asthma An Asthma Management Calendar

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					Living Well
with Asthma
An Asthma Management Calendar


            2009
Here’s to Breathing Easier in 2009!
Welcome to 2009! It’s a brand new year full of opportunities for living a healthier, happier life.
But for those of us with asthma, that’s not always easy.

Did you know that more than 22 million people in the U.S., including 6 million children, have
asthma? What’s more, it’s an equal opportunity disease that plays no favorites. Anyone of any
age, race and nationality can have it. Rich or poor, it makes no difference. And asthma is on the
rise all over, not just in the United States. It’s estimated that 300 million people worldwide have
this chronic lung disease.

When it comes to managing asthma, knowledge really is power. So whether you’ve been
recently diagnosed or have had asthma for years, this calendar is for you.

Inside, you’ll find:
° Monthly asthma care topics and tips
° An asthma action plan                                                                               Be a team player!
° Spaces in the monthly blocks to record your daily peak flow readings                                It’s helpful to think of all your doctors and their staff members as your teachers and
° Room to record your health care appointments                                                        teammates in asthma management. They’re a team that can work with you to help keep
° Suggestions for eating healthier and increasing physical activity                                   your asthma under control and better manage it by discussing your treatment goals and
                                                                                                      how to achieve them.

                                                                                                      They’ll also:
                                                                                                      ° Discuss the things that trigger your symptoms
                                                                                                      ° Provide you with a written asthma action plan and help you understand and use it
                                                                                                      ° Discuss the medicines you should take, what they do, how much to take and when to
                                                                                                        take them
                                                                                                      ° Demonstrate how to monitor your asthma by using a device called a peak flow meter
                                                                                                      Teaming with your health care provider means staying in close touch with him or her. Each
                                                                                                      visit is a chance for you to confirm that you’re doing the right things to manage your
                                                                                                      asthma and learn about new things that may improve your asthma control.

                                                                                                      SOURCE: National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
                                                                                                                                                        Do You Know
                                                                                                                                                        the Signs?
                                                                                                                                                        There are many signs that an asthma
                                                                                                                                                        attack could be on the way. Since
                                                                                                                                                        everyone is different, check the ones
                                                                                                                                                        that you’ve experienced:
                                                                                                                                                        ° Awakening at night
                                                                                                                                                        ° Coughing, especially at night
                                                                                                                                                        ° Difficulty breathing
Understanding Asthma                                                                                                                                    ° Chest tightness
                                                                                                                                                        ° Wheezing
                                                                                                                                                        ° Breathing faster than normal
                                                                                                                                                        ° Getting out of breath easily
                                                                                                                                                        ° Feeling very tired
If you’ve lived with asthma for a while, you probably already know how
it affects your lungs. But if you’ve just found out that you have asthma,
                                                                            Can asthma be cured?                                                        ° Itchy, watery, or glassy eyes
the information in this calendar describes the condition and suggests       There’s no cure for asthma right now. But most people can control it so     ° Itchy, scratchy, or sore throat
some important ways to help you manage it better.                           they can live active lives with fewer and infrequent symptoms.              ° Itchy nose
                                                                                                                                                        ° Chest starts to feel tight or hurts
It takes a little effort each day. But one thing’s for sure: easier
breathing and freedom from asthma complications are worth
                                                                            Doing what it takes                                                         ° Sneezing
                                                                                                                                                        ° Head congestion
the effort.                                                                 Controlling your asthma helps control the quality of your life. It means:
                                                                                                                                                        ° Headache
                                                                            ° Working closely with your doctor to learn what to do                      ° Restlessness
What is asthma?                                                             ° Staying away from things that bother your airways                         ° Runny nose
Asthma (az-muh) is a chronic disease that affects your airways -- the       ° Taking medicines as your doctor tells you                                 ° Change in face color
tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. With asthma, the inside      ° Monitoring your asthma each day so you can respond quickly to             ° Dark circles under eyes
                                                                              signs of an attack
walls of your airways are swollen. This inflammation makes the airways                                                                                  Be sure to call your doctor when you
very sensitive, and they tend to react strongly to things that you are      It’s not always easy. But controlling your asthma each day can help you     first experience any of these signs.
allergic to or find irritating. When the airways react, they get nar-       avoid serious symptoms and enjoy many of your favorite activities.
rower, and less air flows through to your lungs. This causes symptoms                                                                                   SOURCE: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute,
                                                                            SOURCE: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov                www.nhlbi.nih.gov
like wheezing (a whistling sound when you breathe), coughing, chest
tightness, and trouble breathing -- especially at night and in the early
morning.
                                                                                                           Asthma Action Plan for ________________________________________________ Date ________________

          Asthma Action Plan                                                                               Doctor’s Name _____________________________________ Doctor’s Phone Number _____________________
                                                                                                           Hospital/Emergency Room Phone Number __________________________________________________________



                   Doing Well                                                                                  Take These Long-Term-Control Medicines Each Day (include anti-inflammatory)
GREEN ZONE




                                                                                                                Medicine                                                                 How much to take                             When to take it
                   ° No cough, wheeze, chest tightness, or shortness of
                     breath during the day or night
                   ° Can do usual activities
                   And, if a peak flow meter is used,
                   Peak flow: more than __________________
                               (80% or more of my best peak flow)
                   My best peak flow is: __________________                                                    Before exercise, take________________________________                                           q 2 or q 4 puffs              5 to 60 minutes before exercise



                                                                                                                 FIRST       Add: Quick-Relief Medicine — and keep taking your GREEN ZONE medicine

                   Asthma is Getting Worse                                                                                   _______________________________ q 2 or q 4 puffs, every 20 minutes for up to 1 hour
YELLOW ZONE




