two worl verb by wandii

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									                                         CHAPTER I
                                    INTRODUCTION




A. Background
   What is a Preposition
A preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. The word
or phrase that the preposition introduces is called the object of the preposition.
A preposition usually indicates the temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its object to
the rest of the sentence as in the following examples:
The book is on the table.
The book is beneath the table.
The book is leaning against the table.
The book is beside the table.
She held the book over the table.
She read the book during class.
In each of the preceding sentences, a preposition locates the noun "book" in space or in
time.


B. Purpose
        My purpose in compiling this paper is that students know how we improve our
listening in. And after read this paper I hope we can learn Preposition And Two Wold
Verb with easyly, so we get high score in learning Preposition And Two Wold Verb.


A prepositional phrase is made up of the preposition, its object and any associated
adjectives or adverbs. A prepositional phrase can function as a noun, an adjective, or an
adverb. The most common prepositions are "about," "above," "across," "after," "against,"
"along," "among," "around," "at," "before," "behind," "below," "beneath," "beside,"
"between," "beyond," "but," "by," "despite," "down," "during," "except," "for," "from,"
"in," "inside," "into," "like," "near," "of," "off," "on," "onto," "out," "outside," "over,"




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"past," "since," "through," "throughout," "till," "to," "toward," "under," "underneath,"
"until," "up," "upon," "with," "within," and "without."


Each of the highlighted words in the following sentences is a preposition:
The children climbed the mountain without fear.
In this sentence, the preposition "without" introduces the noun "fear." The prepositional
phrase "without fear" functions as an adverb describing how the children climbed. There
was rejoicing throughout the land when the government was defeated. Here, the
preposition "throughout" introduces the noun phrase "the land." The prepositional phrase
acts as an adverb describing the location of the rejoicing.
The spider crawled slowly along the banister. the preposition "along" introduces the noun
phrase "the banister" and the prepositional phrase "along the banister" acts as an adverb,
describing where the spider crawled.


The dog is hiding under the porch because it knows it will be punished for chewing up a
new pair of shoes. here the preposition "under" introduces the prepositional phrase "under
the porch," which acts as an adverb modifying the compound verb "is hiding."
The screenwriter searched for the manuscript he was certain was somewhere in his
office. similarly in this sentence, the preposition "in" introduces a prepositional phrase "in
his office," which acts as an adverb describing the location of the missing papers.




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                                         CHAPTER II
                                         DISCUSSION


A. Preposition
        Locative prepositions are:, for, and. Preposition (in, at, on) indicates that the
action occurs in the place indicated by the following noun and there is no movement.
Preposition (to) indicates movement toward, and preposition (from) indicates movement
away. These prepositions can be combined with a set of locative pronouns, which
indicate position in relation to the speaker. The locative pronouns are 'here' (near
speaker), 'there' (not far off), and 'there' (far off). These three locative prepositions also
can be combined with a set of locative nouns which indicate location in relation to the
following noun.


       Two-word verbs also called Two-Part Verbs are verbs that combined with a
preposition or adverbial Particle containing a unity of meaning.
Two-words Verbs have to be separated (Separable) if you have an object and if the object
is replaced with the object or the object pronoun short (me, him ", her, it, us, you, Them)
and there can not be separated (Non- -Separable).
Two-word Verbs that can be separated by the object pronoun is a combination of Particle
Verb + adverbial, while the Two-word Verbs which can not be separated by the pronoun
is the object Verb + preposition combinations.
The two-word Verbs that do not have the object also is a combination of Particle Verb +
adverbial. Does that adverbial particles? Adverbial particles are words that are placed
after the verb to indicate the position and direction of movement.
Example Two-word Verbs which can be separated by the object pronoun (Separable
Two-word Verbs):
   1. Break down the door. Please, do not break it down.
   2. Call off the meeting.
   3. Students, I Want to call it off.
   4. Cross out the wall.
   5. Please, do cross it out.



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   6. Do over our classroom.
   7. Students, We Will do it over Tomorrow.
   8. Do not hang up the window.
   9. Boy, Do not hang it up!
   10. Do not put off your work.

               atas                              "top,               above"
               bawah                             "beneath,           under"
               depan                             "front"
               muka                              "front"
               belakang                          "back"
               dalam                             "inside"
               luar                              "outside"
               samping                           "side"
               sebelah                           "side"
               antara                            "between"
               tepi                              "edge"
               seberang                          "other side"


B. Two-Word Verbs Vs. Prepositions
       A student came in to my office one day, looked at the text on my screen
(something like "...make sure the computer is turned on.") and proclaimed, "You have a
participle!" After I figured out that he was trying to say that I had a sentence ending
in preposition -- and after I blasted him for not knowing the difference -- I pointed out
that, yes, "on" is a preposition, but here I'm using "turned on" as a "two-word verb."
I came across this term through teaching ESL (a great hobby if you're an
armchair linguist!), and I was hoping that some of the English types on the list might
mention it. Other examples of two-word verbs are "pick up," "put down," log in," and,
well, you get the idea. So the next time someone gets on your case about
"participles," whip out the ol' two-word verb explanation. –Debbie


C. Two-word Verbs
       Introduction: A class-long activity for the practise of two verb verbs
What is learnt? Compound Verbs
How the game is played:



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 1. Pair the students and ask them to match the verbs on the Mixed-up verb sheet you
give them. Tell them to use dictionaries and to call you over. Be everywhere at once.
 2. Ask them to take a clean sheet of paper and a pen or pencil suitable for drawing. Tell
them you are going to give them a few phrases to illustrate. They are to draw a situation
that brings out the meaning of the phrases. Here are the phrases - do not give them more
than 30 seconds per drawing (they will groan)


        Two-word verbs are made of a verb and a preposition. The combination gives a
special meaning. Two-word verbs are used with object pronouns (it, him, her, me, you,
them, us)
or proper nouns (Robert, Mary) or common nouns (the book, the student). Two-word
verbs that use the prepositions ON, OFF, UP, DOWN, OVER, IN, OUT, AWAY, BACK
are usually "separable." This means that the object pronouns must go between the verb
and the preposition (they are "separated"):


                      I WOKE him UP.
                      He THROWS them OUT.
                      PUT her DOWN.
                      He's TRYING it ON.


With common nouns and proper nouns, you have a choice. You can separate the verb
and preposition, or you can keep them together and put the common or proper noun after
them:
                      I WOKE Robert UP.
                      I WOKE UP Robert.
                      He THROWS his old magazines OUT.
                      He THROWS OUT his old magazines.




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                                      CHAPTER III
                                        CLOSSING


A. Conclusion
       A preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence.
The word or phrase that the preposition introduces is called the object of the preposition.
A preposition usually indicates the temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its object to
the rest of the sentence as in the following examples




B. Suggestion
       A student came in to my office one day, looked at the text on my screen
(something like "...make sure the computer is turned on.") and proclaimed, "You have a
participle




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                    REFRENCES


www.wikipedia.com
www.google.com




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