can define
                        attribute and display characteristics to the layer. Press [Apply] to save your settings.
Field                   Applies only to point servers, eg. DSLITE and WFSLite. Specify the field in your pointdata table
                        which will be used to display a single pointfeature‟s attribute when the mousepointer hovers on top of
                        it on the map, and the layer has been activated for querying. Default is 'Label'.
Presentation            Each option requires a short description for display in the navigation- tree on the left side of the
                        dialog and for presentation of layer capabilities in the extended metadata record displays.
URL of Icon to use      The completely specified URL retrieving the image used in legend and search catalog. In the case of
in Legend               point data, this will also be used to render this layer.
                        Example 1: Hand-drawn image to represent points:
                                  is.dlwc.nsw.gov.au/gifs/orangetriangle_saline.gif
                        Example 2: Program generated, classification/based legend:
                                is.dlwc.nsw.gov.au/cgi-
                                bin/fornet3/mapserv3?map=dlwc2/dlwc2_geo.map&mode=legend&layer=dlwc_dryland_sal
                        _haz
                        Example 3: Legend „copied‟ from a website:
                                globe.gsfc.nasa.gov/globe/en/icons/colorbars/rprain.h.gif
URL of external         Provides a button to link to an arbitrary website. Currently a bug (or is it a feature ?) will link the layer
web interface           to the ANZ metadata record if there is one. Only from within the extended metadata record (displayed
                        when double-clicking the layer-title in the legend or search dialog) you will be able to link to the
                        external site as intended.
Geographic Extent       Zooms map to extent of a feature when clicked (requires Feature Details option). Problems with point
                        data layers as middleware does not deal with extent of magnitude 0.
Feature Details         A flag that this layer can be queried against attributes. No entry in „Default‟ field required. Layers with
                        this attribute will have a blue rectangle around the legend symbol (old NRA interface) or a checkbox
                        in the Query column of the legend (WebMapComposer).
URL of external         Fully specified URL to an application that will produce a report for a feature other than feature-info
web interface for a     capabilities inbuilt into the middleware. The customized program will receive the identifier-value from
single Feature          the dataset as returned in dataserver XML element <ID> as in:
                        waterinfo.dlwc.nsw.gov.au/servlet/dummyreport?site=
                        or
                        Part of an URL pointing to a website that stores individual static html-pages for each feature on the
                        map („root directory‟). Currently there are two ways of realising this feature:
                        (1) using Mapserver as your dataserver, employ template mechanism to translate an arbitrary
                            column value for this feature into the name of a corresponding web-page (Example: „Statistical
                            Local Area‟ layer by ABS).
                        (2) pointdata only: store the name of the html-page in a column of a dataset served by DSLITE
                        Example: „Monitoring River Health Initiative‟ by EPA, using defaults:
                        A column in your DSLITE-readable database named „ID‟ holds unique identifiers
                        ID,X,Y,Label




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                        ID_400, 135.0, -35.0, „Site 1‟
                        ID_401, 135.1, -35.1, „Site 2‟
                        ID_402, 135.2, -35.2, „Site 3‟
                        Specify URL to root of static document directory, eg: mysite/gis/mylayer/staticpages/
                        Place pages called „ID_400‟, „ID_401‟, „ID_402‟ into the physical path mapped to the URL above,
                        each containing your customized content for presentation of the particular feature.
String interpreted      This option is currently not honoured. Its purpose is to send additional, static information about this
by data server          layer to a dataserver outside the standard CSGI/WMS protocol.

Named Style             The value for the „style‟ key in WMS-compliant queries. Can be used to pass additional information to
                        a customized data-server wrapper for special purposes.



7.4      Testing and troubleshooting
Testing for each layer consists of checking the intended functionality against actual outcome.
Troubleshooting procedures are very different for each data layer and dataserver environment.
Typical troublespots are:
      incorrect or incomplete metadata-extension specifications
      metadatabase inconsistency
      mapserver configuration requirements
      data inconsistencies
      disfunctions from special characters in URLs
      mapserver environment (java, perl)
      server configuration (file access, routing issues)
DLWC maintains a testing regimen by regularly invoking dataservers for each layer and flagging non-
response. This process is not fully automatic yet.