                                                                                                                                             (short-acting beta2-agonist)                  q Nebulizer, once
                   ° Cough, wheeze, chest tightness, or shortness of breath, or                                   SECOND     If your symptoms (and peak flow, if used) return to GREEN ZONE after 1 hour of above treatment:
                   ° Waking at night due to asthma, or                                                                       q Take the quick-relief medicine every 4 hours for 1 to 2 days.
                   ° Can do some, but not all, usual activities                                                              q Double the dose of your inhaled steroid for __________ (7-10) days.
                                                                                                                             OR
                   OR                                                                                                        If your symptoms (and peak flow, if used) do not return to GREEN ZONE after 1 hour of above treatment:
                   Peak flow: ____________to____________                                                                     q Take:_____________________________________________ q 2 or q 4 puffs or q Nebulizer
                              (>50% - < 80% of my best peak flow)                                                                                                (short-acting beta2-agonist)
                                                                                                                             q Add:_____________________________________________ mg. per day For________ (3-10) days
                                                                                                                                                                        (oral steroid)
                                                                                                                             q Call the doctor q before/ q within __________ hours after taking the oral steroid.


                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     DANGER SIGNS
                   MEDICAL ALERT!                                                                             Take this medicine:                                                                                              ° Trouble walking and talking due
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 to shortness of breath
                                                                                                              q ________________________q 4 or q 6 puffs or q Nebulizer
                   ° Very short of breath, or
RED ZONE




                                                                                                                             (short-acting beta2-agonist)                                                                      ° Lips or fingernails are blue
                   ° Quick-relief medicines have not helped, or
                                                                                                              q _________________________mg.
                   ° Cannot do usual activities, or                                                                                (oral steroid)
                   ° Symptoms are same or get worse after 24 hours in Yellow Zone
                   OR                                                                                         Then call your doctor NOW. Go to the hospital or call for an ambulance if:
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Take q 4 or q 6 puffs of your quick-relief
                   Peak flow: less than____________                                                           ° you are still in the Red Zone after 15 minutes AND                                                     medicine AND
                                (< 50% of my best peak flow)                                                  ° you have not reached your doctor.                                                                      Go to the hospital or call for an ambulance
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       (____________________) NOW!


          Source: Adapted with permission from the National Asthma Education Program Expert Panel Report II: 1997 Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Update on Selected Topics 1 2002.
          *Updates the NAEPP Expert Panel Report 2.
                                                                                                  Smoking: A major asthma trigger
                                                                                                  People with asthma should not smoke or be exposed to second-hand smoke. Tobacco
                                                                                                  smoke is the worst indoor environmental trigger for those with asthma and is a major
                                                                                                  cause of asthma symptoms in both adults and children.




                                                                                                  Metered Dose Inhalers (MDIs)
                                                                                                  A metered dose inhaler (MDI) is a device that brings a specific amount of medicine to
                                                                                                  your lungs to help you breathe easier. Here are some of the common types:

Read All About It                                                                                 Dry-powdered inhaler (DPI) – The medicine in this type of inhaler comes in powder
                                                                                                  form, which gets into your lungs as you breathe it in. A DPI does not require the coor-
                                                                                                  dination the typical MDI requires. But the DPI may be difficult to use when breathing
Stay on track by keeping track                                                                    is greatly impaired.

                                                                                                  HFA-propelled metered dose inhaler – Similar to a traditional MDI, the medicine in
Taking your peak flow readings can help you track important daily changes in your asthma. To
                                                                                                  this inhaler comes in aerosol form. However, it uses a more environmentally friendly
do that, your doctor can show you how to use a peak flow meter and record the results, and
                                                                                                  propellant.
tell you what to do if the readings fall below a certain level.
                                                                                                  Breath-actuated inhaler – This inhaler requires less coordination than the tradition-
Use this calendar as a tool to help you manage your asthma. It has space for writing
                                                                                                  al MDI. To use it, pull up on a lever, place the inhaler in your mouth and breathe in. As
down your daily morning and evening peak flow readings (as recommended by the National
                                                                                                  you breathe in, a force of air activates the valve in the canister, releasing the aerosol
Institutes of Health for people with moderate to severe asthma, age five and older). Also, take
                                                                                                  medicine into your lungs.
your readings with you to your doctor’s office visits. This may help your doctor and you to:
° Determine asthma severity                                                                       Using a Spacer May Help
° Check response to treatment
                                                                                                  If you have trouble using your MDI, try using a spacer. A spacer attaches to the
° Monitor treatment progress
                                                                                                  mouthpiece of your inhaler and holds the medicine in its chamber until you breathe
° Determine the need for medicines
                                                                                                  in. This may help you get more of the medicine you need into your lungs. A spacer is
° Pinpoint asthma triggers
                                                                                                  recommended with inhaled corticosteroids (kor-tih-ko-steh-roydz), but it should not
° Detect worsening lung function
                                                                                                  be used with dry powder medicines. Talk with your doctor if you think you may need a
° Possibly prevent serious asthma flare-ups
                                                                                                  spacer. Spacers are recommended for children and some adults.
Tips for Better
Asthma Management
Take your medicines
Whether you take one medicine or many, it’s important to take them as your doctor tells you –
even if you’re feeling good. Some people find it helps to make a list of their medicines so they
remember to take them regularly.

Know what triggers your attacks
                                                                                                    Get your flu shot each year
Some common asthma triggers include tobacco smoke, cold air and common allergens like
pollen, mold, animal dander, and certain foods. Try keeping a diary of the things you’ve done,      Getting a flu shot each year can help protect you from getting sick with influenza (the
the places you’ve been, and what you’ve eaten. Once you figure out the things that trigger your     “flu”). In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that getting a
attacks, be sure to avoid them.                                                                     flu shot each Fall is “the single best way to prevent the flu.” Also, talk with your doctor to
                                                                                                    see if a pneumonia vaccination is right for you.
Keep it clean
                                                                                                    Eat 5 - 9 servings of fruits and vegetables
You can help control many asthma triggers by keeping your home as clean as possible. Carpets,
curtains and even your child’s stuffed animals can collect dust that can lead to asthma attacks.    Five-to-nine servings of fruits and vegetables each day may sound like a lot. But when
Keep pets like cats and dogs off your bed, couches and chairs. Use a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA     you sneak them into your daily eating plan, it’s easy to do. Try adding peppers, broccoli,
filter. And wear a dust mask – available at most home centers and hardware stores – when you        carrots or cucumbers to pasta or green salads. Or add some grapes, apple or pineapple
rake leaves or cut grass.                                                                           chunks to tuna or chicken salad. You can even top cereal with bananas, berries or raisins.

