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Reader Profile Outline

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					                                 RED 5517 Case Study Outline
Step 1. Data Collection
(As you complete each section below, turn in to your folder. You will have a checklist in your
folder. This will be checked/scored when the documents are returned to you. Leave the
checklist in your folder each week.) Throughout your data collection, keep up with dates and
times you met with child for purposes below. Turn in list of dates and times after all data
collected.

1.    Administer word lists.
      Complete Word List Miscue Analysis Chart. Begin Student Profile Sheet.
2.    Administer first 2 passages according to directions on separate handout.
      Includes silent reading followed by oral reading.
      Complete Miscue Analysis Worksheet. (p. 79; also on CD)
3.    Administer 2nd 2 passages (silent reading only).
      Add to Student Profile Sheet.
4.    Administer listening passages. Add info to Student Profile Sheet.
5.    Complete Retelling Profile chart.
6.    Administer Burke Interview, Interests Inventory (at least several questions from Parts I
      and II and chart), Book Preference Test.
8.    Optional assessment: Names Test (handout) OR Reutzel-Cooter Word Attack Survey
      (SRAI, p. 218); Classroom Modified Version of Reading Strategy Use Scale (CMRSUS)
      (SRAI, p. 274)
9.    Turn in anecdotal records and benchmark chart for this child.
10. Turn in list of dates and times worked with child on data collection for profile.
Place all of the above (1-8) in your folder.

Step 2. Data Interpretation.
Complete the elements chart provided. Write in specific strengths and needs. Do not try to type;
handwriting is fine. Use the following guidelines to help you draw conclusions. (Needs do not
necessarily reflect weaknesses; good readers have needs for continuing improvement):
Because this information will guide instruction, be as specific as possible.
(Sources of data indicated in parentheses.) (RETURN ALL OF DATA FROM STEP 1. WHEN
YOU TURN IN THE ELEMENTS CHART)

Prediction - should use prior knowledge, text clues (title), uses picture clues; makes logical
predictions. (Passages, anecdotal records)

Fluency - should sound like talking, uses appropriate syntactic phrasing; look for patterns of
omissions, hesitations, repetitions, misuse of punctuation. (Passages, anec. records)

Automatic/Sight vocabulary - look for automaticity in word lists and in passages. Especially
look at automatic score on word lists and accuracy score for passages. Think about what you
would expect at grade level. Also, compare words in lists to same in passages. (word lists,
passages, anec. records)
Context - examine miscues for use of syntax (word order; parts of speech) and semantics
(meaning). Self-corrections usually indicate use of semantics. (word lists, passages, anec rec)

Morphemic analysis - examine decoding of roots, prefixes, suffixes; look for specific patterns
(for example, -ed, -s, -ing). (Word lists, passages, anec. records)

Graphophonics - identify specific phonic patterns (for example, initial /sh/, short a, ea for short
e, etc). Pattern = several instances of a type of miscue. If child is consistent in using initial
consonants, you may use the general "initial consonants" or Aonsets@. (Word lists, passages,
anec. Records, optional assessments)

Prior knowledge - draw conclusions about whether child has background knowledge and can use
that knowledge to make predictions, to help decode words while reading, to help retell, and to
help answer implicit questions. Address use of prior knowledge before, during, and after
reading. Think about whether there is a relationship between child=s prior knowledge and
comprehension scores. (Passages, anec. records)

Retelling - draw conclusions about strengths/needs by interpreting the retelling profile summary.
Use specific conclusions from retelling profile summary. (Passages, anec. records)

Text type - examine salient differences for narrative and expository text; look at text structure
used during retelling; examine comprehension differences (explicit/implicit, recall/reinspection)
for the two text types. (Focus on silent comprehension.) (Passages, anec. records)

Explicit comp. - examine in general; look at performance during retelling and on explicit types
of questions. Any difference when child is reading orally, silently, or listening? Any differences
for narrative vs. expository)? (Passages, anec. records)

Implicit comp. - examine in general; look at implicit questions and main idea questions; examine
retellings and questions. Any differences when child reading orally, silently, or listening? Any
difference for narrative vs. expository? (Passages, anec. records)

Reinspection/Look backs - determine whether reinspection/ Alook backs@ helped, what student
did during reinspection, whether any differences for explicit vs. implicit. (Passages; anec rec)

Listening - examine explicit and implicit questions; compare listening level (potential) to silent
reading instructional level (achievement). (Passages)

View/perception of reading - determine how child would define reading based on his/her
responses about reading...not necessarily what child actually does during reading. Burke
Interview is good source of data. Decide whether child sees reading as meaning-getting process
or as an oral performance/sounding-out act. (Burke Int; optional assessment)
Attitudes toward reading - determine whether child likes to read and whether he/she actually
does read other than when required. Look at attitude within different classroom contexts
(individual, small group, whole group) and across disciplines (ex: social studies). (Use interest
inventory, book preference test, general observations.)

General interests - determine what child likes to do during leisure time. Needs may relate to
broadening interests. (Same sources of data as above.) MOST CHILDREN HAVE NEEDS.