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


8 Guide to Data Serving
Who should read this Guide
This document is intended for technical users who intend to serve their own data, ie, you will be concerned
with establishing CANRI-compliant online data services.
If you do not intend to provide online access to your data products, simply follow the procedures for
registering with the NRDD at MET Online metadata management. This process ensures that users of the
NRDD can see how you wish to make the data product available.
If you are particularly interested in displaying and interacting with data, please refer to Applications:
Solutions for your end-users.

Figure 12: Orientation to Data Serving

                                    Provide an end-user                   End-user applications
                                                                           End-user applications
                                         application


                                        Comms strategy
                                         Product design                         CANRI
                    Participating        Needs analysis              Information-sharing network
                    organisation       Techincal inventory
                                          Infrastructure         Register NRDD
                                               Skills              metadata

                                    Provide data products                         Serve Data
                                                                                   Serve Data


Software and Solutions
This section documents CANRI-specific tunings, or adjustments, that are associated with various software
packages. The listings are in alphabetical order by name of package. Where possible, we have included
summary procedures supplied by the software developers.
Note: If you are a technology supplier with relevant solutions not listed in this section, please get in touch
with CANRI so we can organise a heading for you.

Table 14: Summary of References: Data serving Solutions
Current list of all OpenGIS compliant products (from the OGC)
ArcIMS / WMS and WFS Connectors
Autodesk MapGuide
CubeSERV
DSLite
Exposure Image / Spatial Server
GenaMap / GenaWorld
GeoMedia WebMap (Intergraph)
GeoServer
IMS/ECW/ERMapper: Image Server
MapInfo
MapServer 3.5
WFSLite




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


8.1      Quick start
Here's an overview of the data serving process from start to finish. This a slightly re-worded version of the
CANRI Four Step (repeated here in case someone lifted the first chapters from your copy of the DIY).

Prepare data for CANRI
We can help you do a lot of tricky tech with CANRI, but we can't invent data. Organising your data
products for access through public applications may involve several rounds of investigation and
prototyping. Application designers and web managers will want to know what's possible within the CANRI
framework, so this section will help you answer specific questions about formats and capabilities available.
More tips related to data product design are provided at: Suggested steps in solution design.

Establish a web environment and data server
If you don't have an existing technical infrastructure, you'll need to choose a serving environment and GIS
platform suitable for your needs.
The most popular open-source solution uses Apache running on Linux with TomCat or Resin as the Java
servlet container. A database and server are needed: MapServer 3.5 is a good choice, with GeoServer
offering specialty shape functions if you need the sort of sophistication available in PostGIS. If you're
serving data, you can use JDBC connections to a range of applications, such as MySQL, MSAccess, and
MSExcel using an OpenGIS WFS connector such as WFSLite (licence fee applies).
There are a number of commercial offerings for these functions, suited to a range of budgets. The product
summary references in this section provide links for more information.
If you already have a data serving environment set up and running, then you need to refer to the specific
package references for more details on setting up your environment.

Hosting services
If data serving is not yet a possibility, you might try to organise a hosting arrangement with a CANRI
partner who already provides OpenGIS-compliant servers.
For example, DLWC have provided, upon negotiation, data hosting for CANRI agencies. To discuss the
particulars of such an agreement suitable for your agency, please contact the CANRI Program Director.

Register data and service metadata
Once you have your data server set up and tested, you need to register the server to the CANRI catalog.
This metadata will include information that instructs CANRI applications how to access the data layer
offered at the service. The CANRI Metadata Managers Guide contains all the detailed procedures required
for this step.
Note: Until your service and your map layers are registered with the CANRI Catalog (NRDD + services),
your data will not be available to CANRI applications.

Test with a viewing application
The easiest way to view your data online is to use the NRA at www.canri.nsw.gov.au/atlas/. More details
about applications you can build yourself is provided under Applications: Solutions for your end-users
If for some reason you don't have a CANRI login, or want to simply test your map server with an OpenGIS
client, then CubeWerx's WMS interface (cubeview) can be useful to test a new server.
Cubeview is located at: www.cubewerx.com/demo/cubeview/cubeview.cgi
Enter your server's URL at the bottom of the page and click "GO". The default set of layers in the interface
should be replaced with your server's layers.