Use your peak flow meter                                                                            Call your doctor about any sleep problems
A peak flow meter is a simple, hand-held device that tells you how swollen your air passages        Be sure to tell your doctor about breathing problems at night that prevent you from get-
are. It can alert you if your asthma is getting worse before you start feeling symptoms. Plus, it   ting a good night’s sleep. Also tell him or her about any symptoms that make it difficult to
can also help you identify triggers by showing you how your airways are doing at any given time.    do things during the day.
Seeing the Big Picture
While it’s very important take care of your asthma, don’t forget your overall health. By practicing a few
healthier lifestyle habits, your asthma may respond better to daily treatment. Here are a few tips:

Learn about the things you can control
While you can’t change your genetic risk factors for asthma, you can choose behaviors that may help you
stay your healthiest. Help protect your lungs and general health by:
° Choosing healthier meals and snacks
° Maintaining a healthy weight
° Drinking alcohol only in moderation (Men = 2 drinks per day or less; Women = 1 drink per day or less)

Get daily exercise
Physical activity doesn’t always have to come from the gym. The American Heart Association recommends
30 to 60 minutes of walking or other moderately vigorous activity four to six times each week. You can start
with as little as five minutes of activity. Then build on your routine each week or two. But before you start
any exercise program, always talk to your doctor about which activities are right for you.

Where there’s smoke, there’s fire!
Lighting up a cigarette is just about the last thing a person with asthma should do. Tobacco smoke, including
second-hand smoke, damages the cells that protect the bronchial tubes. Without this first line of defense,
the tubes become irritated and inflamed, which sets the stage for an asthma attack. Smoke also lowers the
ability of the airways to heal. Also, avoid using smokeless tobacco products. They are not a safe substitute
for cigarettes.

SOURCES: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
         Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov
         US National Library of Medicine, www.nlm.nih.gov
What’s Your Asthma Action Plan?
Ever been to an outdoor party or wedding? Chances are that the event planner had a rain plan to keep bad
weather from ruining a good time.

When you have asthma, you also need to plan for the unexpected. And that’s what an asthma action plan is
all about. It spells out the steps to take when there are changes in your asthma symptoms. With an asthma
action plan, you’ll know how to handle breathing emergencies, use your medicines properly and avoid or
remove asthma triggers.

The National Asthma Education and Prevention Program recommends using a written plan developed by your
doctor so you’ll know what to do if your lung function drops. Use the written action plan included in this
calendar to create a version with your doctor that’s right for you.



Get in the zone!
Your asthma action plan helps you know how to manage your asthma based on your symptoms and your per-
sonal best peak flow numbers. It’s often divided into three zones:

Green Zone
80 to 100 percent of your personal best – The green zone shows your asthma is under good control.
This is where you should try to be most of the time.

Yellow Zone
50 to less than 80 percent of your personal best – The yellow zone signals “caution” and means you may
need to add or increase your medicine as indicated on your asthma action plan.

Red Zone
50 percent or less of your personal best – The red zone signals DANGER and is a medical emergency. You
should add or increase medicine as instructed on your asthma action plan and call your doctor immediately.

SOURCE: National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
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     Sunday           Monday               Tuesday          Wednesday                           Thursday               Friday            Saturday
                                                                                            1       A.M.______ 2        A.M.______ 3           A.M.______
                                                                                                    P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______
                                           Be sure to record your daily
                                              morning and evening
                                               peak flow readings
                                                                                                New Years Day

4     A.M.______ 5        A.M.______ 6       A.M.______ 7       A.M.______ 8                        A.M.______ 9        A.M.______ 10          A.M.______
      P.M. ______         P.M. ______        P.M. ______        P.M. ______                         P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




11    A.M.______ 12       A.M.______ 13      A.M.______ 14      A.M.______ 15                       A.M.______ 16       A.M.______ 17          A.M.______
      P.M. ______         P.M. ______        P.M. ______        P.M. ______                         P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




18    A.M.______ 19       A.M.______ 20      A.M.______ 21      A.M.______ 22                       A.M.______ 23       A.M.______ 24          A.M.______
      P.M. ______         P.M. ______        P.M. ______        P.M. ______                         P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______


                 Martin Luther King, Jr.
                          Day

25    A.M.______ 26       A.M.______ 27      A.M.______ 28      A.M.______ 29                       A.M.______ 30       A.M.______ 31          A.M.______
      P.M. ______         P.M. ______        P.M. ______        P.M. ______                         P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______
How Asthma Medicines Work
Good asthma control requires the use of two main groups of medicines: long-acting control medicines and short-
acting (quick relief) medicines.