Reading interests - identify types of books child likes to read. Needs should included
broadening interests especially building on child's general interests. (Same sources of data as
above.) Every child has needs!

Self-concept - address how child feels about self in general and in reading contexts. (Use your
observation of child in different contexts in addition to comments he/she makes about self.)

Other factors - account for vision, hearing, general health. You may also address any
personality, home, and/or educational factors that may play a role in the child's reading
achievement. Home factors include whether reading materials available, any role models, etc.
Educational factors may include past instruction, retentions, etc. (You make pick up a lot of
information through informal conversation.)


Step 3. Conclusions/Recommendations
Once you=ve completed the elements chart, think about the Abig@ picture. What stands out to
you as the child=s overall strengths and needs? Identify 5 of each.

Reader:
     Age:
     Grade Level:

B.    Reader=s 5 Greatest Strengths:
      (List, and be as specific as possible. For example, rather than listing "implicit
      comprehension" as a strength, indicate in which contexts implicit comp. is a strength --
      silent, listening, expository, narrative, reading level...)

C.    Reader=s 5 Greatest Needs:
      (List, and be as specific as possible (see above). "Greatest" should be determined in
      relation to real-life reading needs. For example, if morpheme -s appears to be a weakness,
      you may not want to include it as a "greatest" need if child has overall strong word
      recognition and has more serious comprehension needs...) (Needs do not necessarily have
      to represent weaknesses. Good readers have needs...)
D.     Instructional Recommendations (to address above strengths/needs)
       (List/Outline Format: account for each strength and need listed above. Indicate which
       recommendations account for which strengths/needs.) (These are intended for classroom
       not for parents; you may make additional - less formal - recommendations for parents.)
       You must have a recommendation for every strength and need identified. Some
       recommendations may meet more than one strength and/or need. Clearly identify
       strengths/needs being addressed.

       Sample recommendations:
       1.   Use patterned books to build automatic vocabulary and fluency.
            EX: The Napping House, The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
            Choral and echo read book, match sentences and words through visual
            discrimination tasks, build visual and auditory memory for words in isolation.
            (S1, N1)

       2.     Use story map to build explicit and implicit comprehension for narrative text.
              Use dotted lines around frame or within organizer to show inferences from text; use
              solid lines to show explicit information. Then have student retell story using story
              map as a guide. (S3, N4)

E.     Instructional Levels (if level unknown, use + or - to indicate relationship to level tested)

       Passage Accuracy               _____
       Passage Acceptability          _____
       Silent Comp. (Narr)            _____ (Indicate whether Familiar/Unfamilar.)
       Silent Comp. (Exp)             _____ (Indicate whether Familiar/Unfamilar.)
       Listening Comp.                _____


When you turn in Step 3, turn in all previous documents from Steps 1 & 2 in order:
Conclusions/Recommendations (Strengths, Needs, Rec, Levels)
Elements Chart
Data: Student Profile Sheet (p. 101) (For explicit/implicit comprehension, indicate number correct out of
               number possible -- for example, 3/4.)
       Word List Miscue Analysis Chart
       Miscue Analysis Worksheet(s) (p. 79)
       List of order of passages administered (level, type, title)
       Examiner Copies (in the order tested) (sentences and passages)
       Retelling Profile
       Optional Assessments
       Burke Interview
       Interests Inventory (at least several questions from Parts I and II and chart)
       Book Preference Test
      Anecdotal Records/Benchmark Charts
Reading Elements Chart
Reader: _______________________________    Date____________
   Element          Strengths           Needs          Comments
Prediction
LA.A.1.1.1.
LA.A.1.2.1.
LA.A.1.3.1.

Fluency



Automatic/
Sight Vocab
LA.A.1.1.3.
LA.A.1.3.3.
Context
(Semantics/Syntax)
LA.A.1.1.2.
LA.A.1.2.2.
LA.A.1.3.2.
Morphemic
Analysis
LA.A.1.1.2.
LA.A.1.2.2. & 1.2.3
LA.A.1.3.2.
Graphophonic
Analysis
LA.A.1.1.2.
LA.A.1.2.2.
Prior
Knowledge
LA.A.1.3.1
LA.E.2.1.1.
LA.E.2.2.3
Retelling
LA.A.1.1.4., 2.1.1,
LA.A.1.2.4., 2.2.1
LA.A.1.3.4., 2.3.1
LA.E.1.1.2
LA.E.1.2.2.
LA.E.1.3.2.
Narrative vs.
Expository
Text
(various
benchmarks)
Explicit
Comprehension
(Details)
(various
benchmarks)

Implicit
Comprehension
(Main idea/
inferences)
(various
benchmarks)
Reinspection
(Look-backs)
LA.A.1.1.4
LA.A.1.2.4.
LA.A.1.3.4.
Listening
Comprehension
LA.C.1.1.1.


Perception
of Reading
(How defines)

Attitudes
toward
Reading
General
Interests

Reading
Interests
LA.A.2.1.2.
LA.A.2.2.4.
LA.A.2.3.4
Self-Concept
Other
Factors

				
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