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8.2         Evaluating your options
For many organisations, technical policy and existing systems will mean there are only a few practical
options. You pretty much will need to work with what you have. To get a better idea of what's possible with
your existing set-up, browse through the summary reference tables for your installed packages.
If you're starting from scratch, you've got a bit of study ahead of you. Providing extensive details on each
possible combination of hosting environment, dataserver, application, and data product is beyond the scope
of this manual. If you require information in addition to what we have provided here, your first option
would be the CANRI-Talk mailing list. After that, you may wish to contact a qualified contractor to
evaluate your options in detail.
In the following table, we provide some of the typical evaluation criteria you can use to compare the
features provided by different combinations of products and solutions.

Table 15: Evaluation criteria for data serving
Platform                             What are the possible operating systems in your network; what GIS tools run in
                                     these environments
Network infrastructure               Any special firewall or proxy servers
Open standards support               Level of support offered for the OpenGIS standards; each standard has several
                                     sub-elements which may be optional. Make sure your application requirements
                                     can be met through the specific OpenGIS implementations offered in the product
File formats                         Compare the data product file formats with the capabilities of the product
Data management facilities           Does the product offer appropriate data management interfaces
Supported data types                 Does the product support your required data types (eg, text, vector, raster)
Supported data models                Does the product support the data models you require (eg, some WFS connectors
                                     offer support for observation, location and time series data models)
Proven interoperability              Has the product been tested for conformance with OpenGIS standards; has the
                                     product been tested for CANRI interoperability
Performance                          How does the product behave with the expected loading
Data volume                          How does the product handle data volume compared with your needs
Stability                            Is the code robust and currently maintained
Scale-dependent behaviour            How does the software handle additional instances of the intended dataserving
                                     and application configurations


There is a list of all products with conformance to OpenGIS implementation specifications at:
http://www.opengis.org/cgi-bin/implement.pl You can filter this listing for your desired standard,
developer, or component type.
Note: OpenGIS conformance does not necessarily equate to CANRI interoperability. For more information
about checking your product's suitability for CANRI, see the summary references for that product, and also
note Testing: Conformance and Interoperability in this document.

8.3         Organising your Data
This section looks more closely at the specifics of data formats. Many of these issues are generic to the
production of digital maps. The information provided here is summarised for use in the CANRI context.

Map layers
An important consideration for map layers is both the originating format, and the capabilities of the
dataserver and middleware to be used by requesting applications.
Map layers may be photographic, single/tiled vector, raster, single/tiled image etc. If you'll be using the
existing CANRI middleware product (MapBroker), you must ensure that your dataserver can deliver:




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                          v0.95


         GIF: 87 or 89a: GIF files must be of a known geographical extent, projection and scale, as
          described in the corresponding metadata record.
         Imagemap: The WMS and WFS specifications allow server-side imagemap formats with
          coordinates in real world units (in supported projections).
         PNG: Portable Network Graphics
         JPEG: Note that there is no transparency to JPEG images; these layers will obscure all lower
          layers in a combined display.
         SVG: SVG is a rendering format for XML data. It can be supported at the client side by SVG-
          capable applications.

Geo-referenced data
The OpenGIS WFS protocol allows you to establish a transaction connection to virtually any ordered
information collection format, including:
      Delimited text (ASCII)
      Other (non-webmap: CORBA, SQL, etc.)
      Simple Features
      Grid Coverages
      Coordinate Transformation Service
      Shapefiles
The specific features supported by each WFS connector will need to be evaluated in detail within the
context of your operating environment.