So what’s the difference?
                                                                       Important tips when taking
Long-Acting Control Medicines                                          asthma medicines:
Long-acting control medicines help keep your asthma under              ° Use your long-term control medicines exactly as
                                                                         your doctor prescribes, even if you are not having
control by reducing airway inflammation. Taking them daily or
                                                                         any symptoms.
as directed by your doctor may help prevent asthma symptoms
such as coughing or wheezing. They include inhaled corticos-           ° Learn how to recognize the symptoms of an
                                                                         asthma attack.
teroids (Pulmicort, AeroBid, Flovent, and Azmacort) long-
acting beta agonists (Serevent, Foradil) or a combination of           ° Do not stop taking your medicine unless your
                                                                         doctor tells you to do so.
corticosteroids and long-acting beta agonists (Advair). Inhaled
corticosteroids are the recommended treatment for persistent           ° Use your short-acting bronchodilator at the earliest
                                                                         sign of an asthma attack.
asthma symptoms occurring more than two times per week.
                                                                       ° Keep track of the puffs you take from your inhaler
Short-Acting or Quick-Relief medicines                                   so you’ll know when it’s almost empty.
                                                                       ° The purpose of taking asthma medication is to
These short-acting bronchodilators (bron-koh-die-lay-tors) are           help you feel better and control your asthma.
also known as “rescue” medicines because they help to stop               If you continue having symptoms, talk to
asthma attacks. They can also be taken before an activity to             your doctor.
control exercise-induced asthma. Short-acting bronchodilators          ° Keep your quick-relief medicine with you at
relieve symptoms, but they don’t prevent the swelling and                all times.
inflammation that cause symptoms. Be sure to keep your                 ° To help prevent mouth infections, be sure to rinse
quick-relief medication with you at all times.                           your mouth with water after taking any inhaled
                                                                         corticosteroid.
A breath of fresh air
Taking your medication properly helps you feel better so you can
do more of the things you enjoy. Long-term control medicines
should be taken every day -- even if you aren’t having any symptoms.

SOURCE: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
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     Sunday             Monday             Tuesday          Wednesday                           Thursday             Friday            Saturday
1     A.M.______ 2         A.M.______ 3      A.M.______ 4       A.M.______ 5                      A.M.______ 6        A.M.______ 7           A.M.______
      P.M. ______          P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                      Groundhog Day

8     A.M.______ 9         A.M.______ 10     A.M.______ 11      A.M.______ 12                     A.M.______ 13       A.M.______ 14          A.M.______
      P.M. ______          P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                                                                                                                      Valentine’s Day

15    A.M.______ 16        A.M.______ 17     A.M.______ 18      A.M.______ 19                     A.M.______ 20       A.M.______ 21          A.M.______
      P.M. ______          P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                      President’s Day

22    A.M.______ 23        A.M.______ 24     A.M.______ 25      A.M.______ 26                     A.M.______ 27       A.M.______ 28          A.M.______
      P.M. ______          P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                           Mardi Gras       Ash Wednesday
Managing Springtime Asthma
and Allergies
Asthma that’s brought on by allergies is called allergic asthma. And it’s the most common form of the
condition.

Many symptoms of allergic and non-allergic asthma are the same - coughing, sneezing, shortness of breath,
rapid breathing, and chest tightness. But the triggers for allergic and non-allergic asthma are different. For
allergic asthma, triggers include pollen, mold, dust mites and pet dander. Triggers for non-allergic asthma
include anxiety, stress, exercise, and cold or dry air.

Springtime Allergies
Pollen (a powder-like substance) from trees such as oak, maple, and walnut can trigger early spring aller-
gies. And in the late spring and early summer, certain grasses can, too.

Mold and mildew are fungi. Their seeds -- called spores -- are spread by the wind. Unlike pollen, mold can be
present any time of the year because it’s affected by the wind, rain and temperature.

Pollen and mold counts measure the level of allergens in the air. For pollen and mold counts in your area, go
to the National Allergy Bureau™ website at www.aaaai.org.

Tips to Avoid Pollen and Mold Allergies:
° Keep windows closed at night to prevent pollen or mold from drifting inside.
° Minimize early morning activity when pollen is usually emitted (5 a.m. to 10 a.m.).
° Keep car windows closed when traveling and use the ventilation system’s air re-circulation feature.
° Stay indoors when pollen counts or humidity are high and when it’s windy; wind spreads dust and pollen
  more widely.
° Close your windows when someone is mowing their lawn close by.
° Take a vacation during the height of the pollen season. Visit a more pollen-free area such as the beach.
° Take medications as prescribed by your doctor.
° Don’t mow lawns or be around freshly-cut grass; mowing stirs up pollen and mold.
SOURCES: Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry, www.atsdr.cdc.gov
         United States Environmental Protection Agency, www.epa.gov
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     Sunday             Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday                         Thursday                  Friday                   Saturday
1       A.M.______ 2     A.M.______ 3        A.M.______ 4      A.M.______ 5                     A.M.______ 6             A.M.______ 7                   A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______              P.M. ______                    P.M. ______




8       A.M.______ 9     A.M.______ 10       A.M.______ 11     A.M.______ 12                    A.M.______ 13            A.M.______ 14                  A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______              P.M. ______                    P.M. ______


Daylight Savings Time
       Begins

15      A.M.______ 16    A.M.______ 17       A.M.______ 18     A.M.______ 19                    A.M.______ 20            A.M.______ 21                  A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______              P.M. ______                    P.M. ______



                                        St. Patrick’s Day                                                          First Day of Spring

22      A.M.______ 23    A.M.______ 24       A.M.______ 25     A.M.______ 26                    A.M.______ 27            A.M.______ 28                  A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______              P.M. ______                    P.M. ______




29      A.M.______ 30    A.M.______ 31       A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______         P.M. ______
Asthma and Heartburn –
What’s the Connection?
The big medical name for heartburn is gastroesophageal reflux disease – or GERD for
short. And it’s estimated that more than 75 percent of people with asthma also get GERD. In
fact, people with asthma are twice as likely to have GERD as people who don’t have asthma.

Although studies show a relationship between asthma and GERD, it’s not clear whether GERD
causes asthma or if it makes existing asthma worse. Asthma occurring at night, after a meal,
onset late in life or without an allergic or seasonal component – especially in a non-smoker –
could indicate GERD.

Have you heard about GERD?
GERD is the backward flow of stomach acids into the esophagus. When this acid enters the
lower part of the esophagus, it can produce a burning sensation. Left untreated, GERD can
eventually lead to lung disease or esophageal ulcers. And untreated GERD can also mean
uncontrolled asthma.


Important Tips to Help Avoid the Burn
° Avoid fatty foods, onions, peppermint, chocolate and spicy or acidic foods, such as
  fruit juice or tomato juice.
° Decrease alcohol and caffeine intake.
° Eat meals at least three hours before lying down and avoid bedtime snacks.
° Elevate the head of your bed six to eight (6-8) inches.
° Maintain a healthy weight.
° Stop smoking.
° Check with your doctor about the medicines you take. That’s because some medicines
  are known to aggravate heartburn.

SOURCE: U.S. National Library of Medicine, www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus
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     Sunday           Monday           Tuesday          Wednesday                              Thursday             Friday            Saturday
                                                   1          A.M.______ 2                       A.M.______ 3        A.M.______ 4           A.M.______
                                                              P.M. ______                        P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                                         April Fool’s Day

5     A.M.______ 6     A.M.______ 7      A.M.______ 8         A.M.______ 9                       A.M.______ 10       A.M.______ 11          A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______          P.M. ______                        P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




12    A.M.______ 13    A.M.______ 14     A.M.______ 15        A.M.______ 16                      A.M.______ 17       A.M.______ 18          A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______          P.M. ______                        P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



      Easter

19    A.M.______ 20    A.M.______ 21     A.M.______ 22        A.M.______ 23                      A.M.______ 24       A.M.______ 25          A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______          P.M. ______                        P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                                           Earth Day

26    A.M.______ 27    A.M.______ 28     A.M.______ 29        A.M.______ 30                      A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______          P.M. ______                        P.M. ______
Stay Active.
Breathe Easier.
Do you get asthma attacks during exercise or other activities? If so, talk to
your doctor. There are several medicines that can prevent them and help keep you in
the game. For many people, the best defense is an inhaler filled with a quick-acting
bronchodilator. Taken 10-15 minutes before your activity, it opens up your airways and
helps prevent asthma symptoms both before and after exercise.



Tips to keep activities fun and safe
° Choose activities that you enjoy.
° Find an activity buddy if you need help staying on track.
° If you can, avoid activities taking place in areas with dust, pollen, animal dander or
  air pollutants.
° Warm up your muscles by gently stretching and bending or walking slowly.
° After your activity, gently stretch your muscles again to prevent muscle cramping
  and soreness.
° Stop any activity immediately if you become nauseous, dizzy, weak or have pain.



Don’t let exercise-induced asthma slow you down
If you get exercise-induced asthma, you don’t have to sit on the sidelines. Work closely
with your doctor to find the right activities for you.

Activities with periods of rest such as volleyball, tennis, golf and softball are least likely
to trigger asthma symptoms. You can also try walking, swimming, weightlifting, and
leisure biking.

SOURCES: National Jewish Medical and Research Center, www.nationaljewish.org
         National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
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May 2009
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      Sunday             Monday              Tuesday           Wednesday                         Thursday            Friday            Saturday
                                                                                                                 1    A.M.______ 2           A.M.______
                                                                                                                      P.M. ______            P.M. ______




3       A.M.______ 4        A.M.______ 5        A.M.______ 6      A.M.______ 7                     A.M.______ 8       A.M.______ 9           A.M.______
        P.M. ______         P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______        P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                            Cinco de Mayo

10      A.M.______ 11       A.M.______ 12       A.M.______ 13     A.M.______ 14                    A.M.______ 15      A.M.______ 16          A.M.______
        P.M. ______         P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______        P.M. ______            P.M. ______



     Mother’s Day                                                                                                                    Armed Forces Day

17      A.M.______ 18       A.M.______ 19       A.M.______ 20     A.M.______ 21                    A.M.______ 22      A.M.______ 23          A.M.______
        P.M. ______         P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______        P.M. ______            P.M. ______




24      A.M.______ 25       A.M.______ 26       A.M.______ 27     A.M.______ 28                    A.M.______ 29      A.M.______ 30          A.M.______
        P.M. ______         P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______        P.M. ______            P.M. ______

31      A.M.______
        P.M. ______
                        Memorial Day
Breathing for Two
When you’re pregnant, controlling your asthma is more important than ever. After all, you’re not
just eating for two, you’re also breathing for two.

Many pregnant women experience changes in their asthma. And left uncontrolled, asthma can
cause premature birth, low birth weight, plus blood pressure changes for the mother. Above all,
asthma must be controlled to help ensure that the baby gets enough oxygen.

Here are some healthy tips for mothers-to-be with asthma:
° Take daily peak flow readings. This can help you know whether your shortness of breath is an
  asthma symptom or an effect of pregnancy.
° Talk to your doctor before you start or stop taking any medicines. The risks of uncontrolled
  asthma are far greater than the risks of taking most asthma-controlling medicines.
° Get both asthma and prenatal care. All your doctors need to know how your asthma is being
  managed so they can work together to do what’s best for you and your baby.
° Don’t smoke! Smoking puts your baby at risk for asthma, respiratory and ear infections, and
  Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). In fact, SIDS occurs over twice as often among babies
  whose mothers smoked.
° Take care of yourself and your asthma after delivery, too. The birth of a baby may bring
  stress, sleep loss and sometimes even postpartum depression.
° Tell your doctor if you’re breast-feeding, and be sure to discuss the safety of all your
  prescription and over-the-counter medicines.