Spatial coordinates: Common Projections and Datum
The common projection methods for NSW-wide and Australia-wide maps produce various distortion
effects. In considering the most appropriate projections for a given data product, it may be important to
refer to this table of recommendations.
Despite the distortion observed in Plate Carée projections, it is used for the default display for most scales.
One reason for this was that the Australian Coastal Atlas had settled on this choice. Another was that the
Airview raster base data to be supplied by NSW Surveyor-General's Department will be in Plate Carée.
Policy note on GDA: Even though its real-world adoption has been slow (in part because it is almost the
same as WGS84), the use of GDA is has been an official requirement of the NSW Cabinet for about five
years (see Cabinet Minute (#51) 264-98 of 1998).

Table 16: Recommended Projections and Datum
Purpose           Interface     Scale      Projection    Datum         Rationale
Storage: raster   N/A           all        lat/long      AGD66         Need to support both projections for display
                                                    ‡
                                           and UTM
Storage: vector   N/A           all        lat/long      AGD66         Store data in most common display
(default)                                  and                         projection(s), to minimise need for reprojection
                                           optionally                  on the fly
                                           UTM
                                                               *
Display           CANRI,        10M        Plate         N/A           Consistency with ACA, StateView & AirView
                                                 †
                  ACA                      Carée
Display           CANRI,        5M         Plate         N/A           Consistency with ACA, StateView & AirView
                  ACA                      Carée
Display           CANRI,        2.5M       Plate         N/A           Consistency with ACA, StateView & AirView
                  ACA                      Carée
Display           CANRI,        1M         Plate         N/A           Match StateView raster, ACA standard
                  ACA                      Carée
Display           ACA           500K       Plate         WGS84         ACA standard




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                                           Carée
Display           ACA           250K       Plate         WGS84         ACA standard
                                           Carée
Display           ACA           100K       Plate         WGS84         ACA standard
                                           Carée
Display           ACA           50K        Plate         WGS84         ACA standard
                                           Carée
Display           ACA           25K        Plate         WGS84         ACA standard
                                           Carée
Display           ACA           10K        Plate         WGS84         ACA standard
                                           Carée
Display           ACA           5K         Plate         WGS84         ACA standard
                                           Carée
Display           CANRI         500K       Plate         AGD66         Match StateView raster
                                           Carée
Display           CANRI         250K       Plate         AGD66         Match StateView raster
                                           Carée
Display           CANRI         100K       Plate         AGD66         Match AirView raster
                                           Carée
                                                ‡
Display           CANRI         50K        UTM           AGD66         Match existing data
Display           CANRI         25K        UTM           AGD66         Match existing data
Display           CANRI         10K        UTM           AGD66         Match existing data
Display           CANRI         5K         UTM           AGD66         Match existing data


Notes:
     Plate Carée is a map projection in which parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude are
       displayed as a square grid.
     Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM): Note that the Australian Map Grid (AMG) is UTM
       projection with AGD66 datum.
     Maximum shift between datums in NSW is approximately 200m, which is not discernible when
       displayed at scales smaller than 700K. So any datum (AGD66, WGS84, GDA) may be used at
       these scales. The WGS84 and GDA datums are equivalent at scales to 1:500.

8.4       ArcIMS / WMS and WFS Connectors
Summary of References 10: ArcIMS (WMS and WFS)
      ArcIMS Technical      arconline.esri.com/arconline/whitepapers/ims_/arcims4_architecture.pdf
           Whitepaper
          WMS Connector     arconline.esri.com/arconline/downloads/ims_/WMS_Connector.html
              Download
    ArcIMS WMS Forum        forums.esri.com/forums.asp?c=64 - 784
            Updates and     mapster.esri.com/ogc/download/
             downloads
            Local contact   ESRI Australia: http://www.esriau.com/
                 Licence    Commercial




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Overview
ArcIMS is the web server that connects with the ESRI suite of GIS spatial products.

How ArcIMS is used
Although ArcIMS is primarily intended for use with ESRI applications, an OpenGIS WMS connector is
provided, and the company has expressed its commitment to providing WFS and web services (catalog)
support as the OpenGIS protocols stabilise.

Procedures
These procedures have been supplied by ESRIAU. For more information and the latest updates, please use
the contacts summarized above.

Install WMS components
The first thing is to install all the WMS components provided with ArcIMS.
This can be done when installing ArcIMS, or after ArcIMS has already been installed, the process is the
same either way.
Choose "custom installation" from the ArcIMS installation options, then choose "options" from the samples
menu and add the WMS connector samples.
For more information, see the ArcIMS Installation Guide, Step 3: Install ArcIMS, Installing ArcIMS
custom Application Server Connectors for your platform for instructions on how to configure ArcIMS with
WMS.
Once ArcIMS is installed, the WMS connector is installed in the same location as the Servlet connector
although it is disabled by default.
ie. <tomcat installation directory>\webapps\ROOT\WEB-INF\classes

Configure for WMS requests
To enable ArcIMS to receive WMS requests, edit the WMSEsrimap_prop file at:
<tomcat installation directory>\webapps\ROOT\WEB-INF\classes\WMSEsrimap_prop
and change these lines:
Default                                 Change to:
enable=False                            enable=True
appServerMachine=                       appServerMachine=<name of ArcIMS application server machine with full
                                        domain name>
capabilitiesDir=                        capabilitiesDir=C:/ArcIMS/capabilities
                                        NB: If this directory is not recognised, add a trailing slash to the path, ie.
                                        C:/ArcIMS/capabilities/



Produce capabilities document
The Capabilities request to the WMS connector on a MapService (a map layer, eg. Dubbo) first looks for a
user defined capabilities file called "Dubbo.XML" in the capabilities directory.
If the file does not exist, the capabilities are generated dynamically, but an exception "The system cannot
find the file specified" is written to the log file. This exception can be ignored as the response to the request
was created dynamically.
Full documentation on each of the properties and available WMS requests can be found in the ArcIMS
help:
<ArcIMS installation directory>\Manager\help (search for WMS or open the WMS section under contents)




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Restart Java servlet engine and test
Once you have changed these properties, restart the servlet engine, eg. Tomcat .
Then test the following requests in a web browser (the responses that you should receive from ArcIMS 3.1
are listed below the requests)
http://<web server name>/servlet/com.esri.wms.Esrimap?CMD=connectorping
ArcIMS WMS-OGC Connector V 3.1
Build_Number=435.1160
Version=3.1
Enabled=true


http://<web server name>/servlet/com.esri.wms.Esrimap?CMD=ping
ArcIMS WMS-OGC Connector Version 3.1
Running at <webserver name>:80


View WMS layers
Copy the WMS samples from <ArcIMS Installation directory>\Samples\WMS to your website folder and
follow the instructions in the readme file to set up the map services required.
The DHTML_wmtclient has the ability to generate a capabilities document, as well as pan zoom and
identify functionality.
For more specific information, the ArcIMS forums have a WMS section
http://forums.esri.com/forums.asp?c=64#784
(It is also possible to search this section to retrieve archived posts if they don't appear on the front page.)
ArcOnline has updates and troubleshooting information http://arconline.esri.com/

Extending ArcIMS: WFS, scripts
ArcScripts (http://arcscripts.esri.com/) also have ArcIMS related downloads, such as "Including OpenGIS
data sources in the htmlviewer", and http://arcscripts.esri.com/details.asp?dbid=11981
There is a beta WFS connector and updates to the WMS connector are available from
http://mapster.esri.com/ogc/download/

8.5      Autodesk MapGuide
Summary of References 11: Autodesk MapGuide
    Product information     http://www.autodesk.com.au/adsk/section/0,,2004719-1170888,00.html
                 Licence    Commercial


MapGuide implements the OpenGIS WMS specification in its web server.

8.6      CubeSERV
Summary of References 12: CubeSERV
    Product information     www.cubewerx.com/
         WMY Test page      www.cubewerx.com/wmt/
                 Licence    Commercial


CubeSERV is a map server that provides access to the CubeSTORTM Spatial Warehouse. It is also fully
OpenGIS compliant and therefore "cascades" to access images and data from other OpenGIS compliant
map servers.