More reasons to quit the habit
Babies born to women who smoke during pregnancy:
° Have about 30 percent higher odds of being born prematurely.
° Are more likely to be born with low birth weight, which increasing their risk for illness or death.
° Weigh an average of 200 grams less than infants born to women who don’t smoke.
° Are more likely to die of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).
SOURCES: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov
         March of Dimes, www.marchofdimes.com
         National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
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June 2009
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       Sunday             Monday           Tuesday          Wednesday                         Thursday             Friday           Saturday
                     1     A.M.______ 2      A.M.______ 3      A.M.______ 4                     A.M.______ 5        A.M.______ 6           A.M.______
                           P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




7         A.M.______ 8     A.M.______ 9      A.M.______ 10     A.M.______ 11                    A.M.______ 12       A.M.______ 13          A.M.______
          P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




14        A.M.______ 15    A.M.______ 16     A.M.______ 17     A.M.______ 18                    A.M.______ 19       A.M.______ 20          A.M.______
          P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



        Flag Day

21        A.M.______ 22    A.M.______ 23     A.M.______ 24     A.M.______ 25                    A.M.______ 26       A.M.______ 27          A.M.______
          P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



     Summer Begins
      Father’s Day

28        A.M.______ 29    A.M.______ 30     A.M.______
          P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______
Asthma and
Food Allergies
Delicious food is one of life’s great pleasures. But even the tastiest morsel of some foods can
cause an unpleasant reaction. According to the CDC, about 4 – 8 percent of children and
2 percent of adults have food allergies.

A food allergy is the body’s response to a food that it mistakenly believes is harmful. Once
your immune system decides that a particular food is harmful, it creates antibodies against it.
So the next time you eat that food, your immune system releases chemicals to protect your
body. These chemicals then trigger allergic symptoms that can affect your respiratory system,
digestive tract, skin and/or cardiovascular system.

Although you can be allergic to any food, the following account for more than 90 percent of
all food allergies:
° Milk
° Tree Nuts (Walnuts, Cashews, etc.)
° Eggs
° Soy
° Peanuts
° Wheat
° Fish and Shellfish

How to prevent a food-triggered asthma attack
The best way to avoid food-induced asthma is to remove the offending food from your eating
plan. Read food labels carefully, especially the ingredients list, to see if there is anything in it
that could cause an allergic asthma attack.

If you suspect that certain foods may be triggering your asthma, discuss this with your doctor.
Skin testing can determine if you are allergic to these foods. For more information about food
allergies, contact the Food Allergy Network at (800) 929-4040 or www.foodallergy.org, or
the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America at (800) 7-asthma or www.aafa.org.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov
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July 2009
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     Sunday           Monday           Tuesday          Wednesday                         Thursday             Friday            Saturday
                                                   1       A.M.______ 2                     A.M.______ 3        A.M.______ 4            A.M.______
                                                           P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______             P.M. ______



                                                                                                                               Independence Day

5     A.M.______ 6     A.M.______ 7      A.M.______ 8      A.M.______ 9                     A.M.______ 10       A.M.______ 11           A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______             P.M. ______




12    A.M.______ 13    A.M.______ 14     A.M.______ 15     A.M.______ 16                    A.M.______ 17       A.M.______ 18           A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______             P.M. ______




19    A.M.______ 20    A.M.______ 21     A.M.______ 22     A.M.______ 23                    A.M.______ 24       A.M.______ 25           A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______             P.M. ______




26    A.M.______ 27    A.M.______ 28     A.M.______ 29     A.M.______ 30                    A.M.______ 31       A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______
Breathe Easier at
Work and School
According to the CDC, asthma accounts for 14 million lost days of school missed annually and is a leading
cause of hospitalization in the U.S. among those younger than 15 years of age. In fact, more than 20 percent
of asthma cases in the U.S. happen due to triggers in the workplace.

On the job
Work-related asthma happens when a person is sensitive to and inhales a particular gas, fume, dust particle
or other substance in the workplace. Symptoms may include wheezing, chest tightness, cough, runny nose,
nasal congestion and eye irritation. The symptoms often worsen during the workweek and decrease on the
weekend.

If you think you may be experiencing work-related asthma, use a dust mask or respirator and try to avoid
exposure to the triggers causing your symptoms. Discuss your symptoms, job and working conditions in
detail with your doctor.

In the classroom
School buildings contain many common asthma triggers: cockroaches and other pests, mold from excess
moisture, and dander from animals in the classroom. Secondhand smoke and dust mites are also asthma
triggers found in schools. Some children with asthma may be affected by other pollutants found there from
sources like unvented stoves or heaters, cleaning agents, perfumes, and sprays.

Proper asthma control may result in fewer sick days for your child. And having a school plan can help you
better communicate with his or her teachers and school nurse. Be sure to meet with school personnel –
such as the nurse, teachers and coaches – to discuss:
° Your child’s asthma triggers and treatments
° Your child’s written asthma action plan
° Your child’s asthma medicines
° The school’s policy on administering asthma medicines
SOURCES: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
         Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov
         American Lung Association, www.lungusa.org
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August 2009
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     Sunday           Monday           Tuesday          Wednesday                         Thursday             Friday           Saturday
                                                                                                                           1           A.M.______
                                                                                                                                       P.M. ______




2     A.M.______ 3     A.M.______ 4      A.M.______ 5      A.M.______ 6                     A.M.______ 7        A.M.______ 8           A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




9     A.M.______ 10    A.M.______ 11     A.M.______ 12     A.M.______ 13                    A.M.______ 14       A.M.______ 15          A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




16    A.M.______ 17    A.M.______ 18     A.M.______ 19     A.M.______ 20                    A.M.______ 21       A.M.______ 22          A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




23    A.M.______ 24    A.M.______ 25     A.M.______ 26     A.M.______ 27                    A.M.______ 28       A.M.______ 29          A.M.______
      P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______

30    A.M.______ 31
      P.M. ______
Managing Fall Allergies
and Asthma
Allergic asthma is the most common form of asthma among adults and children, and it
tends to peak in the Spring and Fall. Being exposed to pollen, mold and different kinds of
weeds can cause a reaction called allergic rhinitis (rye-nye-tis). You might know it better as
hay fever.

Mold is present indoors and outdoors. Outdoors, it’s in the soil, vegetation, and rotting
wood. Indoors, you can find it in attics, basements, bathrooms, kitchens (refrigerators),
carpets and upholstery. Remember that mold allergies can be present any time of the year,
although they tend to peak in July in southern states and October in northern states.

Contact your doctor if you experience sneezing, congestion, runny nose, or itchiness in
your nose, eyes, throat or ears. He or she can give you special allergy tests to determine
the specific pollen or mold causing your symptoms. Your doctor may prescribe a nasal
spray, antihistamine, decongestant, or other medicines.

Pollen and mold allergy avoidance tips:
° Don’t rake leaves because it stirs up mold.
° Don’t hang sheets or clothes outside to dry. Pollen and mold may collect on them.
° Don’t over-water indoor plants if you are allergic to mold. Wet soil encourages mold growth.
° Don’t mow lawns or be around freshly cut grass. Mowing stirs up pollen and mold.
° Take medications as prescribed by your doctor.


Fall travel tip
Traveling somewhere this Fall? Then remember to pack a peak flow meter, a copy of your
asthma action plan and your doctor’s phone number. Also, if traveling by airplane, pack your
asthma medicines in your purse or carry-on bag to avoid being without them if your luggage
is lost.

SOURCE: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, www.atsdr.cdc.gov
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September 2009
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     Sunday            Monday            Tuesday           Wednesday                          Thursday             Friday           Saturday
                                     1      A.M.______ 2      A.M.______ 3                      A.M.______ 4        A.M.______ 5           A.M.______
                                            P.M. ______       P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______
                       Have you
                     gotten your
                     flu shot yet?


6     A.M.______ 7       A.M.______ 8       A.M.______ 9      A.M.______ 10                     A.M.______ 11       A.M.______ 12          A.M.______
      P.M. ______        P.M. ______        P.M. ______       P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                       Labor Day

13    A.M.______ 14      A.M.______ 15      A.M.______ 16     A.M.______ 17                     A.M.______ 18       A.M.______ 19          A.M.______
      P.M. ______        P.M. ______        P.M. ______       P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




20    A.M.______ 21      A.M.______ 22      A.M.______ 23     A.M.______ 24                     A.M.______ 25       A.M.______ 26          A.M.______
      P.M. ______        P.M. ______        P.M. ______       P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                     First Day of Autumn

27    A.M.______ 28      A.M.______ 29      A.M.______ 30     A.M.______
      P.M. ______        P.M. ______        P.M. ______       P.M. ______
Cold and Flu Season
While only a nuisance to some people, colds and the flu can be a more serious
threat to people with asthma. That’s because these viral infections irritate the
nose, throat and lungs, which can cause an asthma flare-up. The CDC recom-
mends an annual flu shot for adults and children who have asthma.

Some medicines aren’t the answer
When you don’t feel well, your first thought might be about over-the-counter medi-
cines. However, it’s best to think twice. Aspirin or ibuprofen, known as NSAIDS
(non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), can actually cause asthma episodes in
people who are sensitive to these medicines. That’s why it’s so important
to talk with your doctor or your pharmacist before using any over-the-
counter drugs.

To help you stay flu-free, remember to:
° Wash your hands frequently.
° Avoid close contact with people who have colds or the flu.
° Use a tissue to cover your mouth and nose when you sneeze or cough. Then
  throw it away.
° Clean surfaces you touch with a germ-killing disinfectant.
° Don’t put your hands on your nose, eyes or mouth.
° Talk to your doctor about getting a flu shot.

Nothing to sneeze at…
The CDC reports that every year, on average 5 to 20 percent of the U.S. population
gets the flu. More than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications
and about 36,000 people die from flu. Some individuals -- such as older people,
young children and people with certain health conditions -- are at high risk for
serious flu complications.

SOURCE: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov
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October 2009
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     Sunday            Monday             Tuesday          Wednesday                           Thursday             Friday            Saturday
                                                                                          1      A.M.______ 2        A.M.______ 3           A.M.______
                                                             Have you                            P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______
                                                           gotten your
                                                           flu shot yet?


4     A.M.______ 5        A.M.______ 6      A.M.______ 7       A.M.______ 8                      A.M.______ 9        A.M.______ 10          A.M.______
      P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______




11    A.M.______ 12       A.M.______ 13     A.M.______ 14      A.M.______ 15                     A.M.______ 16       A.M.______ 17          A.M.______
      P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                      Columbus Day

18    A.M.______ 19       A.M.______ 20     A.M.______ 21      A.M.______ 22                     A.M.______ 23       A.M.______ 24          A.M.______
      P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                                                                                                                    United Nations Day

25    A.M.______ 26       A.M.______ 27     A.M.______ 28      A.M.______ 29                     A.M.______ 30       A.M.______ 31          A.M.______
      P.M. ______         P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                       P.M. ______         P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                                                                                                                        Halloween
Be a Quitter
Cigarette smoke is one of the worst asthma triggers. When you inhale cigarette smoke, irritating
substances settle in the lining of your airways and may trigger an asthma attack. People with
asthma who smoke or are exposed to second-hand smoke keep their lungs in a constant state
of poor asthma control and have ongoing asthma symptoms. If you are a smoker and have
asthma, you should kick the habit as soon as possible.

Quitting cigarettes and/or smokeless tobacco is one of the most positive health changes you
can make. According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, your risk of having a heart
attack falls after the first year you stop. At times, it may take every ounce of willpower you’ve got.
But quitting and staying tobacco-free is absolutely possible!

The dangers of second-hand smoke
Think second-hand smoke is no big deal? Actually, it’s harmful and hazardous to the health of the
general public and is particularly dangerous to children. The U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services reports that secondhand smoke increases the risk of serious respiratory problems in
children, such as a greater number and severity of asthma attacks and lower respiratory tract
infections, and increases the risk for middle ear infections.

Tips for quitting:
° Pick a date to quit.
° Keep finger foods like carrot sticks handy. Try chewing gum or dried fruit when you get the urge
  to smoke.
° Stay active to relieve stress and keep your mind off smoking. Go for a walk or read a book.
° Join a support group or take a smoking cessation class.
° Tell your family and friends that you plan to quit. Ask for their support.