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                           v0.95


8.7      DSLite
Summary of References 13: DSLite
    Product information     Please consult carefully with the CANRI Technical Officer before using this software.
 Legacy documentation       http://icmiss.socialchange.net.au/support/ds_setup.htm


DSLite is prototype software developed under the original ICMISS program, prior to the formation of
OpenGIS standards. CANRI policy is to adopt OpenGIS standards. At this stage there are no plans to
upgrade DSLite to support OpenGIS standards as its functionality has been superceded by WFSLite,
GeoServer, MapServer 3.5, and others.
For urgent matters of support on existing DSLite installations, please contact the CANRI Technical Officer
for guidance.

8.8      Exposure Image / Spatial Server
Summary of References 14: Exposure Image / Spatial Server
    Product information     http://www.geometryit.com/web/main/home.php
                 Licence    Commercial


Exposure offers an image server and spatial server with OpenGIS implementations:
     conforms to OpenGIS Consortium Web Map Server standards
     supports highly compressed ECW image files to save disk space
     achieves storage reduction of 20:1 without loss of quality

8.9      GenaMap / GenaWorld
Summary of References 15: GenaMap / GenaWorld
    Product information     Peter Bayley: peter@homer.com.au
                 Licence    Commercial


For those users still running GenaMap systems, there is a built-in function called WebRequester which
provides basic WMS functionality. No FeatureInfo layer, no projections: returns images only.
Users

8.10 GeoMedia WebMap (Intergraph)
Summary of References 16: GeoMedia WebMap (Intergraph)
    Product information     www.geomedia5.com/
       More information     www.intergraph.com/gis/gmwm/
                 Licence    Commercial


Intergraph offer a configurable application that demonstrates how to build an OpenGIS Web Map Server.
The GeoMedia 5.0 product suite runs with the Oracle 9i Standard Edition

8.11 GeoServer
Summary of References 17: GeoServer
    Product information     http://geoserver.sourceforge.net/html/index.php




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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


        WFS Installation    http://geoserver.sourceforge.net/documentation/user/install.htm
                 Licence    Open-source


The GeoServer project is a Java (J2EE) implementation of the OpenGIS Consortium's Web Feature Server
specification. It is free software, available under the GPL 2.0 license.
GeoServer requires PostGIS as its spatial database.

8.12 ER Mapper: Image Server
Summary of References 18: ER Mapper: Image Server
     Online information     http://www.ermapper.com/
                 Licence    Commercial


The ER Mapper image web server provides the capability to serve very large images to the web. An OGC
WMS interface has been developed and is being improved by Digital Earth
http://www.digitalearth.com.au/.

8.13 MapInfo
Summary of References 19: MapInfo
     Online information     http://dynamo.mapinfo.com/miproducts/Features.cfm?ProductID=1041
                 Licence    Commercial


MapInfo are beta testing an OpenGIS connector. MapInfo runs in Windows environments and uses ASP for
extended middleware processes.

8.14 MapServer (MapServ, ex ForNet)
ForNet MapServer is still in use at DLWC. For all new installations, see following listing.

8.15 MapServer 3.5 / 3.6
Summary of References 20: MapServer 3.5 / 3.6
     Online information     mapserver.gis.umn.edu/doc.html
     WMS Server Guide       mapserver.gis.umn.edu/doc/wms-server-howto.html
      WMS Client Guide      http://mapserver.gis.umn.edu/doc/wms-client-howto.html
                 Licence    Open-source, GPL



Overview
MapServer is an open-source project hosted at the University of Minnesota. MapServer is not a fully-
featured GIS, but its web interface does support OpenGIS WMS/WFS queries. It is a solid platform for
basic functionality. In essence, this software is an open-source equivalent of a commercial WMS/WFS.
The 3.5 version has been tested against the WebMap Composer's OpenGIS WMS and WFS queries. There
are a small number of tunings required for CANRI interoperation currently. For more information on these
adjustments, please send a message to CANRI-Talk, or contact the CANRI Technical Officer.
The current version is 3.6. Documentation is expected soon.
MapServer optionally comes pre-compiled for Windows environments, but can be compiled and run from
source on any platform with a C-compiler.



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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


How MapServer might be used
Typically, MapServer is used as a web front end to proprietary GIS packages that run internal to an
organisation's network.
For example, an agency with GenaSYS installed on their intranet might establish a public web server for
the purpose of providing limited public access to some core datasets.
In order to make the data available to the CANRI framework, the GenaMap export files would be read by a
MapServer installation running on the public web server.

8.16 WFSLite
Summary of References 21: WFSLite
 Online Information     http://webmap.socialchange.net.au
            Licence     Commercial



Overview
WFSLite is a servlet that accepts WFS queries (plus services extension) and returns GML which may then
be symbolized by appropriate middleware.
WFSLite supports a limited number of geometries, but an extensive range of transaction models and
backend connectivity via JDBC.

Procedure for installation and testing
This procedure have been supplied by the developer. Please see the Summary of References table above for
the most current online version.

Establish database access
1. Determine the type and version of database you are using i.e. MySQL, PostgreSQL and copy the
   required JDBC driver in the WEB-INF/lib directory. Currently the directory contains valid JDBC
   Driver's for PosgreSQL 7.0, PostgreSQL7.1 and MySQL.
2. Configure the servlet to speak to the database by editing the DBConnectionManager.properties file,
   located in WEB-INF/classes/csgi/DBConnectionManager.properties. Exmaples for PostgreSQL and
   MySQL are shown in these files. You will have to edit it appropriately for your database.

Setup Capabilities
The capabilities document is stored in wfs/xml/GetCapabilities1.0.0
3. Read the example
4. Change it to match your database structure
5. Ensure that it is called GetCapabilities1.0.0.xml as this is the default name the servlet uses to call the
   document.
Comments are contained inside the example to guide you through it

Describe FeatureType
All table names correspond to TYPENAME in WFS queries. Thus for each FeatureType in the capabilities
document a corresponding XML schema must be created for it and this file must be stored under wfs/xml/
the current example is test.xsd
6. Read the example
7. Change it to mirror your table structure
8. Ensure that the name inside the capabilities document exactly matches the name of the file and
    correspondingly the file name.



CANRI: Community Access to Natural Resources Information                                                          54/56
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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95

Comments are contained inside the example test.xsd to guide you through it

Setup Tomcat context
Only perform if you have not dumped the wfs.war into the webapps directory)
9. Setup the context for the project under in tomcat in the server.xml file.
10. Restart Tomcat.

Testing
Testing can be performed by using the test JSP pages hyperlinked above.
Some additional comments:
      Each WFS is automatically configured to support GET and POST queries
      Additional configuration is required for any BESPOKE querying interfaces.
      Please contact terence@socialchange.net.au for any further support and comments on the
         installation documentation.




CANRI: Community Access to Natural Resources Information                                                          55/56
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CANRI DIY: Do-It-Yourself                                                                                         v0.95


9 Testing: Conformance and Interoperability
This sections is largely a placeholder for future developments. We expect strong support for test facilities as
interoperability becomes more the norm amongst NRIMS agencies. Testing facilities will allow developers
and users to demonstrate an unambiguous conformance to the relevant technical standards as well as
demonstrating interoperability in the relevant context.

9.1      Utilities and testcases
Software developers often provide test pages to validate a particular aspect of configuration. For example,
WFSLite is packaged with a JSP page that generates WFS requests to the local installation. At a more
general level, Cubewerx provide a WMS checking interface at:
www.cubewerx.com/demo/cubeview/cubeview.cgi . Using this page, you should be able to verify that your
WMS server is functioning properly.
For more complex systems, you can develop testcases to demonstrate a system's functionality over several
steps in a scenario. Testcases should include "pre-conditions" and "post-conditions" to clarify the intended
boundary interactions.

9.2      WMT program
The OGC use a testbed process to develop and refine candidate standards. A review of this process can help
you see the characteristics being demonstrated and validated. A similar process should be adopted when
specifying a solution in your DIY project.

9.3      ConformIT
ConformIT is an Australian initiative for providing a service bureau interface that allows developers to test
their product's conformance to OpenGIS implementation specifications, as well as getting an
interoperability report for connecting with various CANRI resources. The project is being undertaken by
Social Change Online.




CANRI: Community Access to Natural Resources Information                                                          56/56
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