Not just blowing smoke
Ready to kick the habit? This is one time it’s OK to be a quitter. Learn more about becoming
tobacco-free by visiting www.Smokefree.gov or calling 1-800-784-8669. And many states also
offer smoking cessation tools to their residents. Check out your state’s official website to see if it
offers assistance.

SOURCES: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
         U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, www.surgeongeneral.gov
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November 2009
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     Sunday             Monday           Tuesday          Wednesday                            Thursday               Friday           Saturday
1       A.M.______ 2     A.M.______ 3      A.M.______ 4       A.M.______ 5                        A.M.______ 6         A.M.______ 7           A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                         P.M. ______          P.M. ______            P.M. ______



Daylight Savings Time
         Ends

8       A.M.______ 9     A.M.______ 10     A.M.______ 11      A.M.______ 12                       A.M.______ 13        A.M.______ 14          A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                         P.M. ______          P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                                           Veterans Day

15      A.M.______ 16    A.M.______ 17     A.M.______ 18      A.M.______ 19                       A.M.______ 20        A.M.______ 21          A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                         P.M. ______          P.M. ______            P.M. ______




22      A.M.______ 23    A.M.______ 24     A.M.______ 25      A.M.______ 26                       A.M.______ 27        A.M.______ 28          A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______       P.M. ______        P.M. ______                         P.M. ______          P.M. ______            P.M. ______



                                                                                               Thanksgiving

29      A.M.______ 30    A.M.______
        P.M. ______      P.M. ______
Don’t Let Asthma
Chill Your Winter Fun
The Fall allergy season might be over. But don’t forget that falling temperatures and cold,
dry air can also trigger asthma attacks. The good news is that taking just a few precautions
can help keep your asthma under control.

Here are a few suggestions to help you stay
safe and symptom-free in chilly weather:
° Dress warmly and in layers. Retaining body heat helps to keep your airways warmer.
° Wear a scarf to warm and moisten the air before it reaches your airways.
° Avoid using heavily scented products like perfume, candles and potpourri.
° Be sure to vent gas appliances and fireplaces to the outside and maintain them regularly.
° Drink plenty of fluids.
° Avoid cozying up too close to the fireplace.
° If you know that cold air triggers your asthma, take a couple of puffs of your fast-acting
  inhaler before going outside.
° Clean or change your furnace’s air filter. The American Lung Association recommends
  changing the filter every three months.
° With everything going on during the holidays, don’t forget to re-fill your prescription(s) if
  necessary.

Christmas trees… real or artificial?
For those celebrating Christmas, that’s a common question when it comes to choosing a
tree. And for those with asthma, the answer is especially important. The National Asthma
Council Australia reports that a live tree can bring pollens and dust into the home, which can
lead some people to wheeze through the holiday. But artificial trees don’t always lead to a
symptom-free season. That’s because they can easily accumulate dust and mold. And the
same holds true for the Christmas ornaments used on both real and artificial trees.

SOURCES: National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, www.nhlbi.nih.gov
         American Lung Association, www.lungusa.org
         Environmental Protection Agency, www.epa.gov
         National Asthma Council Australia, www.nationalasthma.org.au
                                                                       My Appointments
                                                                                         D at e        Doctor’s Name               PhoNe Number




December 2009
                                                                                         D at e        Doctor’s Name               PhoNe Number



                                                                                         D at e        Doctor’s Name               PhoNe Number




     Sunday             Monday                 Tuesday          Wednesday                         Thursday             Friday              Saturday
                                           1     A.M.______ 2      A.M.______ 3                     A.M.______ 4         A.M.______ 5             A.M.______
                                                 P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______          P.M. ______              P.M. ______




6     A.M.______ 7          A.M.______ 8         A.M.______ 9      A.M.______ 10                    A.M.______ 11        A.M.______ 12            A.M.______
      P.M. ______           P.M. ______          P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______          P.M. ______              P.M. ______



                      Pearl Harbor Day

13    A.M.______ 14         A.M.______ 15        A.M.______ 16     A.M.______ 17                    A.M.______ 18        A.M.______ 19            A.M.______
      P.M. ______           P.M. ______          P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______          P.M. ______              P.M. ______




20    A.M.______ 21         A.M.______ 22        A.M.______ 23     A.M.______ 24                    A.M.______ 25        A.M.______ 26            A.M.______
      P.M. ______           P.M. ______          P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______          P.M. ______              P.M. ______



                     First Day of Winter                                                                               Christmas          Kwanzaa Begins

27    A.M.______ 28         A.M.______ 29        A.M.______ 30     A.M.______ 31                    A.M.______
      P.M. ______           P.M. ______          P.M. ______       P.M. ______                      P.M. ______
Resources
It’s important to learn as much as you can about asthma. The more you know
about the condition, the better you can manage it and live a fuller life.

For more information about asthma, check out these resources:

Allergy & Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics
www.aanma.org
800-878-4403

American Association for Respiratory Care
972-243-2272
www.aarc.org

American Lung Association
800-LUNG-USA
www.lungusa.org

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America
800-727-8462
www.aafa.org

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
800-311-3435
www.cdc.gov

National Asthma Education and Prevention Program
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/naepp/index.htm

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
301-592-8573                                                                 The information contained in this calendar is for educational purposes only. Please consult your
240-629-3255 (TTY)                                                           physician for specific advice regarding recommendations for your individual circumstances.
www.nhlbi.nih.gov                                                            Trade names of commonly used medicines and devices are provided for ease of education,
                                                                             but are not intended as particular endorsement. Your physician may choose to use items not
National Jewish Medical and Research Center                                  represented here. Some recommended treatments may not be covered under your health plan.
800-222-LUNG                                                                 To find out if a recommended treatment is covered, call the customer service number on the
www.nationaljewish.org                                                       back of your member ID card.
                                                                                                                                                IAH_M0013_08_059 05/2008

				
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Description: asthma An Asthma Management Calendar